recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : projectideas   146

« earlier  
BYBORRE - Mastering Knit
"Byborre is an Amsterdam based textile innovation studio working on the frontiers of material development, functionality and aesthetics through engineered knits.

Signature to Byborre are the innovative hand-rendered techniques that, through direct interaction with their circular knitting machines, give the studio full creative freedom to play with patterns, colours, and textures within their fabrics. Designing from the yarn up allows Byborre to discover new possibilities both within their own collections and for leading brands.

Over the past six years Byborre has worked with clients such as Nike, wings+horns, The North Face, and Daniel Arsham. Through consultation and collaboration with other brands, Byborre pushes knit innovation to find creative ways to achieve the project’s goal. The archetypical clothing pieces in the studio’s own label tell an important story about the relationship between material and machine, along with introducing a new approach to fashion where process and product are equally important.

Over the past six years Byborre has worked with clients such as Nike, wings+horns, The North Face, and Daniel Arsham. Through consultation and collaboration with other brands, Byborre pushes knit innovation to find creative ways to achieve the project’s goal. The archetypical clothing pieces in the studio’s own label tell an important story about the relationship between material and machine, along with introducing a new approach to fashion where process and product are equally important."
clothing  uniform  fashion  glvo  projectideas  amsterdam  materials  knits  knitting  design  clothes  wearable  wearables  byborre  textiles 
april 2019 by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: How to make a website for your creative work
"A guide to getting your work on the internet so you can share it with others, written by Jason Huff and illustrated by Sean Suchara."



"If you’re a creative person living in the world today, people will expect to be able to find some examples of your work online. How you choose to put it there, though, is completely up to you.

I got started on the web in the early aughts when I created a gallery for my creative work. I call it a gallery because it was just that: a blank space with images in a row that linked to some projects I wanted to share with friends. Since then my site has evolved, disappeared, come back, and spawned other sites that express my ideas and identity online. Each evolution was a chance to share new work in a way that reflected how I wanted people to experience it.

I work on the web everyday. I help designers, artists, and galleries discover and create their online presence. And for seven years, I designed and led teams at Etsy, a platform that helps millions of creative humans around the world use the web to make an income from their craft. In all of my work, I’ve learned that every person brings their own body of knowledge and point of view when they create their own space online. The unique approaches that each individual brings to the experience are what make the internet an interesting place to explore.

Before digging into this guide, I recommend reading Laurel Schwulst’s essay, My website is a shifting house next to a river of knowledge. What could yours be? It’s a great sister piece to this more practical guide, and provides many poetic explorations of the website format. Like Laurel mentions in her essay, “Artists excel at creating worlds.” I hope this guide will help you start creating yours.

— Jason Huff"
webdesign  webdev  howto  websites  seansuchara  jasonhuff  art  glvo  projectideas  laurelschwulst  morehshinallahyari  petracortright  americanartist  ingridburrington  damonzucconi  jennyodell  seokhoonchoi  tomjennings  carlyayres 
january 2019 by robertogreco
The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library on Vimeo
[parts of the video (from the introduction): "1. Libraries existed to copy data. Libraries as warehouses was a recent idea and not a very good one 2. The online world used to be considered rhizomatic but recent events have proven that it is actually quite arboretic and precarious. 3. A method of sharing files using hard drives is slow, but it is extremely resilient. This reversalism is a radical tactic agains draconian proprietarianism. 4. There are forces and trends that are working against portable libraries."]

[Book is here:
http://networkcultures.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/NN07_complete.pdf
http://networkcultures.org/blog/publication/no-07-radical-tactics-of-the-offline-library-henry-warwick/ ]

"The Radical Tactics of the Offline Library is based on the book "Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries"
By Henry Warwick

The Personal Portable Library in its most simple form is a hard drive or USB stick containing a large collection of e-books, curated and archived by an individual user. The flourishing of the offline digital library is a response to the fact that truly private sharing of knowledge in the online realm is increasingly made impossible. While P2P sharing sites and online libraries with downloadable e-books are precarious, people are naturally led to an atavistic and reversalist workaround. The radical tactics of the offline: abandoning the online for more secure offline transfer. Taking inspiration from ancient libraries as copying centers and Sneakernet, Henry Warwick describes the future of the library as digital and offline. Radical Tactics: Reversalism and Personal Portable Libraries traces the history of the library and the importance of the Personal Portable Library in sharing knowledge and resisting proprietarian forces.

The library in Alexandria contained about 500,000 scrolls; the Library of Congress, the largest library in the history of civilization, contains about 35 million books. A digital version of it would fit on a 24 TB drive, which can be purchased for about $2000. Obviously, most people don’t need 35 million books. A small local library of 10,000 books could fit on a 64 GB thumb drive the size of a pack of chewing gum and costing perhaps $40. An astounding fact with immense implications. It is trivially simple to start collecting e-books, marshalling them into libraries on hard drives, and then to share the results. And it is much less trivially important. Sharing is caring. Societies where people share, especially ideas, are societies that will naturally flourish."
libraries  henrywarwick  archives  collection  digital  digitalmedia  ebooks  drm  documentary  librarians  alexandriaproject  copying  rhizomes  internet  online  sharing  files  p2p  proprietarianism  sneakernet  history  harddrives  learning  unschooling  property  deschooling  resistance  mesopotamia  egypt  alexandria  copies  decay  resilience  cv  projectideas  libraryofalexandria  books  scrolls  tablets  radicalism  literacy  printing  moveabletype  china  europe  publishing  2014  copyright  capitalism  canon  librarydevelopment  walterbenjamin  portability  andrewtanenbaum  portable  portablelibraries  félixguattari  cloudcomputing  politics  deleuze  deleuze&guattari  web  offline  riaa  greed  openstudioproject  lcproject 
november 2018 by robertogreco
These ain't no books […]
"These ain't no books [...]
Realized projects lectures / talks / workshops
[...] But aesthetic investigations
these ain’t no books (…)

(…) But pro­jects in di­gi­tal and hy­brid pu­blis­hing.

*******

MISSION

We work at the in­ter­sec­tion of de­sign and tech­no­logy, crea­ting and de­si­gning in­di­vi­dual di­gi­tal and hy­brid pu­blis­hing work­flows.

Take a set of en­cy­clo­pe­dias and ask, “how do i make this di­gi­tal?” you get a Mi­cro­soft En­carta CD. Take the phi­lo­so­phy of en­cy­clo­pe­dia-ma­king and ask, “how does di­gi­tal ch­ange our en­ga­ge­ment with this?” you get wi­ki­pe­dia.

Post-artifact books and publishing – digital’s effect on how we produce, distribute and consume content.

“Most people are tal­king about a 1:1 Text trans­fer to di­gi­tal. Much more in­te­res­ting is the ques­tion: What lies bey­ond that bor­der? how do new ways of books look like? how can they be dis­played on di­gi­tal de­vices?” —Leander Wattig

*******

DESIGN

The de­ve­lop­ment of an in­di­vi­dual, cha­rac­te­ris­tic vi­sual lan­guage for every pu­blis­hing pro­ject is the main goal in our pro­cess.

By ex­pe­ri­men­ting, using tools dif­fer­ently and con­nec­ting lose ends in a new way, we try to find our own me­thods and work­flows.

*******

TECHNOLOGY

Pro­gramming and de­si­gning at the same time al­lows us to take ad­van­tage of the cur­rent tech­no­lo­gi­cal pos­si­bi­li­ties, thus co­m­ing up with uni­que so­lu­ti­ons.

“I don’t know… pro­gramming and de­si­gning is the same thing…” —Erik van Blokland

“We live in a tech­ni­cal rea­lity.” —Mercedes Bunz

“How ex­actly does the tech­no­logy we use to read ch­ange the way we read?” —Ferris Jabr

*******

ABOUT

“These ain’t no books (…)” is a pro­ject by John­son / Kings­ton, emer­ging from the en­ga­ge­ment with the fu­ture of the book and rea­ding on screens.

Tech­no­lo­gi­cal pro­gress has a big im­pact on so­ciety – it is our duty to take part in sha­ping these ch­an­ges.

*******

These ain't no books [...]
is a project by
Johnson / Kingston
Ivan Weiss / Michael Kryenbühl
Bern / Luzern

Contact us:
info@theseaintnobooks.com
www.johnsonkingston.ch"
books  bookfuturism  digital  screens  print  leanderwattig  publishing  technology  design  programming  erikvanblokland  mercedezbunz  ferrisjabr  ivanweiss  michaelkryenbühl  microsoftencarta  encarta  multimedia  encyclopedias  projectideas  howweread  reading  howwewrite  writing 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Paper Road, by Nicole Lavelle
"PAPER ROAD is a book. It is a research narrative capturing my process of re-orienting myself to an important home-place. A heart-place.



This book is the final document of a year-long research project conducted while I was a Graduate Fellow at the Headlands Center for the Arts from July 2016 to July 2017.

What is PAPER ROAD about? See a weird concept framework I made for this project.

The research process and story both begin at my family's summer cabin in Lagunitas, California. I have spent a lot of time in this place. I use houses as vessels for situating my own located experience within broader California cultural contexts and land use histories. The book is a non-linear narrative of fragments, recontextualized image and text collected from private and public archives and collections. The content I assembled from research materials is annotated in first-person narrative, explaining the wild connections that emerged between everything.

The book contains 450 pages of annotated narrative, an introductory essay, a conversation with archivist and independent scholar Rick Prelinger, a non-functional (but poetic!) index, and a bibliography."
nicolelavelle  books  place  lagunitas  archives  rickprelinger  bibliographies  indices  culture  classideas  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  experience  california  collections  curation  research  storytelling  identity  2016  2017 
august 2018 by robertogreco
adaptive1 | Learning Library
"The Adaptive Design Association abides by the “open source” philosophy of design and fabrication. This does not mean that we simply offer our techniques and processes free of charge, but that we share them with a community who can build and expand upon what we teach. We hope that you -- whether you be a student, teacher, parent, designer, or therapist -- will in turn share your own concepts and designs with us, so that we may grow together.

Our community blog and forum is a platform for individuals to share adaptive design techniques, problems, and solutions with each other from all over the world -- and we encourage you to follow and join the conversation here.

The Adaptive Design Association also embraces a non-proprietary stance with our designs. Our work is not about the item -- but about the child -- and about children in every school or home whose environments might not be built for them.

When we focus on ownership, we delay in building -- and ultimately hinder a child from reaching their full potential. So please Take, Build, Improve, and Expand upon the things you see here -- but understand not only what you are doing -- but for whom -- and do so safely and collaboratively with others."
diy  howto  cardboard  via:ablerism  tutorials  opensource  classideas  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  adaptivedesign 
july 2016 by robertogreco
LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."
libraris  hardware  opensource  occupy.here  librarybox  piratebox  classideas  projectideas  via:unthinkingly 
june 2016 by robertogreco
MALIK on Vimeo
"part of the tribute series for mainline

dazeddigital.com/tribute

MALIK
director: abteen
producer: kay
cinematographer: isaac
editor: sergei
music: dj koze
shot entirely on GoPro"
gopro  documentary  abteenbagheri  youth  children  filmmaking  srg  edg  classidea  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  film  video  sfsh 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Reuben Margolin: On Kinetic Art - YouTube
"First inspired by the mysterious and mathematical qualities of a caterpillars crawl, artist Reuben Margolin creates large-scale kinetic sculptures that use pulleys and motors to recreate the complex movements and structures we see in nature. Margolin takes to the PopTech stage to share some of his extraordinary mechanical installations."

[See also: http://poptech.org/reubenmargolin
http://poptech.org/popcasts/reuben_margolins_kinetic_art
https://vimeo.com/7711239
http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/210831294/ ]
reubenmargolin  sculpture  kineticsculpture  classideas  kineticart  art  projectideas  beauty  math  nature  sinewaves  cycles  waves 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Uganda’s Tarantino and his $200 action movies - BBC News
"A Ugandan film company that makes low-budget action movies in the slums has found a cult following online - one US fan liked their films so much, he abandoned New York to become an action movie star in Kampala."



"Isaac Nabwana, the film director and brains behind Ramon Productions, was not fazed by the unexpected arrival. "I asked him, why didn't he call me? He said: 'I am a friend, I had to reach you.' That's when I realised that he's a true friend," he says. Nabwana offered his visitor some tea, and they spoke for five hours.

"I thought I was going to meet someone like myself - a little crazy with a camera and some friends - and very quickly I realised this is the real deal," says Hofmanis.

He had arrived in "Wakaliwood", where over the past decade, self-taught film maker Nabwana has shot more than 40 low-budget action films. He is not sure how much each one costs to make, but guesses it might be around $200 (£130). "It is passion that really makes a movie here," Nabwana says.

The volunteer cast and crew source props wherever they can. The green screen is a piece of cloth bought at the market, draped over a wall. The camera crane is made from spare tractor parts - Dauda Bissaso, one of the regular actors, is a mechanic and builds all the heavy gear and weapons. "He's just a genius with a blowtorch, he makes everything," says Hofmanis. Another key member of the team is Bruce U, a Bruce Lee fan who choreographs the fight scenes and runs a kung fu school for the children of Wakaliga.

To recreate gunshot injuries, they use free condoms from the local health clinic, filled with fake blood - they burst quite realistically. They used to be filled with real animal blood, but when one of the actors got sick with brucellosis, a disease passed on from cows, they switched to food colouring.

Fake blood is needed in vast quantities because the films are violent - but in a cartoonish way, and quite unlike the real violence Nabwana witnessed growing up during Uganda's 1981-86 civil war. "I don't put that in my movies, what I saw in the past," he says. "I include comedy - there was no comedy in the violence which I witnessed."

