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GitHub - jkriss/zinepdf
"This is a short Python 2 script that will take a 7-8 page pdf, legal size, and turn it into a single sheet foldable zine."
jessekriss  python  zines  papernet  typesetting  printing  print 
13 hours ago by robertogreco
The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library on Vimeo
[parts of the video (from the introduction): "1. Libraries existed to copy data. Libraries as warehouses was a recent idea and not a very good one 2. The online world used to be considered rhizomatic but recent events have proven that it is actually quite arboretic and precarious. 3. A method of sharing files using hard drives is slow, but it is extremely resilient. This reversalism is a radical tactic agains draconian proprietarianism. 4. There are forces and trends that are working against portable libraries."]

[Book is here:
http://networkcultures.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NN07_complete.pdf
http://networkcultures.org/blog/publication/no-07-radical-tactics-of-the-offline-library-henry-warwick/ ]

"The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library is based on the book "Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries"
By Henry Warwick

The Personal Portable Library in its most simple form is a hard drive or USB stick containing a large collection of e-books, curated and archived by an individual user. The flourishing of the offline digital library is a response to the fact that truly private sharing of knowledge in the online realm is increasingly made impossible. While P2P sharing sites and online libraries with downloadable e-books are precarious, people are naturally led to an atavistic and reversalist workaround. The radical tactics of the offline: abandoning the online for more secure offline transfer. Taking inspiration from ancient libraries as copying centers and Sneakernet, Henry Warwick describes the future of the library as digital and offline. Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries traces the history of the library and the importance of the Personal Portable Library in sharing knowledge and resisting proprietarian forces.

The library in Alexandria contained about 500,000 scrolls; the Library of Congress, the largest library in the history of civilization, contains about 35 million books. A digital version of it would fit on a 24 TB drive, which can be purchased for about $2000. Obviously, most people don’t need 35 million books. A small local library of 10,000 books could fit on a 64 GB thumb drive the size of a pack of chewing gum and costing perhaps $40. An astounding fact with immense implications. It is trivially simple to start collecting e-books, marshalling them into libraries on hard drives, and then to share the results. And it is much less trivially important. Sharing is caring. Societies where people share, especially ideas, are societies that will naturally flourish."
libraries  henrywarwick  archives  collection  digital  digitalmedia  ebooks  drm  documentary  librarians  alexandriaproject  copying  rhizomes  internet  online  sharing  files  p2p  proprietarianism  sneakernet  history  harddrives  learning  unschooling  property  deschooling  resistance  mesopotamia  egypt  alexandria  copies  decay  resilience  cv  projectideas  libraryofalexandria  books  scrolls  tablets  radicalism  literacy  printing  moveabletype  china  europe  publishing  2014  copyright  capitalism  canon  librarydevelopment  walterbenjamin  portability  andrewtanenbaum  portable  portablelibraries  félixguattari  cloudcomputing  politics  deleuze  deleuze&guattari  web  offline  riaa  greed  openstudioproject  lcproject 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Print Simulator - Ink Shift – RISOTTO
"The print simulator is a quick and easy way to experiment with your artwork!

See how your print will look on our variety of papers, switch ink colours at the click of a button and learn the foundations of artwork layering and preparation.

There are 2 modes to play with..."

[via: https://are.na/block/2018171
https://are.na/benjamin-hickethier/riso-1498024805 ]
print  papernet  printing  simulations  risograph 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Arion Press | Presidio – San Francisco, CA
"​​​​​​San Franciscans are notably creative spirits. Amongst us you'll find artists, writers, bibliophiles, DIY enthusiasts, crafters, collectors, and art appreciators. Yet too few of us have visited, let alone are even aware of, the Arion Press, one of the nation's last printers of museum-quality, handmade books created with traditional letterpress printing equipment.

Founded in 1974 by publisher Andrew Hoyem, you'll find Arion Press in a former laundry facility in the Presidio, a space shared with its associated type foundry, M&H Type, and its non-profit and owner, the Grabhorn Institute. Together, the three divisions are a powerhouse dedicated to preserving the craft of fine printing and bookmaking.

While Arion Press only publishes about three books a year (up to 400 copies of each edition), every one is an exceptional work of art that's created using a human-touch process. Select literary texts are chosen and then matched with renowned contemporary artists who illustrate each work. M&H Type composes and casts the type from molten lead blocks, which is then handset and hand printed on 100-year-old letterpress machines. The printed pages are proofread by actually being read out loud. And then, once everything is perfect, the pages are meticulously hand bound – sewn, glued, and pressed together into a one-of-a-kind, tangible tribute to the literary work it houses.

Come for a Visit
The Arion Press gallery is free and open to the public Monday through Friday, 10 to 5 pm and by appointment. Here you'll find Arion's recent projects and publications. But for a truly memorable and awe-inspiring visit, make a reservation for a 90 minute public demonstration tour, where for $10 you'll see the whole printmaking process in action, browse the facilities, including the floor-to-ceiling walls of typefaces (more than 3,888 typecases, 100 tons of type!), and go home with your very own printmaking souvenir.

Once you've visited this unique printmaker, gallery, publisher, and living museum, should you ever hear anyone claim that print is dead, you can kindly point them to Arion Press.

Arion Press is located just inside the 14th Avenue Gate in the Presidio's Public Health Service District, adjacent to the Richmond District. You'll know you're at the right place when you approach a building with a tall smokestack."
classideas  presidio  sanfrancisco  tovisit  printing  letterpress 
march 2018 by robertogreco
California job case - Wikipedia
"A California job case is a kind of type case: a compartmentalized wooden box used to store movable type used in letterpress printing.[1] It was the most popular and accepted of the job case designs in America. The California job case took its name from the Pacific Coast location of the foundries that made the case popular.[2]

The defining characteristic of the California job case is the layout, documented by J. L. Ringwalt in the American Encyclopaedia of Printing in 1871, as used by San Francisco printers.[3] This modification of a previously popular case, the Italic, it was claimed reduced the compositor's hand travel as he set the pieces of type into his composing stick by more than half a mile per day.[4] In the previous convention, upper- and lower-case type were kept in separate cases, or trays. This is why capital letters are called upper-case and the minuscules are lower-case.[5] The combined case became popular during the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century."
letterpress  printing  california 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Line-us: The little robot drawing arm
"Line-us is a small internet-connected robot drawing arm.
 
Line-us mimics your motion with a pen and recreates whatever you draw on screen. Draw with your finger, mouse, stylus or
Apple Pencil and watch as it copies your movements in real time.
The Line-us App then lets you save your drawings and share them with friends or other Line-us machines!
 
Line-us is Durrell Bishop and Robert Poll. We both have many years of experience in product design and engineering. If you love drawing like we do Line-us and the Line-us community will be the start of something fun and exciting."

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2017/11/13/filtered ]
robots  drawing  printing  printers  2017 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Leslie Watts Fine Art: Drypoint with a pasta maker
[via: https://twitter.com/lesliewattsart/status/893142096139440128

"Did you know that you can use a pasta maker as a printing press? My first drypoint, scratched on the lid of a plastic salad container.

I used a scalpel.

The soft white lids from yogourt containers are interesting, but the lines are mushier. I like these transparent, more rigid plastic.

So [to prevent slippage] now I roll card+printing paper in 1" and then carefully place the plate between. Then roll slowly & pull it out the bottom."

"I first put a drawing under the plastic for guidelines. Then I rub graphite powder into the scratches so they show against white paper."

"Takua intaglio, Mars Black."

"You can find lots of videos on YouTube. Search for drypoint technique and pasta maker printmaking. Also intaglio techniques."]

[Some videos:

Rosie Scribblah: "In this short and informative film Rosie Scribblah shows you how to use use a recycled, domestic pasta machine for dry point etching. Yes it works. And the cat helped too."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEE1hzz_xdI

Paul O'Dowd: "Vlog 0037 - Pasta Machine Print Press"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrPIZkocAOA

Pasta press modified to be better for regular printmaking: "What stops a lot of people from printmaking at home is that they don't have a press. By adapting a pasta press there is a cheap easy to use press that can make small postcard size prints."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IywvwD8shg

World of Woodcraft: "Printing with a pasta press and learning an art cheat at the same time. In this video I share an inexpensive method of creating interesting prints."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtuEL2mSOtk ]
classideas  printmaking  printing  art  2017  sfsh  pastamakers  lesliewatts  glvo 
august 2017 by robertogreco
My experiences printing a small batch of books – Medium
"A comparison of four online printing services: Blurb, BookBaby, Lulu, and Nook Press"



"Printing services I compared

I wanted to find a printing service that would allow you to get a small batch of 15 copies, preceded by a 1-copy proof print, relatively cheaply. I found these four:

• Blurb
• BookBaby
• Lulu
• Nook Press

A few others I learned of were too expensive (Lightning Press, Infinity Publishing, Best Book Printing), offered only paperback (CreateSpace), or seemed cumbersome (Lightning Source required a new account to be approved manually!?) If there are more that fit the bill, please let me know.

I ordered one copy of the book from each of the four services. Here’s how they compared."
papertnet  books  lulu  blurb  printing  print  publishing  marchinwichary  2016  bookbaby  nookpress  ondemand 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Colpa | Colpa
"COLPA is the collaborative art practice of Luca Antonucci and David Kasprzak. We work together as a publisher, designer, printer and curator.

COLPA PRESS publishes art books, limited edition prints and art objects, often working with artists on unique projects.

Founded by Carissa Potter and Luca Antonucci in 2010, with great assistance from Hailey Loman, COLPA has grown to include international events and exhibitions.

COLPA has exhibited with SFMOMA at the FOG Design + Art Fair, The NY Art Book Fair at PS1 MoMa, The LA Art Book Fair at the Geffen Contemporary MOCA, the Kadist Foundation and the Headlands Center for the Arts.

Our publications are in the permanent collection of The Getty Foundation, The Los Angeles County Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum, Stanford University, Reed University and The Kadist Foundation.

We are lucky to have worked with amazing assistants such as Eva Struble, Cecile Legnaghi, Maëlle Brientini, Nino Galluzzo, Sarah Kim, Jenna Jorgenson, Jackson Brinkley, Madison Voekel, Nelly Ansruther, Lindsey Watson and Amy Burek.

For a quote or other inquiry, please contact us at hello@colpapress.com."
art  books  artbooks  sanfrancisco  lucaantonucci  davidkasprzak  publishing  design  printing  curation  carissapotter  colpa  artistsbooks 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Independent Publishing Resource Center | Independent Publishing Resource Center
"IPRC’S Mission & Vision

The IPRC’s Mission is to facilitate creative expression, identity and community by providing individual access to tools and resources for creating independently published media and artwork.

