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robertogreco : press   23

Understanding Hillary: The Clinton America sees isn’t the Clinton colleagues know. Why are they so different?
"I don’t buy it. Other politicians find themselves under continuous assault, but their poll numbers strengthen amid campaigns. Barack Obama’s approval rating rose in the year of his reelection. So too did George W. Bush’s. And Bill Clinton’s. All three sustained attacks. All three endured opponents lobbing a mix of true and false accusations. But all three seemed boosted by running for the job — if anything, people preferred watching them campaign to watching them govern.

Hillary Clinton is just the opposite. There is something about her persona that seems uniquely vulnerable to campaigning; something is getting lost in the Gap. So as I interviewed Clinton's staffers, colleagues, friends, and foes, I began every discussion with some form of the same question: What is true about the Hillary Clinton you’ve worked with that doesn’t come through on the campaign trail?

The answers startled me in their consistency. Every single person brought up, in some way or another, the exact same quality they feel leads Clinton to excel in governance and struggle in campaigns. On the one hand, that makes my job as a reporter easy. There actually is an answer to the question. On the other hand, it makes my job as a writer harder: It isn’t a very satisfying answer to the question, at least not when you first hear it.

Hillary Clinton, they said over and over again, listens.

How a listener campaigns

“I love Bill Clinton,” says Tom Harkin, who served as senator from Iowa from 1985 to 2015. “But every time you talk to Bill, you’re just trying to get a word in edgewise. With Hillary, you’re in a meeting with her, and she really listens to you.”

The first few times I heard someone praise Clinton’s listening, I discounted it. After hearing it five, six, seven times, I got annoyed by it. What a gendered compliment: “She listens.” It sounds like a caricature of what we would say about a female politician.

But after hearing it 11, 12, 15 times, I began to take it seriously, ask more questions about it. And as I did, the Gap began to make more sense.

Modern presidential campaigns are built to reward people who are really, really good at talking. So imagine what a campaign feels like if you’re not entirely natural in front of big crowds. Imagine that you are constantly compared to your husband, one of the greatest campaign orators of all time; that you’ve been burned again and again after saying the wrong thing in public; that you’ve been told, for decades, that you come across as calculated and inauthentic on the stump. What would you do?"



"Laurie Rubiner, who served as Clinton’s legislative director from 2005 to 2008, recalls being asked to block out two hours on the calendar for “card-table time.” Rubiner had just started in Clinton’s office six weeks before, and she had no idea what card-table time was, but when the boss wants something put on the calendar, you do it.

When the appointed day arrived, Clinton had laid out two card tables alongside two huge suitcases. She opened the suitcases, and they were stuffed with newspaper clippings, position papers, random scraps of paper. Seeing the befuddled look on Rubiner’s face, Clinton asked, “Did anyone tell you what we’re doing here?”

It turned out that Clinton, in her travels, stuffed notes from her conversations and her reading into suitcases, and every few months she dumped the stray paper on the floor of her Senate office and picked through it with her staff. The card tables were for categorization: scraps of paper related to the environment went here, crumpled clippings related to military families there. These notes, Rubiner recalls, really did lead to legislation. Clinton took seriously the things she was told, the things she read, the things she saw. She made her team follow up.

Her process works the same way today. Multiple Clinton aides told me that the campaign’s plan to fight opiate addiction, the first and most comprehensive offered by any of the major candidates, was the direct result of Clinton hearing about the issue on her tour. “Her way of dealing with the stories she hears is not just to repeat the story but to do something about the story,” says John Podesta, the chair of Clinton’s campaign."



"One way of reading the Democratic primary is that it pitted an unusually pure male leadership style against an unusually pure female leadership style. Sanders is a great talker and a poor relationship builder. Clinton is a great relationship builder and a poor talker. In this case — the first time at the presidential level — the female leadership style won.

But that wasn’t how the primary was understood. Clinton’s endorsements left her excoriated as a tool of the establishment while Sanders's speeches left people marveling at his political skills. Thus was her core political strength reframed as a weakness.

