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Harvard EdCast: Lifelong Kindergarten | Harvard Graduate School of Education
"The concept of kindergarten — as a place for young children to learn by interacting with materials and people around them — has existed for over 200 years, but never has the approach been so suited to the way the world works as it is today, says Mitchel Resnick, the LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab.

“That approach to kindergarten is really aligned with the needs of today’s society," says Resnick, citing the need to adapt to the speed at which things change in the world. "As kids in the traditional kindergarten were playfully designing and creating things, they were developing as creative thinkers…. That’s exactly what we need.”

Being given the room to explore, experiment, and express oneself is vital to becoming a creative thinker — and to the learning process as a whole — says Resnick, author of Lifelong Kindergarten: Cultivating Creativity through Projects, Passion, Peers, and Play. If people aren't encouraged in their creativity at an early age, and if this isn't nutured throughout their schooling, then they aren't as prepared to deal with the unexpected when it arises.

“We’re trying to spread that approach to learners of all ages," says Resnick, who also leads the Lifelong Kindergarten research group at MIT. "We want to take what’s worked best in kindergarten and here at the Media Lab and provide opportunities for all kids of all ages to be able to explore and experiment and express themselves in that same spirit.”

In this edition of the Harvard EdCast, Resnick talks about the importance of nurturing creativity in learning and explains why kindergarten is the greatest invention of the last millennium."

[See also:
"Mitchel Resnick - MIT Media Lab: Lifelong Kindergarten" (2014)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRxD-pe3PN0

"Helping Kids Develop as Creative Thinkers" (2017)
https://vimeo.com/244986026 ]
mitchresnick  lifelongkindergarten  mitmedialab  2017  interviews  kindergarten  play  projects  projectbasedlearning  passion  collaboration  experimentation  creativity  medialab  scratch  making  pbl  teaching  sfsh  learning  howweteach  howwelearn  risks  risktaking  education  schools  lcproject  openstudioproject  curiosity  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  mindstorms  writing  coding  programming  leaning  creating  lego  reasoning 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Makerbase
"Makerbase is a database of digital projects like apps, websites or artworks, and the makers who create them.

Anyone can edit Makerbase.

Who is Makerbase for?

Makerbase is a reference for anyone who's interested in apps and web sites and the people behind them. It's particularly valuable for makers and aspiring makers, helping everyone discover who creates technology and the ways they teamed up.

Anyone who makes things on the internet should be here on Makerbase.

How do I use Makerbase?

Everything in Makerbase starts with search. From the homepage, you can type in the search box to find any maker or project that you're interested in. Don't see yours? Just click "Create this Maker" or "Create this Project". Makerbase will automatically pull in information from Twitter or the App Store to fill out the details.

After that, you can go to any project and add the names of makers who worked on it, with an optional description of what they did and the dates when they did it.

Makerbase automatically does things like showing you which people a maker tends to collaborate with.

Who is a maker?

A maker is a human being who has helped build a project in any way. Makerbase defines "making" broadly, so a project's makers aren't just the coders and founders.

It’s easy to find out who the founders of an app are, or the editors-in-chief of a site, or the organizers of a conference, or the hosts of a podcast, but not as easy to find out who designed the logo, or managed community, or wrote copy, or was a guest or speaker—that’s the value Makerbase adds.

If you contributed in any way to creating a project, you're a maker—go ahead and add yourself. Anyone else who has helped you build your project is also a maker. The only rule about makers is: a maker is an individual person. Companies, organizations, or brands are not makers.

What is a project?

A project is a digital work, like an app, game, web site, podcast, ebook, video, blog, or art project. Projects don't have to be exclusively digital. Anything that has a digital component—like programmable hardware, or an event focused on web technology—count as projects. Companies and brands are not projects, though some projects become companies.

Projects are not necessarily products, or things makers built at or for work. Makerbase welcomes hobby projects, weekend and nighttime collaborations, and student work or art projects.

Just like makers, Makerbase uses the term "project" inclusively. If you're not sure if your project qualifies, it probably does—add it! Makers have listed conferences, books, fundraisers, memes, and networks on Makerbase and they are welcome. The only guidelines are: a human is not a project, and a company is not a project.

Uh-oh, I see a mistake. How do I fix it?

Everything on Makerbase can be updated. Like Wikipedia, Makerbase is user-editable, which means that anyone can sign in with a Twitter account and add or revise any maker or project or role. If you need to make a change, click on the Edit button and make it.

If you added a project or maker by accident, click on the Edit button, and then the Archive button. If you accidentally archived something, simply click on the Edit button, then the Unarchive button.

If you need a page deleted completely from Makerbase, or want to report abuse, click on the Flag button on the relevant page.

Who makes Makerbase?

We all do! Everyone can add and update the information on Makerbase.

The Makerbase site itself was built and is managed by Anil Dash and Gina Trapani. (Our company is called ThinkUp, after our first product. You can read more about ThinkUp and about our values.)

What does Makerbase cost? Who pays for it?

Makerbase is free. Anyone can view, edit and explore the site without paying anything. Our business model is sponsorship, which means great companies like MailChimp, Hover and Slack support the site. In exchange, the Makerbase community supports these sponsors by letting the world know when they make use of these great tools.

We'll be introducing additional select sponsors in 2016; get in touch if you'd like to be one of them.

What if something's wrong or I need help?

Email us at help@makerba.se and we'll take care of it. If there's a problem with content or behavior on the site, you can include a link to the relevant page. There's also a flag link to report a problem on every page of the site.

I want to write about Makerbase. Who can I talk to?

We would love that! Email press@makerba.se and we'll answer any questions. You can also download our logo if you need it.

Makerbase is a trademark of ThinkUp LLC."
makerbase  anildash  ginatrapani  wikis  socialmedia  thinkup  projects  makers  diy  entrepreneurship  startups 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Kurt Hahn - Wikipedia
"Six Declines of Modern Youth

1. Decline of Fitness due to modern methods of locomotion [moving about];
2. Decline of Initiative and Enterprise due to the widespread disease of spectatoritis;
3. Decline of Memory and Imagination due to the confused restlessness of modern life;
4. Decline of Skill and Care due to the weakened tradition of craftsmanship;
5. Decline of Self-discipline due to the ever-present availability of stimulants and tranquilizers;
6. Decline of Compassion due to the unseemly haste with which modern life is conducted or as William Temple called "spiritual death".

Hahn not only pointed out the decline of modern youth, he also came up with four antidotes to fix the problem.

1. Fitness Training (e.g., to compete with one's self in physical fitness; in so doing, train the discipline and determination of the mind through the body)
2. Expeditions (e.g., via sea or land, to engage in long, challenging endurance tasks)
3. Projects (e.g., involving crafts and manual skills)
4. Rescue Service (e.g., surf lifesaving, fire fighting, first aid)

Ten Expeditionary Learning Principles
These 10 principles, which seek to describe a caring, adventurous school culture and approach to learning, were drawn[by whom?] from the ideas of Kurt Hahn and other education leaders[which?] for use in Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound (ELOB) schools.

1. The primacy of self-discovery
Learning happens best with emotion, challenge and the requisite support. People discover their abilities, values, passions, and responsibilities in situations that offer adventure and the unexpected. In Expeditionary Learning schools, students undertake tasks that require perseverance, fitness, craftsmanship, imagination, self-discipline, and significant achievement. A teacher’s primary task is to help students overcome their fears and discover they can do more than they think they can.

2. The having of wonderful ideas
Teaching in Expeditionary Learning schools fosters curiosity about the world by creating learning situations that provide something important to think about, time to experiment, and time to make sense of what is observed.

4. The responsibility for learning
Learning is both a personal process of discovery and a social activity. Everyone learns both individually and as part of a group. Every aspect of an Expeditionary Learning school encourages both children and adults to become increasingly responsible for directing their own personal and collective learning.

4. Empathy and caring
Learning is fostered best in communities where students’ and teachers’ ideas are respected and where there is mutual trust. Learning groups are small in Expeditionary Learning schools, with a caring adult looking after the progress and acting as an advocate for each child. Older students mentor younger ones, and students feel physically and emotionally safe.