About

Since its inception in 1998 the center has been dedicated to encouraging the growth of a visual and literary publishing community by offering a space to gather and exchange information and ideas, as well as to produce work.

We’ve empowered thousands of people to create and publish their own artwork, writing, zines, books, websites, comics and graphic novels.

In our 18 years of operation, we’ve provided artistic services to upwards of 27,000 Oregonians through membership, use of the Center, workshops and outreach programs. By gathering such diverse people under one roof, the IPRC nourishes an expansive and productive community. In fact the IPRC is at the very heart of Portland’s vibrant do-it-yourself (DIY) artistic and literary communities is a creative home for many local artists, and an incubator for the independent creative spirit that makes Portland unique.

We’ve helped community members find their artistic voices, especially disenfranchised youth (including GLBT, minority, at-risk, and homeless youth) whose lifestyles and experiences tend to be marginalized in the major media.

We’ve helped countless individuals to discover themselves through art, and to reach and inspire others in the community by publishing and sharing their work. We’re always looking for volunteers to help our outreach programs."

[via: http://theokbb.tumblr.com/post/136224475227/one-of-the-first-places-that-i-visited-when-i ]
portland  oregon  diy  books  publishing  zines  lcproject  openstudioproject  art  printing  iprc 
december 2015 by robertogreco
PRINT ALL OVER ME
"Print All Over Me is a creative community of people turning virtual ideas into real world objects. Join us to create, share, sell, produce and buy great design!"

[via: https://twitter.com/TheFutureLab/status/667009564068487168
and https://www.lsnglobal.com/seed/article/18543/clothes-by-algorithm ]
clothing  fashion  printing  clothes  fabric  printalloverme 
november 2015 by robertogreco
How textiles revolutionised technology – Virginia Postrel – Aeon
"Older than bronze and as new as nanowires, textiles are technology — and they have remade our world time and again"

"In February 1939, Vogue ran a major feature on the fashions of the future. Inspired by the soon-to-open New York World’s Fair, the magazine asked nine industrial designers to imagine what the people of ‘a far Tomorrow’ might wear and why. (The editors deemed fashion designers too of-the-moment for such speculations.) A mock‑up of each outfit was manufactured and photographed for a lavish nine-page colour spread.

You might have seen some of the results online: an evening dress with a see-through net top and strategically placed swirls of gold braid, for instance, or a baggy men’s jumpsuit with a utility belt and halo antenna. Bloggers periodically rediscover a British newsreel of models demonstrating the outfits while a campy narrator (‘Oh, swish!’) makes laboured jokes. The silly get‑ups are always good for self-satisfied smirks. What dopes those old-time prognosticators were!

The ridicule is unfair. Anticipating climate-controlled interiors, greater nudity, more athleticism, more travel and simpler wardrobes, the designers actually got a lot of trends right. Besides, the mock‑ups don’t reveal what really made the predicted fashions futuristic. Looking only at the pictures, you can’t detect the most prominent technological theme.

‘The important improvements and innovations in clothes for the World of Tomorrow will be in the fabrics themselves,’ declared Raymond Loewy, one of the Vogue contributors. His fellow visionaries agreed. Every single one talked about textile advances. Many of their designs specified yet-to-be-invented materials that could adjust to temperature, change colour or be crushed into suitcases without wrinkling. Without exception, everyone foretelling the ‘World of Tomorrow’ believed that an exciting future meant innovative new fabrics.

They all understood something we’ve largely forgotten: that textiles are technology, more ancient than bronze and as contemporary as nanowires. We hairless apes co-evolved with our apparel. But, to reverse Arthur C Clarke’s adage, any sufficiently familiar technology is indistinguishable from nature. It seems intuitive, obvious – so woven into the fabric of our lives that we take it for granted.

We drag out heirloom metaphors – ‘on tenterhooks’, ‘tow-headed’, ‘frazzled’ – with no idea that we’re talking about fabric and fibres. We repeat threadbare clichés: ‘whole cloth’, ‘hanging by a thread’, ‘dyed in the wool’. We catch airline shuttles, weave through traffic, follow comment threads. We talk of lifespans and spin‑offs and never wonder why drawing out fibres and twirling them into thread looms so large in our language."



"As late as the 1970s, textiles still enjoyed the aura of science. Since then, however, we’ve stopped thinking of them as a technical achievement. In today’s popular imagination, fabric entirely belongs to the frivolous world of fashion. Even in the pages of Vogue, ‘wearable technology’ means electronic gadgets awkwardly tricked out as accessories, not the soft stuff you wear against your skin – no matter how much brainpower went into producing it. When we imagine economic progress, we no longer think about cloth, or even the machines that make it.

This cultural amnesia has multiple causes. The rise of computers and software as the very definition of ‘high technology’ eclipsed other industries. Intense global competition drove down prices of fibres and fabric, making textiles and apparel a less noticeable part of household budgets, and turning textile makers into unglamorous, commodity businesses. Environmental campaigns made synthetic a synonym for toxic. And for the first time in human history, generations of women across the developed world grew up without learning the needle arts."



"Textiles illustrate a more general point about technology. The more advanced a field is, the more blasé we are about its latest upgrades. Success breeds indifference. We still expect Moore’s Law to hold, but we no longer get excited about the latest microprocessor. The public has largely forgotten the silicon in Silicon Valley.

New and improved fabric technologies haven’t attracted public enthusiasm since the backlash against leisure suits and disco shirts made synthetics declassé in the early 1980s. ‘Pity poor polyester. People pick on it,’ wrote The Wall Street Journal’s Ronald Alsop in 1982, describing DuPont’s efforts to rehabilitate the fibre’s image.

What ended the consumer hatred of polyester wasn’t a marketing campaign. It was a quiet series of technical innovations: the development of microfibres. These are synthetics, most often polyester or nylon, that are thinner than silk and incredibly soft, as well as lightweight, strong, washable and quick-drying. Their shapes can be engineered to control how water vapour and heat pass through the fabric or to create microcapsules to add sunscreen, antimicrobial agents or insect repellent. Over the past decade, microfibres have become ubiquitous; they’re found in everything from wickable workout wear to supersoft plush toys.

Microfibres are one reason the ‘air-conditioned’ fabrics Loewy and his fellow designers foresaw in 1939 have finally come to pass. These fabrics just aren’t promoted in the pages of Vogue or highlighted on the racks at Banana Republic. They don’t attract attention during New York Fashion Week. Their tribe gathers instead at the big Outdoor Retailer trade shows held twice a year in Salt Lake City. There, outdoor-apparel makers and their suppliers tout textiles that keep wearers warm in the cold and cool in the heat; that block raindrops but allow sweat to escape; that repel insects, screen out UV rays and control odour. By establishing that truly weather-resistant fabrics were possible, Gore-Tex (first sold in 1976) and Polartec synthetic fleece (1979) created an industry where engineers now vie to find ever-better ways to conquer the elements. For instance, ‘smart textiles’ originally developed for spacesuits use microencapsulated materials that melt when they get hot, keeping wearers comfortable by absorbing body heat; when temperatures fall, the materials solidify and warm the body."



"Reducing textiles to their functional properties misses much of their appeal, however. They’ve always been decorative as well, a source of sensory pleasure going all the way back to the sexy string skirts worn by Stone Age women. That’s why dyes have been so important in the history of chemistry and trade.

In our computer-centric era, the pursuit of beautiful textiles has naturally turned to information technology. Over the past decade, inkjet printing on fabric has taken off. Instead of requiring a separate plate for each colour, digital printing registers the entire design at once. So for the first time, designers can use as many colours, and as varied patterns, as they choose. Although it currently accounts for less than 5 per cent of printed fabrics, digital printing has already changed the way clothes look. It’s the technology driving the colourful prints so prominent in recent women’s fashion, as well as the crowdsourced design sites Threadless and Spoonflower.

The customers who’ve embraced those designs don’t think much about what makes them possible. But the very invisibility of textiles testifies to their power. We think of them as natural. The instinct behind ‘wearable technology’ is sound, even if the products so far are awkward. ‘Imagine a textile structured from a blend of different fibres which each function as component within a circuit, for example, battery fibres, solar fibres and antenna fibres,’ writes the US fashion technologist Amanda Parkes in an op-ed for the website Business of Fashion. ‘The material itself becomes a self-sustaining “textile circuit” that has its own power and interactive capabilities, but the embedded technology is essentially invisible.’

If the goal is to shrink the distance between nature and artifice, us and it, no technology is as powerful as fabric. Intimate and essential, it touches every moment of our lives. It is among the greatest products of human artifice. Yet it is also an extension of our skin."
textiles  glvo  virginiapostrel  history  clothing  crafts  culture  technology  2015  wearables  materials  industrialrevolution  fashion  craft  dyes  machines  printing  science  adamsmith  raymondloewy  arthurcclarke  dupont  synthetics  fabrics  fabric  elizabethbarber  williampetty  davidorban  josephmariejacquard  weaving  looms  knitting  spinning  craigmuldrew  jameshargreaves  richardarkwright  beverlylemire  samuelcrompton  1939  vogue  microfibres  gore-tex  polartec  ministryofsupply  mizzenandmain  yicui  materialsscience  threadless  spoonflower  amandaparkes  future  making  cv 
june 2015 by robertogreco
The Humane Representation of Thought on Vimeo
"Closing keynote at the UIST and SPLASH conferences, October 2014.
Preface: http://worrydream.com/TheHumaneRepresentationOfThought/note.html

References to baby-steps towards some of the concepts mentioned:

Dynamic reality (physical responsiveness):
- The primary work here is Hiroshi Ishii's "Radical Atoms": http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/
- but also relevant are the "Soft Robotics" projects at Harvard: http://softroboticstoolkit.com
- and at Otherlab: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gyMowPAJwqo
- and some of the more avant-garde corners of material science and 3D printing

Dynamic conversations and presentations:
- Ken Perlin's "Chalktalk" changes daily; here's a recent demo: http://bit.ly/1x5eCOX

Context-sensitive reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/

"Explore-the-model" reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/ExplorableExplanations/
- http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/
- http://ncase.me/polygons/
- http://redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html
- http://earthprimer.com/

Evidence-backed models:
- http://worrydream.com/TenBrighterIdeas/

Direct-manipulation dynamic authoring:
- http://worrydream.com/StopDrawingDeadFish/
- http://worrydream.com/DrawingDynamicVisualizationsTalk/
- http://tobyschachman.com/Shadershop/

Modes of understanding:
- Jerome Bruner: http://amazon.com/dp/0674897013
- Howard Gardner: http://amazon.com/dp/0465024335
- Kieran Egan: http://amazon.com/dp/0226190390

Embodied thinking:
- Edwin Hutchins: http://amazon.com/dp/0262581469
- Andy Clark: http://amazon.com/dp/0262531569
- George Lakoff: http://amazon.com/dp/0465037712
- JJ Gibson: http://amazon.com/dp/0898599598
- among others: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embodied_cognition

I don't know what this is all about:
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/responses.html

---

Abstract:

New representations of thought — written language, mathematical notation, information graphics, etc — have been responsible for some of the most significant leaps in the progress of civilization, by expanding humanity’s collectively-thinkable territory.