I want to be very clear here. I’m not saying that anyone who opposed Clinton was sexist. Nor am I saying Clinton should have won. What I’m saying is that presidential campaigns are built to showcase the stereotypically male trait of standing in front of a room speaking confidently — and in ways that are pretty deep, that’s what we expect out of our presidential candidates. Campaigns built on charismatic oration feel legitimate in a way that campaigns built on deep relationships do not.

But here’s the thing about the particular skills Clinton used to capture the Democratic nomination: They are very, very relevant to the work of governing. And they are particularly relevant to the way Clinton governs.

In her book Why Presidents Fail, Brookings scholar Elaine Kamarck argues that "successful presidential leadership occurs when the president is able to put together and balance three sets of skills: policy, communication, and implementation."

The problem, Kamarck says, is that campaigns are built to test only one of those skills. “The obsession with communication — presidential talking and messaging — is a dangerous mirage of the media age, a delusion that inevitably comes crashing down in the face of government failure.”

Part of Kamarck’s argument is that presidential primaries used to be decided in the proverbial smoke-filled room — a room filled with political elites who knew the candidates personally, who had worked with them professionally, who had some sense of how they governed. It tested “the ability of one politician to form a coalition of equals in power.”

Hillary Clinton won the Democratic nomination by forming a coalition. And part of how she forms coalitions is by listening to her potential partners — both to figure out what they need and to build her relationships with them. This is not a skill all politicians possess.

As I began to press the people I talked to about why they brought up Clinton’s listening skills, a torrent of complaints about other politicians emerged. “The reason so many people comment on this is most of us have experienced working with people who are awful listeners,” says Sara Rosenbaum, who worked with Clinton on the 1994 health reform bill and is now at George Washington University. “Because they don’t listen, they can’t ask good questions. They can’t absorb the information you’ve given them.”"



"The danger of leading by listening

There is a downside to listening to everyone, to seeking rapport, to being inclusive, to obsessing over common ground. Clinton’s effort to find broad consensus can turn her speeches and policies into mush. Her interest in hearing diverse voices can end with her chasing down the leads of cranks and hacks. Her belief that the highest good in politics is getting something — at times, anything — done means she takes few lonely stands and occasionally cuts deals many of her supporters regret.

Clinton spent much of the primary defending herself against criticisms of deals her husband made and she supported — welfare reform and the crime bill, specifically. Her great failure, the 1994 health reform effort, unwound in part because she created a sprawling, unruly process in which hundreds of experts came together to write a bill no one understood and no one could explain."



"This is, in general, one of the frustrations you hear from Clintonites: Her network is massive, and particularly when her poll numbers flag, or she feels under attack, she reaches out into that vast, strange ecosystem. The stories of Clinton receiving a midnight email from an old friend and throwing her campaign into chaos are legion, and it was all the worse because she often wouldn’t admit that’s what was happening, and so her staff ended up arguing against a ghost.

In an exhaustive review of private communications from her 2008 campaign, Joshua Green wrote that “her advisers couldn’t execute strategy; they routinely attacked and undermined each other, and Clinton never forced a resolution.” Under duress, Clinton’s process broke down, and her management proved cumbersome, ineffective, and conducive to staff infighting.

“What is clear from the internal documents is that Clinton’s loss derived not from any specific decision she made but rather from the preponderance of the many she did not make,” Green concluded. “Her hesitancy and habit of avoiding hard choices exacted a price that eventually sank her chances at the presidency.”"



"Clinton laments how polarizing she is, but the fault lies at least partly with her. Asked at a Democratic debate to name the enemies she’s most proud of making, she replied, “The Republicans.” For all her talk of finding common ground, of reaching out, of respecting each other, she stood up, on national television, and said she’s proud of the enmity she inspires in roughly half the country.

I asked her if she regretted that statement, whether she thinks she’s feeding the negativity, becoming part of the problem. “Not very much,” she said. “I mean, you can go back and look at how I’ve worked with Republicans, and I … [more]
2016  hillaryclinton  politics  elections  listening  consensus  policy  billclinton  barackobama  governance  berniesanders  gender  coalitions  media  journalism  press  communication  networking  decisionmaking  relationships  implementation 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Meet Nava
[Notes below by Sha:]

"terrible title, but okay.