His cinematic hero is Chuck Norris, although he also likes Rambo and The Expendables. Hofmanis, on the other hand, compares him to directors like Guillermo del Toro, Robert Rodriguez and Martin Scorsese - "in terms of creativity and what they're contributing to cinema"."



"Unable to find a distributor, Nabwana came up with an ingenious solution: the actors and crew work for nothing, but get to keep half the profits from any DVDs they sell. "We do man-to-man, door-to-door all over the country to sell them," he says. The films can sell for up to 3,000 shillings - about $1 - but the team only has a window of about a week before they are pirated. They sometimes wear full costume to maximise sales."

[See also:
http://wakaliwood.com/

“WAKALIWOOD : Home of Ramon Film Productions”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MfvXLtZtLrQ

“Who Killed Captain Alex: Uganda's First Action Movie (English Subtitles & Video Joker) - Wakaliwood”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEoGrbKAyKE

“The New Wave of Ultra-Violent Ugandan DIY Action Cinema: Wakaliwood” (Vice)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sy0OOVTmsJI ]
isaacnabwana  uganda  film  filmmaking  2015  vibekevenema  africa  alanhofmanis  entertainment  kampala  ramonfilmproductions  wakaliga  wakaliwood  ramonproductions  lcproject  openstudioproject  classideas  projectideas 
may 2015 by robertogreco
This Mesh We're In: Why Communities Are Building An Internet That's More Local | Fast Company | Business + Innovation
"Recently, a pair of artists in New York put forward an unusual plan for teaching middle school students about the Internet: specifically, by teaching them how to get off it and build their own.

OurNet will combine two series of lessons: one on building a social network, and the other dedicated to constructing a private network, or "darknet," in the classroom. In the process, write Joanne McNeil and Dan Phiffer in their proposal, students will learn important concepts about how the Internet works. Last week the project was awarded a $35,000 grant from a MacArthur Foundation digital learning initiative.

Unlike the physical networks of Time Warner and Verizon or the virtual networks of Facebook and Instagram, however, the networks they and their students build will be noncommercial, and limited to people in their Wi-Fi range. That’s not just a way to simplify the lesson: It’s a deliberate choice to help students think about alternatives to corporate Internet providers and platforms built around advertising and tracking.

"This is an opportunity for the students to see what kind of middlemen they don’t need to connect—the idea that you can socialize with people without going on Facebook, or the idea that you can actually have a network that’s not through an ISP," says McNeil.

OurNet is part of a growing movement that aims to consider and build alternative computer networks. The wireless network idea adds to a growing number of small, independent, nonprofit wireless community networks, often organized as so-called "mesh networks" for their weblike, decentralized design, in which each node—a phone, for instance, or a sophisticated wireless router—relays the connection onwards to the next node. OurNet, with one central classroom router, will have an even simpler structure, though it shares the mesh networks' philosophy of decentralization.

The ad hoc approach has gained attention for its usefulness in more extreme situations. Various mesh networks have been deployed to improve communication at Occupy Wall Street and at Hong Kong's Occupy Central, for instance, and the State Department has funded their installation in Detroit and Tunisia, where they're thought of as a way to extend Internet service and avoid government surveillance. They've also been used to improve communications after disasters to replace severed communications links.

One network in Red Hook, Brooklyn, built by activists as a way to help the neighborhood stay connected and get emergency updates after superstorm Sandy struck New York in 2012, last week received a grant from one of the city's resiliency initiatives."
joannemcneil  danphiffer  education  internet  ournet  wireless  meshnetworks  ows  occupywallstreet  occupy.here  sarahgrant  subnodes  stevenmelendez  infrastructure  shahselbejerthorpe  guifi  guifi.net  hyperboria  isp  chicagomeshnetjefflunt  nycmesh  history  web  raspberypi  projectideas  edtech 
may 2015 by robertogreco
EXPERIENCE ECONOMIES
"Founded in 2010 by Gavin Kroeber and Rebecca Uchill, Experience Economies is a nomadic event-based platform for cultural inquiry. Experience Economies supports work by an array of artists and cultural producers, working across the visual and performing arts, the sciences, and the humanities. Our events are structured as experiments that encompass entire evenings, emphasizing experimentation, site specificity, discussion, and conviviality. Not a lecture and not a party, Experience Economies welcomes audiences that want their spectacles to mess with them and presenters who need a space to make that mess.

Contact Experience Economies at experience.economies@gmail.com "

[via: https://twitter.com/ablerism/status/589801232488914944 ]
experienceeconomies  experience  art  science  humanities  lcproject  openstudioproject  projectideas  rebeccauchill  gavinkroeber  performance  culture  culturalinquiry  messiness  experimentation  conviviality 
april 2015 by robertogreco
prosthetic knowledge — Pinhole Cinema Project from Fuwari Lab is a...
"Pinhole Cinema

Project from Fuwari Lab is a cardboard headset with tiny holes that project an alternative viewpoint inside it:

[embedded video: https://vimeo.com/111914423 ]
Workshop to make a pinhole cinema that can be enjoyed by wearing the head. To make your own movie theater in a box of size that can be mounted on the head … Images are projected therein, enters from a small hole drilled in the box …

More (in Japanese) here [http://www.fuwarilab.com/pinholecinema.html ]"

[See also: http://lensual.com/work/?lens_portfolio=pinhole-cinema ]
projectideas  perspective  perception  cameras  vision  fuwarilab  glvo  pinholecameras 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Being 12: The Year Everything Changes - WNYC
"It's no secret that being 12 years old can be tough. At 12, kids shed layers, test new roles and transform before our eyes as they explore what kind of adult they want to be. Their brains and bodies change at alarming rates. At the same time, school gets harder. In New York City, academic performance in seventh grade largely sets a student's path in high school.

New Yorkers this age often start commuting to school alone. For girls, it may be the year they buy their first bra or get their period. For everyone, it's an age for plugging in to the digital world, and tuning out adults more and more. Some may also have jobs or look after younger siblings. Friendships shift. Romantic feelings may blossom. The stakes get higher in so many ways. WNYC’s series, Being 12, brings to life the array of faces, voices and perspectives of these young New Yorkers.

See what they look like. Hear what they have to say. They are the city’s future. We think you should get to know them better."

[See also:
http://beingtwelve.tumblr.com/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/nbc-young-new-yorkers-open-about-tweenage-years/

“Being 12: The Year Everything Changes”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3Gxgv6-H3E

“What Romance Is Like in Middle School”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2HH72_AeCw

“If You Give a 12-Year-Old a Phone....”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzQ469WS9C8

and the many specific articles and episodes linked within the collection post. Examples:

http://www.wnyc.org/story/being-12-most-awkward-exhilarating-essential-year-our-lives/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/being-12-year-everything-changes-kids-schools-and-marketing/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/top-12-things-about-being-12/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/first-person-new-yorkers-being-12/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/meet-teachers-crazy-enough-teach-middle-school/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/being-12-when-relationships-reign-supreme/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/cutting-through-distractions-with-care/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/kids-and-technology/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/12-year-old-brain-peer-pressure/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/chancellor-seventh-grade-matters-lot/
http://www.wnyc.org/story/opinion-power-students-teaching-students/ ]
children  adolescence  12  age12  via:lizette  wnyc  radio  interviews  middleschool  nyc  technology  socialmedia  schools  education  learning  behavior  gender  teaching  youth  video  documentary  projectideas  classideas 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Gandhi’s Printing Press — Isabel Hofmeyr | Harvard University Press
"At the same time that Gandhi, as a young lawyer in South Africa, began fashioning the tenets of his political philosophy, he was absorbed by a seemingly unrelated enterprise: creating a newspaper. Gandhi’s Printing Press is an account of how this project, an apparent footnote to a titanic career, shaped the man who would become the world-changing Mahatma. Pioneering publisher, experimental editor, ethical anthologist—these roles reveal a Gandhi developing the qualities and talents that would later define him.

Isabel Hofmeyr presents a detailed study of Gandhi’s work in South Africa (1893–1914), when he was the some-time proprietor of a printing press and launched the periodical Indian Opinion. The skills Gandhi honed as a newspaperman—distilling stories from numerous sources, circumventing shortages of type—influenced his spare prose style. Operating out of the colonized Indian Ocean world, Gandhi saw firsthand how a global empire depended on the rapid transmission of information over vast distances. He sensed that communication in an industrialized age was becoming calibrated to technological tempos.

But he responded by slowing the pace, experimenting with modes of reading and writing focused on bodily, not mechanical, rhythms. Favoring the use of hand-operated presses, he produced a newspaper to contemplate rather than scan, one more likely to excerpt Thoreau than feature easily glossed headlines. Gandhi’s Printing Press illuminates how the concentration and self-discipline inculcated by slow reading, imbuing the self with knowledge and ethical values, evolved into satyagraha, truth-force, the cornerstone of Gandhi’s revolutionary idea of nonviolent resistance."

[via: https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/568156442240229376 ]
gandhi  printing  press  media  history  books  toread  2013  isabelhofmeyr  nonviolence  resistance  ethics  satyagraha  truth  truth-force  reading  writing  slow  newspapers  contemplation  reflection  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  thoreau  self-discipline  information  slowjournalism  journalism  publishing  zines  howweread  howwrite 
february 2015 by robertogreco
N O D E: HOW TO CREATE A HANDHELD LINUX TERMINAL
"This tutorial will teach you how to create your own handheld linux terminal with built in screen, QWERTY thumb keyboard and battery. It has four passive USB ports for expansion and extra connectivity. It’s super portable and is about the size of a Nintendo DS (if slightly thicker).

I initially made it because I thought it’d be cool to fit down into such a small form-factor, but it also has some interesting purposes. It’s basically a full handheld linux system that can do almost everything a normal sized computer can do. It’s not going to destroy any benchmark tests, so it’s best suited to command line stuff. Since this is the case, it’s actually a pretty good tool for learning the command line interface as well as basic scripting. The keyboard has all the special characters you need which is really handy.

Almost all the design choices here are made entirely out of necessity for space. If I had a chance to make a custom keyboard and case, it’d be alot sleeker. Considering it’s a bunch of off the shelf stuff, I think it turned out pretty nicely."
diy  electronics  linux  raspberrypi  2015  chrisrobinson  projectideas 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Tyler, the Creator and the Ironic(ish) Style of His Golf Wang Line | Billboard
“Tyler had grown up drawing doughnuts on his pants and dressing his own way and doing stuff,” says Clancy. “These guys are just making clothes for themselves, and then it’s a no-brainer for me as a manager to say, ‘OK, this is an obvious business.’ As I always say, the margin on socks is better than the margin on CDs, that’s for sure,” says Clancy. There even is a sneaker collaboration: Vans Syndicate x Odd Future, a collection of Old Skool Pro “S” suede shoes (those are skate shoes to laymen), in four colors, that came out in 2013. New colorways debut in July.


But while Tyler designs, he doesn’t think of himself as a designer: “I f—ing hate fashion and everything about it. I just like making stuff and it happens to be in f—ing cotton and, like, materials. But that shit [of the fashion world] is disgusting.” A healthy distrust of the corporate fashion industry, which exploits blind consumerism and false need, quite ironically makes for good business among post-millennials in the Internet age.


“I don’t want it to be like f—ing Rocawear or, I don’t know, a lot of things that come and go,” says Tyler. “That’s why I don’t give out free clothes to famous people. That actually could be the worst thing possible, if famous people wore Golf Wang
lcproject  clothing  tylerthecreator  ofwgkta  2014  projectideas  glvo  making  openstudioproject  oddfuture  golfwang 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Sampson Starkweather Strips it Down to Just Chapbooks | HTMLGIANT
"Hey Sampson, what’s the deal with chapbooks?

Funny, that’s how I start all my stand-up comedy gigs. It kills of course. So I wanted to start with a quote from James Haug’s Why I Like Chapbooks (Factory Hollow, 2011), who waxes lyrical “Chapbooks are stealth books./ They can slip under a door./ They don’t impose. They suggest./ They’re not one thing or another. They don’t take much time. They’re sly and easy to ignore. They imply, insinuate, inquire./ They don’t expect an answer./ They have a long history; they have no history.”

Chapbooks are the currency of underground poetry publishing, and tied to a sense of community and gift-ish economy, mostly run by poets who want to give something back and create a home for the work they believe in. Chapbooks are the new of the new, in the world of poetry most poets’ first publications come through chapbooks, so if you want to know the future (of poetry), read chapbooks. Chapbooks tend to be exciting and tied to a counter-culture because they provide a space for more experimental, esoteric or avant-garde work to be published that contests and university presses or bigger presses who may be more concerned with money wouldn’t take the risk on or didn’t think would sell…Chapbooks are like the opposite of money. Which is so money!

Chapbooks also have such a materiality and visceral physical life, because they are mostly handmade and handbound and come in all shapes, sizes (from Small Fires matchbooks to The Pines LP records) and textures imaginable (god I love texture!), made from old military uniforms, childhood blankets, prison cups, cardboard, vinyl, rubber, bolts, matchbooks, you name it. It is this handmade element and imagination and of course each chapbook’s limited nature that gives them such value, and ties them to history and an archival existence. Chapbooks are a link to the human that I think is more important than ever right now in the face of ever increasing digital media and publishing, Chapbooks are like Sarah Connor and her son (John Connor) facing the Terminators in Terminator 2: the hope of all mankind and the future of the human race lie in their hands. Also, they are perfect to read on the subway!"

