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robertogreco : pottery   4

Eyeo 2014 - Leah Buechley on Vimeo
"Thinking About Making – An examination of what we mean by making (MAKEing) these days. What gets made? Who makes? Why does making matter?"



[uninscusive covers of Make Magazine and composition of Google employment]

“Meet the new boss, same as the old boss”

"I'm really tired of setting up structures where we tell young women and young brown and black kids that they should aspire to be like rich white guys."

[RTd these back than, but never watched the video. Thanks, Sara for bringing it back up.

https://twitter.com/arikan/status/477546169329938432
https://twitter.com/arikan/status/477549826498764801 ]

[Talk with some of the same content from Leah Buechley (and a lot of defensive comments from the crowd that Buechleya addresses well):
http://edstream.stanford.edu/Video/Play/883b61dd951d4d3f90abeec65eead2911d
https://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-10-29-make-ing-more-diverse-makers ]
leahbuechley  making  makermovement  critique  equality  gender  race  2014  via:ablerism  privilege  wealth  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  democratization  inequality  makemagazine  money  age  education  electronics  robots  robotics  rockets  technology  compsci  computerscience  computing  computers  canon  language  work  inclusivity  funding  google  intel  macarthurfoundation  opportunity  power  influence  movements  engineering  lowriders  pottery  craft  culture  universality  marketing  inclusion 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Functional 3D Printed Ceramics - Olivier van Herpt
"When I first started researching 3D printing the technology was an exciting and interesting one. But, the desktop 3D printers on offer were unable to produce things at a human scale. Large and medium scale functional design objects that we use such as bowls, plates & decorative objects could not be made. The objects made with desktop 3D printers were also low in heat resistance and could not be food safe. Industrial 3D printers could make food safe objects for everyday use but these would be too costly to produce. I ended up spending two years working on 3D printer and 3D printing process that could make large and medium scale functional 3D printed ceramics to solve this problem.

I designed and made my own extruder and experimented with many different types of clay. Iteratively improving my process and testing brought me closer and closer to a solution. Mayor issues such as the collapse of objects gradually solved. A breakthrough came when I decided to move from mixing clay with water. By redesigning my extruder I could use hard clay instead. This lead me to be able to make larger items with higher levels of detail.

In the early days the 3D printed vases and bowls seemed rough, with the layers clearly visible. I was able to experiment with textures, surfaces, shapes and sizes. Now I'm able to make objects up to 80 cm tall with a diameter of 42 cm. By altering the settings on my machine I can very and give the pieces very different appearances.

The 3D Woven collection comprises of a weave pattern reminiscent of the days of artisans. 3D printing has the potential to bring back the unique and individualized objects that artisans make. But, this time it is a machine who manufactures the final product. Each unique vase in this collection shows us the potential of cutting edge technology while reminding us of the days of yore.

The Sediment collection has some of the thinnest 3D printed ceramics layers available today. Imposing, unique 3D printed interior items ushering in a new world of digital fabrication. The fine stria do remind us that the object was 3D printed but only when one is close to it."

[via: http://journal.benbashford.com/post/95916512233 ]
ceramics  3dprinting  pottery  olivervanherpt  housewares  2014 
august 2014 by robertogreco
BrutCake | BrutCake is a creative art and design project
"By focusing on products created entirely by hand, we hope more people will be moved by and treasure the essence of raw materials."

"BrutCake is a creative concept covering products, art and most importantly – life.

Brut refers to the Art Brut movement originating in France, and is an apt description of the raw, original and essential elements of Brut Cake products. Cake evokes images of the simple pleasures and happiness in life.

We take the concept of Art Brut from a position of pure artistic ambition to one of functional creation. However, Brut Cake doesn’t see itself as an industrial design shop; instead, we devote ourselves to handcrafted, useful and functional objects of art.

Such is our belief in the longevity and beauty of raw materials, we also see treasure where others see only waste. Combining elements from discarded furniture and the like, we re-imagine them into new functional pieces, bringing a new life and aesthetic to these recycled gems."
pottery  handmade  design  reuse  glvo  recycled  brutcake  ceramics  craft  nicoleteng  wabi-sabi 
july 2012 by robertogreco

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