5. Success and failure
All students need to be successful if they are to build the confidence and capacity to take risks and meet increasingly difficult challenges. But it is also important for students to learn from their failures, to persevere when things are hard, and to learn to turn disabilities into opportunities.

6. Collaboration and competition
Individual development and group development are integrated so that the value of friendship, trust, and group action is clear. Students are encouraged to compete not against each other but with their own personal best and with rigorous standards of excellence.

7. Diversity and inclusion
Both diversity and inclusion increase the richness of ideas, creative power, problem-solving ability, respect for others. In Expeditionary Learning schools, students investigate value their different histories talents as well as those of other communities cultures. Schools learning groups heterogeneous.

8. The natural world
Direct respectful relationship with the natural world refreshes the human spirit teaches[clarification needed] the important ideas of recurring cycles and cause and effect. Students learn to become stewards of the earth and of future generations.

9. Solitude and reflection
Students and teachers need time alone to explore their own thoughts, make their own connections, and create their own ideas. They also need time to exchange their reflections with others.

10. Service and compassion
We are crew, not passengers. Students and teachers are strengthened by acts of consequential service to others, and one of an Expeditionary Learning school's primary functions is to prepare students with the attitudes and skills to learn from and be of service to others."
kurthahn  learning  youth  fitness  health  skill  care  self-discipline  memory  imagination  consumerism  spectatoritis  locomotion  williamtemple  stimulation  expeditions  projects  projectbasedlearning  self-discovery  howwelearn  outwardbound  unitedworldcolleges  collaboration  competition  nature  outdoors  solitude  reflection  compassion  service  servicelearning  howweteach  education  pedagogy  experientiallearning  experience  success  failure  empathy  caring  responsibility 
april 2016 by robertogreco
What Hollywood Can Teach Us About the Future of Work - NYTimes.com
"I was there as a “technical adviser”: The movie involved some financial events that I’ve reported on, and the filmmakers wanted to ask me questions as they set up their scenes. But I spent much of the day asking questions of my own, trying to figure out something that mystified me as the day went on: Why was this process so smooth? The team had never worked together before, and the scenes they were shooting that day required many different complex tasks to happen in harmony: lighting, makeup, hair, costumes, sets, props, acting. And yet there was no transition time; everybody worked together seamlessly, instantly. The set designer told me about the shade of off-­white that he chose for the walls, how it supported the feel of the scene. The costume designer had agonized over precisely which sandals the lead actor should wear. They told me all this, but they didn’t need to tell one another. They just got to work, and somehow it all fit together.

This approach to business is sometimes called the “Hollywood model.” A project is identified; a team is assembled; it works together for precisely as long as is needed to complete the task; then the team disbands. This short-­term, project-­based business structure is an alternative to the corporate model, in which capital is spent up front to build a business, which then hires workers for long-­term, open-­ended jobs that can last for years, even a lifetime. It’s also distinct from the Uber-­style “gig economy,” which is designed to take care of extremely short-­term tasks, manageable by one person, typically in less than a day.

With the Hollywood model, ad hoc teams carry out projects that are large and complex, requiring many different people with complementary skills. The Hollywood model is now used to build bridges, design apps or start restaurants. Many cosmetics companies assemble a temporary team of aestheticians and technical experts to develop new products, then hand off the actual production to a factory, which does have long-­term employees. (The big studios, actually, work the same way: While the production of the movie is done by temps, marketing and distribution are typically handled by professionals with long-­term jobs.)

Our economy is in the midst of a grand shift toward the Hollywood model. More of us will see our working lives structured around short-­term, project-­based teams rather than long-­term, open­-ended jobs. There are many reasons this change is happening right now, but perhaps the best way to understand it is that we have reached the end of a hundred-­year fluke, an odd moment in economic history that was dominated by big businesses offering essentially identical products. Competition came largely by focusing on the cost side, through making production cheaper and more efficient; this process required businesses to invest tremendous amounts in physical capital — machines and factories — and then to populate those factories with workers who performed routine activities. Nonmanufacturing corporations followed a similar model: Think of all those office towers filled with clerical staff or accountants or lawyers. That system began to fray in the United States during the 1960s, first in manufacturing, with the economic rise of Germany and Japan. It was then ripped apart by Chinese competition during the 2000s. Enter the Hollywood model, which is far more adaptable. Each new team can be assembled based on the specific needs of that moment and with a limited financial commitment."

[Compare to: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/29/business/yourmoney/29pixar.html?pagewanted=all
and http://www.cityofsound.com/blog/2013/10/departments-to-studios.html

This comparison noted here:
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/597978757912137731
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/597979986910322689 ]
2015  hollywoodmodel  projects  teams  work  howwework  adamdavidson  multidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  film  filmmaking  hollywood 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Letter to the community | the Purple Thistle Centre
"Refusing to Jump the Shark, OR: the Thistle was never meant to be an institution.

dear friends, community and supporters,

As many of you may have heard, the Thistle has hit some hard funding cuts this past year. It’s been pretty rough and it has required an administrative dance-to-end-all-dances just to keep us afloat. It hasn’t been all bad though; we’ve managed to do some cool stuff anyhow, like Solidarity Camp during the teachers strike, an amazing public art show at Heartwood Cafe and another run of FARMcamp (to name just a few). But energy and funding at the Thistle has been dwindling, and it means that we are going to close the space at the end of April.

Before we all jump to the front lines and try and save the space, please have a read about how this transition and change isn’t about saving the Thistle space, but about celebrating the Thistle and the ongoing work of youth liberation, friendship, and community.

This is a letter to say thanks to a lot of folks and hey, let’s keep in touch!

The Thistle has been around for 14 and half years, and that’s something to be really proud of. Not one person is the Thistle, so be sure to talk to folks who have been involved with the project, their individual or collective stories will be worth hearing!

The Thistle was never meant to be an institution, but rather a space where folks could come together meet and dream about doing something collaboratively and then do it! And overall, that’s what has happened.

Youth liberation is at the Thistle’s core- an alternative to school. A place to reimagine how young folks can organize and co-create. What blossomed from almost 15 years in this environment, are solid friendships and a community that lives, and will survive, outside the walls of the centre.

A bunch of us at the Thistle think we have had an impact on the discourse of youth liberation and youth engagement in their communities and we feel pretty great about that, too. But more than all of that, what has happened at the Thistle over the almost 15 years has been about the creation of solid friendships and community.

At the Thistle we learn to trust — to trust that kids and youth have the capacity to solve their own problems and to author their own lives, and to trust ourselves as adults and mentors — to learn to work together in a way that lives so comfortably outside institutions. So right now, we also need to trust that this is the time to end this experiment, and that new projects will flourish. The signs are lining up (low participation, funding issues, slowing of momentum), it’s time to be responsive to that and trust ourselves.

A BIT MORE ABOUT WHY WE ARE CLOSING:
Over the past year and half, we have witnessed a wellspring of youth projects starting up: from youth-run collectives, to cooperatives and art projects and it’s been inspiring to see. At the same time, and partly as a result of this, we have seen the general involvement at the Thistle really lessen, which really makes a lot of sense to us. There are less youth at drop-ins, fewer active Thistle pods, and folks are feeling pulled among all kinds of rad projects. In other words, there’s lots going on, and a bunch of it isn’t happening at the Thistle.

This has shown us that perhaps we are no longer needed in the way we were in the past, and have pretty much done our time — after all, everything does end! And to be honest, we wish more places would end when it’s time — but unfortunately we live in a system that values longevity over thriving; and that aint us. Our society puts us in competition with other rad, youth-run projects for grants and funding, and we want to celebrate those other projects by closing up and supporting these rad new initiatives. Youth projects are still flourishing, and doing a bunch of the things that the Thistle has done well in the past. And some of the new initiatives may very well come out of the Thistle and some of the current collective…

We could also “jump the shark” by turning the Thistle into an institution, or partnering with a few institutions to make us stay open. In doing so, we could have enough money to keep it going, at least for a while, but we think that’s not right either and that doing that would ultimately undermine the core of what the Thistle was/is: a space run by youth.

