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Generative Knitting – fathominfo – Medium
[loaded with images]

"I personally have long been fascinated by textile arts, and as a studio we are always looking for ways to explore data-driven designs beyond the computer screen. The 1:1 comparison of pixels to stitches has been widely explored, but it wasn’t until recently that our studio had the means to explore it ourselves.

Coding and textile arts share a close bond. Some of the earliest programmable machines were Jacquard looms — weavers used a series of punch cards to make more complex patterns and produce textiles more quickly.

Since a full Jacquard loom was a little out of scope for a side project, we started looking into other machines. An embroidery machine was promising, but was unsuited for a project of a larger scale.

Then I stumbled upon Claire Williams‘s data knits work. I was so intrigued by the complexity of patterns she was able to knit using a hacked 90‘s electronic knitting machine that I started looking into how it was done. Turns out, she has instructions on how to get started with connecting these kinds of machines to a computer. While Anisha looked into the parts we would need for the electronics, I began my search for a knitting machine. I ended up finding a woman in western Massachusetts who works with these machines and had a nicely refurbished one that we were able to purchase. She even came to the studio and gave us a full tutorial on how to the machine works.

While we waited for the electronic interface to get up and running, Martha and I tested different techniques and patterns with the machine.

During that time, we also went to the Bauhaus exhibit at the Harvard Art Museums, and I was completely blown away by Anni Albers’s and Gunta Stölzl’s work. That led me to pick up Albers’s book On Weaving.

In particular, Albers’s piece “Pasture” stuck with me, and I began thinking about using photographs of places and objects to generate palettes for textiles. That led to an exploration using various software sketches to generate palettes and patterns and build assistive knitting tools.

Generating palettes
First, I was interested in seeing what you could pull from just a photo. I began with photos that had a great balance of colors, hoping that reapplying those same ratios in different orientations could create new works with a similar mood.

In making mistakes, I also got some cool results.

Generating patterns

I then started to think more about the limitations of our machine (with an eye towards actually knitting something). In theory, our machine can use as many colors as you want, but only 2 can be loaded in at a time. Some accessories allow four colors at a time, so I set my sights on four-color patterns.

I didn’t have any knitting patterns handy, so I drew a few “pattern pieces” in Photoshop, and used those as the blueprints onto which I could map new colors. I wrote a few sketches in Processing to map the photo colors onto these pieces, and also generate different combinations of the pieces to create different patterns.

The program also worked by passing in a set palette, and having it randomly select four colors to apply to a pattern.

Moving into Knitting
With those patterns in place, it was time to see if I could actually produce them with the machine.

I printed out a small sample of all my generated palettes to bring to the store and see which colors were available.

From far away, this also started to look like its own giant pattern…

It only took five hours…but I did knit one pattern I had generated, and I am really excited by the results. My knitting and finishing techniques need some work, but the colors and texture that resulted are lovely.

I struggle to keep track of where I’m at in a pattern, so I threw together a little Processing sketch to help me. One thing I didn’t realize while making this tool is that the machine knits patterns upside down! Oh well: I’ve been told there are no mistakes in knitting.

With more of the automation in place (and more practice!), we‘ll be able to explore the more irregular, glitchy, and tapestry-like patterns.

There’s also so much more to experiment with on the physical side that moves beyond color and its arrangement — like the different textures and sheen of the yarn (maybe we could use four different black yarns with different textures!), or different types of stitches. I’m also looking forward to exploring more meaningful data relationships between the data generating the colors and the patterns themselves."
oliviaglennon  knitting  generative  textiles  looms  jacquardlooms  codign  programming  processing  art  glvo 
april 2019 by robertogreco
The UX design case of closed captions for everyone // Sebastian Greger
"Are video subtitles really chiefly for users who cannot hear or lack an audio device? A recent Twitter thread on “closed captions for the hearing” triggered a brief qualitative exploration and thought experiment – there may well be a growing group of users being forgotten in the design of closed captions.

Most commonly perceived as an auxiliary means for the hearing impaired, video subtitles, a.k.a. closed captions (CC), have only recently started to be widely considered as an affordance for users in situations with no audio available/possible (think mobile devices in public settings, libraries, shared office spaces); the latter to the extend that contemporary “social media marketing guidelines” strongly recommend subtitling video clips uploaded to Facebook, Twitter et al.

So: subtitles are for those who cannot hear, or with muted devices?

Who else uses closed captions?

I’m personally a great fan of closed captions, for various reasons unrelated to either of the above, and have often noticed certain limitations in their design. Hence, the user researcher inside me just did a somersault as I randomly encountered a Twitter thread [https://twitter.com/jkottke/status/1091338252475396097 ] following Jason Kottke asking his 247.000 followers:
After seeing several photos my (English-speaking, non-deaf) friends have taken of their TV screens over the past week, I’m realizing that many of you watch TV with closed captions (or subtitles) on?! Is this a thing? And if so, why?

The 150+ replies (I guess this qualifies as a reasonable sample for a qualitative analysis of sorts?) are a wonderful example of “accessibility features” benefiting everybody (I wrote about another instance recently [https://sebastiangreger.net/2018/11/twitter-alt-texts-on-db-trains/ ]). The reasons why people watch TV with closed captions on, despite having good hearing abilities and not being constrained by having to watch muted video, are manifold and go far beyond those two most commonly anticipated use cases.

[image: Close-up image of a video with subtitles (caption: "Closed captions are used by people with good hearing and audio playback turned on. An overseen use case?")]

Even applying a rather shallow, ex-tempore categorisation exercise based on the replies on Twitter, I end up with an impressive list to start with:

• Permanent difficulties with audio content
◦ audio processing disorders
◦ short attention span (incl., but not limited to clinical conditions)
◦ hard of hearing, irrespective of age
• Temporary impairments of hearing or perception
◦ watching under the influence of alcohol
◦ noise from eating chips while watching
• Environmental/contextual factors
◦ environment noise from others in the room (or a snoring dog)
◦ distractions and multitasking (working out, child care, web browsing, working, phone calls)
• Reasons related to the media itself
◦ bad audio levels of voice vs. music
• Enabler for improved understanding
◦ easier to follow dialogue
◦ annoyance with missing dialogue
◦ avoidance of misinterpretations
◦ better appreciation of dialogue
• Better access to details
◦ able to take note of titles of songs played
◦ ability to understand song lyrics
◦ re-watching to catch missed details
• Language-related reasons
◦ strong accents
◦ fast talking, mumbling
◦ unable to understand foreign language
◦ insecurity with non-native language
• Educational goals, learning and understanding
◦ language learning
◦ literacy development for children
◦ seeing the spelling of unknown words/names
◦ easier memorability of content read (retainability)
• Social reasons
◦ courtesy to others, either in need for silence or with a need/preference for subtitles
◦ presence of pets or sleeping children
◦ avoiding social conflict over sound level or distractions (“CC = family peace”)
• Media habits
◦ ability to share screen photos with text online
• Personal preferences
◦ preference for reading
◦ acquired habit
• Limitations of technology skills
◦ lack of knowledge of how to turn them off

An attempt at designerly analysis

The reasons range from common sense to surprising, such as the examples of closed captions used to avoid family conflict or the two respondents explicitly mentioning “eating chips” as a source of disturbing noise. Motivations mentioned repeatedly refer to learning and/or understanding, but also such apparently banal reasons like not knowing how to turn them off (a usability issue?). Most importantly, though, it becomes apparent that using CC is more often than not related to choice/preference, rather than to impairment or restraints from using audio.

At the same time, it becomes very clear that not everybody likes them, especially when forced to watch with subtitles by another person. The desire/need of some may negatively affect the experience of others present. A repeat complaint that, particularly with comedy, CC can kill the jokes may also hint at the fact that subtitles and their timing could perhaps be improved by considering them as more than an accessibility aid for those who would not hear the audio? (It appears as if the scenario of audio and CC consumed simultaneously is not something considered when subtitles are created and implemented; are we looking at another case for “exclusive design”?)

And while perceived as distracting when new – this was the starting point of Kottke’s Tweet – many of the comments share the view that it becomes less obtrusive over time; people from countries where TV is not dubbed in particular are so used to it they barely notice it (“becomes second nature”). Yet, there are even such interesting behaviours like people skipping back to re-read a dialogue they only listened to at first, as well as that of skipping back to be able to pay better attention to the picture at second view (e.g. details of expression) after reading the subtitles initially.

Last but not least, it is interesting how people may even feel shame over using CC. Only a conversation like the cited Twitter thread may help them realise that it is much more common than they thought. And most importantly that it has nothing to do with a perceived stigmatisation of being “hard of hearing”.