[Via:
https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/538120884657995776
https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/538121092934557696
https://twitter.com/annegalloway/status/538121130263855104

See also: "I wish academics would release chapbooks of solo essays & half-baked ideas, the way musicians release EPs, demos, B-Sides, alt-takes, etc."
https://twitter.com/ezbrooks/status/531901193199837185 ]
chapbooks  sampsonstarkweathher  academia  zines  ideas  projectideas  classideas  b-sides  eps  texture  handmade  publishing  diy  lcproject  openstudioproject  jameshaug  inquiry  stealth 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Home - Technology Will Save Us Technology Will Save Us
"Technology Will Save Us design gadgets that you can make yourself. Our DIY kits and resources are the best way to learn skills, make cool things and begin your own journey as a tech maker."

[See also: https://vimeo.com/59401624 ]
arduino  electronics  kits  classideas  projectideas  diy  education 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Asylum center phonecard party | Princes of Ubiquity
"Friday October 31st, 2014. Refugees at the belgian federal asylum seekers center Klein Kasteeltje/Petit Chateau in Brussels were invited to gather in a so called ‘phonecard party’, initiated by Recyclart at the asylum center. The people from Syria, Afganistan, Albania, Palestine, Senegal.. were helped by the dj to plug-in their phones in the mixing table and play the favourite songs they stored on their device.

The result was an at least sweaty and astonishing event, with a hard to grasp atmosphere. The festive and somehow cosmopolitan mixing of local and often unshazamable mp3 hits had a dark and hysterical side to it. Nostalgia, hope, despair, trauma, adventure, melancholy, excitement and pride,.. all this was part of the melting pot and shared in a single room.

The disco gathering was loud in every aspect: the music, the cheering and the clapping, the way people danced, laughed and sweated or sat idle on a stool and stared. Loud.

Mixed groups of arab adolescent men, african women, eastern european families with childeren and elderly people all participated in what resembled an unfamiliar wedding party. Each new song that was played introduced a different traditional or less traditional dance to the floor, which was then interpreted by the others, or simply denied in favour of cheerful improvisation.

Apart maybe from my own presence, there was nothing exotic to this confusing reality of a hysterically loud transit zone.

[Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/bcrevits/asylum-seekers-phonecard-party ]

About the tracklist:

Not all songs could be recognized by Shazam. Actually, the most beautiful and mainly Arab songs were not. I’m still looking for people who could help identifying them.

For the tracks I could find, a quick research often showed a direct link between the status and quest of a refugee and either the lyrics or the biography of the singer: “European gipsy”, the Palestinian winner of Arab Idol 2013 singing “Raise your keffiea”, “I’m titanium, I’m bulletproof”, the Iraqi singer Hussam Al Rassam (a singer banned from Iraq by Muslim fundamentalists), Meda (an Albanian singer born in Kosovo and living in Stuttgart) etc, “taste the money – testimony” and the international polyglot release Shiki Riddim…

It is very clear however that this tracklist shows something else as well. Unsurprisingly, we a see what Henry Jenkins called pop cosmopolitanism through monocultural ‘urban’ music mixed with Bruce Sterling’s favela chic reflected by the phablets – you have lost everything material, no job or prospects, but you are wired to the gills and potentially big on facebook. And add to that a twist of cyberbalkanization.

Taste the money (Testimony) – P-Square
La Nueva y La Ex – Daddy Yankee
European Gipsy (Balkan Cigeni) – Koddok
Ala El Koufiea – Mouhammad Assaf
Gili Gili – Sinan Hoxha
Shaki Riddim – Sir Lewis
Edhe Pak – Dhurata Dora Feat. & Lumi B
Alef Mabrook – Hussam Al Rassam
Kar E Don, E Don – Meda
Titanium (Alesso remix) Lyrics – David Guetta feat. Sia

[YouTube playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFBZkWA4dTE&list=PLMEpByAUUDHHfJaLjKMVpw8PFq8XAJJWN "
music  culture  refugees  mobile  phones  digital  henryjenkins  popcosmopolitanism  brucesterling  favelachic  cyberbalkanization  sharing  cosmopolitanism  projectideas  playlists 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Rev Dan Catt: RDCXAD #007, the binaural episode.
"The latest experimental audio diary is out and this one is a bit of fun (for me). For this week it's all about the binaural recordings.

I was introduced to binaural recordings for the first time back in 2008 by Scott while working at Flickr. In short you record with microphones positioned at ear distance apart, with a head like object between them to block the sound from one side of the head directly reaching the other. A good way to simulate this head like object is to use your actual head, easy huh!

Then when someone wearing headphones listens back to the recording they end up with the slightly freaky experience of essentially ending up in your head. The effect isn't so great on stereo speakers, but I figure most people listen to podcasts with headphones.

Anyway, wearing a pair of handy in-ear microphones we all set off on a family walk around our local deer park, with the intent of getting some nice nature/field records. Turns out as a family we don't really shut up for more than 20 seconds at a time, I blame the kids."

[Direct link to the podcast: https://soundcloud.com/revdancatt/rev-dan-catt-experimental-audio-diary-episode-7 ]

[Hardware:

Zoom H1 Handy Portable Digital Recorder
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003QKBVYK/

Roland CS-10EM Binaural Microphone Earphones
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003QGPCTE/ ]
revdancatt  fieldnotes  fieldrecording  audio  sound  soundscapes  2014  classideas  projectideas  microphones  binaural  binauralrecording  zoomh1 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Face Your World, StedelijkLab Slotervaart
"The Face Your World (2002) project, conceived in Columbus, Ohio (USA) [see also 3.8, pp. 23-24], offers children a collective learning environment in which they can learn how to investigate, as well as adapt, their living environment. The Interactor, a 3-D multi-user computer environment, allows children to 'engineer' their surroundings. On the initiative of SKOR (a Dutch foundation for art and public space) and AFK (Amsterdam Fund for the Arts), Van Heeswijk and architect Dennis Kaspori developed a practical educational model for participation in urban renewal aimed at secondary school students (specifically VMBO-level, lower secondary vocational education), devising a completely new version of the Interactor in collaboration with IJsfontein.

Face Your World StedelijkLab Slotervaart started in early 2005 in the Staalmanplein neighbourhood, an area undergoing drastic urban renewal, including the planned creation of a park about 13,500 m2 to serve as the district's new public heart. Van Heeswijk worked hard to ensure this commission went to Face Your World, in order to create an urban-planning process based around intensive participation by local residents and striving to invest urban regeneration, usually based on economic principles, with existing social and cultural capital. From January through July, Face Your World set up camp in an old gymnasium, on the site of the future park, transformed into an 'urban lab': a place to discuss and work on the design of the park with students, local residents and other interested parties. Each day, pupils from the Professor Einstein Elementary School and students from the Calvijn met Junior College (a VMBO school), along with neighbourhood residents, explored their surroundings with Van Heeswijk and Kaspori and invited experts. Collectively they worked on the design of their future park, addressing not only what facilities should be available, but also how it should look and their personal roles within it. StedelijkLab Slotervaart provided a learning environment as part of a public process of planning for the neighbourhood's future. Six months later the participants presented their design to the local authorities and other local residents. After some minimal modifications, the borough council officially approved the communal design for the 'Staalman Park' on 1 March 2006. The whole project and the way in which it interrelated several complex issues - urban renewal, practical education, neighbourhood participation and the role of art in public space within the concrete context of a design project - was presented and discussed at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. The model StedelijkLab is to be set up at four new locations, two in the Netherlands and two abroad."
jeannevanheeswijk  2005  art  community  staalmanplein  netherlands  openstudioproject  lcproject  urbanrenewal  projectideas  urbanism  urban  urbanlab  design  stedelijklab  children  participatory 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Portlander on Vimeo
"Portlander is a site-specific publication produced from a one-month residency in a public library on the Isle of Portland, England in June 2014. The 64-page print-on-demand newspaper contains photography, oral histories, text fragments, found material and other ephemera collected during chance encounters and connections with various members of the Portland communities. 3,000 copies of Portlander were printed and distributed throughout Portland for the b-side arts festival in September 2014. Funded by Arts Council England."

[See also: http://soulellis.com/2014/08/the-last-day-of-august/
http://soulellis.com/2014/06/on-portland/ ]
paulsoulellis  artbooks  books  publication  newspapers  photography  place  2014  portlander  portland  england  print  projectideas  classideas  srg  artistsbooks 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Yuki Kageyama: Exploring Japan’s Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups | PingMag
"A base or a hideout. Well, whatever you called it — you can bet that you had one as a kid. But it’s not just about larking around when young. Hideouts can also be hubs for alternate ways of living, a refuge and a means of returning to a more innocent childhood world.

Hideouts are necessary spaces in everyday life and function like an abode. Since we are thinking about all things related to Japanese homes at the moment, when we heard about a new book by Yuki Kageyama called “Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups”, we were intrigued to say the least. It introduces a range of examples from around Japan and also pointers on how to create a hideout yourself."
books  japan  architecture  hideouts  bases  yukikageyama  projectideas  classideas  glvo  edg  srg  2014 
september 2014 by robertogreco
andrew simpson reincarnates junk mail into pressed paper products
"as part of the london design festival 2014, 19 greek street will be adding a selection of sustainable design pieces to the café’s existing display. among the collection is the ‘junk press’ series by andrew simpson of supercyclers, which challenges the perception of junk mail being merely something to discard, and instead reincarnates trash as a raw material for functional use. ‘the origin of the idea is that, try as we might, it seems impossible junk mail, but the other way to think about the situation is that there is a constant flow of free cellulose coming to peoples homes.‘ simpson describes to us ‘with this raw material on tap, I started to look for applications for it and settled on paper plates.’"
projectideas  papermaking  junkmail  andrewsimpson  supercyclers  reuse  2014 
september 2014 by robertogreco
The Hunt for Brooklyn's Hidden Creeks | Motherboard
"The morning's goal is get pictures of the whole lawn and then to look at the vegetation. Nature can be built over, but it can't be stopped, and the long-buried waterways are still written on the surface in grass. The type of grass growing reveals the soil below, where the patterns of the historic streams persist. Although unseen, they're still adding to the Gowanus watershed through combined sewers, much to the detriment of the water and the health of those who would enjoy it.

“Combined sewers have limited capacities, and when it rains, they overflow poop and condoms into our Canal where we canoe,” he says. “By getting clean stream water out of the sewers, and diverting them to parks, and Street Creeks, we can improve the water quality.”

So Eymund has been mapping Brooklyn's cryptocreeks upstream from the canal, a David Livingstone venturing into the past. Instead of working for the crown, he's working with the New York City Department of Environmental Protection, helping them find places to implement their Green Infrastructure Plan. He wants to bridge the local expertise, which in this case is property owners whose basements are always flooding, with the EPA's clean-up efforts in Gowanus. As the canal is paying for the whole borough, the clean-up has to involve the whole borough, creating a more sustainable, greener Brooklyn."



"That day's plan is to send the balloon aloft carrying two regular point-and-shoot digital cameras, like everyone had before smartphones, that are hacked to take pictures every 10 seconds. Though the whole endeavor is designed to be both cheap and sustainable—the eight- and 12-megapixel cameras were ten-buck rescues from the e-waste warehouse on Nevin Street, by the canal—Eymund excitedly tells us we'll be using a new balloon to look for where the creeks were buried."
maps  mapping  nature  urban  urbanism  2014  brooklyn  gowanus  aerialphotography  balloons  classideas  projectideas  nyc 
august 2014 by robertogreco
PLAY Stories: An Interview With John Marshall
"John Marshall's latest project (with rootoftwo) is a weather vane built for the 21st Century: a headless chicken that tracks and responds to Internet “fear levels”. Five of these Whithervanes are installed on the highest points of five buildings in Folkestone, UK for the 2014 Folkestone Triennial (30 August – 2 November)."



"The chickens are four feet tall and made of polyurethane foam coated in polyester resin. Each is controlled by a credit-card sized computer that connects to the Internet and listens in real-time to news reports uploaded by journalists from around the world.

When a report comes in, the computer reads it and works out the GPS coordinates where the event happened. It then calculates the direction and distance of the event from Folkestone. The computer then reads the rest of the report, cross-checking the text with the list of keywords and phrases the Department of Homeland Security uses to monitor social networking sites for terrorist threats. The computer also looks for keywords and phrases gathered in a series of workshops we did with the people of Folkestone about what they are afraid of. The keyword list includes threats as diverse as: race riots, gastro tourists, unemployment and dog poo.

The intensity of fear is indicated by changing colored lighting and the number of spins each chicken makes. There are five levels of fear: 1. Low (Green), 2. Guarded (Blue), 3. Elevated (Yellow), 4. High (Orange) and 5. Severe (Red) - the same as the Homeland Security National Terrorism Advisory System. The five chickens revolve away from the location of each news story."



"Every Whithervane has the same list of keywords and phrases, but each has a unique "score" associated with the terms that reflect the aggregate values of the people that live in each neighborhood where the chickens are located. The "scores" have been weighted using marketing tools based on UK census data that are typically used for targeting junk mail. The computer does a calculation that considers the level of fear in the story for the local population and the distance of the event from Folkestone. For example, the same story about immigration from the European Union will have a different level of fear for different neighborhoods. Folkestone is the first point of entry in the UK for visitors arriving via the Channel Tunnel - this makes for some very complicated local opinions.