To borrow on a Quakers ethos, sometimes you gotta just “lay it down.” That is, to get out of the way so other, more timely projects can sprout. We are excited to see what will grow in the Thistle’s place when the space closes its doors — and there are a bunch of us who are excited to be part of those conversations!

THE FACTS:
The space is closing April 30th, but a few of the pods will still be going: Lovable, Thistle Institute and one of the the garden projects. Carla Bergman, with the support of Arts In Action will still be wearing an administrator hat to support youth run projects like DIT (Daughters in Tandem) and ArtQuake, to gain funding and connect to community and so on.

AND NOW FOR SOME BIG THANKS!
A tremendously big thank you to Morley Faber, who put up with us in the Mergartroid building for all these years — we sincerely couldn’t have done half of what we accomplished without his support and guidance. Thank you to Arts In Action, and especially, Selena Couture, Verity Rolfe and Claudine Pommier, for always being open to our far-fetched ideas and for signing a lot of paperwork! And of course, thank you to the funders who also let us have a lot of autonomy along the way and supported youth liberation– thank you all!

But mostly, we want say thank you to all the youth who trusted this project and jumped in with all your fierce passions and radical dreams– you all should feel incredibly proud! There are too many to name, but you are all remembered! And a special thank you to all the adults who came in and hung out, offered mentorship, learned more than they gave and were anchors.

Lastly, for a bunch of us we really got to send the biggest shout out and say the biggest thank you to that first crew of youth: Gen, Cole, Jesse, Keith, Leni, Dan, Maggie, and Lauriel, and of course thank you Matt Hern, for having the vision, the imagination and the courage to create the Thistle.

much gratitude to you all.

KEEP IN TOUCH:
It’s time to move on, but we will be open for a couple more months and there will be lots to do! so come hang out, make some art, help pack and clean the place! And, before we close the doors to that space, let’s celebrate almost 15 years of a project that created a lot of cool things, most of all community! We will be in touch soon about the party.

FINAL WORDS:
The Thistle project was created by a group of friends, and it’ll be amazing to see what a new group of friends will create in its place. And so, the space may close, but the relationships and the small projects that grew out of the Thistle project will go on. Let’s not have the walls of a space say who we are and let’s not fall into that institutional trap –almost everyone who has been involved in the project is still around; we have us and all the connections we’ve made, all the projects that have blossomed and all the seeds we’ve collectively planted. And that’s a lot.

see you all in the streets and in our homes.

in friendship and liberation,

The Thistle Community

co-signers:

alex, aly, Marly, Savanna, Sylvia, LeyAnn, Niko, Aliza, Durga, Maneo, Manisha, Corin, Zach, Dani and carla"
purplethistle  2015  ephemerality  unschooling  deschooling  longevity  ephemeral  institutions  projects  lcproject  openstudioproject  closing  youth  thriving  success  change  quakers  carlabergman  matthern 
january 2015 by robertogreco
What I Learned in my First Week of Running a School | ThinkThankThunk
[Highlighting 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 12, and 13]

"1. Competency-based education is really attractive to a certain group of parents and students; those that know their kid needs a real CV to compete coming out of the gate.

2. No one has any idea what a project is.

3. If you start a project without an external audience in mind, it’s probably going to be sucky.

4. If you start a project with a genuinely interesting question, it’s probably going to be legit. (How different are the proteins in blue, green, & brown eyes? vs. the much crappier: How does DNA make proteins?)

5. Middle school students can’t drive.

6. There’s an astonishingly small number of students who gravitate towards (and are properly served by) book-first learning. BIG is operating at 10% of students really flourishing this way. <implications implied implicitly>

7. Blurred Lines is a fun tune, but wildly inappropriate.

8. Ripping off Piet Mondrian for your logo makes you look like a fop, and minimizes time in Illustrator.

9. Writing competencies should be individualized to the student and needs to map back to at least 3 curriculum standards, or you’re just never going to stay at a good pace (just below Grueling/Meager Rations.)

10. No one talks about grades at BIG. It just doesn’t come up.

11. Keep a Google Doc for every student that has all of the crazy good ideas that pop up. You won’t remember everything, and the kids won’t either.

12. The context upon which you can hang content has a surprisingly wide latitude for most students.

13. Symposium time is necessary. (When 5-10 students get together to share progress, failures, successes, and ideas with each other)

14. We really need a mascot and colors. Currently we’re The Fighting Whalephants."
competency  competency-basededucation  middleschool  projects  projectbasedlearning  teaching  education  learning  schools  bigideasgroup  bigideasschool  shawncornally  2013  audience  parents  context  content  reflection  sharing  standards  pbl 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Dalton School ~ The Dalton Plan in the High School
"Through the Dalton Plan, High School students learn to make educated choices, employ their free time constructively, and appreciate the unique worth of each individual. House, Assignment, and Lab provide the underpinnings for the High School's focus on courage and empathy, creativity and scholarship, and independence and collaboration.

House is the daily gathering of sixteen to twenty-two students with either one or two faculty advisors. Each House consists of students from all four grades who serve as resources for each other. The relationship between House Advisor and advisee is generally a four year relationship. The House Advisor gets to know the student advisee well and is an academic advisor, an advocate, and a confidant.

The Assignment structures the classroom experience. Individual Assignments generally take four to six weeks to complete and serve as guides to student learning. Often, Assignments offer opportunities for students to pursue a topic in a unique way and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of forms. Ideally, an Assignment is a starting point for learning and, through Lab, students may individualize and extend their learning. The one-to-one or small group format of Lab fosters close relationships between students and teachers."

[See also:
Middle School Plan: http://www.dalton.org/program/middle/dalton_plan
Primary School Plan: http://www.dalton.org/program/first_program/the_dalton_plan ]
dalton  daltonschool  nyc  schools  schooldesign  teaching  learning  advising  projectbasedlearning  projects  attention  via:steelemaley  lcproject  howweteach  education  pbl 
april 2013 by robertogreco
News from the Executive Suite, Los Angeles Bureau | Near Future Laboratory
"they are projects and they reflect the more complete aspects of the Laboratory as a practice. They are a reflection of our additional interests, curiosities and explorations. Some of them are exercises of a more proto-professional nature, to explore ways of studying the world around us, short probes into a field of practice about which we want to understand by doing rather than by idle observation. In sum, they represent ways that the Laboratory is always curious, always learning, never set or fixed in what it does and how it does it. This makes me understand the Laboratory as a practice. A bit like a studio. But, I understand now even more as we grow and as more people join in, that it is better to communicate the multivalent character of the Laboratory through more aspects of what we here do.

There are no “side projects” in this practice. There are we all who are always following our curiosities."
julianbleecker  2013  projects  creativity  curiosity  curiosities  nearfuturelaboratory  learning  howwelearn  glvo  understanding  learningbydoing  observation  iteration  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject 
march 2013 by robertogreco
audience-driven storytelling
"When you write an abstract for a project, retweak it every time you tell someone about it. That way the story gets retooled at the speed of thought, matching your community and all the information you take in from them. Every time you retell the story for someone just on the edge of your social circle, you entertain another body of knowledge.  How would this story sound to scientists? to working-class folk?  Try to hear their thoughts in advance and tell them a story they'd find meaningful.  Then see how they actually respond, and take on what they know.

This advice particularly applies to graduate students at the end stage of a dissertation.  Retooling your methods won't work, but once you have your data, it can speak to many questions. Most book manuscripts that come out of dissertations suffer by responding to too shallow a literature, too narrow a public.  When you sit down to write the introduction and conclusion to a project, remember the best books you've read, the smartest people you've talked to, the most compelling conversations about changing the world."
workinginpublic  2013  writing  community  feedback  projects  prototyping  iteration  advice  retooling  joguldi  conversation  smallifying  collaboration  criticism  constructivecriticism 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Tupperwolf - Lichen names
"Yesterday I happened across that Eames promotion for the SX-70 for the first time. It reminded me, among many things, of an old friend, now dead – Bob Rodieck.