CC as part of video content design

The phenomenon is obviously not new. Some articles on the topic suggest that it is a generational habit [https://medium.com/s/the-upgrade/why-gen-z-loves-closed-captioning-ec4e44b8d02f ] of generation Z (though Kottke’s little survey proves the contrary), or even sees [https://www.wired.com/story/closed-captions-everywhere/ ] it as paranoid and obsessive-compulsive behaviour of “postmodern completists” as facilitated by new technological possibilities. Research on the benefits of CC for language learning, on the other hand, reaches back [https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19388078909557984 ] several decades.

No matter what – the phenomenon in itself is interesting enough to make this a theme for deeper consideration in any design project that contains video material. Because, after all, one thing is for sure: closed captions are not for those with hearing impairments or with muted devices alone – and to deliver great UX, these users should be considered as well."

[See also: https://kottke.org/19/04/why-everyone-is-watching-tv-with-closed-captioning-on-these-days ]
closedcaptioning  subtitles  closedcaptions  text  reading  genz  generationz  audio  video  tv  film  dialogue  listening  howweread  2019  sebastiangreger  literacy  language  languages  ux  ui  television  ocd  attention  adhd  languagelearning  learning  howwelearn  processing  hearing  sound  environment  parenting  media  multimedia  clarity  accents  memory  memorization  children  distractions  technology  classideas 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Poetic Computation: Reader
"Greetings. Welcome to the first class of Poetics and Politics of Computation at the School for Poetic Computation(SFPC). I’d like to begin the class by asking “What is poetic computation?” First, there is the poetics of code, which refers to code as a form of poetry. There is something poetic about code itself, the way that syntax works, the way that repetitions work, and the way that instruction becomes execution through abstraction. There is also what I call the poetic effect of code, which is an aesthetic experience realized through code. In other words, when the mechanics of words are in the right place, the language transcends its constraints and rules, and in turn, creates this poetic effect whereby thought is transformed into experience.

Together, the poetics of code and the poetic effect of code form ‘poetic computation.’ The terms code and computation are often used interchangeably, but I should note that code is only one aspect of computation. Code is a series of instruction for computation that requires logical systems and hardware to make the instructions computable. In that sense, computation is a higher level concept than code. For our purposes, however, we can use poetics of code and poetics of computation interchangeably throughout these discussions.

To a non-coder, non-artist friend, or to those just beginning to learn to program, I often say code may look like poetry in an alien language. And to those more experienced with code, writing code sometimes feels like writing poetry because it doesn’t always ‘work.’ I mean two things by ‘work’: first, does it work as an art form? Is it good poetry? On the other hand, I mean ‘work’ in a more utilitarian sense. Does it have practical application?

At SFPC, we like to think that poetic computation is when language meets mathematics, and logic meets electricity. Sometimes, poetic computation is literally writing poems with code. Some of our teachers and students write poetry with algorithms to explore what the language can do. When we started the school, a lot of people asked if the school is for generative poetry or electronic literature. We clarified that while we are definitely interested in the intersection of language and computation, we want to explore a broader definition of the ‘poetic.’ We want to investigate the art of computation as well as the expressive qualities of code, including its aesthetic, visual, aural and material aspects.

While this artistic potential lies at the core of the school’s excitement about code and computation, I’m interested in how this turn towards art may help us explore political possibilities. In this class, I consider computation to be a lens for examining reality and thinking about emergent issues in the world. In other words, computation can be a vehicle for imagining new ways of being in the world. Let’s first step back to look at material precedents of modern computation and computers."
taeyoonchoi  coding  processing  sfpc  poetry  books  toread  ebooks  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Patricio Gonzalez Vivo on Vimeo
"What Are The Chances? – This talk investigates the relationships between chaos and chance, cause and effect. It is built from volcanoes, ashes, wind, love, and new life. Along the way Patricio talks about The Book of Shaders, mapping at Mapzen, and other recent collaborations and works in progress.

Many of these slides are interactive: patriciogonzalezvivo.github.io/eyeo16/# "

[The Book of Shaders: http://thebookofshaders.com/ ]
expressivearttherapy  lygiaclark  mapzen  processing  code  coding  arttherapy  psychology  2016  eyeo  eyeo2016  psychoanalysis  freud  carljung  dreams  collectiveunconscious  caseyreas  shaders  nightmares  community  opensource  maps  mapping  openframeworks  fragility  jenlowe  thebookofshaders  mandalas  synchronicity  interconnectedness  patriciogonzalezvivo  edg  raspberrypi  classideas  interconnected  interconnectivity 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Turtle
"A Library by Leah Buechley for the Processing programming environment. The Turtle library provides an implementation of a LOGO Turtle for Processing.

Turtle Geometry (see the fabulous book of the same name by Hal Abelson and Andrea diSessa) provides a different way of thinking about geometry. You draw by driving around a "turtle". Programs are written from the point of view of this turtle, which enables you to take an embodied approach to geometry.

LOGO, a turtle-based programming language, was developed by Seymour Papert and a group of collaboraters in the late 1960s. It was presented as a novel way to introduce children to computer programming and mathematics. LOGO and Turtle Geometry remain strongly associated with children and education, but are full of beautiful tools and ideas that adult artists and programmers can fruitfully explore.

A previous turtle library for Processing, Terrapin, is great, but somewhat limited in functionality. This library provides a more full-featured implementation, including "push" and "pop" functionality as well as high-resolution drawing capabilities.

DOWNLOAD

Download Turtle version 1.0.0 (1) in .zip format."
leahbuechley  logo  processing  programming  geometry  2016 
july 2016 by robertogreco
WOVNS
"This tutorial will show you how to design textiles using code, specifically the Processing software. Using code makes it easy to create complex and precise patterns that would be difficult to draw manually – and to quickly explore a lot of different variations."



[from http://www.wovns.com/about :

"WOVNS is the first platform of its kind, a San Francisco/Maui based company that is a textile studio and technology platform, giving designers access to the means of textile production.

Working with US textile manufacturers, we have developed a patent pending system for jacquard looms that enables textile production in quantities as small as a single yard. Customers simply access our selection of colors and qualities, apply them to their own designs, and submit for purchase / production. In addition, our platform promotes independent designers through the WOVNS Collection, a curated fabric and product collection that offers royalties to contributors on every yard sold. We proudly offer this collection to the design community.

In the era of digital fabrication platforms, desktop 3D printers and milling machines, our goal is to revolutionize textile production, creating access and immediacy for woven textile development. Start bringing your designs to life!"]

[See also: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/wovns/wovns-a-platform-for-on-demand-production-of-woven
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gq4baT5bKF4 ]
processing  code  learning  patterns  textiles  denamolnar  chelseamolnar  glvo  coding  wovns 
june 2016 by robertogreco
The Jacob’s Ladder of coding — Medium
"Anecdotes and questions about climbing up and down the ladder of abstraction: Atari, ARM, demoscene, education, creative coding, community, seeking lightness, enlightenment & strange languages"



"With only an hour or two of computer time a week, our learning and progress was largely down to intensive trial & error, daily homework and learning to code and debug with only pencil and paper, whilst trying to be the machine yourself: Playing every step through in our heads (and on paper) over and over until we were confident, the code did as we’d expect, yet, often still failing because of wrong intuitions. Learning this analytical thinking is essential to successful debugging, even today, specifically in languages / environments where no GUI debugger is available. In the late 90s, John Maeda did similar exercises at MIT Media Lab, with students role-playing different parts of a CPU or a whole computer executing a simple process. Later at college, my own CS prof too would often quote Alan Perlis:
“To understand a program you must become both the machine and the program.” — Alan Perlis

Initially we’d only be using the machine largely to just verify our ideas prepared at home (spending the majority of the time typing in/correcting numbers from paper). Through this monastic style of working, we also learned the importance of having the right tools and balance of skills within the group and were responsible to create them ourselves in order to achieve our vision. This important lesson stayed with me throughout (maybe even became) my career so far… Most projects I worked on, especially in the past 15 years, almost exclusively relied on custom-made tooling, which was as much part of the final outcome as the main deliverable to clients. Often times it even was the main deliverable. On the other hand, I’ve also had to learn the hard way that being a largely self-sufficient generalist often is undesired in the modern workplace, which frequently still encourages narrow expertise above all else…

After a few months of convincing my parents to invest all of their saved up and invaluable West-german money to purchase a piece of “Power Without the Price” (a much beloved Atari 800XL) a year before the Wall came down in Berlin, I finally gained daily access to a computer, but was still in a similar situation as before: No more hard west money left to buy a tape nor disk drive from the Intershop, I wasn’t able to save any work (apart from creating paper copies) and so the Atari was largely kept switched on until November 10, 1989, the day after the Berlin Wall was opened and I could buy an XC-12 tape recorder. I too had to choose whether to go the usual route of working with the built-in BASIC language or stick with what I’d learned/taught myself so far, Assembly… In hindsight, am glad I chose the latter, since it proved to be far more useful and transportable knowledge, even today!"