The public can also influence the individual Whithervanes by Tweeting to @whithervanes #keepcalm (to reduce) or #skyfalling (to increase) the ambient fear level in the system. If they don't have a Twitter account we have built a website where you can submit a Tweet by clicking a button. There are public access terminals in the Triennial visitor's center in Folkestone."
johnmarshall  art  weathervanes  internet  fear  2014  news  twitter  rootoftwo  whitervanes  python  raspberrypi  projectideas  bigdata 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Letters from a Skeptic by Gregory A. Boyd
"Ecological
What are its effects on the health of the planet and of the person?
Does it preserve or destroy biodiversity?
Does it preserve or reduce ecosystem integrity?
What are its effects on the land?
What are its effects on wildlife?
How much, and what kind of waste does it generate?
Does it incorporate the principles of ecological design?
Does it break the bond of renewal between humans and nature?
Does it preserve or reduce cultural diversity?
What is the totality of its effects, its "ecology"?

Social
Does it serve community?
Does it empower community members?
How does it affect our perception of our needs?
Is it consistent with the creation of a communal, human economy?
What are its effects on relationships?
Does it undermine conviviality?
Does it undermine traditional forms of community?
How does it affect our way of seeing and experiencing the world?
Does it foster a diversity of forms of knowledge?
Does it build on, or contribute to, the renewal of traditional forms of knowledge?
Does it serve to commodity knowledge or relationships?
To what extent does it redefine reality?
Does it erase a sense of time and history?
What is its potential to become addictive?

Practical
What does it make?
Who does it benefit?
What is its purpose?
Where was it produced?
Where is it used?
Where must it go when it's broken or obsolete?
How expensive is it?
Can it be repaired?
By an ordinary person?

Moral
What values does its use foster?
What is gained by its use?
What are its effects beyond its utility to the individual?
What is lost in using it?
What are its effects on the least advantaged in society?

Ethical
How complicated is it?
What does it allow us to ignore?
To what extent does it distance agent from effect?
Can we assume personal, or communal responsibility for its effects?
Can its effects be directly apprehended?
What ancillary technologies does it require?
What behavior might it make possible in the future?
What other technologies might it make possible?
Does it alter our sense of time and relationships in ways conducive to nihilism?

Vocational
What is its impact on craft?
Does it reduce, deaden, or enhance human creativity?
Is it the least imposing technology available for the task?
Does it replace, or does it aid human hands and human beings?
Can it be responsive to organic circumstance?
Does it depress or enhance the quality of goods?
Does it depress or enhance the meaning of work?

Metaphysical
What aspect of the inner self does it reflect?
Does it express love?
Does it express rage?
What aspect of our past does it reflect?
Does it reflect cyclical or linear thinking?

Political
Does it concentrate or equalize power?
Does it require, or institute a knowledge elite?
It is totalitarian?
Does it require a bureaucracy for its perpetuation?
What legal empowerments does it require?
Does it undermine traditional moral authority?
Does it require military defense?
Does it enhance, or serve military purposes?
How does it affect warfare?
Is it massifying?
Is it consistent with the creation of a global economy?
Does it empower transnational corporations?
What kind of capital does it require?

Aesthetic
Is it ugly?
Does it cause ugliness?
What noise does it make?
What pace does it set?
How does it affect the quality of life (as distinct from the standard of living)?"
jaquesellul  technology  design  classideas  projectideas  curriculuminquestions  questions  environment  ecology  social  society  morality  ethics  metaphysics  politics  aesthetics  power  economics 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Twitter / ablerism: a workshop for designers: they ...
"a workshop for designers: they do nothing but develop and write 3 versions of a bio/about page, and 1 sample project narrative"

[thread that followed]

"‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism Yes please. Assessed on intelligibility."

@ablerism
"@annegalloway I recently sent someone to your lab site, and they remarked particularly about how well you articulated the questions/work."

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism thanks - and that’s nice to hear :) it’s something i believe in strongly and really push my students to do well."

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway Do you have a basic formula? I relied this past year on the following: Tell us 1) What is your question(s)? +"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway 2) What did you make? 3) Walk us through your material choices. 4) Why does it matter? Big > smaller > smaller > very big. +"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway I had good exchanges with students using that generally. But I think it could be much better, more nuanced than that."

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism v similar: 1) what did you want to know? 2) why did you want to know? (can include but must go beyond curiosity/personal interest)

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism 3) how did you answer it (methods & materials) and why those choices? 4) what did you learn? 5) what would u do differently/next?"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway I like your grouping of question + why right up front. And reassured to see the overlaps!"

@annegalloway
"@ablerism I find it helps get away from design as *either* problem-solving *or* self-expression :)"

@ablerism
"@annegalloway Yep. Have you written formally or informally about that both/and wish explicitly?"

‏@annegalloway
"@ablerism Nah - I rant about it so much in class that I try not to think about it otherwise ;)"

@annegalloway
"@ablerism and since I wasn't trained as a designer, I've only recently started to get validation from (some) designers"

‏@ablerism
"@annegalloway I was suddenly wondering whether purselipsquarejaw contained these ideas."
sarahendren  2014  workshopideas  classideas  profiles  biographies  narratives  writing  design  art  communication  teaching  howweteach  projectideas  reflection  presentation 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Michael Wesch at Pasadena City College - YouTube
[Questions that burn in the souls of Wesch's students:
Who am I?
What is the meaning of life?
What am I going to do with my life?
Am I going to make it?]

[See also: http://mediatedcultures.net/presentations/learning-as-soul-making/ ]
education  teaching  michaelwesch  identity  cv  soulmaking  spirituality  why  whyweteach  howweteach  learning  unschooling  deschooling  life  purpose  relationships  anthropology  ethnography  canon  meaning  meaningmaking  schooliness  schools  schooling  achievement  bigpicture  counseling  society  seymourpapert  empathy  perspective  assessment  fakingit  presentationofself  burnout  web  internet  wonder  curiosity  ambiguity  controversy  questions  questioning  askingquestions  questionasking  modeling  quests  risk  risktaking  2014  death  vulnerability  connectedness  sharedvulnerability  cars  technology  telecommunications  boxes  robertputnam  community  lievendecauter  capsules  openness  trust  peterwhite  safety  pubictrust  exploration  helicopterparenting  interestedness  ambition  ericagoldson  structure  institutions  organizations  constructionism  patricksuppes  instructionism  adaptivelearning  khanacademy  play  cocreationtesting  challenge  rules  engagement  novelty  simulation  compassion  digitalethnography  classideas  projectideas  collaboration  lcproject  tcsnmy  op 
july 2014 by robertogreco
(Hu)mans: A Course of Study
"What is human about human beings? How did they get that way? How can they be made more so?"



"This archive contains the entire collection of pamphlets and booklets for children, as well as teacher’s instructional guides. The course was brought online by Dr. Wendy Saul, professor of education at UMSL, in collaboration with Peter Dow of Firsthand Learning. Permission to use the materials non-commercially is granted by Education Development Center, and the films accompanying the written materials are available from Documentary Educational Resources."

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man:_A_Course_of_Study ]
macos  curriculum  jeromebruner  wendysaul  peterdow  anthropology  sociology  classideas  projectideas  teaching  learning  schools  1970s  humanities  asenbalikci 
june 2014 by robertogreco
hut privacy alcove by antoine lesur + marc venot wins prix emile hermes
"‘hut’ by designers antoine lesur and marc venot answers the theme of ‘time to yourself’, a competition proposed by the fondation hermès which distances itself from existing typologies of furniture andobject. the concept stems from the realization of the lack of appropriate spaces in which to briefly isolate in workplaces, and from the fact that when such spaces are available they are often too emphasized and therefore avoided. to solve this, lesur and venot imagined a space in between the end of the spectrum; a wall alcove that allows a moment of intimacy, enabling individuals to lean back for a moment of privacy – a place where it is possible to rest without falling asleep."
privacy  space  design  antoinelesur  marcvenot  glvo  classideas  2014  projectideas 
june 2014 by robertogreco
A mask maker's journey, in and out of the wrestling ring - latimes.com
"Clothes make the man. But what about the man who makes the clothes? ... In this case, for characters in the colorful, uber-dramatic world of Mexican freestyle wrestling.

Manuel Quiroz is the "chingon" mask and gear maker for fighters across the globe, many in L.A.’s popular lucha libre circuit. His journey to be known as the "best of the best" as he puts it, is as finely detailed and at times dramatic as a character plot constructed for the very fighters he clothes.

When he was an aimless teenager in Aguascalientes, Mexico, Quiroz’s curiosity led him to toy around with his mother’s sewing machine. Soon after, he took up an apprenticeship with a local tailor, who doubled as a luchador in the wrestling ring.

Quiroz learned to sew wedding suits for grooms, before the wild personas and physical action of lucha libre enticed him. His sewing teacher became his mentor and wrestling trainer -- a nurturing relationship the now 54-year-old mask maker holds dear decades later. "He give me [advice]," Quiroz reflects with a thoughtful pause. "He give me a lot."

With that training, Quiroz moved up the local lucha libre ranks and gained renown as an amateur champion under character names such as El Cachorro, Reptilico and Atlantico. He even went pro in 1982. But after a big championship win, a follow-up match in Mexico City would change the fabric of the luchador’s life forever.

Quiroz’s voice cracks and tears well up in his gentle brown eyes as he recalls that match. "In a moment, everything is black. Supposedly, somebody jumped me off the rope." Quiroz toppled onto the first line of bolted chairs in the audience. The fall had broken his back. Doctors gave the wrestler six months to re-learn how to walk, or else, they warned, he’d permanently lose the use of his legs.

...The fighter triumphed, and walked in three months.

In an effort to leave behind his painfully dashed dreams of luchador fame, Quiroz relocated to Texas, then Los Angeles -- a journey wrought with financial struggles. Quiroz sang in a mariachi band and stitched suits for his friends to make money before taking up available sewing gigs at various clothing manufacturers. He found a renewed focus on tailoring, and lucha libre was a distant memory.

Until eight years ago, when his son rekindled his father’s dream. "Daddy, I want to wrestle," Quiroz’s son admitted one day. His son asked his father -- now a master tailor in his own right -- to sew his lucha gear. "When he started training, he knew the gear is no good," Quiroz explains, adding, "So he tell me, OK, Daddy, you know how to do this job … Do it."

His son’s request awakened a new dream for Quiroz.

The mask maker now spends 15 hours a day in the dusty, tight sewing room of his South L.A. home, cutting, stitching, creating gear to be donned by larger-than-life characters in the ring -- a place he’s learned to happily observe from the outside. "My dream is no more lucha, but more mask," the tailor says.

Quiroz charges $100 for a simple mask, and up to $300 for a more detailed one, many of which are showcased at events thrown by the L.A.-based wrestling, burlesque and comedy act Lucha VaVOOM. "If you put something in your mind, I’ll make it on my machine."

Quiroz dedicates a balanced amount of effort in each piece of gear he creates. "Every guy coming to me is really important and they’re all equal," he says. The tailor knows all too well that people go through tough times. "One time, someone paid me with a crate of Jarritos [Mexican soda]," he chuckles, making the tailor’s humble beginnings and passion for creating lucha gear even more apparent.

"The rich men is [not] the men have more money. Is the men have more love," Quiroz sweetly reflects.

Though, he admits with a smile, he does enjoy the celebrity treatment he and his wife of 35 years receive at local lucha matches as Mr. Quiroz, "el mascarero.""
masks  glvo  2014  luchalibre  wrestling  manuelquiroz  losangeles  projectideas  mascarero  video 
april 2014 by robertogreco
» History and Future of the Book (Fall 2014 Digital Studies Course) SAMPLE REALITY
"A book may only be made of paper, cardboard, ink, and glue, but it is nonetheless a remarkable piece of technology—about which we have mostly forgotten it is a piece of technology. This class is concerned with the long history, the varied present, and the uncertain future of the book in the digital age.

We will approach the history of the book in the most materialist way possible. In other words, when we say “books,” we don’t mean novels. We don’t mean texts. We mean books, the actual physical objects. Books have heft. They burn. They mildew. They smell. Their shape and design limit certain uses and encourage others. Similarly, books in the future—or whatever replaces books—will foster certain practices over others.

Over the course of the semester History and Future of the Book will return again and again to three central questions: (1) What is the history of the book as a physical and cultural object? (2) How have current disruptions in reading and writing technology changed the way we use and imagine books? (3) What does the future of the book look like?

Along the way we will consider reading and writing innovations such as electronic paper, e-readers, touchscreen interfaces, DIY publishing experiments, and place-based authoring. We will also address what some critics call the phenomenon of bookishness in contemporary culture—an exaggeration of the most “bookish” elements of a book, which may represent either the last dying gasp of the printed book or herald a renaissance of the form"
books  syllabus  bookfuturism  marksample  2014  projectideas  ebooks  technology  digitalhumanities  syllabi 
april 2014 by robertogreco
CubeTeam
"What is CubeTeam?

CubeTeam is a multiplayer 3D painting and modeling program that lets you and your friends imagine worlds out of cubes and then print them in 3D. CubeTeam is free, runs in a web browser, and has powerful editing tools that let you create in a virtually limitless environment.
Who is CubeTeam for?

CubeTeam is for anyone who wants to build 3D worlds or models. Whether you want to experiment with 3D printing, or just build worlds with you friends, CubeTeam is the easiest way to get started."

[via: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/81897452097/cubeteam-in-browser-collaborative-3d-voxel-editor ]
cubeteam  3dprinting  3dpainting  classideas  projectideas  edg  srg  3dmodeling  cubes  blockart 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Challenge 20/20
"Challenge 20/20 is an Internet-based program that pairs classes at any grade level (K-12) from schools in the U.S. with their counterpart classes in schools in other countries; together, the teams (of two or three schools) find local solutions to one of 20 global problems. Schools do not have to be NAIS members to participate. We accept private, public, charter schools from the U.S. and any other country. Schools can be elementary or secondary schools. There is no cost to participate in Challenge 20/20 and no travel required. Follow the navigation on the left to read details."