My high school was my mother (a qualified teacher), our neighbor R., and me. One of the classes was to make a book on our island’s natural history. When we were planning it, we visited Bob on an extremely gray spring day to talk about desktop publishing, because he’d been talking about how he was writing a book himself. (I may have the timeline slightly wrong here. Please consider this an As I Remember It story.)

We explained what we wanted to do. Bob, who was a freshly emeritus professor, scratched his stubble and leaned forward, then leaned back. He asked if we knew the difference between vector and raster graphics. I started explaining how they’re actually fairly isomorphic, since pixels can be represented as squares and, conversely, control points are in a discrete space, and from then on we were friends. It was Bob who turned me on to Tufte, and I turned him on to Bringhurst.



The natural history book was a well chosen project. We interviewed a lot of the oldest and most eccentric people on the island. They had records, written or in memory, about when flowers used to bloom, where the clams used to live before they were depleted, how many eagles used to nest on the point, how the old Samish woman had treated leather, when the last puffin was seen, what time of year the beaver showed up, and so on. There was the mystery of the flying squirrel.

We got a lot of very guarded mushroom knowledge from Dorothy H., who was in her eighties and roughly three times as vigorous and alert as I was. It’s really hard to come by good mushroom knowledge, because the people careful enough to understand mushrooms tend to be careful about risking other people on possibly poisonous food. Dorothy played her cards close to her chest.



Bob eventually finished his book, which was called The First Steps in Seeing. It was very well received, but as far as I can tell never sold well – Amazon has only four reviews, though they’re all five-star. I think it’s because he wasn’t around to promote it. He’d told me this wonderful story about graphic design and experimental design once: He went to get a check-up. He was given a form to fill out that included dietary habits. He said that he was about to check “1 serving of green vegetables/day” when he noticed that the checkbox itself was red! He figured that, being of northern European stock, he was adapted to fewer greens, and checked the first box that wasn’t red, 3 servings, and called it good. Not long after finishing the book, he was diagnosed with gut cancer.

Towards the end, he was on the island resting when he started having an unusual type of trouble moving his eyes. He said it was clearly a certain potassium channel failing, and it was time to go back to Seattle and die.

I think that, had he been around to promote it and put out a second edition, his book would be a classic now. It’s in the details and how they’re subordinated to the big-picture view. He drew all the illustrations himself. He chose the spot colors. He thought very hard about what path through the material he could provide that would be easiest for the beginner but pass the best trailheads for those who went further. He threw a lot of textbook conventions out the window and never missed them. He gave a crap but didn’t give a fuck.

Dorothy’s reluctance to tell us which mushrooms we could eat drove us to the classic texts, David Arora’s books. We could use him as a lever on her – “Arora says …; is that really true?”. In other fields we found other guidebooks: Pojar & MacKinnon on plants, Love’s Probably More Than You Want to Know About the Fishes of the Pacific Coast.

If you don’t spend a lot of time with natural history guidebooks, you might not know that the best ones have voice – authorial voice. It’s necessary, I think, to make a book that’s basically a huge list of details interesting enough to pay attention to. And I suspect you’re unlikely to excell in mycology, botany, or marine biology unless you have a sense of perspective. If you are humorless, it’s a lot easier to be a businessperson than to spend three weeks in a tent, looking at little tufts of fungus–alga symbionts.

It’s the big picture and the little picture. It’s Philip Morrison’s speech at the end of that Polaroid film. It’s the SX-70 letting you be more inside experience, less concerned with problems of representation, in something more than a tree or a net. It’s an idea of technology that seems a little dangerous and very good to me. It reminds me of Twitter a little. Lately there I appreciated a map of surf conditions from Bob’s son, and reconnected with my fellow student R.’s cousin."
charlieloyd  highschool  projects  projectbasedlearning  pbl  naturalhistory  lichen  names  naming  2013  memory  learning  education  books  writing  teaching  sx-70  philipmorrison  polaroid  mushrooms  bobrodieck  unschooling  deschooling  sight  seeing  memories  imaging  photography  publishing  promotion  fun  play  words  wordplay  design  davidarora  trevorgoward  brucemccune  delmeidinger  science  interestedness  interestingness  interested 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Innovation in Education | Fast Company
"Nikhil Goyal, student and author of One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student's Assessment of School:

1. Make cities our classrooms. … projects, apprenticeships, working with mentors, and traveling … community should be our curriculum …

2. Swap pedagogy for andragogy. We need to switch from pedagogy (teacher-focused) to andragogy (adult-leading). In this model of education, children have control, they are motivated intrinsically, and the curriculum is problem- rather than content-orientated. We need to have young people become the captains of their learning. …

3. Hike teacher pay and end market-based rewards. …

Gever Tulley, founder, Brightworks and the Tinkering School:

1. Focus on microschools: Schools don't have to be big. The hyper-local micro-school can compete on a financial basis while delivering a more engaging learning experience.

2. Make room for alternative schools. …

3. Treat education as a regular practice like exercise, not as a phase. …"
pbl  projectbasedlearning  projects  making  tinkering  tinkeringschool  brightworks  pedagogy  process  practice  practices  howwelearn  mentorship  mentorships  mentors  mentoring  apprenticeships  urbanism  urban  cities  cityasclassroom  andragogy  alted  alternative  deschooling  unschooling  2012  teaching  georgeparker  michellerhee  gevertulley  cv  schools  education  learning  openstudioproject  lcproject  nikhilgoyal 
november 2012 by robertogreco
REV-
"REV- is a non-profit organization that furthers socially-engaged art, design, and pedagogy. REV- produces projects that fuse disciplines, foster diversity, and vary in form (workshops, publications, exhibitions, design objects, etc.). Engaged with different communities and groups, REV-‘s projects involve collaborative production, resource-sharing, and a commitment to the process as political gesture. The organization derives its name from both the colloquial expression “to rev” a vehicle and the prefix “rev-“ which means to turn—as in, revolver, revolution, revolt, revere, irreverent, etc."
nonprofit  sociallyengaged  design  openstudioproject  resourcesharing  lcproject  collaborativeproduction  interdisciplinary  collective  projects  politics  community  nyc  pedagogy  activism  art  nonprofits 
february 2012 by robertogreco
nickd: Whatever's next; whatever's good.
"I like dabbling in small projects with good people, and I like making tiny amounts of money so I can eat burritos in a city with a comically low cost of living."

"I always keep an open mind about any sort of projects that involve some degree of research, play, and curiosity. So if you want to plan anything off-the-wall funny or pranksterish, then get at me. I love outlandish, ridiculous projects. Let’s scheme together."

"I would like to make cool things with good people. Maybe you’re one of these good people. And maybe you know other good people, too. I’m in a rare inflection point in my life where I don’t have to juggle competing priorities to take on new stuff. I would love if you got in touch (nickd//nickd/org or @nickd), and spread this far and wide. I am a little scared these days, but things are really only worth doing if they’re scary, so I figure I must be at least a little right."
focus  makingtime  projects  projectideas  curiosity  risktaking  time  leapsoffaith  design  yearoff  glvo  freelance  doing  making  play  quitting  2012  nickdisabato 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Creativity Is Hustle: Make Something Every Day - Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg - Video - The Atlantic
"I think doing something start to finish each day not only helps you get over the fear of starting a project, but also the fear of finishing one. I know it can be hard to let stuff go when you know you could make it better, but at some point in every project, at some level you need to be like, "fine, good enough." That's really hard for some people, but this can definitely help.