"Lesson learned: Language skills, natural and coded ones, are gateways, opening paths not just for more expression, but also to paths in life.

As is the case today, so it was back then: People tend to organize around specific technological interests, languages and platforms and then stick with them for a long time, for better or worse. Over the years I’ve been part of many such tool-based communities (chronologically: Asm, C, TurboPascal, Director, JS, Flash, Java, Processing, Clojure) and have somewhat turned into a nomad, not being able to ever find a true home in most of them. This might sound judgemental and negative, but really isn’t meant to and these travels through the land of languages and toolkits has given me much food for thought. Having slowly climbed up the ladder of abstraction and spent many years both with low & high level languages, has shown me how much each side of the spectrum can inform and learn from the other (and they really should do more so!). It’s an experience I can highly recommend to anyone attempting to better understand these machines some of us are working with for many hours a day and which impact so much of all our lives. So am extremely grateful to all the kind souls & learning encountered on the way!"



"In the vastly larger open source creative computing demographic of today, the by far biggest groups are tight-knit communities around individual frameworks and languages. There is much these platforms have achieved in terms of output, increasing overall code literacy and turning thousands of people from mere computer users into authors. This is a feat not be underestimated and a Good Thing™! Yet my issue with this siloed general state of affairs is that, apart from a few notable exceptions (especially the more recent arrivals), there’s unfortunately a) not much cross-fertilizing with fundamentally different and/or new ideas in computing going on and b) over time only incremental progress is happening, business as usual, rather than a will to continuously challenge core assumptions among these largest communities about how we talk to machines and how we can do so better. I find it truly sad that many of these popular frameworks rely only on the same old imperative programming language family, philosophy and process, which has been pre-dominant and largely unchanged for the past 30+ years, and their communities also happily avoid or actively reject alternative solutions, which might require fundamental changes to their tools, but which actually could be more suitable and/or powerful to their aims and reach. Some of these platforms have become and act as institutions in their own right and as such also tend to espouse an inward looking approach & philosophy to further cement their status (as owners or pillars?) in their field. This often includes a no-skills-neccessary, we-cater-all-problems promise to their new users, with each community re-inventing the same old wheels in their own image along the way. It’s Not-Invented-Here on a community level: A reliance on insular support ecosystems, libraries & tooling is typical, reducing overall code re-use (at least between communities sharing the same underlying language) and increasing fragmentation. More often than not these platforms equate simplicity with ease (go watch Rich Hickey taking this argument eloquently apart!). The popular prioritization of no pre-requisite knowledge, super shallow learning curves and quick results eventually becomes the main obstacle to later achieve systemic changes, not just in these tools themselves, but also for (creative) coding as discipline at large. Bloatware emerges. Please do forgive if that all sounds harsh, but I simply do believe we can do better!

Every time I talk with others about this topic, I can’t help but think about Snow Crash’s idea of “Language is a virus”. I sometimes do wonder what makes us modern humans, especially those working with computing technology, so fundamentalist and brand-loyal to these often flawed platforms we happen to use? Is it really that we believe there’s no better way? Are we really always only pressed for time? Are we mostly content with Good Enough? Are we just doing what everyone else seems to be doing? Is it status anxiety, a feeling we have to use X to make a living? Are we afraid of unlearning? Is it that learning tech/coding is (still) too hard, too much of an effort, which can only be justified a few times per lifetime? For people who have been in the game long enough and maybe made a name for themselves in their community, is it pride, sentimentality or fear of becoming a complete beginner again? Is it maybe a sign that the way we teach computing and focus on concrete tools too early in order to obtain quick, unrealistically complex results, rather than fundamental (“boring”) knowledge, which is somewhat flawed? Is it our addiction to largely focus on things we can document/celebrate every minor learning step as an achievement in public? This is no stab at educators — much of this systemic behavior is driven by the sheer explosion of (too often similar) choices, demands made by students and policy makers. But I do think we should ask ourselves these questions more often."

[author's tweet: https://twitter.com/toxi/status/676578816572067840 ]
coding  via:tealtan  2015  abstraction  demoscene  education  creativecoding  math  mathematics  howwelearn  typography  design  dennocoil  alanperlis  johnmaeda  criticalthinking  analyticalthinking  basic  programming  assembly  hexcode  georgedyson  computing  computers  atari  amiga  commodore  sinclair  identity  opensource  insularity  simplicity  ease  language  languages  community  communities  processing  flexibility  unschooling  deschooling  pedagogy  teaching  howweteach  understanding  bottomup  topdown  karstenschmidt 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Mooooooving — Animated GIFs by Guy Moorhouse
"Mooooooving is a side project featuring animated gifs I make using Processing and Flash.

My one rule is that the animations must start and end on a blank white frame — I kind of like the idea that they come out of nothing and return to nothing.

Anyway, hope you like them."

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2015/10/05/filtered ]
tumblrs  motion  geometry  design  animation  guymoorhouse  gifs  processing  flash  coding 
october 2015 by robertogreco
GLSL Book
"This is a gentle step-by-step guide through the abstract and complex universe of Fragment Shaders."



"The images above were made in different ways. The first one was made by Van Gogh's hand applying layer over layer of paint. It took him hours. The second was produced in seconds by the combination of four matrices of pixels: one for cyan, one for magenta, one for yellow and one for black. The key difference is that the second image is produced in a non-serial way (that means not step-by-step, but all at the same time).

This book is about the revolutionary computational technique, fragment shaders, that is taking digitally generated images to the next level. You can think of it as the equivalent of Gutenberg's press for graphics.

In the following chapters you will discover how incredibly fast and powerful this technique is and how to apply it to your professional and personal work.

Who is this book for?

This book is written for creative coders, game developers and engineers who have coding experience, a basic knowledge of linear algebra and trigonometry, and who want to take their work to an exciting new level of graphical quality. (If you want to learn how to code, I highly recommend you start with Processing and come back later when you are comfortable with it.)

This book will teach you how to use and integrate shaders into your projects, improving their performance and graphical quality. Because GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language) shaders compile and run on a variety of platforms, you will be able to apply what you learn here to any enviroment that uses OpenGL, OpenGL ES or WebGL. In other words, you will be able to apply and use your knowledge with Processing sketches, openFrameworks applications, Cinder interactive installations, Three.js websites or iOS/Android games.

What does this book cover?

This book will focus on the use of GLSL pixel shaders. First we'll define what shaders are; then we'll learn how to make procedural shapes, patterns, textures and animations with them. You'll learn the foundations of shading language and apply it to more useful scenarios such as: image processing (image operations, matrix convolutions, blurs, color filters, lookup tables and other effects) and simulations (Conway's game of life, Gray-Scott's reaction-diffusion, water ripples, watercolor effects, Voronoi cells, etc.). Towards the end of the book we'll see a set of advanced techniques based on Ray Marching.

There are interactive examples for you to play with in every chapter. When you change the code, you will see the changes immediately. The concepts can be abstract and confusing, so the interactive examples are essential to helping you learn the material. The faster you put the concepts into motion the easier the learning process will be."
patriciogonzalezvivo  jenlowe  fragmentshaders  books  glsl  opengl  webgl  processing  conwaysgameoflife  shaders  thebookofshaders 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Benedikt Groß – The Big Atlas of LA Pools
"The “Big Atlas of LA Pools” is about the process of mapping and map-making in the contemporary age of big data, open data, crowdsourcing, and citizen science. The project attempts to highlight on one hand the emerging and powerful role of non-domain experts in the discovery of scientifically and socially relevant information, and on the other hand seeks to emphasize the darker, creepier, and more contentious issues surrounding data processing and exploration.

As a “two-person army”, Benedikt Groß (DE) and Joseph K. Lee (US) located and traced the contours of over 43000 pools and other manmade water boundaries — features which computer vision could not adequately demarcate. Throughout their project, the two exploited the idea of “crowdsourcing” to process the aerial ortho-imagery of their study area in Los Angeles County and to validate their dataset using commercial online third-party services, namely clipping farms in India and Amazon Mechanical Turk. In addition, they mashed then together additional layers of contextual information that might suggest surprising, or intriguing, or sinister spatial relationships within LA’s social and physical landscapes."

