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robertogreco : pride   10

Harvard Design Magazine: No. 46 / No Sweat
"This issue of Harvard Design Magazine is about the design of work and the work of design. “No Sweat” challenges designers to speculate on the spaces of work in an accelerated future, and to imagine a world in which a novel ethics of labor can emerge. What scenarios and spaces can we imagine for the next generation of work? How can we anticipate and formulate work environments and experiences that are productive, humane, and ecologically responsible?

From corner office to kitchen sink, from building site to factory floor, from cubicle to car to coffee shop, work shapes our lives and physical world. Whether we produce objects, generate ideas, manage processes, or perform services, work is a hybrid of dedication and alienation, power and oppression. As work spaces morph to integrate machines that mimic, assist, or complement human abilities, the way we perform work, and the way we feel about it, change too.

To work (to put forth effort) and the work (that effort, or the result it generates) are sources of pride and shame, fulfillment and drudgery. As many jobs become obsolete, and as populations are displaced under the pressures of climate change and political turmoil, the boundaries of the workplace are shifting in space and time. Though some claim that a world without work is on the horizon, “labor-saving” innovations are enmeshed with human exploitation, and housework and care work remain at the crux of persistent inequalities.

Paradoxically, the more that work, as we once understood it, appears to be receding, the more omnipresent and ambiguous it becomes. The workplace is everywhere—or is it nowhere?"

[via: "also check out Andrew Herscher’s piece in HDM 46 (not online) for critique of how architects mobilize constructions of “community”"
https://twitter.com/anamarialeon/status/1101941868210909184 ]
design  work  pride  shame  2018  responsibility  ecology  sustainability  humanism  productivity  labor  ethics  fulfillment  drudgery  jobs  workplace  housework  exploitation  emotionallabor  care  caring  maintenance  andrewherscher  architecture 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Body Atlas Reveals Where We Feel Happiness and Shame - D-brief | DiscoverMagazine.com
"Chests puffing up with pride — and happiness felt head to toe — are sensations as real as they are universal. And now we can make an atlas of them.

Researchers have long known that emotions are connected to a range of physiological changes, from nervous job candidates’ sweaty palms to the racing pulse that results from hearing a strange noise at night. But new research reveals that emotional states are universally associated with certain bodily sensations, regardless of individuals’ culture or language.

Once More With Feeling

More than 700 participants in Finland, Sweden and Taiwan participated in experiments aimed at mapping their bodily sensations in connection with specific emotions. Participants viewed emotion-laden words, videos, facial expressions and stories. They then self-reported areas of their bodies that felt different than before they’d viewed the material. By coloring in two computer-generated silhouettes — one to note areas of increased bodily sensation and the second to mark areas of decreased sensation — participants were able to provide researchers with a broad base of data showing both positive and negative bodily responses to different emotions.

Researchers found statistically discrete areas for each emotion tested, such as happiness, contempt and love, that were consistent regardless of respondents’ nationality. Afterward, researchers applied controls to reduce the risk that participants may have been biased by sensation-specific phrases common to many languages (such as the English “cold feet” as a metaphor for fear, reluctance or hesitation). The results are published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Hot-Headed

Although each emotion produced a specific map of bodily sensation, researchers did identify some areas of overlap. Basic emotions, such as anger and fear, caused an increase in sensation in the upper chest area, likely corresponding to increases in pulse and respiration rate. Happiness was the only emotion tested that increased sensation all over the body.

The findings enhance researchers’ understanding of how we process emotions. Despite differences in culture and language, it appears our physical experience of feelings is remarkably consistent across different populations. The researchers believe that further development of these bodily sensation maps may one day result in a new way of identifying and treating emotional disorders."
2013  psychology  science  physiology  emotions  shame  happiness  love  humans  anger  disgust  depression  contempt  pride  envy  anxiety  surprise  sadness  fear 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Why This Shepherd Loves Twitter - Herdy Shepherd - The Atlantic
"I'm not really an “early-adopter.” In fact, I'm the exact opposite. I'm a Luddite and a shepherd.

Our shepherding work in the English Lake District is all about continuity and being part of a living cultural tradition that stretches back into the depths of time. Our work is often little changed from the way things were done when the Vikings first settled these valleys. Even our dialect is peppered with Norse words.

I like old things, old ways of doing things, old stories, old places, and old people. I'm deeply conservative with a small 'c'. Ask any half decent economist and they'll tell you that most new ideas are a waste of time, most new ideas fail. Our way of life results in fairly conservative people suspicious of pointless chatter and new technologies for the sake of newness.

I am, in short, about as unlikely to get excited by something like Twitter as anyone alive.



I tweet anonymously because that's how I like it. My feed is not really about me: I’m just a narrator. It’s about the way my people farm an amazing landscape, the sheep, the land, the sheepdogs, and the characters in our valley. It’s not really in the spirit of my community to self promote... The individual is not that important here compared to the collective way of life. At the start of my tweeting I feared that my farming peers would disapprove of it, so its been amusing to discover that they worked out who I was very quickly, many follow me on Twitter, and funniest of all they ask me to post pictures of their sheep or to tell the wider world things ‘that need to be said.’