But at debilitating cost. These representations, having been invented for static media such as paper, tap into a small subset of human capabilities and neglect the rest. Knowledge work means sitting at a desk, interpreting and manipulating symbols. The human body is reduced to an eye staring at tiny rectangles and fingers on a pen or keyboard.

Like any severely unbalanced way of living, this is crippling to mind and body. But it is also enormously wasteful of the vast human potential. Human beings naturally have many powerful modes of thinking and understanding.

Most are incompatible with static media. In a culture that has contorted itself around the limitations of marks on paper, these modes are undeveloped, unrecognized, or scorned.

We are now seeing the start of a dynamic medium. To a large extent, people today are using this medium merely to emulate and extend static representations from the era of paper, and to further constrain the ways in which the human body can interact with external representations of thought.

But the dynamic medium offers the opportunity to deliberately invent a humane and empowering form of knowledge work. We can design dynamic representations which draw on the entire range of human capabilities — all senses, all forms of movement, all forms of understanding — instead of straining a few and atrophying the rest.

This talk suggests how each of the human activities in which thought is externalized (conversing, presenting, reading, writing, etc) can be redesigned around such representations.

---

Art by David Hellman.
Bret Victor -- http://worrydream.com "

[Some notes from Boris Anthony:

"Those of you who know my "book hack", Bret talks about exactly what motivates my explorations starting at 20:45 in https://vimeo.com/115154289 "
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574339495274876928

"From a different angle, btwn 20:00-29:00 Bret explains how "IoT" is totally changing everything
https://vimeo.com/115154289
@timoreilly @moia"
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574341875836043265 ]
bretvictor  towatch  interactiondesign  davidhellman  hiroshiishii  softrobotics  robots  robotics  kenperlin  jeromebruner  howardgardner  kieranegan  edwinhutchins  andyclark  jjgibson  embodiedcognition  cognition  writing  math  mathematics  infographic  visualization  communication  graphics  graphicdesign  design  representation  humans  understanding  howwelearn  howwethink  media  digital  dynamism  movement  conversation  presentation  reading  howweread  howwewrite  chalktalk  otherlab  3dprinting  3d  materials  physical  tangibility  depth  learning  canon  ui  informationdesign  infographics  maps  mapping  data  thinking  thoughts  numbers  algebra  arithmetic  notation  williamplayfair  cartography  gestures  placevalue  periodictable  michaelfaraday  jamesclerkmaxell  ideas  print  printing  leibniz  humanism  humanerepresentation  icons  visual  aural  kinesthetic  spatial  tactile  symbols  iot  internetofthings  programming  computers  screens  computation  computing  coding  modeling  exploration  via:robertogreco  reasoning  rhetoric  gerrysussman  environments  scale  virtualization 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Article: Rise of the Risograph, Part One / Features / Nothing Major
"Once marketed to schools as a cheap copier, the Risograph has become a fave of graphic designers, artists, zine publishers, and arts institutions. Part one: Rise of the Machine."

[Parts two and three:

"So, now that we know what a Risograph is, who's using it, and how?"
http://nothingmajor.com/features/18-rise-of-the-risograph-part-two/

"This week, we're checking in with art institutions to see how they use Risographs."
http://nothingmajor.com/features/24-rise-of-the-risograph-part-three/ ]
risograph  print  printing  mattputrino  via:robinsloan  design  openstudioproject  lcproject  classideas  zines  glvo  srg 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Gandhi’s Printing Press — Isabel Hofmeyr | Harvard University Press
"At the same time that Gandhi, as a young lawyer in South Africa, began fashioning the tenets of his political philosophy, he was absorbed by a seemingly unrelated enterprise: creating a newspaper. Gandhi’s Printing Press is an account of how this project, an apparent footnote to a titanic career, shaped the man who would become the world-changing Mahatma. Pioneering publisher, experimental editor, ethical anthologist—these roles reveal a Gandhi developing the qualities and talents that would later define him.

Isabel Hofmeyr presents a detailed study of Gandhi’s work in South Africa (1893–1914), when he was the some-time proprietor of a printing press and launched the periodical Indian Opinion. The skills Gandhi honed as a newspaperman—distilling stories from numerous sources, circumventing shortages of type—influenced his spare prose style. Operating out of the colonized Indian Ocean world, Gandhi saw firsthand how a global empire depended on the rapid transmission of information over vast distances. He sensed that communication in an industrialized age was becoming calibrated to technological tempos.

But he responded by slowing the pace, experimenting with modes of reading and writing focused on bodily, not mechanical, rhythms. Favoring the use of hand-operated presses, he produced a newspaper to contemplate rather than scan, one more likely to excerpt Thoreau than feature easily glossed headlines. Gandhi’s Printing Press illuminates how the concentration and self-discipline inculcated by slow reading, imbuing the self with knowledge and ethical values, evolved into satyagraha, truth-force, the cornerstone of Gandhi’s revolutionary idea of nonviolent resistance."

[via: https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/568156442240229376 ]
gandhi  printing  press  media  history  books  toread  2013  isabelhofmeyr  nonviolence  resistance  ethics  satyagraha  truth  truth-force  reading  writing  slow  newspapers  contemplation  reflection  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  thoreau  self-discipline  information  slowjournalism  journalism  publishing  zines  howweread  howwrite 
february 2015 by robertogreco
CrimethInc. Ex-Workers’ Collective : Home
"Greetings, dissident.

History is not something that happens to people—it is the activity of people. In every moment, in every decision and gesture, we make our culture, our life stories, our world, whether we take responsibility for this ourselves or ascribe this power to executives, politicians, pop stars, economic systems, or deities.

The Future is UnwrittenIn a society which glorifies their power and our passivity, all thought which challenges this passivity is thoughtcrime. Crimethink is the transgression without which freedom and self-determination are impossible—it is the skeleton key that unlocks the prisons of our age.

CrimethInc. is the black market where we trade in this precious contraband. Here, the secret worlds of shoplifters, rioters, dropouts, deserters, adulterers, vandals, daydreamers—that is to say, of all of us, in those moments when, wanting more, we indulge in little revolts—converge to form gateways to new worlds where theft, cheating, warfare, boredom, and so on are simply obsolete.

This webpage is one of many manifestations of the underground network through which we work to realize these daydreams, to take the reins of our lives and make our history rather than using the same energy to insist we are being made by it. If you have illicit ideas and intentions of your own to share, you're invited to join us here.

Now Entering Cyberia (Population: Zero)
A Note on the Medium

Due to your vague interest in these matters which have been deemed antisocial by the new thought police, you have been exiled to Cyberia. You may believe your visit to be voluntary, but ask yourself: if you could live—in real time, in full color, without a 'net'—the revolt and transformation you fantasize about, would you be here, contemplating and trading in mere representations of such things? The new isolation chambers and interrogation rooms largely need no judicial procedures or law enforcement to fill them—we confine ourselves to these office cubicles, internet cafes, and lonely bedrooms willingly, even believing ourselves to have found access to our dreams and desires here.

Not to criticize you, of course—since obviously I am in the same situation as you, similarly self-exiled. But let's use this time in the wilderness as the political prisoners of old did: not to get accustomed to it, not to build new lives around this voluntary amputation, but to educate ourselves, increase our powers and connections, so when we can return to society we will be armed with new tools for dismantling and reconceiving it. Let us take the world itself back, rather than the "information superhighways" upon which we are being herded so quickly away from it, so one day there will be no need for anyone to return here besides misguided historians and other archaeologists of the cursed graveyards of the past.

See you on the other side of the screen, if you make it, earnest cyberspace cadet.

-CrimethInc. Workers' Collective."
activism  anarchism  anarchy  politics  publishing  books  collectives  print  printing 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Sam Hamill :: NewPages.com Interview
"NP: How did the press take off from there?

Hamill: In the fall of 1973, I met with Bill Ransom, who lived in Port Townsend. He and Joe Wheeler, who invented a non-profit arts organization called Centrum, were putting together a Port Townsend Symposium—they changed the name when it was pointed out that Symposium meant “to gather and drink.” They invited me to come and work with Centrum. They gave me a building in Port Townsend that was, for several years, rent-free. So I came here in utter poverty and lived in a travel-trailer, cleared some land, built my own house, and lived for several years. I had no regular income. I was basically supporting us and helping to support the press by teaching in prisons part time, in Artists in the Schools Programs, and working with battered women and children.

NP: Did that ever change, where Copper Canyon Press was making enough money that you didn’t have to support it?

Hamill: It changed in the 90s but it also radically changed the nature of the press, which is why I’m no longer there. It became a corporation, which creates corporate behavior, which is a kind of poison. People get involved in power and money and they lose sight of the real work. You have employees rather than real people who want to give something. That’s just the nature of corporate consciousness and I suppose it has to be because that’s what it’s there for. People make middle class incomes and live bourgeois lives. For the first 20 years of the press’s life, we lived “Buddhist economics,” which means we were not paid. That changes radically when you get a board of directors. You suddenly get bourgeois values and practices, a capitalist practice, in something that hadn’t been that way before.

It’s not that Copper Canyon makes money. Non profit corporations don’t make money. 40-50% of every book that you buy from Copper Canyon or other nonprofit presses comes from fundraising and donations.

NP: So you’ve thrown out “corporate culture” as an appropriate kind of work environment. What kind of work environment do you think a literary press should create and cultivate in its stead?

I didn’t “throw it out.” I simply pointed out that “incorporation” creates a board of directors that may change the direction, the focus and practice, of the organization."



"NP: What are some of the experiences along the way that have proved rewarding?