[via: http://referencescout.tumblr.com/post/100504568781/gosergiogo-the-big-atlas-of-la-pools-poster-by ]
losangeles  poools  books  art  landscapes  swimmingpools  design  maps  mapping  processing  data  josephklee  benediktgroß  2014 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Too Much World: Is the Internet Dead? | e-flux
"Postproduction

But if images start pouring across screens and invading subject and object matter, the major and quite overlooked consequence is that reality now widely consists of images; or rather, of things, constellations, and processes formerly evident as images. This means one cannot understand reality without understanding cinema, photography, 3D modeling, animation, or other forms of moving or still image. The world is imbued with the shrapnel of former images, as well as images edited, photoshopped, cobbled together from spam and scrap. Reality itself is postproduced and scripted, affect rendered as after-effect. Far from being opposites across an unbridgeable chasm, image and world are in many cases just versions of each other.14They are not equivalents however, but deficient, excessive, and uneven in relation to each other. And the gap between them gives way to speculation and intense anxiety.

Under these conditions, production morphs into postproduction, meaning the world can be understood but also altered by its tools. The tools of postproduction: editing, color correction, filtering, cutting, and so on are not aimed at achieving representation. They have become means of creation, not only of images but also of the world in their wake. One possible reason: with digital proliferation of all sorts of imagery, suddenly too much world became available. The map, to use the well-known fable by Borges, has not only become equal to the world, but exceeds it by far.15 A vast quantity of images covers the surface of the world—very in the case of aerial imaging—in a confusing stack of layers. The map explodes on a material territory, which is increasingly fragmented and also gets entangled with it: in one instance, Google Maps cartography led to near military conflict.16

While Borges wagered that the map might wither away, Baudrillard speculated that on the contrary, reality was disintegrating.17 In fact, both proliferate and confuse one another: on handheld devices, at checkpoints, and in between edits. Map and territory reach into one another to realize strokes on trackpads as theme parks or apartheid architecture. Image layers get stuck as geological strata while SWAT teams patrol Amazon shopping carts. The point is that no one can deal with this. This extensive and exhausting mess needs to be edited down in real time: filtered, scanned, sorted, and selected—into so many Wikipedia versions, into layered, libidinal, logistical, lopsided geographies.

This assigns a new role to image production, and in consequence also to people who deal with it. Image workers now deal directly in a world made of images, and can do so much faster than previously possible. But production has also become mixed up with circulation to the point of being indistinguishable. The factory/studio/tumblr blur with online shopping, oligarch collections, realty branding, and surveillance architecture. Today’s workplace could turn out to be a rogue algorithm commandeering your hard drive, eyeballs, and dreams. And tomorrow you might have to disco all the way to insanity.

As the web spills over into a different dimension, image production moves way beyond the confines of specialized fields. It becomes mass postproduction in an age of crowd creativity. Today, almost everyone is an artist. We are pitching, phishing, spamming, chain-liking or mansplaining. We are twitching, tweeting, and toasting as some form of solo relational art, high on dual processing and a smartphone flat rate. Image circulation today works by pimping pixels in orbit via strategic sharing of wacky, neo-tribal, and mostly US-American content. Improbable objects, celebrity cat GIFs, and a jumble of unseen anonymous images proliferate and waft through human bodies via Wi-Fi. One could perhaps think of the results as a new and vital form of folk art, that is if one is prepared to completely overhaul one’s definition of folk as well as art. A new form of storytelling using emojis and tweeted rape threats is both creating and tearing apart communities loosely linked by shared attention deficit."

[via: http://finalbossform.com/post/88613954773/while-borges-wagered-that-the-map-might-wither ]
internet  technology  images  communication  newaesthetic  web  socialmedia  production  art  folkart  infrastructure  hitosteyerl  2014  borges  baudrillard  maps  mapping  territory  reality  tumblr  processing  online  algorithms 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Mary Huang :: portfolio
"With computational design there is the opportunity to not only create beautifully intricate forms, but to define a design according to its governing processes and user interactions. This project sought to mediate between the avant-garde and ready-to-wear, between individual users and a designer's vision. Could we use technology to democratize haute couture? Could we let people design their own dress, and still maintain a cohesive, recognizable design?

Computational couture captures this philosophy and applies it toward solving the persistent problem of standardized sizing in ready-to-wear. CONTINUUM is a concept for a web-based fashion label in which designs are user-generated using custom software and made to order to your personal measurements. Its seminal collection is a deconstruction of the classic little black dress. Software allows you to "draw" a dress and converts it into a 3D model, which is turned into a flat pattern that can be cut out of fabric and sewn into the dress. Not only can the physical dress be purchased through the label, but the cutting patterns are downloadable free of charge for those who would rather devote the time to making their own. With design encompassing a continuous user experience, we can inspire changing attitudes and behaviors of mass consumption."

[See also: http://www.continuumfashion.com/Ddress/ ]
processing  fashion  wearable  wearables  triangles  glvo  computing  maryhuang 
december 2013 by robertogreco
www.normalfutu.re [Normaltype]
"N O R M A L T Y P E is designed to be a display font with no fixed shape. Version 1 came out as a piece of parametric typography, but we thought it was important to introduce motion in our application as soon possible. Hence why now, it comes with the same parameters as in the previous version, but also a ‘step sequencer’ so you can create animation loops to then export as animated GIFs! On top of that, we added a few new parameters such as ‘connections’ between characters, more punctuation and also a small window for text editing."
fonts  typography  coding  processing  dynamic  generativetypography 
december 2013 by robertogreco
The Lives of Images Peter Galison in conversation with Trevor Paglen [.pdf]
"What is observation? What is seeing? What counts as “right depiction”? Are images today now doing more than showing? What is objectivity? What does the future of imaging hold?

Peter Galison, one of the world’s leading historians of science, has written widely on how visual representation shapes our understanding of the world. Trevor Paglen is an artist whose work with photography has explored governmental secrecy and the limits of seeing. For his most recent project, The Last Pictures, Paglen worked with a group of scientists to create a disc of images marking our historical moment; the project culminated in last year’s launch of a satellite, carrying those images, that will remain in Earth’s orbit perpetually. The following conversation took place at Aperture’s office earlier this year."



"Well, what is it that the digital really does? There are many ways in which the digital is shaped by the legacy of analog photography and film. Both for political reasons and aesthetic reasons, what’s really important is the fact that digital is small, cheap, and searchable. The combination of these three features is dramatic. It means that your smartphone does facial recognition—no longer is that an inaccessible and futuristic piece of the state-security apparatus. It’s ubiquitous.

Aesthetically, this can mean a kind of decentering, a vision of the world that is not directly human. It also means that cameras are everywhere, and you’re not even aware of them. There’s an interesting film by a colleague and friend, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, working with Véréna Paravel, called Leviathan (2012), filmed on fishing boats in the North Atlantic. A lot of the film would have been completely unimaginable just a generation ago. They use little high-resolution digital cameras to achieve points of view in places that would previously have been impossible: amidst the pile of dead fish, or underwater as the tank is being filled, or looking back at the front of the boat. These are not impossible camera angles, but they’re nonhuman points of view."



"It seems that we’re moving away from thinking about images interms of representation and toward thinking about their creation as part of a networked process, guided by political or economic “scripts” embedded in the algorithms controlling these image-making networks. If we look at Facebook’s facial-recognition and search technologies, or at Instagram, we see similar things going on, but in a commercial context."



"If images become tools, it’s easier to see them as stepping-stones to other things. For me, the fundamental separation between art and science is not an eternal characteristic of science. The split happened in a historical moment. If you said to Leonardo da Vinci—pardon me, historians—“Are your studies of turbulent water art or science?” he would reply (so I imagine): “You’re crazy! What are you talking about? I don’t even recognize this choice.” But in the nineteenth century, you begin to have the idea of an objective image and of a scientist who is defined by being self-restrained, followed by the idea of maximal detachment from the image. At that moment, Charles Baudelaire criticized photography, saying (approximately): “You know, this isn’t really part of art because it’s insufficiently modulated by the person who says he’s an artist.” In that sense, what Baudelaire is saying and what late-nineteenth-century scientists are saying is the same thing, except they come to opposite conclusions. What they agree on is that art is defined by intervention and science is defined by lack of intervention.