"Removing distance has made the process a lot clearer and a lot cleaner"

I need to get better at phrasing this:

"The less complex the software better, Nava says. But that's easier said than done, especially when you're translating paper to pixels. Managing how much information a user needs to divulge—and how the digital system processes it—becomes a new challenge.

"From a design perspective, general problems come up from a transition between designing for paper forms, then designing for websites," Sha Hwang, Nava's design lead, says. "On paper you need to handle all of your edge cases, you need to have every possible question that could possibly arise to fulfill your decision tree. A lot of the work we did last year for retooling the Healthcare.gov application process was figuring out which questions were necessary to ask of everyone and which ones were only necessary for certain people.""
nava  government  hcgov  press  shahwang  gov.uk  us  via:sha 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Gandhi’s Printing Press — Isabel Hofmeyr | Harvard University Press
"At the same time that Gandhi, as a young lawyer in South Africa, began fashioning the tenets of his political philosophy, he was absorbed by a seemingly unrelated enterprise: creating a newspaper. Gandhi’s Printing Press is an account of how this project, an apparent footnote to a titanic career, shaped the man who would become the world-changing Mahatma. Pioneering publisher, experimental editor, ethical anthologist—these roles reveal a Gandhi developing the qualities and talents that would later define him.

Isabel Hofmeyr presents a detailed study of Gandhi’s work in South Africa (1893–1914), when he was the some-time proprietor of a printing press and launched the periodical Indian Opinion. The skills Gandhi honed as a newspaperman—distilling stories from numerous sources, circumventing shortages of type—influenced his spare prose style. Operating out of the colonized Indian Ocean world, Gandhi saw firsthand how a global empire depended on the rapid transmission of information over vast distances. He sensed that communication in an industrialized age was becoming calibrated to technological tempos.

But he responded by slowing the pace, experimenting with modes of reading and writing focused on bodily, not mechanical, rhythms. Favoring the use of hand-operated presses, he produced a newspaper to contemplate rather than scan, one more likely to excerpt Thoreau than feature easily glossed headlines. Gandhi’s Printing Press illuminates how the concentration and self-discipline inculcated by slow reading, imbuing the self with knowledge and ethical values, evolved into satyagraha, truth-force, the cornerstone of Gandhi’s revolutionary idea of nonviolent resistance."

[via: https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/568156442240229376 ]
gandhi  printing  press  media  history  books  toread  2013  isabelhofmeyr  nonviolence  resistance  ethics  satyagraha  truth  truth-force  reading  writing  slow  newspapers  contemplation  reflection  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  thoreau  self-discipline  information  slowjournalism  journalism  publishing  zines  howweread  howwrite 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Partner Voices | Voice of San Diego
"Whether it's protecting the environment, inspiring kids to achieve, fostering innovation or feeding the hungry, nonprofits strive to make San Diego better. Partner Voices gives these nonprofits a platform to showcase their contributions to the community in a more interesting format than traditional promotions. These messages are paid for by the nonprofits themselves, or by local businesses or philanthropists who support their efforts. They are not products of Voice of San Diego's editorial staff.

Give your organization a voice! Contact us for more information."
sandiego  voiceofsandiego  nonprofit  pr  press  nonprofits 
may 2014 by robertogreco
As Media Lines 'Blur,' We All Become Editors : NPR
[link to transcript: http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=140118092 ]

"We function as our own editors. We create our own news diet for ourselves. We create our own front page, if you will. ... We're no longer relying on seven white males at The New York Times to do that for us."