I've think a project like this also helps with the notion that you need to be in some totally inspired state of zen to create art. Art is like taking a dump, it's not always fun or convenient but it's something you gotta do everyday and you shouldn't get to hung up if the product looks like pile of crap. Yer not gonna make a masterpiece everyday or even 95% of the time, but it's a numbers game and the you've got to get rid of all those crappy ideas before you can get to the good ones. Just showing up is 90% of the battle."
faketv  mikewinkelman  glvo  making  doing  howwework  ideas  creativity  cv  projects  plp  focus  2011  kasiacieplak-mayrvonbaldegg  interviews  animation  art 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Think before wiping that whiteboard - FT.com
"A few years ago, Intel, the US technology giant, permitted a couple of social anthropologists to explore its Seattle offices. The two researchers, Dawn Nafus and Ken Anderson, duly started observing the rituals of everyday life in Intel’s corporate “jungle”, in much the same way that anthropologists might study the social life of an Amazonian tribe, say, or a far-flung Indian village.

However, there was a twist; instead of simply looking at how Intel made products, or how the staff related to each other, Nafus and Anderson focused on Intel’s “project rooms” as their “field-site”. More specifically, they watched how different Intel employees and researchers (including other ethnographers) used whiteboards, colourful charts, photographs and graphs to convey company messages, stimulate debate – and “brainstorm” innovative ideas."
via:hrheingold  intel  observation  anthropology  howwework  innovation  whiteboards  postits  post-its  brainstorming  ideas  workspace  permanence  powerpoint  projectbasedlearning  projects  ethnography  2011  workspaces  pbl 
july 2011 by robertogreco
8 Big Ideas of the Constructionist Learning Lab « Generation YES Blog
"learning by doing…We all learn better when learning is part of doing something we find really interesting…

technology as building material…If you can use technology to make things you can make a lot more interesting things…

hard fun…We learn best & work best if we enjoy what we are doing…doesn’t mean “easy”…

learning to learn…Many students get the idea that “the only way to learn is by being taught.” This is what makes them fail in school & life…

taking time…students at school get used to being told every 5 minutes or every hour: do this, then do that…If someone isn’t telling them what to do they get bored. Life is not like that. To do anything important you have to learn to manage time for yourself…

you can’t get it right without getting it wrong…To succeed you need the freedom to goof on the way…

do unto ourselves what we do unto our students…

we are entering a digital world…where knowing about digital technology is as important as reading and writing…"
education  learning  technology  teaching  curriculum  tcsnmy  sylviamartinez  garystager  seymourpapert  constructionism  1999  howwework  howwelearn  cv  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learningbydoing  projects  projectbasedlearning  openstudio  time  persistence  interestdriven  failure  timemanagement  freedom  modeling  schools  digital  making  constructing  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Now, we make projects « Re-educate Seattle
"we don’t live in a factory economy anymore. There’s no such thing as “set it & forget it.” The pace of change in the digital age is too rapid, & the competition too relentless. You’d think that Facebook, w/ it’s hundreds of millions of users, would be able to sit back & simply let the profits come rolling in. But it recently recruited the CEO of Netflix to its Board of Directors because it knows that it’s not 2009 anymore. Times have changed since then.

We don’t go to work in factories anymore. Now, we work on projects. Sometimes those projects last 3 months, or they might last 9 years. These projects typically involve either solving a specific problem or, if you’re doing truly innovative work, identifying a problem before it becomes a problem & being the first to market with a solution. The have a beginning, middle, & end. When the project is finished—remember, there’s no specific timetable for how long any given project will take—then it’s time to get busy on the next one."
projects  projectbasedlearning  education  tcsnmy  toshare  sethgodin  stevemiranda  learning  factoryschools  unschooling  deschooling  facebook  making  doing  self-directedlearning  problemsolving  criticalthinking  2011  thisiswhatwedo  howwework  howwelearn  pscs  pugetsoundcommunityschool  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Model and Method [Xskool]
"The Xskool model is expected to be based on some kind of self-directed action learning that enables participants to study locally, at work or on a project, and in their own language – but supported by a distributed network of learning providers, tutors and mentors.

To be determined: Accreditation/certification

Xskool is envisaged, at the moment, as a part-time programme of intensive workshops, each of a three to five days’ duration. Some workshops on this learning journey will be at a residential site; others will involve participation in live projects."
xskool  actionlearning  unschooling  deschooling  workshops  2011  self-directedlearning  self-directed  altgdp  distributed  networkedlearning  networks  lcproject  local  projectbasedlearning  projects  tcsnmy  classideas  accreditation  certification  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
INTHECONVERSATION: Art Leisure Instead of Art Work: A Conversation with Randall Szott [Truly too much to quote, so random snips below. Go read the whole thing.]
"Sal Randolph talks w/ Randall Szott about collections, cooking, "art of living," & infra-institutional activity."

"undergrad art ed seemed overly concerned w/ 'how & what to make' sorts of questions…"

"in my possibly pathetic & overly romantic vision of considered life, I am quite hopeful about ability of (art & non-art) people to improve their own experience & others' in both grand & mundane ways"

"I would like to build along model of public library. Libraries meet an incredibly diverse set of needs & desires"

"art is a great conversation…tool for making meaning & enhancing experience, but it is highly specialized, & all too often, closed conversation of insiders"

"I am deeply committed to promoting "everyday" people who are finding ways to make lives more meaningful - devoted amateurs to a variety of intellectual pursuits, hobbyists, collectors, autodidacts, bloggers, karaoke singers, crafters, etc…advocate for a rich, inclusive understanding of human meaning-making."
2008  salrandolph  randallszott  leisure  art  living  collecting  food  cooking  life  slow  thinking  philosophy  unschooling  deschooling  credentials  artschool  education  learning  skepticism  everyday  vernacular  language  work  leisurearts  dilletante  generalists  cv  distraction  culture  marxism  anarchism  situationist  lcproject  tcsnmy  intellectualism  elitism  meaning  sensemaking  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  projectbasedlearning  projects  openstudio  crossdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  thewhy  why  audiencesofone  canon  amateurs  artleisure  darkmatter  pbl  artschools 
may 2011 by robertogreco
InCUBATE [Quotes from the 'about' page]
"InCUBATE is a research group dedicated to exploring new approaches to arts administration and arts funding. We at InCUBATE act as curators, researchers and co-producers of artists projects. These activities have manifested in a series traveling exhibitions called Other Options, an artist residency program, and various other projects such as Sunday Soup (a monthly meal that generates funding for a creative project grant). We don’t have non-profit status, instead we are interested in what kinds of organizational strategies could provide more direct support to critical and socially-engaged art and culture beyond for-profit or non-profit structures. Our core organizational principle is to treat art administration as a creative practice. By doing so, we hope to generate and share a new vocabulary of practical solutions to the everyday problems of producing under-the-radar culture. Currently we do not have a physical location and we work together on an ongoing project basis."

"Finally, it is worth noting how various models such as a labor unions, community centers, block-clubs, or religious institutions seem to resolve some of the key problems facing our concept of the slow build. Consider how these institutions provide space and resources, exert political influence, and allow for the participation of wider demographics. Our task for the future is to produce these effects without instituting a rigid hierarchy or overtly moralizing and dogmatic system in order to affect a more equitable, participatory, and democratic future."
art  economics  social  community  collaboration  anarchism  incubate  randallszott  lcproject  openstudio  curation  curating  hierarchy  flatness  slow  chicago  democracy  culture  culturehacking  activism  administration  engagement  organizations  organization  equity  participatory  residencies  pop-upculture  exhibitions  projects  horizontality  horizontalidad  ncm  participatoryart  everyday  amateurs 
may 2011 by robertogreco
How To Steal Like An Artist (And 9 Other Things Nobody Told Me) - Austin Kleon
"All advice is autobiographical.

It’s one of my theories that when people give you advice, they’re really just talking to themselves in the past. This list is me talking to a previous version of myself.