I believe the trunk split, at that point, into two branches. But in many ways the branches are coming back together again in our moment. People in the art world aren’t frightened, in the way they once were, of having a scientific dimension to what they do. It’s not destabilizing for Matthew Ritchie to collaborate with scientists, nor is it a professional disqualification for scientists to work with artists."
trevorpaglen  petergalison  aperture  images  photography  perception  interpretation  history  science  art  seeing  sight  leviathan  recording  video  film  processing  photoshop  digital  luciencastaing-taylor  vérénaparavel  presentation  manipulation  capture  distortion  depiction  universalism  language  communication  symbols  semiotics  aesthetics  interdisciplinary  glvo  instagram  networkedfictions  canon  matthewritchie  leonardodavinci  facebook  uniquity  gopro  charlesbaudelaire  newaesthetic  convergence 
june 2013 by robertogreco
LISA PARK
"Lisa Park (Yeon-Hee) was raised in Seoul, Korea and currently lives and works in New York. Her background was in Fine Art Media in her undergraduate degree at Art Center College of Design and her works range from painting, installation, photography, and film.She began to focus her artistic practice in interactive based works by integrating technology and art. She has her master’s degree in M.P.S from ITP (Interactive Telecommunications Program) at New York University. The program’s multidisciplinary education significantly extended her knowledge to use programming softwares like Processing, Arduino, Max/MSP to create into art works.

Over the past years, she used technology as an interface to create projects like Eunoia, Le Violon d’Lisa, and Obsession is sad Passion. She does performance and the recurring themes in her works deal with vulnerability, confrontation, suspension, self-control, and liberation."

[via: http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/eunoia-seeking-enlightenment-by-tracking-brainwaves ]
lisapark  art  artists  arduino  processing  physicalcomputing  eunoia  performance  interactive  technology 
june 2013 by robertogreco
An Informal Catalogue of Slit-Scan Video Artworks and Research - Golan Levin and Collaborators
"Slitscan imaging techniques are used to create static images of time-based phenomena. In traditional film photography, slit scan images are created by exposing film as it slides past a slit-shaped aperture. In the digital realm, thin slices are extracted from a sequence of video frames, and concatenated into a new image.

Recently I've seen many new-media projects based on slit-scan techniques. They range from student projects, to Java demonstrations on the Processing.org site, to works by recognized pioneers of video and interactive art. My inclination to make lists is irresistible, and so I've put together this catalogue as an aid to researchers and students. My aim is to be as inclusive as possible, rather than attempt to winnow the projects down to just a few ideal exemplars or the most significant historic precursors. Thus not all of the examples are even computational: some of the projects described below use motion-picture film, still photography, or analog video techniques. Please note that this page is not self-promotional; I have not produced any slit-scan based projects myself.

Eddie Elliott, one of the earliest researchers of digital slit-scan imaging, keeps a related list which is more oriented towards photography, early cinema and flipbooks. There is now a Flickr tag for slitscan images, and many of the latest and informal productions can be seen there."
slitscanner  art  photography  processing  video  time  timemerge  timemergemedia  golanlevin  andrewdavidhazy  jacques-henrilartigue  georgesilk  williamlarson  douglastrumbull  r/greenbergassociates  r/ga  derekburnett  jean-micheljarre  pipilottirist  zbigrybczynski  billspinhoven  eddieelliott  toshioiwai  joachimsauter  dirklúsebrink  ansenseale  tamáswaliczky  annaszepesi  björnbarnekow  romyachituv  michaelnaimark  paulharter  christiankessler  martinreinhart  virgilwildrich  sidneyfels  kenjimase  ericlee  danielcrooks  bryanmumford  camilleutterback 
april 2013 by robertogreco
I Just Wanna Hold Your Hand
"By interacting with one another people are able to transform their environment through play."

"Two metal hands are mounted to the wall. When two or more individuals complete the circuit they provoke audio-visual responses.

The level of interactivity is determined by the flow of electricity through the individuals

The interaction can be tailored per installation; the core tool is the Arduino, and in this case we’ve experimented with Processing projections to activate blank city walls. storefronts, or pavement.

This design allows for expansion as well as meaningful data collection.

Also, we just like making people hold hands."
arduino  processing  games  play  touch  contact  humancontact  circuits  datacollection 
january 2013 by robertogreco
The Nature of Code
"Can we capture the unpredictable evolutionary and emergent properties of nature in software? Can understanding the mathematical principles behind our physical world help us to create digital worlds? This book focuses on the programming strategies and techniques behind computer simulations of natural systems using Processing."

"Read the Entire Book Online for Free

The complete book is available as HTML with interactive Processing.js examples.

Download the book's code

All of the source files for building the book and the Processing code examples are available on github."
howto  via:jenlowe  2012  coding  edg  srg  danielsciffman  books  code  processing  programming 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Remote Sensor Connections - Scratch Wiki
"Remote sensor connections is a feature allowing other programs to connect to Scratch. This allows it to be extended to connect to devices, access the internet, or perform other functions not possible inside Scratch. For example, JoyTail allows you to use a joystick with Scratch."
sensors  actionscript  flash  objective-c  processing  python  wiimote  edg  scratch 
september 2012 by robertogreco
openFrameworks
"openFrameworks is an open source C++ toolkit designed to assist the creative process by providing a simple and intuitive framework for experimentation. The toolkit is designed to work as a general purpose glue, and wraps together several commonly used libraries, including:

OpenGL, GLEW, GLUT, libtess2 and cairo for graphics
rtAudio, PortAudio or FMOD and Kiss FFT for audio input, output and analysis
FreeType for fonts
FreeImage for image saving and loading
Quicktime and videoInput for video playback and grabbing
Poco for a variety of utilities
The code is written to be massively cross-compatible. Right now we support five operating systems (Windows, OSX, Linux, iOS, Android) and four IDEs (XCode, Code::Blocks, and Visual Studio and Eclipse). The API is designed to be minimal and easy to grasp.

Simply put, openFrameworks is a tool that makes it much easier to make things with code. We find it super useful, and we hope you do too."
benfry  caseyreas  arturocastro  theodorewatson  zachlieberman  matthewgingold  stevevarga  jeffcrouse  diederickhuijbers  damianstewart  lukaszkarluk  philipwhitfield  joshnoble  christophbuchner  jasonvancleave  kylemcdonald  gregborenstein  jamesgeorge  elliotwoods  open  frameworks  design  software  processing  openframeworks  art  visualization  opensource  c++  programming 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Congressional Kindness
"This is a serendipity tool. It contains 2674 mentions of the word kindness recorded in the U.S. congressional record from January 1, 1996 to May 1, 2012.

Recognition is kindness in recognition of a person, place, or event.

Remembrance is kindness in a eulogy.

Protocol is kindness when representatives thank each other for yielding time on the floor.

Prayer is kindness in the daily opening prayer.

Other is often a political use of "the kindness of strangers," a mention of human kindness during natural disasters or terorist attacks, or a mention of the kindness of American troops abroad.

More context and a story are available in the notebook [http://www.datatelling.com/2012/05/23/congressional-kindness/ ]."
2012  words  visualization  infovis  processing  language  congressionalrecord  kindness  jenlowe 
july 2012 by robertogreco
CW&T; is an art and design studio.
"At CW&T;, we create multidisciplinary work in collaborative environments where we leverage technology and computing. With the latest tools and processes, we imagine near future possibilities and build them into reality.

Our design approach is to create lasting designs while questioning conventional thinking. In our quest to fulfill our goals, we favor minimal aesthetics, intuitive interfaces and over-engineered construction.

Che-Wei Wang is an artist, designer and architect. His work involves a wide range of disciplines and skills ranging from architecture, exhibition design, web design, interactive installations, robotics, sculpture and product design…

Taylor Levy is an artist and designer who works with various technologies. In her work, technology is broken apart and reconstructed to expose its otherwise opaque inner workings…

Many projects call for unique talents, so we assemble the best from our community of close collaborators that love working together."
glvo  javascript  java  openframeworks  processing  arduino  brooklyn  taylorlevy  che-weiwang  industrialdesign  id  architecture  design  art  nyc 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Carnivore
Carnivore is a Processing library that allows you to perform surveillance on data networks. Carnivore listens to all Internet traffic (email, web surfing, etc.) on a specific local network. Using Processing you are able to animate, diagnose, or interpret the network traffic in any way you wish.
network  processing  security  software  visualization  via:stml  datanetworks  data  networks  networktraffic  surveillance  traffic  web  online  email  localnetworks 
april 2012 by robertogreco
You Can't Fuck the System If You've Never Met One by Casey A. Gollan
"Part of the reason systems are hard to see is because they're an abstraction. They don't really exist until you articulate them.

And any two things don't make a system, even where there are strong correlations. Towns with more trees have lower divorce rates, for example, but you'd be hard-pressed to go anywhere with that.

However, if you can manage to divine the secret connections and interdependencies between things, it's like putting on glasses for the first time. Your headache goes away and you can focus on how you want to change things.

I learned that in systems analysis — if you'd like to change the world — there is a sweet spot between low and high level thinking. In this space you are not dumbfoundedly adjusting variables…nor are you contemplating the void.

In the same way that systems don't exist until you point them out…"

"This is probably a built up series of misunderstandings. I look forward to revising these ideas."