[See also: http://challenge2020.tiged.org/
http://www.tigweb.org/tiged/
http://www.connectallschools.org/about/partners/nais ]

[via: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/rethinking-independent-schools-21st-century-homa-tavangar ]
nais  teaching  classideas  global  collaboration  projectideas 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Resources to teach strategy game design - Home
"I have chosen to share these resources that I have developed over the last four or five years, rather than publish them in some stagnant lesson plan book, in the hopes that others can and will use them.

I've always loved board games, and I started looking into finding additional strategy games for my classroom than Risk, Stratego, Mastermind, and such. Those are good games, of course, but once I started really looking into specialty strategy games, I came across terms like designer games and euro games, I realized that there is a whole amazing world of board games out there that I had no idea existed! I started to really get into board gaming as a personal hobby. I joined a local board game Meetup group in St. Louis, MO, a place not as violent as one might be led to believe, and got to know many amazing gamers and designers(!) who lived in my midst. I began to think about how my gifted students, who devoured any new game I brought into my classroom (currently 200ish), were so creative and analytical and clever and loved fun and weren't those key abilities of a good game designer? So, quite fumblingly (that's probably a word) at first, I began teaching kids to design board games. I've improved and refined my methods, and now I'm happy to share them with others who are interested in doing the same. I don't think they are perfect, which is why the book idea stalled for so long, because I am a perfectionist and couldn't stomach the idea of putting out less than really amazing stuff. But with others using them and providing input (see below), I think we can help students learn how to develop a substantial, meaningful, complete game. In the process, students must problem solve, communicate, demonstrate independence and collaborate, listen to others and respond to feedback, improve upon their ideas, and so much more. Yes, they create a board game, but tell me how those skills aren't the skills we need to nurture for these students to survive in the 21st century. BOOM.

My only request is this: If you use any of these materials, please share with me what you used and how you used it. If you share back with me any changes that you've made, that would amazing and I'll post them too. The only thing you can't do is take these materials and publish them yourself. So not cool. Technology is a great liberator, and in this era of online collaborating and crowd sourcing, I want to provide to teachers, who may not have access to challenging materials for gifted middle and high school students, all my stuff for free. Any one can use it, really. Home schoolers, hobbyists, video game designers (the process is similar, just different outputs)...just give credit where credit is due. You don't want to make Ragnor up there angry.

One last thing, if any student (or teacher, or random other person finding and using this information for their own purposes) publishes a game, let me know, and put me in the credits. I get to have a little bit of an ego, after all."
kathleenmercury  gamedesign  games  curriculum  via:jenksbyjenks  classideas  teaching  education  projectideas  srg  edg  glvo 
march 2014 by robertogreco
jedahan/haiku-wifi · GitHub
"haiku wifi is a neighborhood bulletin board, hosted on a router, living in the wireless cloud.

look for wireless networks to see the current haiku. connect to the haiku network to write a new haiku."

[in use: http://cooper-wifi-poetry.tumblr.com/]
poetry  writing  wifi  projectideas  occupy.here  haiku  classideas  via:caseygollan 
march 2014 by robertogreco
A Botmaking Primer - Features - Source: An OpenNews project
"Not sure where to begin with this whole bot thing? Joseph Kokenge is here to help."
bots  twitter  howto  2014  classideas  projectideas 
march 2014 by robertogreco
From Superman to the Avengers: Rethinking Bruce Mau Design | UX Magazine
"Nurture Culture

Imagine a newspaper filled with a hilarious collection of things staff said throughout the year, off-color messages scribbled on post-it notes, and a two-page photo spread of "twins" (a.k.a. staff who start dressing similarly after working together for a while). That's the gist of the annual BMD Haiku book that is given to everyone on staff.

What I love about this artifact is that it's about culture, and culture only. It’s not about profit margins or client work, it simply and powerfully creates a snapshot of what it was like to work together for a year. So often as we race toward deadlines and profit goals, we forget that we are people. It's incredibly important to nurture our relationships, play with one another, and connect as human beings … because those bonds are what get us through the rough spots in projects.

So, what are you doing as a team or organization to celebrate, laugh, and nurture your culture? Do you have an explicit way to reflect upon the quirky uniqueness of your group? Are you making time to socialize and get to know each other?

There are a million ways to create stronger connections. For example, if you've had a particularly tough week at Cooper, you earn temporary ownership of a stuffed fish and a chance to make light of your angst with everyone.

I know teams that have "Grilled Cheese Fridays," go jogging together at noon, and have bad idea contests. The most important thing is that you instigate ongoing practices to keep culture alive.

“Growth happens. Whenever it does, allow it to emerge.”—Bruce Mau

In closing, there are many ways BMD could have addressed the departure of their founder. They chose to embrace that change and become a new kind of organization, driven by a group of superheroes. That decision impacted how they perceive themselves, create, and interact with clients. So far, it seems to be working. And no matter how it turns out, you have to give them credit for owning change, rather than letting it own them.

As Alan Cohen said, “It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new, but there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change, there is power.”

Sometimes, change is a catalyst for organizations. Sometimes, when leaders retire, those who remain build from the legacy and blossom."
teams  culture  bmd  brucemaudesign  organizations  design  2014  brucemau  play  playfulness  tcsnmy  legacy  change  classideas  projectideas  writing  newspaperclub 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Ariel Waldman » Democratized Science Instrumentation
"I wrote/curated a guidebook on democratized science instrumentation, documenting both hardware and software that significantly increase people’s opportunity to participate in scientific discovery. The paper was commissioned by the Science and Technology Policy Institute (STPI) to be presented to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP)."

[PDF: https://www.ida.org/stpi/occasionalpapers/papers/OP-7-2012-DemocratizedScienceInstrumentation-v1.pdf ]
openhardware  hardware  science  citizenscience  arielwaldman  2014  ostp  stpi  technology  instrumentation  software  projectideas  openstudioproject  srg  edg  glcvo 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Seventeen-day Studio
"Seventeen-day Studio writes about books, experimentation & experience. "

"The Seventeen-day Studio began on March 29, 2013 and ended seventeen days later on April 14. We formed the studio as an exploration in collaboration, an exhibition of the design process, and an evaluation of the field as we know it. What came from the studio greatly outweighs what we put into it, due to the kindness and generosity of our colleagues, advisors, and all those who stopped by."



[Projects]

"Studio as critique.

As much as the studio is about showing designers in their element, we felt a need to be critical about what we do. Through open collaboration with each other and visitors, we embrace the loss of explicit authorship. We recognize our own ego but do not believe in solitary genius. To achieve this we developed projects which spanned the 17 days. These parts of the studio are meant to challenge the traditional notion of the graphic designer through our relationships with clients and the greater public.

Posters, books, and logos are quintessential so we began there. To explore our use of technology, media, and medium as they relate to the deliverable, we created these systems of making and interaction. The Poster Machine, Logo Parlor, and Bookshop as we called them produced work for a walk-in clientele. They act as introduction to basic concepts of design[ing] and being designed for in a way that was personal for each visitor.

We want to expand the space of graphic design criticism. Through our studio space and by working in the gallery, performing, we present design, the verb, to more than our peers. We used one of our 23 ft high walls to proclaim a diagnosis of the field. Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers, toward eccentric perceptions, unusual actions and feelings, withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation.

Bookshop.

The print-per-request Book Shop interprets an individual’s reading preferences and habits. We posit that reading is distracting, because it is plastic, creative work that is affected by methods of publishing and the devices we use. Visitor input went into editing and producing a 100 page book that focuses on the parts of books and reading that cannot be read or are routinely glanced over, though contribute the how a reader reads.

The poster machine, an alternative interface.

The poster machine was made to challenge the digital tools that designers conventionally use in making. A series of knobs and switches are used by the machine’s operator to alter the mood and layout of their poster. Each poster is then handmade and machine-made. After playing with the machine the maker sends her poster to print, where it is also automatically fed to our website for all to see.

Logo Parlor, a generative identity system.

The logo parlor generates a logo and 20 business cards in 8 minutes. The piece was developed based on a system in which visitors fill out a form where they rank different skill sets in a scale of 1 to 10. The skill sets are gathered from a survey of most repeated characteristics mentioned by prospective candidate during interviews across different fields. During the exhibition visitors were encouraged to fill out a form and spend 8 minutes with the designer as the process of creating their customized logotype unfolded."



"Graphic design is made of contrary elements, involving a clash of thought, emotion, and behavior, leading us as graphic designers toward eccentric perceptions, inappropriate actions and feelings, our withdrawal from reality into fantasy or delusion, and a sense of mental fragmentation."
design  designprocess  classideas  projectideas  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  books  making  openstudioproject  glvo  srg  manifestos  workshops  events  studios  printing  publishing  eventideas 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Ben Pieratt, Blog - A 3-step process for naming a project/product. (And some resources)
"Naming a project is always an awful experience.

An earworm that won’t stop tapping your skull from the inside. A tenacious pop jingle with teeth and a paycheck.

As a freelance designer, I do a fair amount of this for clients. Generally, my process has been a garble of notes and trips to thesaurus.com, but lately I’ve noticed a fairly simple pattern emerging, a 3-step framework for cutting through the fog.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
3-Step Process
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Step 1.
Identify the feeling you want the brand to convey. A great brand communicates on an emotional wavelength, so make that feeling your bedrock.

One way to identify what feeling you’re pursuing is by figuring out what you’re not. A great brand is defined as much by what it is as by what it is not. So if you’re entering a certain market that is a certain way, identify that point of frustration and invert it. For instance, if your market is confusing, you could pursue ‘Relaxed’, or ‘Lucid’.

Step 2.
Embody that feeling in a list of persons, places, things or phrases (etc) that communicate viscerally. For instance:
Relaxed = a picnic
Exclusive = Studio 54
Cool = Paul Newman

Step 3. Final
Identify a detail that represents the [embodiment] of [your feeling] in a non obvious but compelling way.
Relaxed = a picnic = Sunny Nap™
Exclusive = Studio 54 = Velvet™
Cool = Paul Newman = Ben Quick™ (a character he played)

Repeat.
New insights gained from the process should help you get a better handle on the unique feeling or value your brand has to offer.

Ideally,
the name should have a ‘special wrongness’* to it. An unforgettable newness. A new shape. 1+1=3. If your name lacks this, the product itself may have a hard time differentiating itself in whatever market you’re entering. Why are you different than your competitors? That difference should be reflected in the brain jam your name causes in its audience.

*”Special Wrongness” is a term I’ve stolen and adopted from Peter Mendelsund from this amazing interview: http://portersquarebooksblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/interview-with-peter-mendelsund.html "
branding  names  naming  benpieratt  glvo  projectideas  howto  design  creativity 
february 2014 by robertogreco
LibraryBox
"LibraryBox is an open source, portable digital file distribution tool based on inexpensive hardware that enables delivery of educational, healthcare, and other vital information to individuals off the grid."

[via: https://twitter.com/davidtedu/status/438579734922805248 ]

[See also: http://occupyhere.org/
https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:a567897ee14f ]

"Expanded Hardware
LibraryBox v2.0 now runs on a wide variety of hardware, including the preferrred MR3020, but also the MR3040, the WR703N, and much more. Now you can choose the hardware best for your particular need, and build your LibraryBox to suit.

Statistics
LibraryBox v2.0 now collects statistics on its use, and displays them to users. On the homepage, you can see the top 10 most downloaded items, and on the statistics page you can see both number of users per day and a full list of all downloads. These statistics are completely anonymous, and no identifying information about users is retained.

Bootstrap 3.0
The entirety of the web interface has been redesigned. Not only is the web front end now on the USB drive (making development much easier) but it's based on the Bootstrap 3 framework. This standard makes it simple for libraries and individuals to modify the interface to suit their needs.

Auto Sync/Mesh
LibraryBox v2.0 has a service built in that will allow you to have installed Boxen located in physically inaccessible areas that can be automatically updated simply by bringing a "master" box into range of their wifi signal. The remote Boxen will automatically see the Master, and update their content to match, no intervention or attention necessary.

Easier Installation
Making your own LibraryBox couldn't be much easier than the v2.0 makes it. Copy some files, update one file via a web browser, and then just wait while the software does its work. One-step installation!

Custom Configurations
We've moved most of the request configuration options to the USB thumb drive, allowing users to very easily change things like the SSID of the LibraryBox, the power of the wifi, the wifi channel, and even the local hostname of the LibraryBox server. It's never been easier to customize to just your needs."
librarybox  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Se eu fosse eu - Blog do IMS
"O Instituto Moreira Salles convidou a fotógrafa e educadora Tatiana Altberg, coordenadora do projeto Mão na Lata, para ministrar aulas de fotografia pinhole para adolescentes que vivem na Rocinha.

O resultado dessa atividade é a exposição Se eu fosse eu, com imagens e textos produzidos pelos alunos, que abre no Rio de Janeiro em 21 de dezembro, às 15h, na Biblioteca Parque da Rocinha/C4 (Estrada da Gávea, 454).

A oficina, com vinte alunos, foi ministrada ao longo de três meses e teve como proposta trabalhar a fotografia de maneira integrada com a literatura. Durante o curso, os alunos leram A mulher que matou os peixes, de Clarice Lispector, além de uma série de crônicas da mesma autora sobre a infância. Foi a partir dessas leituras que desenvolveram seus textos e fotografias, algumas das quais ilustram este post.