Now we have close to 13,000 followers. We’ve been featured on many of the world’s leading news channels, had features written about us in many magazines, hosted film crews from around the world, and featured on several radio programmes. Weird for something that everyone here thinks is normal, and ‘Just what we do.’

Three things work for me about Twitter:

1) The 140 character limit forces a brevity that suits my way of life;

2) Sharing my world through photos is even quicker, and my world is, I’ve learnt, exotic, strange and beautiful to other people who are disconnected from the land;

3) It works on my smartphone so I can tweet whilst I work outdoors, without needing to stop work to do so. If I spend more than 20 seconds taking photos or tweeting then I’m not doing my real job properly. My tweeting is, and has to be, quick, dirty and real.

The combination of these three elements means that my world has become shareable in real time with other people. I'm no Robert Capa but the combination of a very good smart phone camera, an amazing landscape and working life, and Twitter letting me post pics in 2 or 3 clicks means that my world can be in your world within 10 seconds. And some of you appear to like my world.



On one level, the answer might be ‘not much’. Tweeting doesn’t affect the basic economics of what we do (it's a lousy way to make money), or how cold the rain or snow is, so some folk will never be interested. That’s fine. But tweeting surprised me, because it does sometimes give you heart to know so many other people respect and appreciate what we do. Sometimes it just makes you feel a little less lonely. It gives you a kind of courage to carry on.

Tweeting is kind of an act of resistance and defiance, a way of shouting to the sometimes disinterested world that you’re stubborn, proud, and not giving in as everywhere else is turned into a clone of everywhere else.

* * *

I’m not alone, there are some amazing people tweeting about their lives on Twitter. They are fascinating unique lives that were often invisible before the ability to self-publish on social media. I’d like to think that Twitter has given people that had disappeared from view — obscured and crowded out by the loud noise of modernity — the chance to raise their voice, tell their stories, share their lives, and to say "Hey, we didn’t go away, we are still here, and you might just be interested because what we do is important to everyone."

Twitter gives you an amplifier for your voice (albeit not necessarily an audience if you are tedious, and let's face it: lots of people are). It cuts out the middleman (I don't need you to interpret and translate my life and my work for other people – sorry journalists but I’m a shepherd not an idiot). It lets you find your niche (and that niche can be massive). It lets you sell things (we sell sheep, wool and visits to our farm on Twitter). And it lets you connect with weirdly interesting other people (widening your sphere of influence through collaborations with artists or writers).



Most new ideas may fail, and most new ideas might be rubbish... but sometimes a new idea, a new technology, empowers you to defend the old against the new, and some old things are worth defending."
socialmedia  twitter  resistance  loneliness  farming  herdyshepherd  shepherds  sheep  2013  connection  whyweteet  expression  communication  technology  iphone  voice  defiance  stubbornness  pride  life  living  isolation  agriculture 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Stet by Me: Thoughts on Editing Fiction · Meanjin
The editor’s only real resource is judgement. You have to have absolute faith in it, but you must also interrogate it ceaselessly so as to keep the clearest possible distinction between the needs of the work and your own tastes or preferences.
But it seems to me that perhaps being invisible is an issue when you work in the arts, in entertainment, in media. In public. Actually, I am not sure I think it is a problem. It is just weird.
My authors make themselves vulnerable in the understanding that I will take care of them. Consequently neither of us wants me to get around in public inadvertently creating the impression that their novel was an unpublishable pile of shit before I got my genius hands on it. Editors do not in general confuse themselves with the dude on the cloud receiving the spark from the finger of God. And because we don’t wish anyone to think we do—especially the dude—we do not talk much about our craft. Or, although we feel it acutely, our immense pride in doing it well.
The purpose of writing is to express meaning; the purpose of publishing is to transmit meaning from a single mind to a large number of other minds. The purpose of editing is to ensure the transmission proceeds as far as possible without impediment. As I hope I have indicated, the editorial process itself is not arcane. It is about attention to effect: to how the mechanics of writing operate on the apprehension of meaning. The meaning we are concerned with in fiction is different from that in, say, educational texts, chiefly because it prioritises feeling. But in each case the editor’s task is to ensure that the words and symbols achieve what they need to achieve and do not get in their own way.
Writers, by contrast, are concerned with something very close to magic, something to do with consciousness transported, with the generation of meaning, of feeling—of something that was not there before—by means that cannot (therefore) be apparent to me. I do not know how to help an author who cannot make, or is not making, magic. What I hope I can do is point out that the magic could be even more dazzling but for these things—here and here—obstructing it, occluding it. If I am really on my game I may even be able to tspot some latent magic that only needs this new thing here to bring it out; and that is about as good as it gets.
Good editing is not just important for an individual book, it is crucial to the health of our industry and the survival of reading as a recreation. Nobody will ever recognise good editorial work—that is the point of it.
Of course today’s readers will always love the whisper of a crisp new page or the musty whiff of an old one, but for tomorrow’s, it may be a finger-flick on a touchpad that will spark the associations. The objects are not the source of the power, they merely absorb some of it and radiate it over time. The power comes from written stories: from the particular way reading brings stories to life in the human imagination.
publishing  editing  books  fiction  working  trust  feminism  pride  via:tealtan 
june 2012 by robertogreco
dianakimball/mentoring - GitHub
"the opportunity to offer guidance from experience is a gift…"We don't describe ourselves as 'bursting with pride' over our own success, but we do for others…" … reward requires commitment: "to generate the emotional reward of naches, we have to throw ourselves into the act of mentoring."