Hamill: All of the above.

NP: Including leaving Copper Canyon?

Hamill: Well, I chose to go out on my feet [rather] than remain on my knees.

If I didn’t learn anything else in 32 years, I learned to stand up for something against powerful bourgeois forces, and whether that something was as broad and indefinable as poetry or whether it’s really a simple system of ethics, it’s what has sustained me most of my adult life. I’m sure most of that goes back to Zen practice, but I liked being in the service of poetry, and I did a lot of homework so I could do it efficiently and well."



"NP: What are the most common difficulties you encountered? How did you solve them?

Hamill: As presses age, as it were, the major problem is dealing with boards of directors and the eternal fundraising problem, and it’s cyclical, and it’s infinite, and it’s consuming, and it really isn’t very healthy, this perpetual begging for money. I’m not opposed to it—I’m a good Buddhist—but I also think you need to work in the garden.

The “garden” is the labor- and time-intensive investment in our future, whether as working artists or as publishers. What I plant and nourish this year may bear fruit five years down the line. It’s work done for its own sake, for investment in one’s convictions.

Boards of directors are composed mostly of business people who also care about the arts. They want “success,” which means sales, reducing poetry to a commodity for the masses. Great poets rarely reach the masses during their lifetime. Nobody, really, read Whitman or Dickinson, for instance, until the mid-twentieth century. Sometimes the best poets sell in very low numbers during their lifetime. So there’s likely to be conflict in defining “success,” conflict between a visionary editor and his or her support system.

NP: Can a press that publishes poetry forgo that “begging for money”—in a country where people don’t buy poetry?

Hamill: You can’t say that. Part of the problem is that so much poetry is being published—over 2,000 titles each year. You don’t have to sell very many of each before you have a very large audience, but it’s a very eclectic audience. It can’t rival readers of pop fiction, but that’s why we’re nonprofit. We just need to find more efficient ways for the literati to have more control. There’s frankly too much bad poetry being published these days. Every graduating MFA has a fistful of publishable poetry, certified publishable by the institution. That’s foolish. It sets up a lot of false expectations. Most of those people cozy up to academia, where they live comfortable lives outside the mainstream of humanity. And they all publish and publish.

There’s a reason why sacrifice is such a major theme in poetry around the world. It’s a kind of religion. It’s the “vision thing.” We’re losing the tribal knowledge of the sacrifice that it takes to be a poet. We [poets] do this out of love. That is more important than a $60,000 salary. Desktop publishing is both wonderful and a horrible curse, because everything becomes immediately publishable.

Why do people who want to write not know anything about the history of writing? Why don’t they know anything about letter forms? I learned about those things because I wanted to write. I thought you should know where words come from and where letters come from. Did these letter-forms just suddenly appear? People talk about Chinese pictographs—but our D comes from the Greek, probably from Sumerian before that, and is a diagram of a door swinging on a hinge. Our A is from the Greek Alpha, which is a bull’s head turned upside down. So a lot of the letters in our alphabet go back to pictographic sources. We have such a wonderful hodgepodge of ideas in our writing, odds and ends of Greek and Spanish and Japanese. All these words creep into our language and sometimes change and sometimes connect with deep roots to their foreign cultures. It seems to me writers should know about that stuff, but we spend all our time on self-expression.

A good editor goes to school on language, on its sources and traditions, as well as on the poetry. The idea situation would be an endowed press, like New Directions, that allows a brilliant editor to be brilliant without the conflict between the numbers game and the vision of the practice."



"NP: OK, but I still want to know whether for-profit poetry presses can survive today. How did Copper Canyon survive for so many years before going non-profit?

We had an “umbrella organization” in Centrum that allowed us to get grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, and we learned to master the arts of poverty. We studied hard and worked hard and made sacrifices for the good of the press."
samhamill  poetry  bookmaking  publishing  nonprofit  buddhism  buddhisteconomics  printing  economics  centrum  porttownsend  bourgeois  corporations  corporatism  organizations  power  money  coppercanyonpress  2006  capitalism  writing  mfa  nonprofits 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Engineer Prints from Photojojo
"Your photos, human-sized. $25 · FREE Shipping · 3ft x 4ft"
photography  print  printing  srg  posters 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Custom Game Cards
"Specifications:
Type: Poker sized blank cards
Number of cards per deck: from 18 up to 234
Customization: Each card can be customized individually both front and back as required.
Dimensions: 63mm x 88mm, 2.5" x 3.5"
Material options: [cardstock details]
270gsm promotional quality card stock with blue core
300gsm premium quality card stock with blue core (smooth finish)
310gsm French casino quality card stock with black core (linen finish)
13pt 100% white plastic (0.325mm)
Packaging options (per deck):
Cellowrap (default for deck sizes of above 54 cards)
White plain tuck box (add US$ 0.10 per deck)
White window tuck box (add US$ 0.10 per deck)
Clear plastic case (add US$ 0.30 per deck)
Tin box (add US$ 0.90 per deck)
Custom-printed tuck box (add as low as US$ 0.60 per deck)
Uncut sheet - your cards are not cut individually. Taken straight off the press. 54 cards per sheet (add US$ 9 per deck design)
Delivery packaging: card deck individually shrink-wrapped, boxes shrink-wrapped, uncut sheets rolled up
No minimum order required. Buy 1 deck for $12.00"
cards  games  gamedesign  boardgames  printing  via:bopuc 
april 2014 by robertogreco
4CP | Four Color Process
[via http://laughingsquid.com/4cp-a-website-that-adventures-deep-inside-and-examines-the-four-color-process-used-to-print-comic-books/ (via http://notrare.tumblr.com/post/83740052111/laughingsquid-4cp-a-website-that-adventures) who describes:

"John Hilgart is the creator and curator of 4CP, a fantastic website that “adventures deep inside” and examines the four-color-process that is used to print comic books. By scanning and zooming in on different comic book illustrations, John is able to display a whole new level of detail that one may not notice otherwise. According to John, “one of the most glorious and ludicrous covers in comic book history” is the MAD #21 cover created by cartoonist and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1955. You can dig around through more of his many hidden comic treasures on the 4CP website." ]
comics  design  printing  paper  print  johnhilgart 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Seventeen-day Studio
"Seventeen-day Studio writes about books, experimentation & experience. "

"The Seventeen-day Studio began on March 29, 2013 and ended seventeen days later on April 14. We formed the studio as an exploration in collaboration, an exhibition of the design process, and an evaluation of the field as we know it. What came from the studio greatly outweighs what we put into it, due to the kindness and generosity of our colleagues, advisors, and all those who stopped by."



[Projects]

"Studio as critique.

As much as the studio is about showing designers in their element, we felt a need to be critical about what we do. Through open collaboration with each other and visitors, we embrace the loss of explicit authorship. We recognize our own ego but do not believe in solitary genius. To achieve this we developed projects which spanned the 17 days. These parts of the studio are meant to challenge the traditional notion of the graphic designer through our relationships with clients and the greater public.

Posters, books, and logos are quintessential so we began there. To explore our use of technology, media, and medium as they relate to the deliverable, we created these systems of making and interaction. The Poster Machine, Logo Parlor, and Bookshop as we called them produced work for a walk-in clientele. They act as introduction to basic concepts of design[ing] and being designed for in a way that was personal for each visitor.

We want to expand the space of graphic design criticism. Through our studio space and by working in the gallery, performing, we present design, the verb, to more than our peers. We used one of our 23 ft high walls to proclaim a diagnosis of the field. Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers, toward eccentric perceptions, unusual actions and feelings, withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation.

Bookshop.

The print-per-request Book Shop interprets an individual’s reading preferences and habits. We posit that reading is distracting, because it is plastic, creative work that is affected by methods of publishing and the devices we use. Visitor input went into editing and producing a 100 page book that focuses on the parts of books and reading that cannot be read or are routinely glanced over, though contribute the how a reader reads.

The poster machine, an alternative interface.

The poster machine was made to challenge the digital tools that designers conventionally use in making. A series of knobs and switches are used by the machine’s operator to alter the mood and layout of their poster. Each poster is then handmade and machine-made. After playing with the machine the maker sends her poster to print, where it is also automatically fed to our website for all to see.

Logo Parlor, a generative identity system.

The logo parlor generates a logo and 20 business cards in 8 minutes. The piece was developed based on a system in which visitors fill out a form where they rank different skill sets in a scale of 1 to 10. The skill sets are gathered from a survey of most repeated characteristics mentioned by prospective candidate during interviews across different fields. During the exhibition visitors were encouraged to fill out a form and spend 8 minutes with the designer as the process of creating their customized logotype unfolded."



"Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers toward eccentric perceptions, inappropriate actions and feelings, our withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation."
design  designprocess  classideas  projectideas  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  books  making  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  manifestos  workshops  events  studios  printing  publishing  eventideas 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Links 2013 ["Bret Victor: It’s the end of 2013, and here’s what Bret fell in love with this year"]
"What is the difference between scientific and non-scientific thinking? Thinking within a consistent theory versus thinking haphazardly?

I'm crucially interested in the problem of representing theory such that intuitions are fruitful and theoretically sound, and representations suggest analogies that stay true to the theory. That's not diSessa's problem, but I feel that his viewpoint has some powerful clues."



"Hofstadter says that all thinking runs on analogy-making. Sounds good to me! If he's even partially correct, then it seems to me that a medium for powerful thinking needs to be a medium for seeing powerful analogies. And a medium for powerful communication needs to be designed around inducing the dance he's talking about up there."



Kieran Egan: "Thinking about education during this century has almost entirely involved just three ideas—socialization, Plato's academic idea, and Rousseau's developmental idea. We may see why education is so difficult and contentious if we examine these three ideas and the ways they interact in educational thinking today. The combination of these ideas governs what we do in schools, and what we do to children in the name of education.

Our problems, I will further argue, are due to these three ideas each being fatally flawed and being also incompatible with one other."

Bret Victor: "If you're going to design a system for education, it might help to understand the purpose of education in the first place. Egan points out how modern education is implicitly driven by a cargo-culty mish-mash of three lofty but mutually-incompatible goals. Good luck with that!"



"The cultural importance of the printing press doesn't have much to do with the technology -- the ink and metal type -- but rather how print acted as a medium to amplify human thought in particular ways.

Print was directly responsible for the emergence of a literate and educated society, which (for example) made possible the idea of societal self-governance. The US Constitution could only exist in a literate print culture, where (for example) the Federalist papers and Anti-Federalist papers could be debated in the newspapers.