Your mileage may vary…

1. Steal like an artist… 2. Don’t wait until you know who you are to start making things…  3. Write the book you want to read… 4. Use your hands… 5. Side projects and hobbies are important… 6. The secret: do good work and put it where people can see it… 7. Geography is no longer our master… 8. Be nice. The world is a small town… 9. Be boring. It’s the only way to get work done… 10. Creativity is subtraction…"
glvo  howto  wisdom  austinkleon  design  creativity  writing  work  howwework  calendars  routine  life  kindness  invention  make  making  do  doing  geography  location  boring  boringness  sharing  cv  projects  sideprojects  hobbies  manual  starting  via:steelemaley 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Independence Day: Developing Self-Directed Learning Projects - NYTimes.com
"What would schools look like if students developed their own curriculum? How would education and the experience of being in school differ for students if they had more power to direct their learning? In this lesson, students consider an experiment in public education in which a small group of high school students planned and executed a model for their own learning. They then develop and implement their own self-directed projects and reflect on the results." [See also: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/opinion/15engel.html AND http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTmH1wS2NJY ]
pedagogy  education  learning  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  independentproject  schools  studentdirected  self-directed  self-directedlearning  projectbasedlearning  projects  curriculum  lifeskills  standards  collaboration  problemsolving  criticalthinking  self-regulation  leadership  individualization  theindependentproject  freedom  independence  cv  freeschools  democraticschools  autodidacts  autodidactism  student-led  autodidacticism  pbl 
march 2011 by robertogreco
A Networked Learning Project: The Connected Day
[Broken link, alternative refs here:
https://steelemaley.io/2014/03/06/a-networked-learning-ecology/
http://www.networkedresearch.net/index.php/Networked_Learning_Ecology_Design
http://steelemaley.io/2015/10/25/the-rise-of-micro-schools/ ]

"Piper is a 15 year old who lives in Midcoast Maine, US. A year ago, Piper heard about a new way to learn, and decided to take part in a new learning experience called the Maine Networked Learning Project. Known as “the Mesh” to participants, this learning ecology offered Piper the chance to apply her passion for learning in highly experiential and collaborative ways with groups of young people of varied ages, adult and youth mentors with knowledge territory specialties and organizations focused on ensuring sustainable and resilient societies, economies, and the environment. This is a snapshot of her day…"
connectivism  cck11  thomassteele-maley  maine  mlearning  mobilelearning  mobile  networks  netoworking  lcproject  bighere  longhere  bignow  elearning  self-organizedlearning  self-organizedlearningenvironment  self-organization  sugatamitra  mesh  meshnetworks  twitter  googlereader  projectbasedlearning  realworld  farming  sustainability  ecology  projects  local  glocalism  experientiallearning  meetups  education  speculativefiction  designfiction  pbl  agriculture 
february 2011 by robertogreco
No disrespect intended toward Emily Dickinson, but . . . « Re-educate Seattle
"In this case—and I would argue that this principle is universal—academic content and skills serve as a means towards helping the student mature from childhood to adulthood, from a novice learner dependant on others to a self-directed one that is capable of greater independence.

We spend a lot of time in schools worrying about the product of learning, and not nearly enough on the process."
stevemiranda  processoverproduct  process  projectbasedlearning  projects  teaching  learning  schools  education  pscs  tcsnmy  self-directedlearning  maturity  dependence  interdependence  independence  self-sufficiency  pugetsoundcommunityschool  pbl 
february 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: A Middle School that Works [Project-based everything, individually crafted, team focused, individual education plans for all, "extra" curricular]
"The middle school is really just junior high school continued, & that was always a bad idea. Kids stumble through a bizarrely carved up yet age-dependent curriculum, & nothing could be less appropriate. There is no age range w/ a greater range of individual skills no matter the birth date, & there is no age range where getting kids interested in school is harder…kids 11-14 have a million things, really important things, to learn - about themselves, society, life, their bodies, & almost none of those things are taught in schools.

Meanwhile, the grades, subject areas, sports teams, honor rolls - even corridors - of middle school are essentially designed (a) to encourage bullying, & (b) to make kids see school as worthless & irrelevant.

…divide Middle School Grades into 9 large, & 3 "mini" project-based experiences…which kids choose. Completely interdisciplinary…

Kids would pick three 10-week experiences & 1 shorter experience each year, and that is what they would do all day."
irasocol  education  progressive  tcsnmy  lcproject  cv  teaching  projectbasedlearning  student-centered  projects  middleschool  juniorhigh  gamechanging  change  realreform  learning  adolescence  schools  schooldesign  individualized  teams  collaboration  collaborative  pbl 
january 2011 by robertogreco
THE SELF INTERVIEW | Everybodys Toolbox
"The self interview is a writing exercise aimed at developing your work through verbal articulation. Questioning yourself as a strategy for idea development, documentation and/or reflection. The self interview is to be understood as a tool that can be used in different moments of a working process, as a preparation/proposal of a work, as documentation or as a reflection tool once a work has been completed. When published the self interview is also a tool to share ideas, work/s, methods, strategies etc."
planning  reflection  goals  interviews  classideas  selfinterview  work  projects  via:tomc  humancondition  human  self-management 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Industrial Liquidators :home
"Industrial Liquidators is a surplus retail and wholesale outlet. We also buy closeouts. We have retail stores for our  products as well as a warehouse opento the public to buy shelving, work benches and our larger equipment! We buy and sell items such as: Shelving, Industrial Surplus, electronics, test equipment,laboratory equipment, office equipment, machinery, components, government surplus, excess inventory...etc."
electronics  sandiego  shopping  glvo  projects  make  making  surplus  laboratories  tools  technology  tcsnmy  supplies  furniture  components  machinery 
december 2010 by robertogreco
drawRobot 1.0 | "steve" on Vimeo
"steve stretches his legs (nxt servos) for the first time. controlled manually via the keyboard drawing a figure eight."
drawbots  robots  tomake  edg  projects  drawing  lego  legomindstorms 
december 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - drawing robot
"the robot has two eyes which can only read black or white, if both eyes see black it'll go straight, if only one eye sees black it'll spin till the other eye sees black too."
drawbots  robots  edg  projects  tomake 
december 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - MøBot: DeLeon II [drawbot]
"Newest evolution in the DrawBot series. This video demonstrates the new stylus arm design as well as sets DeLeon on task to begin drawing. I'm inclined to return to the wheel-based system for mobility as it is much more accurate. I really like the the relationship to crop-circles. I think this is starting to go somewhere."

[See also: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NR8rZnNgNdc ]
lego  legomindstorms  drawbots  robots  drawing  projects  edg  tomake 
december 2010 by robertogreco
makezine.com: Helium Balloon Imaging "Satellite"
"Snap aerial photos from 300' up by suspending a hacked drugstore camera from 3 tethered helium balloons."
balloons  edg  sdspacesociety  projects  make  space  aerialphotography  photography  makemagazine 
december 2010 by robertogreco
A Collection a Day, 2010
"This is a blog documenting a project that will span exactly one year, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. On each of those 365 days, I will photograph or draw (& occasionally paint) one collection. Most of the collections are real & exist in my home or studio; those I will photograph. Some are imagined; those I will draw or (occasionally) paint.