Além disso, os adolescentes tiveram a oportunidade de produzir suas próprias câmeras através da técnica de pinhole – construídas a partir de latas recicladas, revestidas internamente com material fotossensível e com um pequeno orifício para a entrada de luz."
brasil  brazil  photography  institutomoreirasalles  tatianaaltberg  mãonalata  seeufosseeu  riodejaneiro  2013  claricelispector  education  teaching  selfportaits  projectideas  classideas  pinholecameras  literature 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Make your own cellphone from scratch.
"The DIY Cellphone is a working (albeit basic) cellphone that you can make yourself. It can make and receive phone calls and text messages, store names and phone numbers, display the time, and serve as an alarm clock. It connects to GSM networks (like AT&T and T-Mobile in the U.S.) using a regular (full-size) SIM card. It builds on the hardware and software in the Arduino GSM Shield but extends it with a full interface, including display, buttons, speaker, microphone, etc. The phone is made up of a custom electronic printed circuit board (PCB), about 60 electronic components, and a laser-cut enclosure. Its hardware and software are open-source and available on GitHub (hardware, software).

Part of my motivation for making the phone -- and helping others to do the same -- is the fact that while cellphones are ubiquitous in our society, most of us have little idea what they're made of or how they work. In fact, you can make a cellphone in much the same way you'd make anything else: find the right parts, figure out how to connect them together, and try to do it in a way that's attractive and robust. Because of the ubiquity of cellphones, there are companies making the components they're made of; with some digging, I was able to find versions of these parts that are possible to buy in small quantities and that are possible to assemble by hand. This wasn't necessarily easy, but it's a very different problem than trying to learn the physics needed to understand how a cellphone tower works. 

I've been using various versions of this phone as my primary device for almost a year and have taught workshops in which others have made the phone for themselves. It doesn't require any specific knowledge of electronics, but it does involve configuring software, soldering a lot of small components, and laser-cutting, all of which can be difficult if you haven't done them before. I'd only recommend this project if you already have some experience with Arduino and soldering, or can find someone to help you out. You'll also need to get access to a laser-cutter, or find an alternative way to make the enclosure for the phone."

[See also this and related photos from Che-Wei Wang: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cwwang/11038248644/ ]
mobile  phones  howto  diy  tutorials  projectideas  openstudioproject  che-weiwang 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Program to teach minority youths how to navigate Pittsburgh city government - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Understanding how a city works is hard enough if you know the language of power.

Karen Abrams has spent the better part of two years trying to spread that know-how to adult groups in Pittsburgh's minority neighborhoods. She began to realize that to really make a difference, youth needed to learn the language, too.

"We have no interaction with 12- to 18-year-olds. But a lot of what we do will have an impact on them in five and 10 years," said Ms. Abrams, the Urban Redevelopment Authority's diversity and community affairs manager. "I thought, 'How do we build a generation of urbanists in communities of color?' We need to include them in the Pittsburgh renaissance."

Ms. Abrams came up with a brainchild: Urban Matters, based on a model at the Center for Urban Pedagogy, a nonprofit in New York City's Brooklyn borough. The Heinz Endowments has provided $50,000 toward its launch.

After several months of planning, the program will recruit high school students next summer to take part in extracurricular investigations of city systems and processes. The students will receive a stipend, and their work will result in audio-visual materials that could be disseminated more widely, possibly for inclusion in school curricula."
centerforurbanpedagogy  pittsburgh  cities  government  civics  education  power  politics  bureaucracy  2013  openstudioproject  projectideas  curriculum 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Generosity Echo
"Like many designers today, I spend a great deal of time in the cloud—connecting with friends and followers on Twitter and other social media platforms. These tools are important; they allow us to amplify our work and broadcast to a larger design community with incredible speed and ease. And I’ve come to rely on my network as a kind of support, generously encouraging me with valuable feedback, or even friction.

But do these tools actually let us engage in deeper conversations around our work? While I treasure the constant connection to the crowd, I find it difficult to slow down for more focused inter­actions unless I’m physically present. For me, the opportunity to go further in a discussion around my work—to explore, to learn, to grow—best occurs when it can mediate both digital and physi­cal worlds.

So I decided to take my work outside. Not just out into the ele­ments, but beyond many of my normal boundaries as a designer. Frustrated with my own addiction to the screen and propelled by my need for richer connections, I stepped outside the studio, curious to discover new kinds of encounters.



By the end of the project, I had received several gifts in return: books, notes, original artwork, countless stories and powerful memories that will stay with me forever. I continue to be inspired by all of the encounters. The community that formed around my books was small but seemed expansive in its ability to generate new meaning. In each connection, regardless of what was exchanged, my audience countered the books with their own sense of the meaningful, and passed it on. Sometimes, the shared action touched one or two people; other times, it expanded and bounced around town. I called it the generosity echo.

Weymouths was an experiment in orchestrated serendipity and small-batch community-building. It’s not exactly a sustainable model; we can’t give everything away. But try it for yourself, at any scale: see what happens when you let go of some of your work—and your assumptions. By stepping outside and returning to the face-to-face—and confronting the fear of an unknown audience—you may rediscover the power of real-time conversa­tion. Sometimes the only thing that separates your work from an engaged community is being present."
generosity  gifts  gifteconomy  paulsoulellis  2013  books  projectideas  community  openstudioproject  slow  small  vulnerability  art 
november 2013 by robertogreco
polis: Placing Sidewalk Vendors on the Map in Ho Chi Minh City
"Some urban treasures are hidden in plain sight. The documentary film "On the Map" shows how MIT professor Annette Kim and her research group, the Sidewalk Lab (SLAB), trained themselves to see anew in Ho Chi Minh City. In the process, they helped open the eyes of planners to one of the city's greatest assets: street and sidewalk vendors. Through rigorous observation and cartography, SLAB worked to protect the rights of these entrepreneurs and highlight their positive impacts on the city.

While filming "On the Map," we found inspiration in SLAB's unique approach to research, analysis and visualization as a path toward understanding. We focused on the use of critical cartography for spatial analysis and public engagement. Kim elaborates on this process in her new book "Sidewalk City: Re-Mapping Public Space in Ho Chi Minh City.""
maps  mapping  vietnam  streetvendors  projectideas  slab  sidewalklab  annettekim  hochiminhcity 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The Quanta of Design Thinking | ThinkThankThunk
"When I say “nucleator” I mean an object, idea, or task that gives students an opportunity to enter into the process of design in a way that isn’t an explicit discussion about “learning design” like so much that gets co-opted from Stanford’s D School.

Kids dig the idea of take-this-bracket-and-make-a-chair. The design process is inherent in the challenge, and for some reason the Wikiseat bracket works. Kids like it.

We toyed around with social studies. What if you asked students to design an eating utensil optimized for a specific food? Like miso soup, or pulled pork. What would it be like to 3D print that object and then live with it for a week or a even a day? What could you say about culture, history, and agriculture? What would the documentary, “Living with the Snork,” be like?

What about math? What if you asked students to redesign RISK? How much math and design would that take? Let’s be honest, we all wish RISK weren’t so boring towards the end.

What if you asked students to redesign the human body? For the first century? for the 16th? The 21st? How much biology would that take? What kind of explanations and communications skills/objects would you have to foster to communicate such a strange idea?

Maybe I’m just in the stream of being with such awesome people right now, and I’m not communicating the nuance that the Wikiseat bracket represents, but I’m digging the idea of fundamental design quanta right now."
shawncornally  projectbasedlearning  projectideas  openstudioproject  teaching  learning  tcsnmy  designthinking  design  criticalthinking  projectsnotclasses  process  education  pedagogy  2013  pbl 
october 2013 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sketchbook: Announcing Sandbox, a collaboration between BERG and Fabrica
"It's an extensive pallette of materials to which we're adding both wireless and data, and with which we can really test what it's like to work with these new materials in real spaces. We also have around 60 people, of all kinds and doing real projects, and so we can begin to explore what it's like to really live, work and play amidst and betwixt connected and disconnected objects and spaces. This will change the way we communicate with each other, and our environment, and it's Fabrica's job to be on top of that."
2013  berg  fabrica  danhill  cityofsound  sandbox  wireless  internetofthings  smartcities  bergcloud  projectideas  iot 
october 2013 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sketchbook: Fabrica 2013 Informal Annual Review: Fabricanti Handbook
"Notes on the Fabricanti Handbook project

When new researchers arrive at Fabrica, there's a lot to take in. They arrive from all over the world for a start. For many it's their first time in Italy. There are language questions, cultural questions. We are also based in the country, outside Treviso, so without the distractions of a big city but equally without its inherent support networks. They also have to quickly get their head around a unique organisation, with a particular mission, in a very special space.

There is a lot of tacit information which sometimes takes a while to uncover and understand before they feel like "Fabricanti", the word we use for Fabrica's researchers.

Interested in enabling Fabricanti to hit the ground running, we've made the first Fabricanti Handbook in Fabrica's history - it describes how to live here, how to work here, how to play here. We asked two of our Fabricanti to lead the project: Anna Kulachek from Ukraine and Samantha Ziino from Australia, both graphic designers. (This was also an experiment in self-directed projects by Fabricanti.) They conducted interviews with their fellow Fabricanti, and decided all the content themselves, from text to photography to illustration. It draws on stories from Fabricanti alumni, sharing their knowledge of local tricks and quirks, and most importantly, how to get your personal projects done. We were inspired by the Valve employee handbook, by Tom Sach's "10 Bullets!" videos, Ove Arup's key speech and more, but this is a bespoke tool for Fabricanti only.

It describes place, people, processes and projects - and all the basics in terms of living locally, from ordering pasta and visiting the Biennale to why a fur coat and a little dog makes you a Treviso resident - but does so in a way that is playful, enriching and inspirational. It is full of in-jokes and secrets - though, importantly, we felt it should not have everything in it. Not everything should be so easy to find. Knowing the web is full of iconic shots of the architecture bereft of people—as architectural photographs tend to be—Anna and Sam commissioned Fabrica's photographers to take shots of the building as it is, with people in it. Knowing the institution could get a bit hierarchical, they contrasted the official view with a Fabricanti view, using different sizes of paper (there might be an idea of an official daily schedule, but the day is really only "before lunch" and "after lunch"; there is the official floor-plan, and then the way it actually works, and so on).

It should feel like a beautiful gift for your first day at Fabrica, an invaluable guide throughout the year, and a souvenir of your time there when you leave. The cover is a delicate all white on purpose, such that the scuffs, bruises and scribbles tell their own story at the end of the year. (There is a "FabricApp" developing alongside the book, starting with a Google Map version of the maps in the book, and developing into real-time installations around the Fabrica campus, as part of Fabrica's Sandbox project with BERG.) Different paper stock defines the different sections.

So this book is by Fabricanti for Fabricanti. But it also describes Fabrica. In making the book, we had to commit to print a few key ideas, notions, patterns about Fabrica, which hadn't happened much. So as Fabrica enters a new phase of its history, the Fabricanti Handbook is an excuse to form a few ideas about what it is. It is a functional document— how do you not just survive Fabrica, but thrive?—but also an inspirational one, a sketch of what Fabrica is now.

As Fabrica is an evolving project (and as bus routes change and bars open and close) it will be redesigned each year, by new Fabricanti; but with this version 1.0, Anna, Sam and their friends have made a huge contribution to Fabrica's present and future.

Insights

• Make something tangible as an excuse to force us to write something down
• Use a new project to try out different non-hierarchical organisation
• Use a Handbook project to bring organisations together
• Focus on the researchers' environment
• A side-effect of making a great Handbook is that you get great promotional material"
fabrica  print  books  2013  danhill  treviso  italy  projectideas  tangibility  commitment  valve  tomsachs  handbooks  howto  annakulachek  samanthaziino  storytelling  openstudioproject  cityofsound 
october 2013 by robertogreco
RGB-LED Lesson 2 (Scratch GPIO) – Getting Started | Meltwater's Raspberry Pi Hardware
"Since Scratch comes pre-installed on the recommended Raspberry Pi distribution (Raspbian “wheezy”), that part is available as soon as you start your Raspbian desktop.

Normally, Scratch’s powers of control extend only to the screen and speakers attached to the Raspberry Pi, and usually actions are directed by the program flow or by external inputs such as the keyboard and mouse.

However, Raspberry Pi blogger “SimpleSi” (http://cymplecy.wordpress.com/) has produced a plug-in to allow Scratch to talk to the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi too.  This allows Scratch to control “real things” and to respond to the “real environment”, which literally opens up a whole new world of possibilities."
scracth  raspberrypi  projectideas  edg  arg 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Experimental Book | Purchase College VDE4600
"Experimental Book traces the development of the artist’s book through the twentieth-century and beyond. This interdisciplinary Art + Design studio course asks highly motivated students to consider the future of the book and expand the boundaries of the traditional codex through provocative studio exercises and projects.

The class will benefit from critical readings, site visits to important book collections, notable guest critics and a collaborative, hands-on studio atmosphere.

Students will help shape the book’s radical trajectory into the twenty-first century by producing their own book works. Of particular interest will be the physicality of the book as it evolves in the digital space, including print-on-demand, book scanning, book videos and book-in-browsers.

Working with noted artist and creative director Paul Soulellis, the studio will engage in thematic exercises to explore narrative structure, form, chance, word and image, digital vs. print technologies, photography, typography and production, as well as audience and performance.

Each student will develop a final book project and participate in a collaboratively-designed studio exhibition."

