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robertogreco : preparation   9

A Work In Progress... | When we adults think of children there is a simple...
"When we adults think of children there is a simple truth which we ignore: childhood is not preparation for life, childhood is life. A child isn’t getting ready to live, a child is living. The child constantly confronted with the question, “What are you going to be?” Courageous would be the youngster who, looking the adult squarely in the face, would say, I’m not going to be anything; I already am.“ We adults would be shocked by such an insolent remark for we have forgotten, if indeed we ever knew, that a child is an active participating and contributing member of society from the time he is born. Childhood isn’t a time when he is molded into a human who will then live life; he is a human who is living life. No child will miss the zest and joy of living unless these are denied him by adults who have convinced themselves that childhood is period of preparation.

How much heartache we would save ourselves if we would save ourselves if we would recognize the child as a partner with partner with adults in the process of living, rather than always viewing him as an apprentice. How much would teach each other… adults with the experience and children with the freshness. How full both our lives could be. A little child may not lead us, but at least we ought to discuss the trip with him for, after all, life is his and her journey, too."

–Professor T. Ripaldi, Notes On An Unhurried Journey [https://pippahirst.wordpress.com/notes-on-an-unhurried-journey/ ]
children  childhood  preparation  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  tripaldi  slow 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Don’t Do What I Do | Seth W.
"You can prepare, fill your head with knowledge, listen to podcasts, buy a lightweight and foldable jacket and $250 pants, and email other people who’ve done the same thing, but really you just need to set off on your own. You need to make your own mistakes, because they’re yours. You’ll learn all the lessons you need to learn.

Am I telling you to trust a complete stranger with ALL your stuff? No.

I’m telling you to go make your own advenutres. Stop waiting for permission, stop waiting for the right circumstances, stop waiting, stop waiting, stop… waiting."

See also: http://sethw.com/about-seth-werkheiser/

"In August of 2010 I ditched my stuff and started traveling full-time while working remotely…

Since then: traveled from Brooklyn, NY to New Orleans, LA, over to Austin, TX and as far west as Albuquerque, NM. Visiting 12 cities in 14 days was fun, too, when I traveled by bike and train from Miami, FL to Portland, ME.

I carry everything I own in a bag (currently a Chrome Yalta)."
sethwerkheiser  experience  preparation  deschooling  unschooling  learning  yearoff2  exploration  trust  justdo  waiting  cv  travel  adventure  2012  bikes  biking  possessions  minimalism  yearoff  wandering  packing 
november 2012 by robertogreco
TeachPaperless: I Am Not A Great Teacher [This rings so true. Shelly is me with hair!?]
"I am not a great teacher. Many of my former students would probably agree. I'm at times flaky. And I can certainly be absent minded. I tend to ask students to do too much work all at once, probably because that's the way I do things.

I'm a terrible test-prepper. When I do give lectures, I tend to go on tangents. Sometimes I mix up names, dates, events; this happens at family BBQs, too. [Many more examples follow.]…

I am far more interested in being a conduit for ideas. A conduit for conversation. A conduit for debate. For real learning. Connecting. Rethinking. Reframing debates. Debates and discussions. The stuff of humanity…

But I'm willing to not know.

I take a lot of solace in the example of Socrates. Not because I think I'm like Socrates, but because I think deep down Socrates is a lot like all of us. Socrates was a guy who both boastfully and intimately explained that in the end, he really didn't know anything.

And that was enough to change everything."
education  teaching  learning  socrates  shellyblake-pock  cv  howwework  howwelearn  inquiry-basedlearning  conversation  relationships  human  humanism  vulnerability  uncertainty  notknowing  collaboration  professionaldevelopment  pd  honesty  openness  pedagogy  humility  improvisation  preparation 
july 2011 by robertogreco
On Your Way Here | Liz Danzico
"if you know what you believe in and you know what you’re passionate about, you can make good decisions. Because what’s presented to you and what you choose to do are very closely aligned with what you believe in."

