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robertogreco : printmaking   5

Leslie Watts Fine Art: Drypoint with a pasta maker
[via: https://twitter.com/lesliewattsart/status/893142096139440128

"Did you know that you can use a pasta maker as a printing press? My first drypoint, scratched on the lid of a plastic salad container.

I used a scalpel.

The soft white lids from yogourt containers are interesting, but the lines are mushier. I like these transparent, more rigid plastic.

So [to prevent slippage] now I roll card+printing paper in 1" and then carefully place the plate between. Then roll slowly & pull it out the bottom."

"I first put a drawing under the plastic for guidelines. Then I rub graphite powder into the scratches so they show against white paper."

"Takua intaglio, Mars Black."

"You can find lots of videos on YouTube. Search for drypoint technique and pasta maker printmaking. Also intaglio techniques."]

[Some videos:

Rosie Scribblah: "In this short and informative film Rosie Scribblah shows you how to use use a recycled, domestic pasta machine for dry point etching. Yes it works. And the cat helped too."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEE1hzz_xdI

Paul O'Dowd: "Vlog 0037 - Pasta Machine Print Press"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SrPIZkocAOA

Pasta press modified to be better for regular printmaking: "What stops a lot of people from printmaking at home is that they don't have a press. By adapting a pasta press there is a cheap easy to use press that can make small postcard size prints."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IywvwD8shg

World of Woodcraft: "Printing with a pasta press and learning an art cheat at the same time. In this video I share an inexpensive method of creating interesting prints."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtuEL2mSOtk ]
classideas  printmaking  printing  art  2017  sfsh  pastamakers  lesliewatts  glvo 
august 2017 by robertogreco
The Dramatic Ways Having Kids Can Change Your Design PracticeEye on Design | Eye on Design
"When the founders of Pupilpeople became parents two years ago, the graphic designers struggled to find quality toys for their baby boy. Disappointed with gimmicky, plasticky gadgets, unsafe and overly-instructive playthings, Sean Kelvin Khoo and Nicole Ong designed their own toys for little Elias instead.

This gave birth to OddBlocks, a set of eight cubes that each unpack into three curious objects. An off-kilter semi-circle, an asymmetrical rectangle and a trapezoid with a chewed-off top are just some of the 24 odd-shaped toys created to help children build from their imagination and discover new shapes and forms.

“A toy is meant to be played with, but a lot of times what we saw in the market was that the product became an educational tool,” explains Khoo. “It’s very Singaporean; everything must [be used to] train my child to be a genius… to be good at maths, good at physics…”

While agreeing that children learnt best through play, the young parents wanted to be less prescriptive in their designs. What started as an open-ended graphic puzzle turned into a three-dimensional product when their studio designer Kong Wen Da roped in industrial designer Jamie Yeo to help. The quartet came up with a sleek plastic prototype in less than half a year, but after testing it with Elias they realized its weight and sharp corners were inappropriate for children. Unlike the “cold” plastic, cork proved a lighter and more environmentally sustainable alternative. The designers were also delighted to discover this made the blocks ideal for printmaking.

Printmaking is just one of several functions that Pupilpeople have found for OddBlocks, and used workshops they conduct under their new initiative Why, O, Why! (w, o, w!), a design school for kids where the eight-year-old studio is developing more products and experiences to nurture creativity in children. For Ong, this is a baby step towards her dream of running a childcare center to address the lack of play and joy in learning among children in Singapore. Growing up, Ong hardly recalls playing, and was creatively stumped the first time she played Lego with Elias. “I was like, ‘Build what? What can I do with it?’” Watching her son have fun building whatever he imagined helped Ong learn that play could establish a sense of discovery. “Is it the children’s fault for not enjoying [what they do] or is it our fault for not exposing themselves enough to find what they love?” she asks.

This also explains Pupilpeople’s recent shift from client work to design education. Khoo discovered a love for teaching when he signed up to lecture part-time 2011. Three years later, the arrival of a Risograph printer in the studio enabled him to experiment with teaching outside of design school. Inspired by overseas initiatives such as the ad-hoc Parallel School, which focuses on art and design as a process, Khoo, Ong and their designer, Kong, founded Areas of Interest to conduct workshops based on the philosophy of “making as a way of thinking”. In one early class, they challenged participants to design and produce printed matter within the limitations of Risograph technology.

“We wanted to create a platform where people could do things that were not typically what we see as design output, and we were trying to challenge what design is,” he explains.

From this year onwards, Khoo will be conducting his experiments on a large scale as a full-time lecturer at Singapore’s pioneering design college, Temasek Design School. While excited by the possibilities that lie ahead, Khoo refuses to tie himself down to a desired outcome and stresses how discovery will continue to be at the heart of both practising and teaching design.

“Design is a form of play,” he says. “Rather than a didactic way of teaching… trying to make clones of myself, I’m trying to discover each individual student’s unique disposition, their own individuality.”"
design  singapore  2016  pupilpeople  sfsh  toys  graphicdesign  seankelvinkhoo  nicoleong  oddblocks  teaching  printmaking  classideas  wood  cork  risograph  proces  thinking  making  howweteach  howwelearn  education  learning  schools  children  process 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Abra Ancliffe
"Abra Ancliffe is an artist working primarily in printmaking & drawing, and is based in Portland, Oregon. She is interested in how language and architecture intersect, the beauty in gaps & voids and translations of translations. She received her MFA in printmaking from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia and her BFA in printmaking from the Pacific Northwest College of Art. Abra teaches in the BFA and Continuing Education programs at PNCA."
glvo  architecture  language  pnca  libraries  printmaking  iceland  translation  translations  oregon  portland  artists  art  abraancliffe 
may 2012 by robertogreco
eye | feature : All you need is love: pictures, words and worship [Great piece on Sister Corita Kent]
"Corita’s cultural contribution spanned several decades. Although she described herself as an artist rather than a design professional, her 1960s work spanned both fields. Graphic strategies such as lettering and layout were central to her artistic voice. At the same time, she had no qualms about accepting commissions for magazine covers, book jackets, album sleeves, ads and posters, although even here she should be seen less as a jobbing designer than as an artist with a distinctive and easily recognisable graphic sensibility. As Harvey Cox said, “The world of signs and sales slogans and plastic containers was not, for her, an empty wasteland. It was the dough out of which she baked the bread of life.” 12 At its best, her work proposed a symbolic template that blurred the boundaries between art, design and communication, between a life of worship and the everyday life of her time."
sistercorita  art  vernacular  life  everyday  glvo  design  communication  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  advertising  signs  symbols  via:britta  teaching  printmaking  serigraphs  accessibility  urban  urbanism  decontextualization  photography  noticing  seeing  seeingtheworld  fieldtrips  unschooling  deschooling  education  immaculateheartcollege  eames  viewfinders  process  julieault  2000  1960s  martinbeck  society  perspective  activism  coritakent 
may 2011 by robertogreco

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