As you read and watch Alan Kay, try not to think about computational technology, but about a society that is fluent in thinking and debating in the dimensions opened up by the computational medium.
Don't think about “coding” (that's ink and metal type, already obsolete), and don't think about “software developers” (medieval scribes only make sense in an illiterate society).

Think about modeling phenomena, modeling situations, simulating models, gaining a common-sense intuition for nonlinear dynamic processes. Then think about a society in which every educated person does these things, in the computational medium, as easily and naturally as we today read and write complex logical arguments in the written medium.

Reading used to be reserved for the clergy, to hand down unquestionable Revealed Truths to the masses. Today, it's just what everyone does. Think about a society in which science is not reserved for the clergy, to hand down unquestionable Revealed Truths to the masses, but is just what everyone does."



[Reading tips from Bret Victor:]

"Reading Tip #1

It’s tempting to judge what you read: "I agree with these statements, and I disagree with those."

However, a great thinker who has spent decades on an unusual line of thought cannot induce their context into your head in a few pages. It’s almost certainly the case that you don’t fully understand their statements.

Instead, you can say: "I have now learned that there exists a worldview in which all of these statements are consistent."

And if it feels worthwhile, you can make a genuine effort to understand that entire worldview. You don't have to adopt it. Just make it available to yourself, so you can make connections to it when it's needed.

Reading Tip #2

Carver Mead describes a physical theory in which atoms exchange energy by resonating with each other. Before the energy transaction can happen, the two atoms must be phase-matched, oscillating in almost perfect synchrony with each other.

I sometimes think about resonant transactions as a metaphor for getting something out of a piece of writing. Before the material can resonate, before energy can be exchanged between the author and reader, the reader must already have available a mode of vibration at the author's frequency. (This doesn't mean that the reader is already thinking the author's thought; it means the reader is capable of thinking it.)

People often describe written communication in terms of transmission (the author explained the concept well, or poorly) and/or absorption (the reader does or doesn't have the background or skill to understand the concept). But I think of it more like a transaction -- the author and the reader must be matched with each other. The author and reader must share a close-enough worldview, viewpoint, vocabulary, set of mental models, sense of aesthetics, and set of goals. For any particular concept in the material, if not enough of these are sufficiently matched, no resonance will occur and no energy will be exchanged.

Perhaps, as a reader, one way to get more out of more material is to collect and cultivate a diverse set of resonators, to increase the probability of a phase-match.

Reading Tip #3

Misunderstandings can arise when an author is thinking in a broader context than the reader. A reader might be thinking tactically: :How can I do a better job today?" while the author is thinking strategically: "How can we make a better tomorrow?"

The misunderstanding becomes especially acute when real progress requires abandoning today's world and starting over.

We are ants crawling on a tree branch. Most ants are happy to be on the branch, and happy to be moving forward.

[image]

But there are a few special ants that, somehow, are able to see a bigger picture. And they can see that this branch is a dead end.

[image]

They can see that if we really want to move forward, we'll have to backtrack a long ways down.

They usually have a hard time explaining this to the ants that can only see the branch they're on. For them, the path ahead appears to go on forever.

[image]"
bretvictor  brunolatour  andreadisessa  douglashofstadter  place  cognition  science  sherryturkle  kieranegan  terrycavanagh  stewartbrand  longnow  julianjaynes  davidhestenes  carvermead  paulsaffo  tednelson  dougengelbert  alankay  reading  toread  2013  gutenberg  printing  print  modeling  simulation  dynamicprocesses  society  progress  thinking  intuition  analogies  education  systemsthinking  howweread  learning  ideas  concepts  context  readiness  simulations 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Print-on-demand | Experimental Book
"I know a few of you are thinking about print-on-demand (POD) for the photobook project. POD is fast and cheap and has totally changed the nature of self-publishing. It’s quite good for some things, and not so great for others.

A few reasons to use POD:

— easy, quick mock-up of an idea, even if you plan to produce it in another way;
— cost: some formats allow you to print a book for under $10;
— with very low up-front costs, you can produce a few machine-made, perfect-bound books with a more commercial feel;
— your books can be purchased through a digital storefront;
— if you plan on producing 1–100 books——more than that and it makes sense to look at other formats;
— if you plan to make changes to your book and you’re unsure how many to print;
— to have access to formats that are not typically available outside of a commercial context (newsprint, magazine).

A few reasons not to use POD:

— you give up control of some aspects of the production of your work;
— frequent printing/binding errors (printer will usually offer a credit);
— you’re limited by the specs of the POD printer (size, finish, paper);
— not cost-efficient for producing more than a few books (especially if over 100);
— cost (you’re bound by the printer’s set pricing).

Popular POD printers:

— Blurb.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— special finishes specifically for photobooks (much more $)
— magazine format (including printing on inside front and back covers)—I can show you a sample of this if you’re interested
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Lulu.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Newspaperclub.com
— various newsprint formats
— free shipping to most places
— scheduled printing 2x per week
— upload PDF via website

Espresso Book Machine (various locations)
— lower quality
— b/w interiors / color covers
— very fast (sometimes on-the-spot)
— physical, walk-in locations only

Magcloud.com
— magazine format from HP

I’ve had mostly good experiences with Blurb, Lulu, Espresso and Newspaperclub, but I’ve never used Magcloud."

[via this thread: https://twitter.com/rogre/status/405790451791175680

@soulellis What do you use for digital printing on demand? Lulu? Blurb? Other?

@rogre all of the above plus @newspaperclub. but for 530 [http://soulellis.com/projects/530-2/ ] I found a digital printer in Reykjavík, who was able to print 50 books only.

@soulellis @newspaperclub Thank you.

@soulellis Any preference or noticeable differences between Lulu and Blurb?

@rogre Blurb good for magazine format and photobooks, Lulu good for thick text-based pubs. Also --> http://experimentalbook.wordpress.com/2013/10/17/print-on-demand/

@soulellis Perfect. Thanks so much. ]
books  publishing  paulsoulellis  printondemand  lulu  magcloud  espressobookmachine  newspaperclub  blurb  printondemnad  printing  selfpublishing  ondemand  self-publishing  epublishing  digitalpublishing 
november 2013 by robertogreco
good reading on the train to white plains this morning. printing/multiples/publishing. for the students today -- and realizing that 'experimental book studio' should be called experimental publishing studio next time I teach it. | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"good reading on the train to white plains this morning. printing/multiples/publishing. for the students today -- and realizing that 'experimental book studio' should be called experimental publishing studio next time I teach it."

[This book: http://www.amazon.com/Print-Out-20-Years/dp/0870708252/

"Over the past two decades, the art world has broadened its geographic reach and opened itself to new continents, allowing for a significant cross-pollination of post-conceptual strategies and vernacular modes. Printed materials, in both innovative and traditional forms, have played a key role in this exchange of ideas and sources. This catalogue, published in conjunction with an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, examines the evolution of artistic practices related to printmaking, from the resurgence of traditional printing techniques--often used alongside digital technologies--to the worldwide proliferation of self-published artist's books and ephemera. Print/Out features focused sections on ten artists and publishers--Ai Weiwei, Edition Jacob Samuel, Ellen Gallagher, Martin Kippenberger, Lucy McKenzie, Aleksandra Mir, museum in progress, Robert Rauschenberg, Superflex and Rirkrit Tiravanija--as well as rich illustrations of additional printed projects from the last 20 years by major artists such as Trisha Donnelly, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Thomas Schütte and Kelley Walker. An introductory essay by Christophe Cherix, Chief Curator of Prints and Illustrated Books at the Museum, offers an overview of this period with particular attention to new directions and strategies within an expanded field of printmaking." ]
paulsoulellis  2013  books  publishing  experimentalbooks  experimentalpublishing  printing  papernet  toread 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Squeegee Prints | Professional apparel printing
"Squeegee Prints is a professional print studio based in San Diego, CA.
We specialize in printing custom apparel, headwear, and promotional products.
Please take a moment to read through our art requirements before submitting a quote."
sandiego  makers  screenprinting  printing 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Risograph - Wikipedia
"Risograph is a high-speed digital printing system manufactured by the Riso Kagaku Corporation and designed mainly for high-volume photocopying and printing. Increasingly, Risograph machines have been commonly referred to as a RISO Printer-Duplicator, due to their common usage as a network printer as well as a stand-alone duplicator. When printing or copying multiple quantities (generally more than 20) of the same original, it is typically far less expensive per page than a conventional photocopier, laser printer, or inkjet printer. Printing historian Rick O'Connor has debated that the original, and thus correct, name for the device is RISSO and not RISO. This debate spawns from the notion that an extra 'S' is added because the inventor's wife found it more pleasing to the ears."

[via http://www.designworklife.com/2013/08/09/risograph-radness/ via Allen]
risograph  risso  riso  printing  publishing  speed  digital  photocopying 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Anonymous Press
"1. Anonymous Press (Α–Π) is a self-sufficient publishing platform.

2. Every publication by Α–Π is a byproduct of an individual and a database, i.e. Google Image Search.

3. Human author defines the topic, the content and the form is generated from the most relevant images found online.

4. Each publication is added to a public library.

5. Every item in the library can be printed on-demand and is available to everyone for a small fee covering shipping and production costs.

6. Publications are sorted in a chronological order.

7. Α–Π does not own, nor is responsible for the content generated by its users."
database  human  magazine  publishing  anonymouspress  publishers  googleimagesearch  on-demand  ondemand  printing 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The Present Group
"The Present Group is an arts based think tank and creative studio whose projects focus on leveraging new technologies in support of the arts and finding new ways to fund and distribute artists projects."
art  technology  glvo  thinktank  funding  distribution  webhosting  hosting  thepresentgroup  ebooks  tumblr  printing  print  papernet 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The digital doesn't annihilate the analog, and the business card creativity proves it. : Observatory: Design Observer
"The digital does not annihilate the analog. It glorifies it. Paper books and vinyl records were once quotidian; today they are objects to defend, romanticize, venerate.

Or consider this example: the humble business card. As a genre of object, it is “doomed,” one technology observer asserted not long ago, asking, “Who needs business cards when you have Google?” The function of the business card, in other words, has been replaced by a more efficient alternative: “We don't need to be made legible to each other because we have already written ourselves onto the Internet.”