But I’ve realized that the people that I respect the most, the people who are doing great things, are people who care so much about what they do that they can’t stop. They are not unhealthy. There are those people who are unhealthy, but I’m talking about the people that care so much about what they do, that they go out of their way to have coffee and do interview projects [like now]. They care. They are not working too hard. They care about quality."

"it’s important that you evaluate what you really believe in from time to time. You can’t say yes to everything and you can’t believe in everything. You have to make some decisions."

"Not everyone needs to go to school"
lizdanzico  passion  perfectionism  love  values  work  life  glvo  tcsnmy  cv  yearoff  decisionmaking  decisions  preparation  observation  opportunity 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Percolation innovation - WWW.THEDAILY.COM
"When it comes to coffeemakers, there's a low-tech counterpart to every high-tech solution."
coffee  brewing  drink  hario  gear  preparation 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Japan’s Pour-Over Coffee Wins Converts - NYTimes.com
"One of the most important coffee markets in the world, Japan imports more than 930 million pounds of it each year — more than France, less than Italy. It’s not a fad. There are coffee shops in Japan that date to at least the 1940s and traditions that reach back even further; it’s a culture that prizes brewed coffee over espresso (although that’s changing) and clarity over body. Coffee is as Japanese as baseball and beer.

Until just a few years ago, much of the coffee gear that made it to the United States from Japan was brought here in suitcases. It wasn’t contraband, just obscure, a trickle of kettles and cones picked up by coffee obsessives or their well-traveled friends who didn’t mind lugging the extra bulk."
coffee  japan  via:thelibrarianedge  drink  cooking  food  preparation 
february 2011 by robertogreco
My Father’s Teachings Part 1 | The Do Village
"He was difficult to please but always selfless. An old fashioned man whose family responsibilities subsumed all else…taught me that families should break bread & eat together as often as possible…taught me to cook well. To respect food, respect producers & labourers that create it, & be parsimonious with leftovers & waste…taught me that when a task is to be taken on…to plan, prepare, take time to accomplish it well, & do it w/ conviction…taught me how to upcycle…I saw him consume little but consume well. He taught me to consume nothing that that you cannot afford to pay for in cash…to avoid borrowing…taught me to be loyal to family. Family comes first, however difficult that can be at times. Period…his teachings were not overt. He did his stuff, & I watched. He used to say to me when I phoned to discuss cooking something I’d eaten with him, and I was in need of quantities and timings – why do you not watch learn. Learn by watching doing not studying"
parenting  advice  waste  upcycling  borrowing  cv  responsiblity  families  food  doing  do  dolectures  production  planning  preparation  consumption  well-being  learning  unschooling  deschooling 
november 2010 by robertogreco
School in NYC's Brooklyn finds success with restructured scheduling - Related Stories - ASCD SmartBrief
"A Brooklyn school is finding success with an alternative-scheduling model that has educators teaching just three classes each day, leaving two hours a day for collaborating with colleagues while maintaining class sizes that are regularly as small as 14 students. The restructured schedule does not cost more than a traditional schedule and allows for more instructional time for students and more professional development for teachers -- all without adding workdays to the 180 set in New York City teachers' contracts."
teaching  schools  professionaldevelopment  learning  policy  scheduling  preparation  tcsnmy 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Do Teachers REALLY Come From The Bottom Third Of Colleges? Or Is That Statistic A Bunch Of Baloney? | Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...
"I’ve heard this kind of statistic about teachers coming from the bottom third of something or other before (though never about the bottom third of classes — I don’t know where he got that bizarre statistic from), and just ignored it. But hearing it on Meet The Press, from the director of a private school, got “my dander up” and I decided to look into where those numbers came from and how valid and reliable they were. It was quite a ride on a Sunday afternoon…."
teaching  education  statistics  policy  politics  us  preparation 
november 2009 by robertogreco

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