"But conventional wisdom didn't tell us how to ferret out the truth amid the farrago on radio and TV, on the newspapers and in the Internet. So whether you're a cop or a teacher or lawyer or an accountant, what technique from your job do you apply to judge whether a news story is fact or opinion? "

"Right, portable ignorance. He would go and say, I don't get this; explain it to me. What are you going to try and do? As opposed to being seduced into trying to look like you know everything and you're very knowledgeable, and that you're sort of in, you know - that you're astute. He used being not astute as a powerful tool."
editors  press  journalism  evidence  ignotance  knowledge  portableignorance  web  radio  internet  news  nealconan  infoliteracy  informationliteracy  blur  crapdetection  truth  information  infooverload  books  2012  tomrosenstiel  billkovach  via:lukeneff 
november 2012 by robertogreco
MediaShift . The Rise of Ad-Hoc Journalist Support Networks | PBS
"To remake journalism, we need to build new networks of resiliency for the future of news. When we talk about the journalistic resources we have lost in recent years we tend to focus almost exclusively on the number of jobs lost, not on the capacity of the entire field to fight for the First Amendment, protect each other and our reporting, and support experimentation and eventually sustainability. To the best of my knowledge, there has been no comprehensive effort to map the needs of the new journalism ecosystem in these terms. Perhaps now is the time."
press  firstamendment  freepress  solidarity  emergingnetworks  joshstearns  2012  via:robinsonmeyer  adhocjournalism  adhoc  collaboration  networking  networks  journalism 
september 2012 by robertogreco
‪London Riots. (The BBC will never replay this. Send it out)‬‏ - YouTube
"Darcus Howe, a West Indian Writer and Broadcaster with a voice about the riots. Speaking about the mistreatment of youths by police leading to an up-roar and the ignorance of both police and the governement."
2011  london  riots  uk  press  respect  darcushowe  inequality  inequity  society 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Phone hacking: British politics has been corrupted by a cosy camaraderie - Telegraph
"Like so many spheres of life in this country…art world…academia & higher reaches of legal profession…it is almost impossible to survive in political journalism as outsider…not to say…that you actually have to have been to school or university w/ people you are trying to engage–can help–but that you must adopt manners which prevail in any club: coded vocabulary, discreet understandings, accepted attitudes…It is this familiarity, intimacy, set of shared assumptions…which is real corruptor of political life. The self-limiting spectrum of what can(not) be said, often patronising preconceptions about what ordinary public will (not) understand & self-reinforcing cowardice which takes for granted that certain vested interests are too powerful to be worth confronting. All of these…constant dangers in political life of democracy…What should worry us are not new, restrictive laws (can be fought out in open) but the old consensual complacency…so familiar that it is almost invisible."
uk  politics  2011  via:preoccupations  consensus  behavior  corruption  statusquo  power  control  democracy  davidcameron  journalism  complacency  janetdaley  press  media  rupertmurdoch  deschooling  unschooling  decolonization  society  cowardice  confrontation  law 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Op-Ed: Sticks and Stones; Ai Weiwei and the Uses of Architecture | Features | Archinect
"…new form does have the potential to enable new social relationships. If we, as architects, didn't believe that built space could change lives, we wouldn't do what we do. The students whose bones were broken in Sichuan certainly had their lives changed by architecture…It is not enough to merely say that CCTV is an office building for government censors, & Bird's Nest is a giant political distraction, Rem & Herzog were wrong, & that all building in China is wrong. Just as it is equally unproductive to simply reproduce the press releases for the latest spectacular cultural institution to be completed or proposed in China , w/out caveat or disclaimer: this state jails artists. "Stunningly Omnipresent Masters Make Mincemeat of Memory". Architecture is large enough to be both radical social transformer & retrograde political instrument, if we're willing to talk about it. These things must be the beginning terms in a larger conversation about architecture in China, & in the world.
fredscharmen  architecture  aiweiwei  china  2011  press  journalism  remkoolhaas  herzogdemeuron  change  transformation  activism  society 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Julie Chen | Flying Fish Press [See also: http://www.craftinamerica.org/artists_paper/?]
"FLYING FISH PRESS was established in 1987 by internationally known book artist and book art educator Julie Chen. The press focuses on the design and production of limited edition artists' books with an emphasis on three-dimensional and movable book structures and fine letterpress printing. Editions range in size from 25 to 150 copies. Work from the press Is known for combining meticulous attention to craft, intricate structural design, and inspired artistic vision."