I wish I believed this. I’ve recently run out of cards and have seriously considered whether I can get away with not ordering a new set. But take a look around, and it’s not hard to find evidence of a business-card-centered creative renaissiance. In fact, start with the very object offered up as a metaphor for the business card’s pending demise: A marketing agency specializing in “viral” campaigns has one that…"
gifts  sharing  projectideas  glvo  edg  srg  creativity  printing  imprint  2012  paper  businesscards  digital  analog  robwalker 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Rediscovering Literacy [Way too much here, quotes are from only the beginning]
"Literacy used to be a very subtle concept that meant linguistic sophistication. It used to denote a skill that could be developed to arbitrary levels of refinement through practice.  Literacy meant using mastery over language — both form and content — to sustain a relentless and increasingly sophisticated pursuit of greater meaning. It was about an appreciative, rather than instrumental use of language. Language as a means of seeing rather than as a means of doing…

The written form itself was merely a convenience…

Before Gutenberg, you demonstrated true literacy not by reading a text out aloud and taking down dictation accurately, but through exposition and condensation.

You were considered literate if you could take a classic verse and expound upon it at length (exposition) and take an ambiguous idea and distill its essence into a terse verbal composition (condensation)…

the fundamental learned behaviors that constitute literacy, not reading and writing…"

[Update: Adding the final portion to this bookmark]

"This might sound like engineering elitism, but I find that the only large classes of people who appear to actually think in clearly literate ways today are mathematicians and programmers. But they typically only do so in very narrow domains.

To learn to think with language, to become literate in the sense of linguistically sophisticated, you must work hard to unlearn everything built on the foundation of literacy-as-reading-and-writing.

Because modern education is not designed to produce literate people. It is designed to produce programmable people. And this programmability requires less real literacy with every passing year. Today, genuinely literate reading and writing are specialized arts. Increasingly, even narrowly instrumental read-write literacy is becoming unnecessary (computers can do both very well).

These are not stupid people. You only have to listen to a child delightedly reciting supercalifragilisticexpialidocious or indulging in other childish forms of word-play to realize that raw skill with language is a native capability in the human brain. It must be repressed by industrial education since it seeks natural expression.

So these are not stupid people. These are merely ordinary people who have been lobotomized via the consumerization of language, delivered via modern education.

We dimly realize that we have lost something. But appreciation for the sophistication of oral cultures mostly manifests itself as mindless reverence for traditional wisdom. We look back at the works of ancients and deep down, wonder if humans have gotten fundamentally stupider over the centuries.

We haven’t. We’ve just had some crucial meme-processing software removed from our brains.

Towards a Literacy Renaissance

This is one of the few subjects about which I am not a pessimist. I believe that something strange is happening. Genuine literacy is seeing a precarious rebirth.

The best of today’s tweets seem to rise above the level of mere bon mots (“gamification is the high-fructose corn syrup of user engagement”) and achieve some of the cryptic depth of esoteric verse forms of earlier ages.

The recombinant madness that is the fate of a new piece of Internet content, as it travels, has some of the characteristics of the deliberate forms of recombinant recitation practiced by oral culture.

The comments section of any half-decent blog is a meaning factory.

Sites like tvtropes.org are sustaining basic literacy skills.

The best of today’s stand-up comics are preserving ancient wordplay skills.

But something is still missing: the idea that literacy is a cultivable skill. That dense, terse thoughts are not just serendipitous finds on the discursive journeys of our brains, but the product of learnable exposition and condensation skills.

I suppose paying attention to these things, and actually attempting to work with archaic forms like maxims and aphorisms in 2012 is something of a quixotic undertaking. When you can store a terbayte of information (about 130,000 books, or about 50% larger than a typical local public library) on a single hard-disk words can seem cheap.

But try reading some La Rochefoucauld, or even late hold outs like Oliver Wendell Holmes and J. B. S. Haldane, and you begin to understand what literacy is really about. The cost of words is not the cost of storing them or distributing, but the cost of producing them. Words are cheap today because we put little effort into their production, not because we can store and transmit as much as we like.

It is as yet too early to declare a literacy renaissance, but one can hope."
production  jbshaldane  oliverwendellholmes  larochefoucauld  words  aphorisms  comprehension  jargon  wisdom  knowledge  banter  citation  correspondence  conversation  self-indulgence  technology  printing  web  content  composition  civilization  memorization  oralculture  creativedestruction  recitation  history  highculture  popculture  culture  internet  education  2012  gutenberg  text  understanding  condensation  exposition  literacy  communication  language  writing  reading  venkateshrao  unschooling  deschooling  moderneducation  schools 
september 2012 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sketchbook: Print-on-demand work-in-progress
"The fact that things could be emailed, which is a prerequisite, also meant they were too easy to ignore. By making something easy to disseminate via email, you were also placing it in a fast-flowing stream of other objects… 

We wanted to exploit the fertile middle ground of “work in progress” with something that was a little more engaging, that would pull focus onto the discussions at hand, yet not so over-produced that the thing couldn’t iterate or evolve. Something that could be thrown around in a workshop—literally!—accessed in linear or non-linear fashion, carry visual and textual information, carried on the person, or remain guiltily within sight on someone’s desk. Something physical and digital' which might have an allure over simply digital, at least at the form of artifacts.

In other words, a small book. So a simple InDesign template later, and a not-quite-so-simple PDF upload a little later, a bunch of A5 books emerged via Lulu’s print-on-demand (POD) service."

[See also: http://www.helsinkidesignlab.org/blog/helsinki-street-eats-and-hacking-lulu ]
workinprogress  communication  email  oma  documentation  process  craigmod  printondemand  low2no  amazon  layout  jamesgoggiin  magcloud  dearlulu  helsinkidesignlab  sitra  newspaperclub  blurb  lulu  projectideas  glvo  books  indesign  pdf  printing  2012  selfpublishing  self-publishing  cityofsound  danhill  unbook 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Speak Up Archive: Dear Lulu, The New Standards
"My plan for the workshop is to investigate the visible & tangible parameters of graphic design — type specimens, halftone screens and, in particular, colour tests & calibration charts — & make a book of our own self-produced tests which we will send to print on Friday afternoon using the online print-on-demand system Lulu. The book project will therefore act as a colour/type/pattern test of the very system with which it is produced. “Print-on-demand” is an increasingly important production system which can serve to make us designers rethink the impact our profession has on the environment and to question the often wasteful print volumes and production methods requested of us by our clients. Graphic designers, and especially students, have a chance to use and subvert these relatively new (and fairly cheap) technological systems to our advantage."

"The result… a fantastic & imaginative resource…"

[via: http://www.cityofsound.com/blog/2012/08/print-on-demand-work-in-progress.html ]

[Book link is broken, now see:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/hochschule-darmstadt-fachbereich-gestaltung/dear-lulu/paperback/product-5643235.html
http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/1197693 ]

[Another interview about the project: http://www.printmag.com/design_articles/supply_on_demand/tabid/449/Default.aspx ]

[James Groggin's website: http://www.practise.co.uk/ ]
printondemand  digital  digitalprinting  patterns  photography  selfpublishing  self-publishing  frankphilippin  howto  projectideas  glvo  diy  design  books  typography  printing  publishing  lulu  jamesgoggin 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Brendan Dawes - The Happiness Machine
"The Happiness Machine is an Internet connected printer that prints random happy thoughts by random people from across the web; press the big black button and the Happiness Machine prints a thought from someone who mentioned the word happy.

Though The Happiness Machine uses content from We Feel Fine, the printer is completely agnostic to the data it prints; the logic is all done on the server so I can easily change what type of data comes back. It could easily be train times, news headlines or your day's appointments – the printer doesn't care – it's dumb. It just prints what comes back.

I still believe paper has advantages from time to time as a content delivery mechanism over all the screens that now pervade our lives; you can tear it off, put it in your wallet/purse, scribble on it or give it someone else without worrying whether it works with their OS. And it doesn't need a power source for display."
wefeelfine  happinessmachine  printing  printers  2012  happiness  brendandawes  papernet  paper 
august 2012 by robertogreco
New Tools for Men of Letters
"The new graphic arts devices are, I believe, capable of working the other way—as implements for a more [p.180] decentralized and less professionalized culture, a culture of local literature and amateur scholarship.

This possibility is especially important today, when electric power promises to develop the village at the expense of the metropolis, and when shorter working hours offer a prospect of leisure to a population of which an increasing proportion is being exposed to college education.



Today the Western scholar’s problem is not to get hold of the books that everyone else has read or is reading but rather to procure materials that hardly anyone else would think of looking at.



Western civilization now expects even poetry to fit the Procrustean bed of the publishing industry.



The art of conversation, with its counterpart the dialogue [p.186] as a literary form for presenting ideas, has also declined since the days of Galileo, while the art of advertising has advanced.

…"

[So much more, but another reaction: academics will always hope everyone is more like them.]
poetry  printing  duplication  microfiche  microfilm  near-print  micro-copying  books  photo-offset  learning  decentralization  professionalization  wpa  greatdepression  dialog  conversation  letterwriting  letters  ruricomp  rural  local  localstudies  academics  academia  research  writing  amateurresearch  amateurism  literature  graphicarts  liberalarts  leisurearts  leisure  education  community  publishing  microformats  mimeograph  media  technology  communication  scholarship  digitalhumanities  1935  robertbinkley  dialogue  artleisure 
june 2012 by robertogreco
brooklyn spaces | a compendium of brooklyn culture & creativity
"Hey, I’m Oriana, and I love Brooklyn. I love the creativity, the drive, the bizarre and beautiful ideas, the thrilling unique energy of the people who live here. This project tracks Brooklyn space by space, in the words of those who make it all happen. I hope you’ll check back often! (You can get email notifications of new profiles by signing up at the right.)

If you know of a space I should cover, have a correction for anything I’ve written, or just want to talk about amazing Brooklyn, email me at brooklynspacesproject@gmail.com."
glvo  printing  places  community  culture  art  nyc  brooklyn 
may 2012 by robertogreco
TOC 2012: Tim Carmody, "Changing Times, Changing Readers: Let's Start With Experience" - YouTube
Notes here by @tealtan:

"unusual contexts in writing / reading text

“In a hyperliterate society, the vast majority of reading is not consciously recognized as reading.”

“What readers expect is more important than what readers want.”

Bill Buxton: “every tool is the best at something and the worst at something else”

skills, path-dependency, learning effects

“…we actually like constraints once we're in them.”"