[Now here: http://caseyagollan.com/systems/
http://caseyagollan.com/systems/read/ ]
color  cooperunion  awareness  systemsawareness  binary  processing  alexandergalloway  nilsaallbarricelli  willwright  pets  superpokepets  superpoke  juliandibbell  dna  simulations  trust  hyper-educated  consulting  genetics  power  richarddawkins  generalizations  capitalism  systemsdesign  relationships  ownership  privacy  identity  cities  socialgovernment  government  thesims  sims  google  politics  facebooks  donatellameadows  sherryturkle  emotions  human  patterns  patternrecognition  systemsthinking  systems  2012  caseygollan  donellameadows 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Piccolo: The Tiny CNC-bot
"Piccolo is a pocket-sized stand-alone CNC platform. For under $70, you will be able to assemble your personal Arduino-compatible kit for tinkering, and playing with basic CNC output. Be it plotting a quick graffiti, printing a one-off business card on the fly, or multiple Piccolos working together to create a large mural, this kit provides a platform for experimenting with 2D or 3D digital fabrication at a small scale.

We are currently refining the Piccolo prototype into an open-source design that is simple, quick to assemble, and easy to use, and is entirely composed of digitally manufactured components and inexpensive off-the-shelf hardware.

The Piccolo project includes Arduino and Processing libraries, to use Piccolo in a variety of ways such as moving autonomously or responding to sensors and data, whilst providing an accessible educational tool and a new output for Processing sketches."
drawing  srg  edg  make  cnc  arduino  piccolo  processing 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Valentine's Day 2012 Cards - a set on Flickr
"For Valentine's Day 2012 we created approximately 75 unique cards for our friends, family, and business associates. Each card generates a custom valentine using the data from the person's name and address.

Don't read below this line if you don't want the "magic" ruined for you."
generativeart  illustration  images  valentines  kindandsmartpeoplemetontheinternet  beauty  design  processing  derrickschultz 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Benedikt Groß – Metrography – London Tube Map to large scale collective mental map
"Nowadays our orientation is very often not longer based exclusively on the actual geography & their landmarks. There are loads of alternatives, from street numbers to GPS routing in our smartphones, to guide us to a destination…those wayfinding devices have in common that they are abstracted projections of real world’s spatial arrangement. Which brings us to 2 interesting implications:…[1] because abstraction means in this case a decrease of information, something is lost…[2] the longer you are using a device the more you accept it or get used to it. For instance the geographical structure of transportation networks are often reshaped to provide users w/ more understandable transit maps. These distortions have a major influence on people’s perception of city’s geography, to the point they get stored mentally & become collective representation of real world’s geography.

‘Metrography’ attempts to explore this phenomenon using the most famous of of transit maps: the London Tube Map."
deformation  osm  openstreetmap  SAX  scriptographer  maperitive  noamtoran  bertrandclerc  benediktgroß  landmarks  gps  cities  transportation  perception  collectiverepresentation  abstraction  mentalmaps  distortion  geography  via:mayonissen  metrography  londontube  processing  mapping  maps  london 
february 2012 by robertogreco
How One Kitchen Table in Brooklyn Became a School for Coders - Steven Heller - Technology - The Atlantic
""We modeled it after our ideal teaching environment," Pitaru says about the genesis, "which means we only take as many students as can fit around our kitchen table (a maximum of five, because the small number is ideal for group-thinking). The seating arrangement is important, as we all get to talk and look at each other rather than face a big projection on a wall."…

Participants are FIFO or first-come-first-serve. As for instructors "We love having guest instructors mainly because it allows us to become students and learn something new," Pitaru says…

Pitaru was recently contacted by someone who wants to open a Kitchen-Table-Coders in London. "Trademarking doesn't worry me," he says. "I'll be flattered if due to our efforts, more kitchen tables are used for learning code, and happy to help anyone who wishes to do so.""

[See also: http://kitchentablecoders.com/ ]
hacking  iphone  processing  workshops  stevenheller  davidnolen  amitpitaru  kitchentablecoders  deschooling  unschooling  discussion  conversation  groupsize  tcsnmy  pedagogy  teaching  development  roundtable  learning  coding  slow  humanscale  small  brooklyn  nyc  education  lcproject 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Old-School Instagram Filters | 1000memories
"At 1000memories, we have a particular fondness for old stuff (if you can’t tell by our homepage). That’s why we’ve always liked Instagram. It celebrates the old, vintage aesthetic of the film photos of yore. But there’s a lot of history behind the photo filter that many folks are not aware of—in fact, none of the photo apps you know today would exist without the vintage photography that inspired them. So we set out to hack the formula to recreate the look of the analog Instagram filters using the technology that inspired them in the first place—vintage cameras and film."
1000memories  cameras  2011  filters  film  polaroid  processing  lomo  instagram  photography 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Machine Pareidolia: Hello Little Fella Meets FaceTracker | Ideas For Dozens
"Facial recognition techniques give computers their own flavor of pareidolia. In addition to responding to actual human faces, facial recognition systems, just like the human vision system, sometimes produce false positives, latching onto some set of features in the image as matching their model of a face. Rather than the millions of years of evolution that shapes human vision, their pareidolia is based on the details of their algorithms and the vicissitudes of the training data they’ve been exposed to.

Their pareidolia is different from ours. Different things trigger it.

After reading Jones’s post, I came up with an experiment designed to explore this difference. I decided to run all of the images from the Hello Little Fella Flickr group through FaceTracker and record the result. These images induce pareidolia in us, but would they do the same to the machine?"
2012  facerecognition  computervision  hellolittlefella  pareidolia  processing  newaesthetic  openframeworks  thenewaesthetic 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Scratch OSC Bridge – kasperkamperman.com : creative media technology
"Send and receive OSC (Open Sound Control) messages with Scratch. You can interface Scratch with external sensors and OSC sending applications/apps. You can also use Scratch to send OSC data to control audio software, VJ software or creative applications.

The bridge converts OSC messages to Scratch sensor and broadcast messages. More technical information about this you’ll find at: http://wiki.scratch.mit.edu/wiki/Remote_Sensors_Protocol

The application was build in Processing. You can download the application for OSX, Windows and Linux, a Processing Sketch is also available."
scratch  osc  oscbridge  edg  srg  processing 
september 2011 by robertogreco
VOID - coffeemakescreative
"VOID is a conceptional processing magazine for the iPad. It is aimed to bring coding closer to designers, with focus on enhanced user integration and personalization with a strong visual approach.

The magazine app features sections where the reader is able to explore projects, learn about other processing artists, manipulate source code live inside the app and immediately see the changes highlighted in the code. <br />
Users can save their modified versions of a sketch, screenshots or short videos to a custom dropbox folder that is linked to the app. It is also possible to share this data via facebook, twitter and email."