juliechen  art  artists  books  bookmaking  bookarts  berkeley  arts  letterpress  printing  bookbinding  press  california 
september 2010 by robertogreco
cloverfield press
"Cloverfield Press is a boutique publishing house dedicated to bringing new literary and artistic voices to a discerning public. We hope to create books as visually beautiful as they are intellectually and emotionally stimulating.
elinornissley  letterpress  harukimurakami  books  cloverfield  publishing  literature  press  graphicdesign  friends 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Newspapers, Universities and the Internet « Esko Kilpi on Interactive Value Creation
"People in the traditional print media have dismissed online writing because of its low average quality. The average quality of the writing online isn’t what the print media are competing against. They’re competing against the best writing online. And often, they’re losing. This is what is going to happen next with teaching. Universities are going to compete against the best bloggers and the very best aggregators of learning content. The sad truth, both when it comes to the newspapers and to the universities, is that if you are used to being a monopoly, you create habits that are hard to overcome when you suddenly face competition. The Internet is now transforming the consumption habits of newspaper customers. There is an even bigger change happening in the learning related habits of people. Hopefully, the universities won’t fight as much against their customers’ new habits as the newspapers do!"
universities  monopolies  newspapers  online  instruction  lectures  teaching  colleges  change  competition  press  media 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Belgian Newspapers Demand Google Pay $77 Million For All The Traffic Google Sent Them ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"Let's not forget - these people with their patents and their lawsuits and their copyright acts aren't trying to make things better. They're trying to wreck the internet. To wreck our capacity to speak freely with each other."
internet  freedom  stephendownes  press  media  google  law  legal 
may 2008 by robertogreco
CJR: The Curious Case of Victor Pey: Why the Chilean government wants to keep a friendly newspaper shuttered.
"irony of Chile’s media is that there was more ideological diversity & journalistic energy in printed press in late 80s, in waning years of hard-line dictatorship of Pinochet, than now when he is long gone & proponents of democracy are firmly in control
chile  press  democracy  economics  media  control  politics 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Why a journalism class leans toward Obama - Lost Remote TV Blog
"Obama campaign treated us like pros - called back within minutes, set up interviews, got press passes, went out of way to make campaign accessible...Clinton campaign didn’t return single phone call, provide press access...virtually nothing to encourage
citizenjournalism  blogs  hillaryclinton  barackobama  elections  2008  media  press  accessibility 
february 2008 by robertogreco
PresidentialWatch08 » Trends
"See the candidates who are actually making the news on the Internet, in the mass media or in the different political communities."
data  datamining  elections  2008  politics  us  visualization  trends  media  press 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Half an Hour: The Public Bias Against the Press
"Roy Peter Clark's article is very well written & can be seen, despite negative undertones, to be passionate defense of traditional media. But his attribution of source of problem, "public that has been conditioned, like rats in Skinnerian dystopia, to ha
media  bias  criticism  stephendownes  press  journalism  credibility  trust 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Un computador por niño
"Esta campaña llevaba meses gestándose entre líderes de algunas de las comunidades y foros más reconocidos de la web nacional y aspira a reunir un millón de equipos antes del bicentenario."
olpc  chile  glvo  family  press 
january 2008 by robertogreco
The Salon Gift Guide | Salon Arts & Entertainment
"And we love the stuffed toys ($44-$240) Lizette Greco and her family make based on their children's drawings -- and using thrifted and recycled materials"
family  glvo  press 
november 2007 by robertogreco
BuzzMachine » Blog Archive » Retrain or retire [about journalism, could be about teaching]
"news organizations of all sorts should train every person in the newsroom in the skills of new media: how to make video, audio, and blogs. That wouldn’t take long, just a day or two. It’s that easy. That’s why everybody out here is doing it."
journalism  newmedia  training  newspapers  press  management  administration  teaching 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Marginal Revolution: Why is the European press more pessimistic than the American press?
"Does the greater pessimism of Europeans produce more disciplined and respectful children? Or just more pessimistic newspapers? I believe the "America is due for a comeuppance" view remains very popular across the Atlantic."
europe  us  pessimism  press  media  economics  schadenfreude 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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