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robertogreco : processoverproduct   8

Jakey Toor en Instagram: “Sorting, Sifting, and Purging in SD; Fascinating to go through all my old books, research, notes, and papers 📚📖📝—- Lisa Delpit was, and…”
"Lisa Delpit was, and still is, one of my favorite education theorists & authors. In fact, a few years ago, while working with a coach, I realized that part of what I want for the field of education is to see more sociology & anthropology research utilized in credentialing programs, as well as in-house professional developments. I feel lucky to have been introduced to Delpit’s work early on in my own program, which I have to say, especially now in retrospect, was top notch. “In her groundbreaking 1988 essay “The Silenced Dialogue: Power and Pedagogy in Educating Other People’s Children,” the elementary school teacher cum theorist Lisa Delpit dismantled some of the pieties of progressive education. Deliberately unstructured teaching strategies like “whole language,” “open classrooms,” and “process, not product” were putting poor, non-white children at an even greater disadvantage in school and beyond...” - The Nation: An interview with Lisa Delpit on educating “Other People’s Children’”."
education  jakeytoor  2018  1988  lisadelpit  progressive  learning  schools  schooling  teaching  howweteach  sociology  anthropology  pedagogy  power  openclassrooms  wholelanguage  disadvantage  process  processoverproduct  structure  unstructured 
august 2018 by robertogreco
10 things parents should unlearn… « What Ed Said
"10 things I think (some) parents should unlearn…

1.  Learning is best measured by a letter or a number.

2. Product is more important than process and progress.

3. Children need to be protected from any kind of failure.

4. The internet  is dangerous for children.

5. Parents and teachers should discuss students without the learner present.

6. Homework is an essential part of learning.

7. The school is responsible for the child’s entire education.

8. Your child’s perspective is the only one.

9. Learning looks the same as when you went to school.

10. Focus on (and fix) your child’s shortcomings, rather than their successes."
unlearning  parenting  unschooling  deschooling  2012  ednasackson  process  processoverproduct  tcsnmy  learning  assessment  testing  standards  standardization  responsibility  education  cv  teaching  studentdirected  students  failure  risk  risktaking  howwelearn  howweteach  schools  lcproject 
july 2012 by robertogreco
YouTube - TEDxEastsidePrep - Shawn Cornally - The Future of Education Without Coercion
[These are killing learning in schools]

No product = Failure [Product is emphasized over process]

What if they don't do anything? [Worry that they won't learn anything if given control of their learning]

3.9 ≠ 4.0 [Loss of motivation, feeling beyond recovery, no meaning]
education  learning  schools  tcsnmy  success  failure  science  teaching  process  productoverprocess  processoverproduct  time  scheduling  schedules  classschedules  2011  shawncornally  inquiry  inquiry-basedlearning  questioning  student-led  student-initiated  openstudio  unschooling  coercion  deschooling  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  overjustification  schooliness  schooling  creativity  absurdity  wonder  colleges  universities  admissions  gameofschool  playingschool  alfiekohn 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Chinese school defies rigid exam-focused education | Marketplace From American Public Media
"XUEQIN: We'd encourage the students to express themselves as much as possible through artwork, music, writing. It' just that because the students have been through this traditional system, they have problems doing that."

[…]

"Wang asked his teachers to start moving among their students, engaging them, not talking at them. And that's what chemistry teacher Qin Lei is doing today. Instead of asking students for the correct answers, Qin focuses on the process, asking students their opinions: asking why, how, challenging what they know. That teaching method is routine in the West, but in China it's a radical departure.

Principal Wang made a name for himself at Shenzhen High School in the southern province of Guangdong when he gutted the school's curriculum and let students choose their own classes.

"ZHENG: A lot of educators from all over the country visited our school. They all agreed the system was good, but risky."

Risky paid off."
china  beijing  education  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  learning  student-centered  student-led  pedagogy  gaokao  testing  standardizedtesting  process  processoverproduct  teaching  2011  risk  toshare  progressive  alternative  creativity 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Drill and Kill: Educating Zombies: The Talking Head(s)
"A friend and I are sharing a middle school classroom with sixteen kids creating a mini-documentary film based on nothing that matters. It doesn’t even matter how the films turn out, which will probably be what you would expect from a twelve year old armed with a Flip video and a YouTube file converter app. We have simply gotten out of the way of the learning. As the adults in charge, we have created the learning environment by providing technical support, a loose agenda, and a guiding hand when energies wane.

We talk about the “sage on the stage” or “the talking head” mentality that is rife in education. We talk about the teacher guilt that appears when one abandons direct instruction. We note the implicit judgment leveled by our colleagues that think that such an educational activity is not “real teaching”."
teaching  sageonthestage  guideontheside  pedagogy  filmmaking  process  processoverproduct  tcsnmy  learning  children  autodidacts  lectures  lecturing  tradition  cv  schools  unschooling  deschooling  unlearning  change  looseagendas  support  lcproject 
february 2011 by robertogreco
No disrespect intended toward Emily Dickinson, but . . . « Re-educate Seattle
"In this case—and I would argue that this principle is universal—academic content and skills serve as a means towards helping the student mature from childhood to adulthood, from a novice learner dependant on others to a self-directed one that is capable of greater independence.

We spend a lot of time in schools worrying about the product of learning, and not nearly enough on the process."
stevemiranda  processoverproduct  process  projectbasedlearning  projects  teaching  learning  schools  education  pscs  tcsnmy  self-directedlearning  maturity  dependence  interdependence  independence  self-sufficiency  pugetsoundcommunityschool  pbl 
february 2011 by robertogreco
A Box? Or a Spaceship? What Makes Kids Creative - WSJ.com
"Researchers believe growth in time kids spend on computers & watching TV, plus a trend in schools toward rote learning & standardized testing, are crowding out the less structured activities that foster creativity. Mark Runco, a professor of creative studies & gifted education at the U of Georgia, says students have as much creative potential as ever, but he would give US elementary, middle & high schools "a 'D' at best" on encouraging them…

Asking open-ended questions & showing interest in answers can help…

It is best to avoid paying too much attention to the outcome of kids' creative efforts…"The more emphasis put on the final product…the greater is "the risk that the kid is going to do pictures for the praise, & not for the enjoyment." Instead, emphasize effort over results…

Raising a creative child can be taxing. Such kids tend to have above-average "spontaneity, boldness, courage, freedom & expressiveness. So they sometimes behave like little anarchists."
creativity  teaching  schools  rote  education  problemsolving  process  processoverproduct  tcsnmy  lcproject  learning  us  curriculum  standardizedtesting  anarchism  anarchy  parenting  rotelearning 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » And the time it takes to make them is the time taken to mean it.
"'[Martin Puryear's] sculptures look the way they do because they need to in order to mean what they do. The labor that is compressed into them allows them to work over time, and the time it takes to make them is the time taken to mean it. That they so often employ specialized tradesmen’s skills in their making allows them to work at the edges of utility—vessels that might be dwellings in the shapes of bodies—and in that fertile seam between representation and abstraction.'

A quote from “From Head to Hand: Art and the Manual” by David Levi Strauss.

Why do I blog this? I like the way that time is emphasized here rather than the outcome. The emphasis is on the the practice and process, which have so much to say about the sculpture."
sculrpture  process  toshare  topost  julianbleecker  martinpuryear  davidlevistrauss  creation  time  processoverproduct  productasindicationofprocess  outcomes  labor  craft  representation  abstraction  sculpture  craftsmanship 
july 2010 by robertogreco

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