[via: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/7703358274/void-interactive-ipad-magazine-for-processing ]
processing  ipad  magazines 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Delivered in a Daydream: 7 Great Achievements That Arose from a Wandering Mind [Slide Show]: Scientific American
"Daydreaming and downtime can lead to solutions for difficult scientific problems and provide inspiration for creative works. Some of history's best-known scientific and literary achievements grew out of such mental meandering"
processing  crunchyneutrinos  eureka  daydreaming  cv  wanderingmind  thinking  discovery 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Your Random Numbers – Getting Started with Processing and Data Visualization | blprnt.blg
"Over the last year or so, I’ve spent almost as much time thinking about how to teach data visualization as I’ve spent working with data. I’ve been a teacher for 10 years – for better or for worse this means that as I learn new techniques and concepts, I’m usually thinking about pedagogy at the same time. Lately, I’ve also become convinced that this massive ‘open data’ movement that we are currently in the midst of is sorely lacking in educational components. The amount of available data, I think, is quickly outpacing our ability to use it in useful and novel ways. How can basic data visualization techniques be taught in an easy, engaging manner?"
processing  visualization  tutorial  data  programming  via:lukeneff  random  randomnumbers 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Understanding Shakespeare / Approaches
"The goal of this approach was to provide an overview of the entire play by showing its text through a collection of the most frequently used words for each character. A scene is represented by a block of text and scaled relatively according to its number of words. Characters are ordered by appearance from left to right throughout the play. The major character’s speeches are highlighted to illustrate their amounts of spoken words as compared to the rest of the play."
shakespeare  visualization  processing  text  classideas  statistics  data  english  language 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Nervous System
"Nervous System creates experimental jewelry, combining nontraditional materials like silicone rubber and stainless steel with rapid prototyping methods. We find inspiration in complex patterns generated by computation and nature."
accessories  handmade  rapidprototyping  processing  patterns  design  computation  generative  fabrication  math  wearable  shopping  nervoussystem  glvo  complexity  nature  biomimicry  coding  biomimetics  jewelry  wearables 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Information is a Material (Device Design Day talk transcript) - Orange Cone
"When something becomes cheap, it quickly joins the toolkit of things we create our world with. It becomes a design material. Sometimes for better and other times for worse.<br />
<br />
In the last five years cheap, small processors have drastically lowered the cost of taking information in, evaluating it, manipulating it, rearranging it, and acting on it. It is no longer unthinkable to have an everyday object use an embedded processor to take a small piece of information--say the temperature, or the orientation of a device, or your meeting schedule--and autonomously act on it to help the device do its job better. Information processing is now part of the set of options we can practically consider when designing just about any object.<br />
<br />
In other words, information is quickly becoming a material to design with."
mikekuniavsky  via:migurski  data  information  design  microprocessors  embedded  informationprocessing  processing  informationasmaterial 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Eide Neurolearning Blog: Simpler is Better: Avoiding the TMI Trap
"In studies of map-based problem solving, whether young or old, expert or novice, a consistent pattern was always seen - people of all ages & expertise seemed to prefer being presented more information, not less, even if it takes longer to study detail-laden maps, figures, or diagrams filled with extraneous material.
simplification  abstraction  displays  design  information  processing  filtering  sensemaking  maps  mapping  tmi  realism  patternrecognition  patterns  simplicity  research 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Modkit [I would love to have an invite for this.]
"Modkit is an in-browser graphical programming environment for little devices called embedded systems. Modkit can currently program Arduino and Arduino compatible hardware using simple graphical blocks similar to and heavily inspired by the Scratch programming environment developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab."
edg  arg  arduino  scratch  programming  coding  processing  physicalcomputing  automation  embedded  hardware  electronics  education  diy  toshare 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: griotism
"So employing an internal data griot makes a lot of sense: someone who can spend the time looking for both large trends and individual needs and uses that illuminate and portend. It’s a hard job, needing a mix of skills rarely found – a smidgen of hard maths and statistics, a pinch of programming, and dessert spoons of various liberal arts. The Economist (sub required) posits them as data scientists (a position Flickr are currently looking for), but this misses the ability to ask interesting questions, and having hunches – being so immersed in the data that relevancy screams out."
chrisheathcote  last.fm  data  griot  processing  python  stories  visualization  web  storytelling  interdisciplinary  hunches  questioning  math  mathematics  relevance  patternrecognition  patterns  newliberalarts  programming  statistics  trends  griotism  datagriots  lastfm 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Square
"In February 2009, Jim McKelvey wasn’t able to sell a piece of his glass art because he couldn’t accept a credit card as payment. Even though a majority of payments has moved to plastic cards, accepting payments from cards is still difficult, requiring long applications, expensive hardware, and an overly complex experience. Square was born a few days later right next to the old San Francisco US Mint.

Today the Square team is focused on bringing immediacy, transparency, and approachability to the world of payments: an inherently social interaction each of us participates in daily. We’re starting with a limited beta and rolling out to everyone in early 2010."
android  iphone  ipad  payment  processing  creditcards  credit  ecommerce  commerce  glvo  applications  business  mobile  money  design  services  retail  twitter  technology  tools  ios 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Study Partner, A Teaching Alliance & Idea laboratory
"We’re Study Partner, a teaching alliance and idea lab co-founded in 2007 by Jen Thomas and Shawn Petersen. We believe that design is for everyone and that designers can have a positive and significant impact on the world. ...