[Readings: http://experimentalbook.wordpress.com/readings/ ]

[See also: http://soulellis.com/2013/10/any-answer-is-as-good-as-any-other-answer/ ]
bookmaking  books  paulsoulellis  2013  classideas  projectideas  experimental  syllabus  booklists  syllabi 
october 2013 by robertogreco
occupy.here / a tiny self-contained darknet
"What is it?
Each Occupy.here router is a LAN island in an archipelago of affiliated websites.

Anyone within range of an Occupy.here wifi router, with a web-capable smartphone or laptop, can join the network “OCCUPY.HERE,” load the locally-hosted website http://occupy.here, and use the message board to connect with other users nearby. The open source forum software offers a simple, mobile-friendly interface where users can share messages and files.

The project has developed in parallel with the Occupy movement and seeks to offer a network of virtual spaces where both committed activists and casual supporters can communicate.

Due to its distributed and autonomous design, Occupy.here is inherently resistant to Internet surveillance. Building up a collective network infrastructure that is owned and controlled by its users can lay the groundwork for other uses and applications. We don't have to choose between abstaining from social media and entrusting our data to corporate interests. We just need to take a greater responsibility for our own online services.

The idea
The project started in October 2011, with the goal to create a written supplement to the spoken conversations in Liberty Square (aka Zuccotti park). I wasn’t able to spend as much time in the park as I wanted, so I thought about how I might connect with others who passed through intermittently via an “offline forum.” Restricting the forum to those within the local wifi range created a self-selecting audience, and also (perhaps) created one more incentive to visit the occupation.

Since Liberty Square has been cleared and the Occupy Wall Street movement is now more decentralized, the goals for the project have adjusted. Instead of (or, perhaps, in addition to) augmenting the experience of being in an OWS encampment, we are building an archipelago of virtual spaces to host conversations similar to those in Liberty Square. More than ever, both “activists” and ”non-activists” alike need to have spaces for open discussion.

The new focus is to create a distributed network of wifi locations, each serving those in its immediate vicinity. These separate networks will soon be able to connect to each other, although that functionality is still under development.

How you can help
The project seeks collaborators of all kinds. You can help write the code, build and host your own wifi node, or simply participate in the conversation.

Dan Phiffer is the founder and lead developer, with further contributions from GitHub user Phaeilo. You should join us!"

[See also; http://rhizome.org/editorial/2013/oct/1/tiny-self-contained-darknet/ ]
danphiffer  occupy  ows  occupywallstreet  codeforamerica  networks  wifi  diy  projectideas  openstudioproject  routers  occupy.here  darknets  distributed  distributednetworks  opensource 
october 2013 by robertogreco
OpenDesk - Open Source Furniture — Made Locally.
"View basket Open source furniture — made locally."

[via: https://twitter.com/zachklein/status/390551937176711168 ]

[See also: http://www.wikihouse.cc/ ]

[Note: I think both Sara Hendren and Nick Sowers have made some of these.]
opensource  furniture  diy  desks  design  openstudioproject  projectideas  classroomdesign  schooldesign  schools  classideas 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Beat Making Lab
"Our mission is one of cultural exchange. We collaborate with cultural centers, connect youth to a global audience, and contribute equipment and training."

[via: http://pri.org/stories/2013-10-02/and-beat-making-lab-goes-ethiopia and
http://pri.org/stories/2013-10-09/what-happens-when-you-mix-culture-talent-health-and-passion-music ]


"What is Beat Making Lab?

Beat Making Lab is an electronic music studio small enough to fit in a backpack. We collaborate with communities all around the world; donating laptops, microphones and software to community centers and conducting two-week residencies with talented youth. We film workshops and shoot music videos as part of a weekly web-series with PBS Digital Studios. Our goals include cultural exchange, innovative collaboration, and social/entrepreneurial impact.

Beat Making Lab is an initiative of ARTVSM LLC, a production company that funds innovative projects merging the worlds of art and activism, “by any medium necessary”. Production funding for the Beat Making Lab web-series is provided, in part, by PBS Digital Studios."


Goma, Democratic Republic of Congo

In June 2012, we set up our first international lab in the Democratic Republic of Congo, partnering with Yole!Africa in Goma to train over 20 young people in music production and entrepreneurship. We reached thousands more through public performances and international media coverage as part of Yole’s annual SKIFF Festival (Salaam Kivu International Film Festival).

Each student trained in Goma was asked to help train others in their community, to ensure long-term impact. DJ Couler, a Beat Making Lab student and MC from Goma explained the process, “when the instructors return to the United States, for us that will not be the end. It will be more like a continuation, or even a beginning for us because we will be able to teach others how to create their own beats.”


Why Beat Making?

Music is a tool to build dialogue, amplify voice and strengthen solidarity. As hip-hop and electronic music have developed into global culture, there is a growing need for resources, education and software to help youth express themselves in these genres.

Beat Making Lab does not require students to be able to read standard music notation, or play a traditional instrument. The participants learn the techniques of beat making through composition, sampling, and songwriting on the most powerful instrument of the 21st century: a laptop.

The results are computer-based electronic dance music and hip-hop songs. This approach and pedagogy radically broadens the population that can be served through modern music education.


Our Story

Beat Making Lab started as an innovative course on music production and entrepreneurship taught in the Music Department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, founded by producer/DJ Stephen Levitin (aka Apple Juice Kid) and Dr. Mark Katz (author of Groove Music: The Art and Culture of the Hip Hop DJ) in 2011. Professor/emcee Pierce Freelon joined Apple Juice Kid to co-teach the popular class in 2012, and was instrumental in transforming the curriculum for implementation in a community setting. Together, Freelon and Apple Juice Kid formed ARTVSM LLC, and initiated a grassroots campaign to crowd-source the funds to donate training and equipment to Yole!Africa. Their efforts culminated in a collaboration with PBS Digital Studios, which will be airing webisodes documenting Beat Making Labs in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Panama, Senegal, Fiji and Ethiopia, each Wednesday on the Beat Making Lab youtube channel.
music  beatmakinglab  sound  youth  projectideas  uncch  stephenlevitin  markkatz  congo  panamá  senegal  fiji  ethiopia  goma  collaboration  culturalexchange 
october 2013 by robertogreco
NYC Haunts | Online Leadership Program
"Global Kids has formed a partnership with The New York Public Library to start the NYC Haunts program. NYC Haunts is a program funded by the Hive NYC Learning Network in which students from the Bronx, Staten Island and Manhattan design and create location-based games using mobile technology and the ARIS platform. In NYC Haunts, the player takes on the role of a ghost detective who encounters the local residents who haunt the community until their issues can be resolved. The games are designed to be played in and around city libraries and will teach its players about the library collection, local history and global issues."
nypl  nyc  youth  globalkids  location  location-based  games  gaming  aris  mobile  manhattan  statenisland  bronx  projectideas  openstudioproject  nychaunts 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Floating Lab Collective |
"The Floating Lab Collective is a group of artists working collaboratively on social research through public and media art projects in Washington DC, as well as nationally and internationally. They experiment with the aesthetics of direct action in crafting responses to specific places, communities, issues and circumstances. FLC artists move across visual art, performance, new media, and publications to engage and integrate such social topics as housing, the environment, migration, labor and urban mobility. One of FLC’s most important tools is a converted taco truck– a Floating Museum– that circulates projects among different neighborhoods, communities and regions.

Floating Lab Collective was started in 2007 in partnership with Provisions Library, an arts and social change research and development center at George Mason University. To date, over 50 groundbreaking community projects have been produced in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area, New York City, Mexico City, Detroit (MI), Louisville (KY), Medellin (Colombia) and Port of Spain (Trinidad). Through Provisions, FLC has been funded by The Creative Communities Initiative, The Nathan Cummings Foundation, The Virginia Museum, George Mason University and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities."
art  openstudioproject  lcproject  activism  place  community  floatinglabcollective  floatingmuseum  newmedia  glvo  performance  action  projectideas  washingtondc  baltimore  nyc  mexicocity  mexicodf  portofspain  medellin  louisville  detroit  socialchange  medellín  dc  colombia  df 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Cardboard Planetarium — DIY star-gazing for kids! | PingMag : Art, Design, Life – from Japan
[Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/20130828205421/http://pingmag.jp/2013/08/16/cardboard-planetarium/ ]

"The Perseid meteor shower was recently visible in the sky. Did you see it? Finding the right time and place to spot the spectacle was a bit of a pain. In the summer holidays, many people want to see the stars but don’t have the money to go to a proper planetarium. If you are one of these people, did you know you can make a planetarium out of some unconventional materials?

At temperatures over 35 degrees Celsius, PingMag popped along to an elementary school gymnasium to watch a special kids’ workshop by Art Studio Asahigaoka, a group of art college students, teaching children to build a planetarium… out of cardboard boxes!"

[Another cardboard planetarium: http://astronomypchs.blogspot.com/ ]
pingmag  cardboard  ncmideas  architecture  decay  memory  2013  projectideas  children  astronomy  planetariums  artstudioasahigaoka  japan  diy 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Object Stories: Rejecting the Single Story in Museums | Art Museum Teaching
"Launched in March 2010, Object Stories invites visitors to record their own narratives about personal objects—whether a piece of clothing, a cherished record album, or a family heirloom. By capturing, honoring, and sharing participants’ stories, this project aims to demystify the Museum, making it more accessible, welcoming, and meaningful to a greater diversity of communities – while continuing to highlight the inherent relationship between people and things. Nearly one thousand people from throughout Portland—most of who had never before set foot in the Museum—have participated as storytellers in this project."



"Since 2010, the Object Stories concept has essentially evolved into a comprehensive educational platform for engaging audiences and forging community collaborations. The Museum has since extended Object Stories into a multi-year partnership with area middle schools that involves in-depth teacher professional development, artist residencies, and multiple visits to the Portland Art Museum that culminates in students’ own personal “object stories.” Further success has brought the Museum into a new international partnership with the Museo Nacional de San Carlos in Mexico City, and a more locally-focused proposed Object Stories project with the Native American Youth and Family Center in Portland. These outreach efforts will also bring the storytelling process outside of the Museum through a new mobile iPad application currently in development."
collections  museums  objects  audiences  ncmideas  storytelling  objectstories  projectideas  education 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Hold the Sun Tea: Our Favorite Mason-Jar Hacks | Gadget Lab | Wired.com
"The Mason jar has proven itself to be a versatile piece of design. It's currently enjoying some attention as the beverage-bearer du jour among the nation's artisanal set. Haters might wonder why hipsters can't just leave the jars for jelly, and with the number of Mason jar-themed art projects, they may have a point. But techies have also gotten hip to the jar's hackability, and the wide threads on the screw-top mouth allow it to easily accommodate an array of accoutrements.

French Press
But, maybe you aren't in a rush to get to work. In that case, you might prefer this Mason jar French press. From the land of eternal brunch, The Portland Press is going to run you $100, and may feel like overkill, especially if you can get a perfectly functional, plastic press for $20. But, the Hardrock Maple is strong and beautiful, and the wool cozy makes it look like it has a beard. Plus, it might save you money in the long run. If you've had a French press, then you've also probably had a broken French press. With this thing, a morning catastrophe is solved by reaching up in the cupboard for a new Mason jar."
fiy  srg  glvo  edg  masonjars  coffee  frenchpresses  projectideas 
august 2013 by robertogreco
eskerex » Blog Archive » DRAWING MACHINE
"Drawingmachine is a construction involving two pendulums, each suspended from a tower construction and connected through “drawing arms” and moveable joints. A ballpoint pen resting on a drawing surface covered with paper is mounted at the point where the pendulums come together. The pendulums are set in motion by hand, and their movements are represented on the paper. The Drawing Machine serves to purposes: On exhibitions where the movements of the pendulums affect the entire room, and the experience engages the beholder’s body. While the rhythmic repetitions cause the beholder to pause, the drawing emerges on the paper. And as a tool where investigations on the relation between time and movement."
eskerex  art  machines  drawing  spyrograph  pendulums  artists  projectideas  openstudioproject  ncmproject 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Critical Practice Chelsea
"Critical Practice is a cluster of individual artists, researchers, academics and others, supported by Chelsea College of Art & Design, London. Through our Aims we intend to support critical practice within art, the field of culture and organization.

We have a longstanding interest in public goods, spaces, services and knowledge, and a track record of producing original participatory events, like Parade an international series of events exploring the disagreeable, contentious, exhilarating, messy, efficient, live, improvisatory and provisional nature of Being in Public.

Critical Practice seeks to avoid the passive reproduction of art, and uncritical cultural production. Our research, projects, exhibitions, publications and funding, our very constitution and administration are legitimate subjects of critical enquiry. All art is organised, so we are trying to be sensitive to issues of governance. Governance emerges whenever there is a deliberate organisation of interactions between people, we are striving to be an 'open' organization, and to make all decisions, processes and production, accessible and transparent. We post all agendas, minutes, budget and decision-making processes online for public scrutiny.

The research elements pursued under the auspices of Critical Practice will engage with the various forces that are implicated in the making of art, and the increasingly devolved experience of art made available through art institutions to their audiences. We will explore new models for creative practice, and engage those models in appropriate public forums, both nationally and internationally; we envisage participation in exhibitions and the institutions of exhibition, seminar and unconferences, film, concert and other event programmes. We will work with archives and collections, publication, broadcast and other distributive media; while actively seeking to collaborate."