And notes from @litherland:

"11:40: “I do things like … just obsess about weird little details. So, for instance … like, how do you do text entry in a Netflix app on the Wii? You know? I think about this a lot.” Your many other talents notwithstanding, Tim, you may have missed your calling as a designer. /

18:30: “I think it’s a tragedy that we have not been able to figure out a good interface for pen and ink on reading devices.” Holy grail. My dream for years. I would give anything. I would give anything to be smart enough to figure this out."
design  reading  writing  journalism  history  timcarmody  toc2012  via:tealtan  constraints  billbuxton  bookfuturism  ebooks  stéphanemallarmé  paper  2012  media  mediarevolutions  sentencediagramming  advertising  photography  change  books  publishing  printing  modernism  context  interface  expectations  conventions  skills  skeuomorph 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Why 3-D Printing Isn't Like Virtual Reality  - Technology Review
"It's also important not to confuse 3-D printing & desktop-class fabrication. These aren't the same thing. There is more to desktop manufacturing than 3-D printers. A well-appointed contemporary maker workshop has working CNC mills, lathes, and laser cutters. A well-appointed design studio has the tools to make and finish prototypes that look very nice indeed. Aside from the 3-D printer, none of these tools are terribly science-fictional; they're well-established technologies that happen to be getting cheaper from year to year.

Something interesting happens when the cost of tooling-up falls. There comes a point where your production runs are small enough that the economies of scale that justify container ships from China stop working. There comes a point where making new things isn't a capital investment but simply a marginal one. Fab shops are already popping up, just like print shops did."
timmaly  2012  printing  rapidprototyping  prototyping  fabshops  economiesofscale  technology  fabbing  3dprinting 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Iceland never had any bookshops between the... - more than 95 theses
"Iceland never had any bookshops between the sixteenth century and the mid-nineteenth. It also had no schools. Yet by the end of the eighteenth century the population was almost entirely literate. Families in farms scattered over an enormous area taught their own children to read—and the Icelanders read a great deal, especially during the long winter months. Aside from religious works, their reading matter consisted primarily of Nordic sagas, copied and recopied over many generations in manuscript books, thousands of them, which now form the principal collections in Iceland’s archives. Iceland therefore provides an example of a society that contradicts everything in my diagram. For three and a half centuries, it had a highly literate population given to reading books, yet it had virtually no printing presses, no bookshops, no libraries, and no schools. An aberration? Perhaps, but the experience of the Icelanders may tell us something about the nature of literary culture throughout throughout Scandinavia and even in other parts of the world, especially in remote rural areas where oral and scribal cultures reinforced each other beyond the range of the printed word.”
Robert Darnton, “‘What is the History of Books?’ Revisited” (2007)"
nordiccountries  robertdarnton  books  printing  learning  society  deschooling  unschooling  schools  literacy  scandinavia  iceland 
january 2012 by robertogreco
the pop-hop: books & curio
"In early 2012, we will launch Pop-Hop Books & Curio, a creative retail space merging a bookshop and print studio in the Highland Park neighborhood of northeast Los Angeles. As a bookshop, we will specialize in art editions, literature, children's books, zines, and books as unique art objects. As a studio, we will offer workshops such as screen printing and book binding, as well as a forum for talks, readings, screenings and other creative programs and performances. It will be an environment that is inviting and approachable, dynamic and stimulating, a place that fosters inspiration and action in equal measure."

[See also: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/361643327/pop-hop-books-and-curio ]
glvo  srg  lcproject  galleries  bookstores  booksellers  highlandpark  print  printing  books  losangeles 
december 2011 by robertogreco
notes on "the berg cloud little printer alternative"
"But then I remembered I already own a thermal printer. A cheap one that prints labels. So I researched a little more and figured out how one could have their own thermal printer to hack away on:

1. Buy a Dymo LabelWriter.
2. Buy this continuous thermal paper.
3. Use the Dymo JavaScript SDK.

Not as cute as the Little Printer, but appears to do the printing part of the equation. Mine prints pretty detailed stamps, so I think it should handle graphics like the ones that were in the demo. I haven’t gotten my hands on the continuous thermal paper yet, so I can’t say if the SDK will give as much control over printing, but it seems like a fun project if you’re looking for one."
printing  papernet  projectideas  glvo  edg  srg  tomake  2011  littleprinter  andretorrez 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Mapvelopes
"Mapvelopes is a 'map envelope' generator, inspired by the 'Google Envelopes' concept by Rahul Mahtani & Yofred Moik, showcased on the Yanko Design blog. Mapvelopes lets you create your own real-life versions of these envelopes, for any from and to address you wish.

To use it, simply enter the source and destination addresses below, and select the type of envelope you want to use. A PDF will be generated and returned to you, suitable for printing directly onto the envelope!

If there's a land route between your source and destination addresses, the route will be printed on the returned map envelope. If there's no route, or we don't have enough routing quota left for the day, an envelope with the start and end markers but no route will be returned."
maps  envelopes  stationery  web  papernet  printing  googlemaps 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Minecraft.Print()
"Incredible structures have been created within Minecraft. Why can't we take those virtual creations, and bring them into the real world? This is our attempt to create a bridge between Minecraft and the real world, via 3D Printers."
minecraft  3d  printing  diy  prototyping  manufacturing  3dprinting  hacks  edg  srg 
october 2011 by robertogreco
the serendipity of the unexpected, or, a copy is not an edition » Sarah Werner
"The best thing about old books, I think, is their longevity and the traces of the history that they carry with them. Inscriptions, marginalia, doodles, vandalism, erasures, cutting out images and leaves–none of those are captured if your focus is solely on the text, and all of them have something to tell us about how a book was used."
unexpectedencounters  serendipity  marginalia  books  history  digitization  2011  socialtransactions  sarahwerner  intangibles  print  printing 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Create your Tweetbook with Bookapp
"Archive your Twitter feed into a beautifully printed and bound book or keep it in PDF form."
papernet  printondemand  twitter  books  printing  tweetbook  bookapp  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
july 2011 by robertogreco
(party) per bend sinister ["Dexter Sinister is the compound name of David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey."]
"David graduated from the UNC in 1993, Yale in 1999, & went on to form O-R-G, a design studio in New York City. Stuart graduated from the University of Reading in 1994, the Werkplaats Typografie in 2000, and co-founded the arts journal Dot Dot Dot the same year. David currently teaches at Columbia University and Rhode Island School of Design. Stuart is currently involved in diverse projects at Parsons School of Design (NYC) and Pasadena Art Center (LA).

Dexter Sinister recently established a workshop in the basement at 38 Ludlow Street, on the Lower East Side in New York City. The workshop is intended to model a ‘Just-In-Time’ economy of print production, running counter to the contemporary assembly-line realities of large-scale publishing. This involves avoiding waste by working on-demand, utilizing local cheap machinery, considering alternate distribution strategies, and collapsing distinctions of editing, design, production and distribution into one efficient activity."
dextersinister  davidreinfurt  stuartbailey  design  art  architecture  books  justintime  nyc  performance  production  booksellers  libraries  workshops  printing  publishing  bookstores  distribution  bookfuturism  efficiency  future 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Instaprint - A location based photo booth for Instagram
"Instagram has brought the nostalgia of old Polaroid prints back to modern day, but deep down we all still miss the uniqueness of those square little photos you'd hold comfortably in your hand. So, we made Instaprint.

Each Instaprint box is set with its location or a specific hashtag. Any Instagram tagged with that location or hashtag will pop out of the Instaprint box, giving you a modern day photo booth.

To stay true to the old days, Instaprint uses a new printing technology developed by Zink. Similar to how instant film once worked, the color for the prints comes from the paper itself. No ink necessary."
photography  instagram  photobooth  polaroid  papernet  via:russelldavies  printing  print  location  location-based 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Print from your phone with Gmail for mobile and Google Cloud Print - Official Gmail Blog
"Let’s say you need to print an important email attachment on your way to work so that it’s waiting for you when you walk in the door. With Gmail for mobile and Google Cloud Print — a service that allows printing from any app on any device, OS or browser without the need to install drivers — you can.

To get started, you’ll first need to connect your printer to Google Cloud Print. For now, this step requires a Windows PC but Linux and Mac support are coming soon. Once you’re set up, just go to gmail.com from your iPhone or Android browser and choose “Print” from the dropdown menu in the top right corner. You can also print eligible email attachments (such as .pdf or .doc) by clicking the “Print” link that appears next to them."
google  mobile  cloud  gmail  printing  googlecloudprint  printers 
january 2011 by robertogreco
xavier antin / Just in Time, or A Short History of Production
"A book printed through a printing chain made of four desktop printers using four different colors and technologies dated from 1880 to 1976. A production process that brings together small scale and large scale production, two sides of the same history.

MAGENTA (Stencil duplicator, 1880)
CYAN (Spirit duplicator, 1923)
BLACK (Laser printer, 1969)
YELLOW (Inkjet printer, 1976)"
design  printing  art  history  process 
january 2011 by robertogreco
John Kestner : Supermechanical objects : Tableau physical email
"Remember when we made a connection by handing someone a photo? As our social circle spreads across a wider geographic area, we look for ways to share experiences. Technology has reconnected us to some extent, but we fiddle with too many cables and menus, and those individual connections get drowned out.

Tableau acts as a bridge between users of physical and digital media, taking the best parts of both. It's a nightstand that quietly drops photos it sees on its Twitter feed into its drawer, for the owner to discover. Images of things placed in the drawer are posted to its account as well.

Tableau is an anti-computer experience. A softly glowing knob that almost imperceptibly shifts color invites interaction without demanding it. The trappings of electronics are removed except for a vestigial cable knob for the paper tray. The nightstand drawer becomes a natural interface to a complex computing task, which now fits into the flow of life."
furniture  design  email  inspiration  twitter  papernet  printing  slow  post-digital 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Seed Booklet : handbuilt
"This small book introduces the story & philosophy of a charter school dedicated to children of immigrant native families. It is designed with a combination of sacred imagery, hand-drawing, and computer generated diagrams. For this extremely low budget book we used newsprint paper and basic black and white printing."
lcproject  schools  printing  handbuilt  design  graphics  papernet  schooldesign  losangeles  learning  education 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Blurb: Make your own book. Make it great.
"With Blurb, you’ll find all the tools you need to make your own photo book, whether you’re making a personalized wedding album, cookbook, baby book, travel photo book, or fundraising book. Count on bookstore-quality printing and binding, and a range of choices from Hardcover photobooks to Softcover paperbacks in an array of trim sizes. Use any of our free online bookmaking tools. Learn how to publish a book and much more with our free how-to tips and tutorials or watch our two-minute BookSmart video and see how easy it is to make a coffee table photo book. Be sure to register and subscribe to Blurb emails to get the news first on Blurb events and promo code coupon offers."