Since I was a young girl, I have been obsessed both with collecting and with arranging, organizing and displaying my collections. This is my attempt to document my collections, both the real & the imagined. Some of my collections are so large that I will need to photograph them separately over several days. I will likely not attempt to photograph collections in which the individual pieces are large in size or awkward in shape (i.e. my art collection or vintage enamel dishware collection). The only rule is that I must photograph or draw a whole or part of a collection each day for 365 days and post the result here on this blog."
collecting  collections  2010  ephemera  photography  illustration  lisacongdon  vintage  blogs  crafts  art  design  daily  projects  classideas 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Constructing Modern Knowledge Reflections - Practical Theory
"luxurious learning enviro=time, resources, permission to play & learn, talk to one another...read, listen, build...we didn't have schedule, we had appointments... ...many ways to learn & lecture can/should be part of good progressive teacher's toolkit...trick is knowing when, what, how long & how you will help students construct meaning from it... we underestimate how complex work we give can be...one pitfall of problem/project-based learning for kids. When there isn't recipe/obvious sequence, roadblocks can feel insurmountable...kids get stuck...not because they don't want to do them, but because they reach stumbling blocks they cannot solve...why teaching "gumption", process & problem solving is so important...as teachers, patience, understanding & flexibility are necessary... utter need for us to honor/assess process. Not every project gets to finish line, teachers can make mistake of not giving a lot of credit for unfinished work"
unconferences  cmk  conferences  chrislehmann  deborahmeier  progressive  tcsnmy  toshare  topost  learning  understanding  gumption  problemsolving  process  projectbasedlearning  projects  tinkering  assessment  acknowledgement  schooldesign  unschooling  deschooling  proceesoverproduct  play  meaning  2010  obstacles  patience  flexibility  complexity  lcproject  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
A Difference: That's Really Hard Work [Some great similarities between what Michael Wesch does with his class and what we do in class at TCSNMY.]
"The kids begin by co-creating a schedule on a wiki for the research they'll do to solve the problem they've decided to work on. They begin by digging into the problem and reading everything they can on it. Summaries of all their reading are compiled on the wiki. Typically they'll read over 90 articles, papers, or books in the first week of class as they do this. (In more typical University classes they read about three articles in the first week.) Mike guides them, having a little deeper experience in the field then they do, by suggesting other sources they might wish to explore. They continue this research and co-create a research paper for publication. When that's all done, they create very brief condensed video summaries of their research, submit them to Mike who then weaves them together into a brief (5 min?) video. All this is only possible because of the community building work they do together in the first few weeks of the course."
via:cervus  michaelwesch  tcsnmy  lcproject  howwework  classideas  projectbasedlearning  engagement  learning  toshare  topost  projects  projectideas  research  pbl 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Blog Archive » Creative Corporate Cultures
"* Creative reviews, even for stuff you’re not working on. Oftentimes a company gets to a size in which no one knows everything that is going on elsewhere, which results in overlap, duplication, inefficiencies and just plain bad organizational structures... * People before ideas. Creative individuals trump project ideas. Bring in creative talent and allow the ideas to come from that... * Constructive post-mortems on projects. I think this is crucial. The time to consider what was done and what went right and wrong is a requirement if a team/company/studio is to learn from what it spent so much time and energy to create."
creativity  pixar  process  projects  reviews  work  tcsnmy  reflection  hr  hiring  leadership  culture  values  management  julianbleecker 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Make Your Own Moleskine-Like-Notebook
"Your very own Moleskine-like-notebook/journal/sketchbook. The one we'll be making is 3.5 x 5.5 x .5 inches. I use this size because it fits nicely into my back or front pants pocket. Strangely enough it is also the same size as the Moleskine notebook. For the pages we'll be using 20# bond paper (the same paper you use in your copier and inkjet printer). As you might have noticed in the dimensions, the notebook is a half-inch thick. This gives you 192 single pages of writing/sketching/painting fun. For the cover we'll use vinyl Naugahyde (that's what I use but feel free to use whatever you have on hand). After we're through I'll offer a list of enhancements and alternative ways to make your notebook/journal/sketchbook to meet your individual needs.

Don't be put off by the many steps involved. This really is a simple project using common materials and tools. Almost anyone can do it."
via:migurski  art  book  bookbinding  moleskine  notebooks  howto  gtd  lifehacks  tutorial  tutorials  make  books  crafts  design  diy  papercraft  papernet  paper  projects  srg  glvo  tcsnmy 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Archigram Archival Project
"The Archigram Archival Project makes the work of the seminal architectural group Archigram available free online for public viewing and academic study. The project was run by EXP, an architectural research group at the University of Westminster. It was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and made possible by the members of Archigram and their heirs, who retain copyright of all images"
archigram  architecture  archive  buildings  creativity  portfolio  projects  uk  design  drawing  1960s  history  experimental  architects 
april 2010 by robertogreco
pblweb - home
"This workshop is intended as a Primer to introduce educators to Project Based Learning - and to the use of free online tools in project based learning."
onlinetoolkit  teaching  projectbasedlearning  1:1  rubrics  e-learning  googleapps  pedagogy  learning  howto  projects  free  tcsnmy  via:cburell  pbl  1to1 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Indirect Collaboration: Collective Creativity on the Web: Q&A With Shawn Allen of Stamen Design
"The tighter our connection with the client, the faster things happen. We appreciate that some clients are going to defer to us on every design-related decision, but the smart ones who can call us out and involve themselves in the process are typically more fun to work with. We thrive on fast-paced projects, rapid iteration, and constructive feedback."
via:migurski  iteration  design  collaboration  interviews  process  clients  stamen  feedback  constructivecriticism  projects  tcsnmy  howwework 
february 2010 by robertogreco
russell davies: lyddle end again
"Some slow projects won't leave you alone. You might not have done anything about them for ages but your attention keeps catching on something related in the world, nagging you, reminding you that there's something that needs completing."
slow  glvo  russelldavies  lyddleend2050  projects  do  make 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Sustainability: advancement vs. apocalypse [via: http://archinect.com/news/article.php?id=94101_0_24_0_C]
"Now, what about architecture? I think what the crisis will mean for us is an end to the ¥€$ regime. For those who didn't recognize it, this is a collection of masterpieces by architects in the last ten years (25). It's a skyline of icons showing, mercilessly, that an icon may be individually plausible, but that collectively they form an ultimately counterproductive and self-canceling kind of landscape. So that is out.
architecture  sustainability  oma  remkoolhaas  crisis  projects  theory  extinction 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Office for Unsolicited Architecture
"The Office for Unsolicited Architecture deploys design as a tool to expand public debate on the future of the city.
architecture  research  unsolicited  landscape  projects  cites  urban 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Rules for Brainstorming - d.school news
"Our bootcamp class got an introduction to the d.school's rules for productive team brainstorms today. These are a time-tested, road-worn recipe for successfully generating ideas with your team. 1. Defer Judgment. Don't block someone else's idea if you don't like it... 2. Go for volume. Getting to 100 ideas is better than 10... 3. One conversation at a time. When different conversations are going on within a team, no one can focus.
d.school  design  brainstorming  creativity  innovation  teamwork  productivity  management  ideas  tips  projects  leadership  administration  tcsnmy 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Stefan Sagmeister: The power of time off | Video on TED.com
"Every seven years, designer Stefan Sagmeister closes his New York studio for a yearlong sabbatical to rejuvenate and refresh their creative outlook. He explains the often overlooked value of time off and shows the innovative projects inspired by his time in Bali."
stefansagmeister  sabbaticals  yearoff  sevenyears  cv  timeoff  lifehacks  gtd  creativity  work  projects  process  design  art  writing  innovation  productivity  life  ideas  bali  glvo  furniture  ted  time  management  google  3m  happiness  planning  tcsnmy  administration 
october 2009 by robertogreco
One Hungry Chef: On Going Overboard
"I have something of a habit of going to extremes. Not always. I'm not obsessive. Rather, I'd call it “passing manic episodes.” Now and again an idea will strike me as particularly interesting or challenging and I dive in, as deep as I can. Typically this involves me learning a complicated process so that I might create something which I could easily purchase for a fraction of the price and no effort at all. For example: I've made paper out of native grasses, started fire with flint and steel, fermented my own sourdough starter using organic grapes, built a bicycle, dug up and potted with native clay, woven rope, brewed beer, made baskets from pine needles, sewed a tent, and made ham."
passingmanicepisodes  cooking  food  obsession  dedication  learning  projects  immersion  process 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Make: Online: Make: Science Room Home
"Greetings citizen scientists, budding biohackers, and backyard explorers! We think you'll find the Make: Science Room a fun and useful resource. We hope you'll use it as your DIY science classroom, virtual laboratory, and a place to share your projects, hacks, and laboratory tips with other amateur scientists. Your Make: Science Room host is Robert Bruce Thompson, author of Illustrated Guide to Home Chemistry Experiments: All Lab, No Lecture. (Make: Books, 2008) and Illustrated Guide to Forensics Investigations: Uncover Evidence in Your Home, Lab, or Basement (not yet published). We'll be drawing material from these titles first, but will soon branch out into biology, astrononmy, Earth sciences, and other disciplines. We'll be adding lots of material on a regular basis, so check back often. For more info on the site, see Introducing the Make: Science Room."
science  make  tcsnmy  howto  diy  microscope  projects  physics  education  chemistry  forensics  glvo  kids  learning  home  lab 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Significant Objects | …and how they got that way
"A talented, creative writer invents a story about an object. Invested with new significance by this fiction, the object should — according to our hypothesis — acquire not merely subjective but objective value. How to test our theory? Via eBay!"
writing  narrative  storytelling  ebay  objects  design  art  significantobjects  significance  meaning  literature  projects  tcsnmy  classideas  srg 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Shut up! Announcing your plans makes you less motivated to accomplish them. | Derek Sivers
"Tests done since 1933 show that people who talk about their intentions are less likely to make them happen.