[via http://www.fiveyears.org.uk/thisisnotaschool/THIS%20IS%20NOT%20A%20SCHOOL/PROGRAMME/TT+.pdf (see also: http://andyweir.info/photo_9694692.html ) and http://www.criticalpracticechelsea.org/wiki/index.php?title=File:This_is_Not_A_School-1.JPG ]
criticalpractice  art  participatory  participatoryart  participatoryevents  events  openstudioproject  lcproject  projectideas  thisisnotaschool  arteducation 
august 2013 by robertogreco
this is tomorrow - A Small Hiccup
"If you have ever spent any time considering how language mutates, from marvelling at how swiftly neologisms like ‘omnishambles’ enter the dictionary to bemoaning how IAU (incessant acronym use) is degrading the English language, then maybe it will not be too great a leap for you to imagine a world in which language itself has become diseased. ‘Pontypool’ (2008), a low budget horror film, which does what ambitious low budget horror should by working within its limited means to convey a disturbing but compelling idea, introduces a new form of viral infection: a linguistic disease spread through speech.

George Vasey takes inspiration from ‘Pontypool’ in curating ‘A Small Hiccup’, a travelling exhibition, events programme, publication and online commission exploring ‘diseased language’. This multi-format approach allows for an impressive number of manifestations of such a disease to be pursued, moving across page, screen, airwaves, internet and beyond to ask, ‘Is it always good to talk?’

The exhibition, which launched at Grand Union in Birmingham and will travel on to The Newbridge Project in Newcastle, and later in event-form to Limoncello, London, features newly commissioned works by Jeremy Hutchison, Leah Lovett, Fay Nicolson & Oliver Smith, Siôn Parkinson, Erica Scourti, Simon Senn, Holly Pester and Charlie Woolley, who variously take on the idea of compromised speech. The artists instigate and investigate moments within which the instability of language is demonstrated; its quirks, limitations and failings, the moments when the ‘small hiccup’ disrupts the flow and leaves the meaning obscured.

For a show about communication the gallery is strangely hushed, the works holding a polite distance from each other and often requiring a careful approach and examination to discern that anything is being said to you at all. Erica Scourti’s ‘Unsent Letters’ are like magic eye puzzles, for which the viewer must relax into a hazy half-focus in order to receive their corrupted message; as what has been written becomes clear it remains ambiguous as to whether the words have been degraded by force of emotion or encrypted against detection.

Every five minutes Holly Pester’s ‘News Piece’ murmurs into life from a pair of speakers, delivering a short sing-song cut-up of this week’s affairs, the words washing over you until a fragment of a recognisable news item emerges from the fog. Similarly riffing on the media, Fay Nicholson and Oliver Smith crunch the news down to symbols printed in punkt pro, a coded font, on a series of tabloid newsprint posters, paring down the already absurdly succinct headlines of the red tops to a series of icons: a Newspeak for the emoticon generation.

The publication, designed by An Endless Supply and printed in newspaper format, extends out the pool of contributors to take in further artists alongside writers and curators. In this format Vasey poses two questions: ‘What does it mean to miscommunicate?’ and ‘Can mistranslation be a productive situation?’ with the ‘answers’ across the subsequent pages building up a dense and intermittently incomprehensible visual babble of cartoon sketches, screen grabs and ventriloquism.

While some areas of the project seem to be bursting at the seams, the central exhibition is more sparing and maintains a varied pace, landing a few heavy hitting one-liners but for the most part allowing for a slower unveiling of meaning, requiring an in-depth reading rather than a skim across the surface. The newspaper, along with the project’s Tumblr blog of extra-curricular materials, feel entirely necessary to hold the curator’s expansive research, which develops the themes of the exhibition even as it pulls them loose into all sorts of tangential directions. This is a highly engaging project for the most part due to its velocity; the huge enthusiasm that the curator shows to keep piling in and travelling on, creates a feeling of near infinite possibility, the elasticity of language being its only potential limitation."
newspaperclub  jeremyhutchison  leahlovett  faynicolson  oliversmith  siônparkinson  ericascourti  simonsenn  hollypester  charliewoolley  georgevasey  art  exhibitions  communication  language  text  neologisms  deathoflanguage  anendlesssupply  elasticity  newmedia  glvo  projectideas  tumblr  curation 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Campsick: Julian Bleecker Reports from Alec Soth’s Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers — Magazine — Walker Art Center
"To give a measure of what a Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers is, let me describe some of its awkward moments.

1. Unspecified expectations, except whatever happens, it will be shared at a public slideshow on the last day.

2. No packing list. Usually, when I went to summer camp as a young tot, there were checklists of bug spray, 12 changes of underwear, swim trunks, swim goggles, toiletries, sleeping bag, wash cloth, pajamas, sun hat, etc.

3. No agenda, except to show up on July 9 at the offices of Little Brown Mushroom around 9:30 or 10.

4. Suburban excursion in a stout RV. That just sorta happened. Spontaneously.

5. Itchy, scratchy mosquito bites in spite of semi-legal, high-test, under-the-counter mosquito repellent.

6. Late-night slideshows. (Think of it as a modern variant of the campfire story telling hour.)

7. A surprise birthday cake.

8. A dance.

9. Campsick. It’s like homesick, but for camp. Specifically, an aching in the belly, like you’ve finished a great summer at camp and must immediately make plans to stay in touch and meet again. As soon as possible. Like something happened you didn’t want to stop, but you had to because it was too expensive to change flights and stay another day or two.

That was the Little Brown Mushroom Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers, a project that brought together 15 eager campers from all over the map. Camp, as Soth described it to me, “evokes campfires and canoes, but the definition is actually quite flexible. ‘Camp’ simply means a summertime gathering that lacks the formal and institutionalized aura of school.” For Soth, the hope was “to just create a context in which people can make art happen.”

But that context, as camp’s name suggests, is decidedly awkward. That’s fitting for a group like Little Brown Mushroom. There is not the pretension that one might expect from a studio attached to an artist’s name. It would’ve been clear to anyone who knew of LBM—either through its blog, their books, or Soth’s work—that camp would not be supplicating students learning from the great master. First of all, Soth is self-admittedly awkward in front of people, so he would not be holding forth in the style of the self-indulgent artist. We’d be working among each other, campers and counselors on equal footing. It was activity-time camp, nearly 14 hours every day. We’d be defining the activities. Exuberant, exhausting, difficult, strange, get-your-game-face-on kinds of activities."



"I have no idea what’s going on, or what I’m doing, but I’m doing it.

And now, back at our encampment there are four of us quietly sitting, thinking, drawing, talking. Out of nowhere, Jim’s lying on the ground in front of the limb-and-leaf backdrop. He’s perfectly still. Is it overdone performance, or is he my muse for the day? I decide, game-face on, he’ll be my muse. Most people have left to find stories in the neighborhood surrounding the park. Some have driven to other parts of town.

The hard part is finding a story in that. You have to, though. Day Two slideshow is at 7 pm. That’s just a couple hours from now.

This is the day that I realize I need to be inspired by the constraints that exist at camp. There are constraints of time, obviously. Cooking out a slideshow from a day of conversations, excursions, light reading, trundling in RVs, following fellow campers in the woods. All this means I have to hold my ideas lightly, not make things too precious, keeping my nose up for any whiff of a story to find and tell.

Today, I’ve become sensitized to what Soth refers to as “humble epics.” Big, powerful things, perhaps in modest, carefully constructed, simple, compact, $18 or cheaper packages.

That’s a kind of storytelling that feels quite modern in a sense. The overwrought image and text story is not what will come out of camp. There are no Taschen-sized epics to be done here, at least for me. I find that liberating. As I quickly refine and hone and edit my forest slideshow, I consider LBM’s obsession with audaciously democratizing the pricing of their publications at $18. I think about Target, the Twin Cities mega-mega that I can imagine goes to nutso ends to whittle pricing by fractions of pennies to make them the no-brainer store. Soth mentions an LBM book that they couldn’t get cheaper than $24, and you can physically see the disappointment at the price-point in his shoulders. Soth would make a great Target buyer. You know, in case this whole photography thing doesn’t work out.

The inexpensive, accessible, humble, epic, image+text LBM books come with an inherent simplicity in production, packaging, and design that is an aesthetic in its own right. Accessible, humble epics are a thing of note, especially within the world that Soth could circulate. He’s a Minnesotan first, Magnum photographer second. Beautiful, seductive, tangible $18 stories-in-books are not a gimmick. Free camp isn’t a gimmick. I can see the earnestness in his explanation of the non-tuition camp. He wants it open. He doesn’t want to turn away someone who could not afford to attend because of a fee. He doesn’t want LBM to be big business.

And only now do I realize that we’re learning how to tell stories. I’ve never mentioned it and stifled the thought in my own head, but we’ve not had formal discussions about photography. At the end of Day Two, during the slideshow, I resolve the suspicion I’ve had since shortly before I arrived: this is not a photography camp, despite being in a photography studio. That thought relaxes me. No one’s geeking out on gear. There is scant feedback on technical elements of image-making or storytelling. We’re free to find stories. Of course, that’s liberating and debilitating at the same time. We’re not told what to do. We’re only told that “whatever you do, whatever story you want to tell at the public slideshow on Saturday, it mustn’t take more than five minutes to tell.”

Day Three
Bookmaking Day, although we don’t make books. We talk about books and their making and unmaking. Some campers wonder why we’re doing a slideshow rather than a book as a final deliverable. A book is easier to keep and share and show again and again. We have a nice, long discussion in the morning facilitated by Alec and designer and art director Hans Seeger. We talk about the materiality and tangibility of books. Their preciousness. The contrast in books designed too earnestly, and books devoid of design that are merely containers for famous photographs by famous photographers. We talked about the great glissade of books after 1986 when computers performed their radical democratization of visual design and publishing. And I wondered how short-form composition and networked dissemination frameworks like Twitter, Instagram, and Vine would do similar things. I wonder aloud to camp if the modern image+text story as we know it now—the things in Soth’s studio library—are for doddering “old” folks like us? I want to talk about the modern, modern image+text story? Is Adam Goldberg’s Vine feed tomorrow’s Willliam Eggleston, or perhaps Cindy Sherman? The comparison may sound idiotic. I once thought that instantly sharing one’s thoughts in 140 characters was idiotic and self-indulgent. I once thought #selfies were idiotic. Then the Arab Spring happened, facilitated in part by 140 characters and what protesters could share in a single image.

The bookmaking-day discussions turn into a list of books to get and a note to consider getting another bookshelf at home. That’s fine. Having a library of books—the material sort—is validated by LBM’s amazing collection. It’s the morning-quiet-time gathering place we all meander through as our coffee takes hold. There’s a quiet reverence to the library in the mornings as campers peruse the stacks, heads cocked to the side to read titles. I find my first photo book in the B’s [Hello, Skater Girl, 2012] and feel suddenly embarrassed at its earnest naivete. I wish I had been to camp and learned what I am learning at camp before I made that.

LBM is a publisher of stories, so one might think camp would do a book as a final outcome. But that brings along complexity and time and money, and you begin to obsess over the operational details of producing such a thing. The slideshow. It has a tradition. It’s familial. It’s familiar. It’s something that can be condensed into a short amount of time. It has history."



"I think about “bookmaking” day’s discussion of Darin Mickey’s Stuff I Gotta Remember Not To Forget and his image story about his father’s odd, Cohen-esque life as a salesman of storage space in underground vaults. In 27 images, Mickey tells a remarkable, humorous, heartfelt story about his father. And I think of Soth’s image of a strikingly pale Indonesian girl he stumbles upon, photographs for The Auckland Project, loses the photograph and then spends the rest of his time struggling to find a story, struggling to find an image that moves him. He finds “missing cat” posters, bird road kill, and pale models. Just hours before he leaves Auckland, he stumbles upon Diandra, the pale Indonesian girl, sitting delicately on a low wall, watching the tiniest bird.

These count as powerful stories in my mind and from what I’ve been learning at camp. I’m thinking about “humble epics,” creative constraints. And how to get done in the next four hours."
julianbleecker  campforsociallyawkwardstorytellers  alecsoth  openstudioproject  camp  lcproject  classideas  walkerartcenter  minnesota  adventure  fun  conferences  unconferences  experientialeducation  design  bookslcproject  summerinwintercamp  littlebrownmushroom  ncmideas  conferenceideas  2013  camps  learning  collaboration  projectideas  experientiallearning 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Cybernetics on the Prairie | Complex Fields
"The core of this project takes the form of BCL/IGB, a commissioned public artwork in three parts: a printed mural, a reprinted collection of historic texts, and a recreated historical computer. I intended the work as a monument to an under-recognized episode in my home institution’s history, constructed in a form appropriate to the content.

More ambitiously, this work is an attempt to deal with the nature of institutional memory, especially in the context of scientific research. More personally, I entered the project as a way to learn how one might successfully navigate the complex moral and philosophical challenges of teaching, research and administration in a modern American University."

[Related: http://bcl.ece.illinois.edu/
http://bcl.ece.illinois.edu/hutchinson/
http://complexfields.org/here/158
http://diabeticfootonline.blogspot.com/2013/07/of-phantom-limbs-and-foreign-bodies.html

[The Whole University Catalog http://spinelessbooks.com/wholeuniversity/ and in .pdf: http://spinelessbooks.com/wholeuniversity/catalog.pdf ]
biologicalcomputerlab  instituteforgenomicbiology  kevinhamilton  sybernetics  complexfields  ncmideas  projectideas  zines  education  history  teaching  biology  research  wholeuniversitycatalog  humbertomaturana  herbertbrün  counterculture  1960s  1969  univeristyofillinois  deschooling  unschooling  pedagogy  radicalpedagogy 
july 2013 by robertogreco
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read