[Related: http://www.magcloud.com and http://www.lulu.com ]
publishing  self-publishing  blurb  books  howto  print  portfolio  photography  flickr  printing  writing  classideas  selfpublishing 
november 2010 by robertogreco
This is Uncommon
"Uncommon makes the most well-designed, highest quality customizable products available. Our proprietary 3D TATT™ (Thermo-Active Transdermal Technology™) process ensures durable, long-lasting, high resolution imagery on every product we imprint. We then package your art with care and ship it quickly and safely to your door."
iphone  ipod  accessories  gifts  uncommon  shopping  products  printing  illustration  diy  design  custom  art  fabrication  webdesign  via:russelldavies  webdev 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Julie Chen | Flying Fish Press [See also: http://www.craftinamerica.org/artists_paper/?]
"FLYING FISH PRESS was established in 1987 by internationally known book artist and book art educator Julie Chen. The press focuses on the design and production of limited edition artists' books with an emphasis on three-dimensional and movable book structures and fine letterpress printing. Editions range in size from 25 to 150 copies. Work from the press Is known for combining meticulous attention to craft, intricate structural design, and inspired artistic vision."
juliechen  art  artists  books  bookmaking  bookarts  berkeley  arts  letterpress  printing  bookbinding  press  california 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Kickstartup — Successful fundraising with Kickstarter & the (re)making of Art Space Tokyo — Craig Mod
"I want to share with you a story about books, publishing, fundraising and seed capital. It's a story that I hope will change how you think about all of these topics. And it's a story that I hope will serve as a template. In April 2010, Ashley Rawlings and I used community fundraising to raise nearly $24,000[1] to breathe new life into our book, Art Space Tokyo. My goal here is to outline what we did and why we did it, with the hope of inspiring anyone with an itch, gumption and a good narrative, to do the same. To bring beautiful, well-considered things into the world."
books  kickstarter  crowdfunding  entrepreneurship  publishing  craigmod  marketing  print  self-publishing  tokyo  fundraising  funding  design  printing  typography  selfpublishing 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Fab@Home - Make Anything | Fab@Home
"Fab@Home will change the way we live. It is a platform of printers and programs which can produce functional 3D objects. It is designed to fit on your desktop and within your budget. Fab@Home is supported by a global, open-source community of professionals and hobbyists, innovating tomorrow, today. Join us, and Make Anything."
fabbing  make  making  3dprinter  fabrication  diy  manufacturing  opensource  print  free  printing  prototyping  hacks  howto 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Why Not Print Buildings? — The Pop-Up City
"During our explorations in fresh developments in architecture we already found plenty of nifty projects, ideas and concepts that have the potential to totally reframe the production of the physical environment. Think of the facade printer, an invention that enables graphic designers to become architects. Or the rise of sustainable plastic as a structural building material. Via Blueprint Magazine we found out about the birth of a machine that is able to print entire buildings. The monster is located near Pisa, Italy, and its father is Enrico Dini, an engineer with a background in offline programming systems for six-axis robots."
enricodini  construction  architecture  buildings  fabbing  printing 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Books in the Age of the iPad — Craig Mod
"With the iPad we finally have a platform for consuming rich-content in digital form. What does that mean? To understand just why the iPad is so exciting we need to think about how we got here. I want to look at where printed books stand in respect to digital publishing, why we historically haven't read long-form text on screens and how the iPad is wedging itself in the middle of everything. In doing so I think we can find the line in the sand to define when content should be printed or digitized. This is a conversation for books-makers, web-heads, content-creators, authors and designers. For people who love beautifully made things. And for the storytellers who are willing to take risks and want to consider the most appropriate shape and media for their yarns."
ipad  books  bookdesign  ebooks  publishing  reading  usability  design  printing  change  craigmod  future  technology  typography  layout 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Connect, Write, Self-Publish and Promote Your Book - all in one place. - FastPencil
"FastPencil is book publishing without the pain. The traditional book publishing process can take many months of effort and more money than most writers anticipate. It’s no wonder authors get discouraged.
fastpencil  writing  books  online  collaboration  printing  publishing  free  selfpublishing  tools  ebooks  self-publishing 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The easiest way to print photos on canvas | CanvasPop
"The easiest way to print your photos on canvas.

Print your photos on canvas pro style with CanvasPop. From any source, any resolution or size - and customized to your wishes - your photos and digital images become stunning custom art."
design  photography  art  canvas  flickr  diy  posters  printing  print  enlargement  glvo  house  gifts  decorating  services  prints 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Robin writes a book (and you get a copy) » His dark materials — Kickstarter
"just starting to wrap my head around the economies of scale involved in printing...when they kick in and when they don't. For instance, in this case, it's a printer that's known for extreme flexibility. That's the appeal: You can get your stuff printed on the craziest paper, with the wackiest ink, all in some weird oblong format nobody's ever seen before. And I have to admit, I went in imagining a book bound in rubber recycled from moped tires. Something just utterly unique and awesome. But flexibility means every job is different. Flexibility means they have to set up and tear down the workflow for every...[job] instead of just adding it to a more-or-less homogenous hopper the way they do at, say, Lulu. Flexibility means you sacrifice those economies of scale...pretty basic stuff, but you have to be patient with us bloggers—we live sheltered lives, well-insulated from the exigencies of the physical world. I'm learning fast."
printing  process  books  robinsloan  economiesofscale  design 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Kosmos - OpenStreetMap [via: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/3481]
"Kosmos is a lightweight OpenStreetMap (OSM) map rendering platform developed by Igor Brejc (User:Breki). It was primarily designed to be used by OSM users on their own computers to:
osm  openstreetmap  maps  mapping  rendering  software  gis  print  printing 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Education - Change.org: Books Were Nice
"printed books themselves are something of an anomaly...mark the only time in history we’ve mass produced perfect copies of literature, text & illustrations. We’ve assumed that’s been for the best. Certainly it was convienent. But why would we ever have assumed that it would last? As a species, we are glossers. That’s why there are signs in public & university libraries that read ‘No Marking or Highlighting in the Books’...we have an impulse to do that...If you look at the majority of texts from the Medieval manuscript codex, they are full of glosses. After all, it’s this era more than any other that defines for us the term ‘palimpsest’...until now...I think we’re in the process of correcting the anomaly of printed mass produced text...we’re going back to our natural instincts...bookmarking online...highlighting & commenting...also doing something unique in the history of our vandalism against text: we’re sharing our glosses globally with immediate effect...this isn’t limited to text."
books  annotation  bookmarking  highlighting  sharing  reading  literature  publishing  diy  ebooks  education  palimpsest  printing  film  video  music  change  technology  internet  web  online 
july 2009 by robertogreco
CD & DVD Templates [Thanks, Jesse]
"COPYCATS is proud to offer our easy to use templates as a tool for graphic designers. These custom cd packaging templates will help you find the perfect look and feel for your product. Choose a platform above to download templates for your specialty cd packaging today!"
dvd  templates  cds  printing 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Print from your iPhone
"Wouldn't it be great just to print out an Email or iPhone contact address and phone number, or quickly print out a web page to read later? Move files to or from your computer and print them. How about printing photos from your iPhone Photo Album? Or even take a picture and print it out straight away. Now you can!
iphone  applications  printing  print  utilities  software  csiap  ios 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Tom Taylor : Projects : Microprinter
"The microprinter is an experiment in physical activity streams and notification, using a repurposed receipt printer connected to the web.
microprinter  printing  make  arduino  diy  howto  hardware  art  papercamp  print  paper  electronics  hacking  projectideas  glvo 
april 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: meet the new schtick (2)
"in many ways, that's [an unfinished book like Dave Gray's Marks and Meaning] a more interesting and involving thing to own than a finished book. You're getting an object, but you're also getting into a little community." ... "You see what I'm getting at here? Books/paper are proven technologies. Brilliant things. Really good at all sorts of stuff. We're not in an age where books are about to disappear. But many of the business models associated with them may do. Because we're getting direct access to book technologies ourselves." ... "So you add all these things together and you realise that there are all sorts of interesting possibilities around the corner. For community media projects, personal media projects, for the creativity that's running rampant online to emerge in physical forms in lots of places."

[part 1: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2009/01/meet-the-new-schtick.html ]
design  technology  culture  future  books  trends  diy  make  glvo  russelldavies  paper  newspapers  printing  advertising  marketing  planning  empowerment  communities  publishing  ebooks  media  digital  business  2009  unbook 
january 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: analogue natives
"So much joyful digital stuff is only a pleasure because it's hugely convenient; quick, free, indoors, no heavy lifting. That's enabled lovely little thoughts to get out there. But as 'digital natives' get more interested in the real world; embedding in it, augmenting it, connecting it, weaponising it, arduinoing it, printing it out, then those thoughts/things need to get better. And we might all need to acquire some analogue native skills."
russelldavies  analog  printing  making  arduino  spimes  technology  papernet  hardware  digital 
december 2008 by robertogreco
magCulture.com / editorial design
"The niche genre of personal magazines, existing outside the realm of the commercial hoard, has been experimenting with this ethic for years. But, can it, or does it, still have a place in our ever more electronic world? I chat (ironically, via email) with a couple of magazine mavericks, Neil Feineman in la and Jeremy Leslie in the uk, about the state of the personal magazine, and other things too."
design  media  magazines  print  printing  paper  expression  via:russelldavies  internet  web  online 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Ponoko Blog - Desktop Factories in Every Classroom, Business and Home
"23 years later and Desktop Factory, (previously mentioned on Ponoko Blog) are about to launch us into the 3rd dimension of desktop printing with their 125ci 3D Printer for under U$5000. The unit weighing around 90 lb (40kg) and 25 x 20 x 20 is only marginally bigger than the first Apple LaserWriter, and allowing for inflation, considerably cheaper."
fabrication  ponoko  technology  history  trends  rapidprototyping  fabbing  3d  printing 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Cool Tool: Spoonflower
"It's a service that let's you upload an image to a web site and the company prints the design as a pattern on 100% cotton fabric. Their customer service is great, and I think the fabric is reasonably-priced: it costs $18/yard, not counting shipping, and an individual 8x8-inch swatch is $5. The site is still in beta, so I had to request an invite to use Spoonflower, but a week after contacting them I was experimenting with patterns and ordering fabric."
art  glvo  fabric  printing  materials  design  textiles 
august 2008 by robertogreco
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