As we live and work on this electric frontier, it's important to build and renew our own traditions. My goal with /mentoring is to encourage people to believe in one another, and to make it the easiest, most natural thing in the world to express and welcome that belief."

Examples:
http://blog.dianakimball.com/mentoring
http://revolution.is/diana-kimball/
http://geemus.com/mentoring
http://nickd.org/mentoring/
http://www.michaelgalpert.com/mentoring
http://kvans.squarespace.com/mentoring/
http://adambrault.com/mentoring
http://trash.davidcole.me/mentoring
http://patrickewing.info/mentoring

[Twitter @mentoring and Wiki at: https://github.com/dianakimball/mentoring/wiki ]
mentoring  dianakimball  networkedlearning  networks  education  unschooling  deschooling  learning  pride  naches  gratification  gamechanging  generosity  growth  mentorship 
september 2011 by robertogreco
aalbright.tumblr : There’s no doubt about it—I love the...
A meandering, evocative post from one member of the inaugural NMY gang. Two choice quotes:

"If NMY has taught me anything, though, it has taught me to ask questions, to put scrutiny to everything and to just plain think about the world I live in—to realize that things are never quite as they seem."

"For a long time, I held the belief that anything other than “hard work” was a waste of time and money. But what happens to you when you trim all the fat off of your steak and never spend a relaxed afternoon in an art museum?

Your morale goes down. Life gets boring. You get fatigued. And in the long run, you’re probably less creative and productive than if you just got outside every now and again. What I am realizing is that just as much as we need to hunker down and get stuff done, we need to also take pause."
anthonyalbright  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  cv  teaching  learning  pride  life  pause  ego  wisdom  beauty  joy  pleasure  balance  observation  noticing  attention 
january 2011 by robertogreco
geek.teacher » Blog Archive » On #edcampoc
"I sat in some great sessions. Rob Grecco did something awesome: he brought his middle school students from his private, progressive school, & had them do a panel discussion on Student-led Urban Adventures. The students had to plan their itineraries and keep to a strict budget on a weeklong field trip to San Francisco. They were intelligent & insightful, doing a great job of representing their school. Afterwards one of the students, Taylor, came over & introduced himself to me. The students were a class act all the way."

"The standout moment of the whole session [Things That Suck] was when one of Rob’s students participated in our discussion on disciplinary practices. She described the way things are handled at her school and described traditional practices like having students sit in the corner as “ineffective.” Love it."
edcampoc  dancallahan  edcampoc2011  edcamp  tcsnmy  cv  ego  pride  students  education  learning  classtrips  discipline  thingsthatsuck 
january 2011 by robertogreco
EdCampOC 2011 | Organic Learning
"Students & teachers from The Children’s School in San Diego shared how their school, centered around project based learning, allows students to follow their passions in learning. Teachers shared their learning spaces on Tumblr (see sidebar on this blog for other classes) & talked about how their one-to-one program was about learning & not about technology. Students were articulate & open about their learning & had an easy, comfortable relationship with their teachers. Oh, how I wish this could happen in all of our schools. I thought it funny that some were referring to this school as the “hippie school”. I could relate. It was great to see that the students were actively participating in other sessions throughout the day. They truly were cultivating life long learning not only with their words, but with their actions."

"especially liked tweet by Matt Arguello, commenting on one of students from TCS, on discipline…"
janicestearns  tcsnmy  ego  students  edcamp  edcampoc  edcampoc2011  schools  education  teaching  projectbasedlearning  cv  pride  learning  progressive  pbl 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Derek Powazek - San Francisco Values
"I’ve lived in San Francisco for 15 years, which is 15 years more than anyone connected to this ad [in support of Proposition 8]. San Francisco changed my life. I found a career here. I was married here. I bought property here. I’m never, ever leaving. So I think I can speak to what San Francisco Values really are. Here are a few of them. [Bulleted list here]…

I believe San Franciscans embody the best American values: bravery, liberty, tolerance, and opportunity. I look around San Francisco and I see people who risked everything to move to a place where they could be free. People who decided, out a mix of idealism and insanity, that they could make a more perfect union that values life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

San Francisco values and American values are one and the same."
sanfrancisco  rights  politics  humanity  us  derekpowazek  values  pride  bravery  freedom  liberty  toleranceopportunity  progressivism  reinvention  perseverance  love  coffee  community  coffeehouses  idealism 
september 2010 by robertogreco

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