We call our methodology “design culture immersion”. It includes inspirational presentations, a supportive learning environment, challenging projects, exposure to the work of the “old masters” and trendsetters of graphic design, presentations on the nuts and bolts of design + typography and online tools so students can facilitate discussions with their peers to create their own design communities."
education  lcproject  schools  teaching  design  graphicdesign  portland  oregon  schooldesign  tcsnmy  processing  visualcommunication 
march 2010 by robertogreco
ONull - Vector Generator
"ONull is an image based Vector Generator for Mac OSX. It allows the user to convert images into rasterized vector graphics. This tool was developed to give graphic designers the ability to transform small images from the Internet into printable and editable graphics. ONull is written in Java and uses the Processing core library as graphical engine."
onull  raster  vectors  visualization  macosx  osx  mac  converter  design  freeware  generator  processing  java  via:migurski  images  illustrator  graphics  software  pdf  photography 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Perlin Noise
"Many people have used random number generators in their programs to create unpredictability, make the motion and behavior of objects appear more natural, or generate textures. Random number generators certainly have their uses, but at times their output can be too harsh to appear natural. This article will present a function which has a very wide range of uses, more than I can think of, but basically anywhere where you need something to look natural in origin. What's more it's output can easily be tailored to suit your needs."
animation  mathematics  processing  algorithms  math  graphics  perlinnoise  random  howto  programming  visualization  software  design  gamedev  texture  noise  tutorial  via:robinsloan 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The cost of getting sick : GE
"To gain a deeper understanding of healthcare costs, we've combined the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) with 500K records from GE's proprietary database. By combining MEPS with GE's data, we gain a more complete picture of the costs associated with chronic conditions."
healthcare  datavisualization  infographics  processing  information  visualization  health  benfry  medical  disease  conversation  data  interactive 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Teaching Your Kids To Be Programmers | GeekDad | Wired.com
"A few minutes after staring at the screen one of my girls (7) started giggling and asked what I was doing. After reading the code she thought I was writing a very strange email to some one about these things called “x” and “y” and “rect.” I explained this was programming and it allowed me to control the computer. But of course more and more questions started coming out about what does “int,” “if” and “do” mean."
programming  processing  children  teaching  learning  tcsnmy  edg  srg  glvo  coding 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Scratch: Programming for All | November 2009 | Communications of the ACM
""Digital fluency" should mean designing, creating, and remixing, not just browsing, chatting, and interacting." ... "As we develop future versions, our goal is to make Scratch even more tinkerable, meaningful, and social. With our Scratch Sensor Board (http://info.scratch.mit.edu/Sensor_Boards External Link), people can create Scratch projects that sense and react to events in the physical world. We are also developing a version of Scratch that runs on mobile devices and a Web-based version that enables people to access online data and program online activities."
scratch  future  media  programming  tcsnmy  tinkering  srg  edg  mobile  data  ubicomp  diy  education  learning  technology  children  kids  processing  medialab  coding  teaching  mitmedialab 
october 2009 by robertogreco
the preservation of favoured traces | ben fry
"We often think of scientific ideas, such as Darwin's theory of evolution, as fixed notions that are accepted as finished. In fact, Darwin's On the Origin of Species evolved over the course of several editions he wrote, edited, & updated during his lifetime. The 1st English ed was approximately 150,000 words, the 6th a much larger 190,000. In the changes are refinements & shifts in ideas — whether increasing the weight of a statement, adding details, or even a change in the idea itself. 2nd edition adds a notable “by the Creator” to the closing paragraph, giving greater attribution to a higher power...the phrase “survival of the fittest” — usually considered central to the theory & often attributed to Darwin — instead came from British philosopher Herbert Spencer, & didn't appear until the 5th edition of the text. Using the 6 editions as a guide, we can see the unfolding & clarification of Darwin's ideas as he sought to further develop his theory during his lifetime."
science  history  darwin  complexity  text  benfry  processing  words  visualization  change  writing  evolution  editing  biology  data  animation  infographics  books  charlesdarwin 
september 2009 by robertogreco
White Glove Tracking
"On May 4th, 2007, we asked internet users to help isolate Michael Jackson's white glove in all 10,060 frames of his nationally televised landmark performance of Billy Jean. 72 hours later 125,000 gloves had been located. wgt_data_v1.txt (listed below) is the culmination of data collected. It is released here for all to download and use as an input into any digital system. Just as the data was gathered collectively it is our hope that it will be visualized collectively. Please email links to your apps, video, source code, and/or screen shots to evan[at]eyebeam[dot]org. Work will be exhibited in an online gallery and depending on popularity and interest potentially in a forthcoming physical gallery exhibition as well. Huge thanks to everyone that contributed to the data collection."
michaeljackson  technology  art  visualization  collaboration  processing  motion  programming  crowdsourcing  music  data  opensource  tracking 
july 2009 by robertogreco
NETLab Toolkit - NETLab
"The NETLab Toolkit is a free set of software tools that enable designers to easily "sketch in hardware". With no programming at all and working in the familiar environment of Flash, designers can hook up a physical sensor (e.g. a knob) and immediately get that knob to control a motor or a video projection. The toolkit works with a wide range of sensors, wireless sensors, input from the Wii Remote, controls motors and LEDs, communicates with MIDI devices, controls sound, graphics, and video in Flash, and communicates with DMX computer controlled lighting equipment, all with a simple drag-and-drop interface (of course, programming hooks are provided as well)."
physicalcomputing  arduino  processing  flash  prototyping  sensors  electronics  hardware  computing  diy  interface  tools  technology  development  programming  design  netlab  microcontrollers 
july 2009 by robertogreco
The Daily Duino» Getting Started with Pachube & Arduino
"Another post on Pachube and how easy it is to get setup and going. This post will cover the basic steps on how to get some sensors online! I will be using my project of two light sensors as an example."
pachube  arduino  microcontrollers  howto  tutorials  diy  processing  sensing  sensors  via:preoccupations 
june 2009 by robertogreco
iPhone Merchant Account Program - iPhone Credit Card Terminal
"Processing credit cards using your Apple iPhone or iTouch is a fast and easy way for your business to accept credit cards anywhere with our iPhone merchant account program. Credit Card Processing Services, in conjunction with Inner Fence, Merchant Focus, Authorize.Net®, and Global Payments has developed a seamless iPhone interface program so that you can instantly accept all of the major credit cards and check cards including MasterCard, Visa, American Express, and Discover Card for your mobile business. There is No Setup Cost and our merchant agreement is Month to Month so you are not locked into any long term contracts like many merchant account companies. We call our excellent iPhone program CCTerminal."
ccterminal  creditcards  iphone  application  business  glvo  money  applications  commerce  paypal  ecommerce  processing  banking  credit  mobile  ios 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Transactions iPhone
"Transactions makes credit card processing away from the home or office effortless. Using two of the most popular payment gateways in the world Transactions allows anyone to easily accept credit cards.
iphone  applications  commerce  paypal  ecommerce  processing  banking  credit  creditcards  business  mobile  glvo  via:jessebrand  ios 
march 2009 by robertogreco
LÖVE - Free 2D Game Engine
"LÖVE is an unquestionably awesome 2D game engine, which allows rapid game development and prototyping in Lua. This project is constantly evolving and changes come and go, sometimes initiated by us and sometimes by the recommendations of others. If you have an idea on how to make the game engine better, it is greatly desired that you contact us and let us know what you think."
design  education  games  software  videogames  programming  edg  coding  osx  gaming  processing  windows  linux  graphics  opensource  mac  development  gamedev  2d  lua 
january 2009 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: Arduino Gift Guide!
"The Arduino open-source microcontroller platform can be programmed and equipped to perform a nearly endless list of functions. It's likely the best all-around centerpiece to a modern electronics project. But one of the tasks Arduino is best used for is straight-up fun - the open design means there's an Arduino board suitable for almost any project, and a wealth of add-on "shields" extends its abilities with ease."
glvo  arduino  edg  microcontrollers  processing  diy  make  electronics  gifts  hardware 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Meggy Jr RGB
"Meggy Jr RGB is a handheld platform for developing your own pixel-scale video games.
gaming  electronics  edg  make  programming  arduino  hacking  games  development  processing  education  technology  gifts 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Arduino Starter Kit
"Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open-source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board. Arduino is open source!
arduino  edg  electronics  processing  microcontrollers  physicalcomputing  hardware  gifts 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Learning Processing: A Beginner's Guide to Programming Images, Animation, and Interaction by Daniel Shiffman
"Find a friend in code. This book tells a story. It’s a story of liberation, of taking the first steps towards understanding the foundations of computing, writing your own code, and creating your own media without the bonds of existing software tools. This story is not reserved for computer scientists and engineers. This story is for you."
processing  books  coding  howto  education  learning  beginner  danielshiffman  tutorials  visualization  programming  edg  srg  teaching  computing 
october 2008 by robertogreco
OLPC runs Processing and Arduino • The Villamil Organization
"At NYU’s ITP program, the Processing and Arduino programming environments are widely used. Since my main interest in the OLPC is to use it as a controller for projects, and since most of my projects are built using those two tools, I was very interested in getting them running on the OLPC. In addition, both Processing and Arduino are projects that have a lot in common with the OLPC project: they are focused on education, focus on making computing technology available to groups that previously would have found it difficult, are fully Open Sourced, and rely on a community-based approach to support and development. Good news: it is strikingly easy (with caveats). The Arduino IDE runs under Sugar (the OLPC’s built-in user interface) and under XFCE (a more conventional Linux window manager). Processing runs fine (albeit slowly) under XFCE. However, it gets confused under Sugar, which doesn’t handle multiple windows well."
opensource  olpc  programming  microcontrollers  arduino  processing  xo  physicalcomputing  hacking  howto  via:reas  edg 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Create Digital Motion » Learning Processing Book Available; Beginners’ Guide to Coding for Visualists
"The book is also geared towards the teacher. It’s not my belief that such a person will necessarily learn any new skills from the book (assuming they have a programming background), however, my hope is that the book will encourage and help facilitate the teaching of programming. It is structured with 10 lessons (complete with examples and exercises) and can act as a ready-made syllabus for a beginner interactive media / programming class. In fact, the book is modeled exactly on ITP’s Introduction to Computational Media course."
books  processing 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Dino Run: Exciting new game from PixelJam - Digital Tools
"Whoohoo! This game is really fun! The subject of Dino Run game is easy. You play a young dinosaur, while the world is going to die. Your mission is simple: run as fast as you can, just to escape the doomsday. The graphics are very fresh and pixely in style. The gameplay is somewhere between games like moon-patrol or motorcross maniacs, so expect something far away from the obvious, that is still much of fun playing! Once again a really good work from Pixel Jam."

[Game link here: http://www.pixeljam.com/dinorun/ ]
processing  games  gaming  free  play  edg 
august 2008 by robertogreco
[dp] - doble página
"Soy profesor en la e.[ad] Escuela de Arquitectura y Diseño, PUCV, Chile y trabajo en los talleres de diseño (Taller de Diseño de Primer Año, Talleres de Titulación y Gráfica Digital). También trabajo en AyerViernes en el área de estrategia y research. En Mayo de 2007 terminé un postgrado en Diseño de Interacción, en la Escuela de Diseño de Carnegie Mellon University."
design  chile  architecture  pucv  processing  coding  viñadelmar  graphics  herbertspencer  poetry  painting 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Book Release: Learning Processing at daniel shiffman
"My goal for “Learning Processing” was to write something for the complete and total programming beginner. If you’ve never written a line of code before in your life, but want to get started creating your own digital media tools then I wrote this book for you."

[see also: http://www.learningprocessing.com/ ]
processing  books  coding  howto  tutorials  learning  edg  classideas 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Pasto colorido « Terreno
"Este código processing crea un array de objetos de una clase. Fué interesante llenar los parámetros con números al azar que pudieran cambiar gradualmente de cuadro a cuadro."

[More here: http://terreno.wordpress.com/2008/07/31/pasto-colorido-en-corriendo-version-web/ ]
processing  organics  organic  coding  code  edg 
july 2008 by robertogreco
XBee LilyPad at Rob Faludi
"When the board files are done, they’ll be posted publicly on my site...A couple of my Sociable Objects students working on socially shape-shifting skirts. Hopefully the new XBee LilyPad will enable their creations."
xbee  wearable  arduino  processing  lilypad  edg  wearables 
july 2008 by robertogreco
YouTube - iphone processing
"A port of Processing based on javascript, Processing.js and a custom built canvas-object running on the iPhone." see also: http://processing.org/discourse/yabb_beta/YaBB.cgi?board=implementations;action=display;num=1212232494
iphone  processing  javascript  programming  hacks  interface 
july 2008 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: WiiChuck control of 3D Studio Max
"Using Processing, Midi Yoke, Ableton Live and 3D Studio Max Motion Capture Controller, I was able to transmit movement from the WiiChuck to 3D Studio Max via MIDI."
make  electronics  arduino  processing  wiimote 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Interactivos? workshop: Interview with Simone Jones and Alvaro Cassinelli - we make money not art
"Learning is more of a "cut and paste" experience than a cumulative one. This is extremely interesting and challenging for educators who design curriculum with specific "learning outcomes" that are derived from a cumulative process of knowledge acquisitio
opensource  electronics  learning  education  wmmna  lcproject  microcontrollers  processing  arduino  classideas  schools  curriculum 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Arduino - ArduinoBoardLilyPad
:microcontroller board designed for wearables and e-textiles. It can be sewn to fabric and similarly mounted power supplies, sensors and actuators with conductive thread. The board is based on the ATmega168V (the low-power version of the ATmega168) (datas
arduino  electronics  technology  wearable  fashion  processing  glvo  interactive  toys  classideas  srg  wearables 
june 2008 by robertogreco
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