Announcing your plans to others satisfies your self-identity just enough that you’re less motivated to do the hard work needed."
psychology  goals  success  productivity  life  health  behavior  brain  planning  creativity  projects  gtd  lifehacks  motivation 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Kickstarter
"Kickstarter is a funding platform for artists, designers, filmmakers, musicians, journalists, inventors, bloggers, explorers..."
glvo  funding  fundraising  art  creativity  design  entrepreneurship  crowdsourcing  vc  socialsoftware  money  networking  community  music  projects  kickstarter 
june 2009 by robertogreco
gewgaw » Moving On
"This makes career planning a bit difficult. If I were soully focused on climbing the ladder - I’d hop from short project to short project, asking for title bumps and raises. It’s a common strategy for managers and (it seems) fairly successful within larger companies. But because I care more about ideals (good game, good team, player/creativity focus) than ends - I often have a hard time articulating exactly where I want to be in the next 3 years - let alone 5."
via:blackbeltjones  careers  management  administration  ideals  projects  cv  goals  work  organizations 
may 2009 by robertogreco
GeekDad's 2nd Anniversary: Why I started GeekDad | Geekdad from Wired.com
'It had turned out to be a perfect father-son project: fun for him and fun for me. Not fun for him and boring for me, like so many other projects aimed at kids. And not fun for me but boring for him, like so many adult projects fathers try to get their kids interested in. But instead a meeting of kid and grown-up interests, turned into a fantastic weekend activity.
geekdad  chrisanderson  teaching  learning  projects  children  parenting  make  diy  edg  srg 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Box of Clouds on the Behance Network
"For use on days with uninteresting skies. Another photo viewer keyring dismembered and put in a tin. In this case I took off the backlight, making the LCD transparent. The button in the middle turns it on and off. Hold it up to a light source to see the clouds! USB to charge, and because the backlight has been removed the battery is good for a couple of days. A selection of the clouds inside, they cycle every five seconds." via: http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2009/02/box_of_clouds_viewer.html?CMP=OTC-0D6B48984890
boxofclouds  art  diy  make  clouds  projects  glvo  beauty  simplicity 
february 2009 by robertogreco
SparkFun Electronics - ArduPilot - Arduino Compatible UAV Controller
"This is a basic navigation-only autopilot that requires a GPS module and separate stabilization unit such as a FMA Co-Pilot to create a functioning Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The hardware and software is all open source. The board comes with all the surface-mount parts already soldered, but requires the user to solder on connectors. Firmware is already loaded, but the autopilot software must be downloaded and loaded onto the board by the user. It can be programmed with the Arduino IDE. All details and instructions can be found at the project's home page."
arduino  surveillance  gps  uav  ardupilot  autopilot  diy  hardware  projects  edg 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Kitchen Budapest - Core77
"The 30 person lab is located in a quiet side street off a very pleasant shopping street, and feels very different from the bars, clothing shops and tanning salons around the corner.
kitchenbudapest  machineproject  budapest  altgdp  lcproject  learning  education  research  tinkering  make  diy  mobile  collaboration  projects  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  urban  space  communication 
january 2009 by robertogreco
TechShop is the SF Bay Area's Only Open-Access Public Workshop
"TechShop is a 15,000 square-foot membership-based workshop that provides members with access to tools and equipment, instruction, and a creative and supportive community of like-minded people so you can build the things you have always wanted to make.
sanfrancisco  lcproject  fabrication  robotics  electronics  workshop  bayarea  techshop  machineproject  diy  projects  community  technology  education  howto  make  classes 
january 2009 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: How-to Tuesday: Fun with the Arduino Starter Kit
"This week I made a project with parts from the Arduino Starter Kit. I skipped over building the Proto Shield from the kit, since I made a how-to a while back. Otherwise, it's a simple build that doesn't require any soldering."
arduino  microcontrollers  howto  make  diy  edg  video  projects 
december 2008 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: Open source hardware 2008 - The definitive guide to open source hardware projects in 2008
"What is open source hardware? Briefly, these are projects that creators have decided to completely publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files to recreate the hardware - they also allow any use, including commercial. Similar to open source hardware like Linux, but hardware centric. ... You can also call this guide... "The Open source hardware gift guide - The one and only, 3rd annual celebration of open source hardware!" - we think these are some of the best things to consider for the holidays and it supports an exciting development in hardware design."
howto  reference  electronics  arduino  microcontrollers  opensource  projects  make  diy  hardware  open  embedded  hacking  gifts  edg 
november 2008 by robertogreco
mrsmaineswiki [via: http://www.edutopia.org/wiki-teacher (source of quote below), see also: http://www.edutopia.org/class-wiki-tips]
"Then she began posting class instructions and useful links, and she gave students a small space to write responses. The more she opened it up to students, the more she saw what they could do. By November, she had given over the wiki -- and with it, the control of learning -- almost entirely to her students. She calls the effect miraculous. Now, the wiki is the hub for almost all class activity. Maine sets it so that only she and her students may edit it, though anyone in the world can view it. When students enter the classroom, they automatically know to look at the wiki for daily instructions, rubrics, and resources. They post their research, lab data, and observations on individual and group pages, which they can access later from home. After hours, the Web site functions as a parallel classroom, where students hold discussions, collaborate on group projects, and post their final work."
professionaldevelopment  classroomwikis  wikis  classideas  tcsnmy  education  edtech  learning  projects  collaboration  biology  classroom  science  classrooms 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Put to the Test: Confronting Concerns About Project Learning | Edutopia
"Questions abound about the inquiry-based teaching approach. Here are answers, from how to meet standards to how to keep control of the classroom."
education  teaching  learning  projectbasedlearning  standards  constructivism  curriculum  collaboration  projects  resources  pbl 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Project Based Learning
"Welcome to PBL-Online, a one stop solution for Project Based Learning! You'll find all the resources you need to design and manage high quality projects for middle and high school students." via: http://www.edutopia.org/project-learning-online-resources
tcsnmy  projectbasedlearning  problemsolving  projectideas  classideas  education  curriculum  learning  examples  projects  pedagogy  pbl 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Start Me Up: Project-Learning Primers | Edutopia
"How do you design a good project? What kind of projects work? How can you teach to the standards and use hands-on projects? Here are three free online resources -- and some tips from an education expert -- about how to get going with project learning in your classroom, even if you've never used it before:"
tcsnmy  projectbasedlearning  problemsolving  projectideas  classideas  education  curriculum  learning  examples  projects  pedagogy  edutopia  edtech  pbl 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Project Library Contents
"The following projects and documents are freely available to our clients as well as visitors to this site. They were written by NACG staff. We are always willing to accept project submissions (submission form) to add to our library. We will give credit for authorship when appropriate. Please do not submit copyrighted material." via: http://www.edutopia.org/project-learning-online-resources
tcsnmy  projectbasedlearning  problemsolving  projectideas  classideas  education  curriculum  learning  examples  projects  pedagogy  pbl 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Picture This: Using Photography to Teach Science, Math, and Writing | Edutopia
"Learn how to turn a cardboard box, disposable cameras, and kids' natural curiosity into an academically rich project-learning program."
math  photography  classideas  projects  edg  tcsnmy 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Vodafone | receiver » Blog Archive » StoryBank – using mobiles to share stories in an Indian village
"Skipping the text-based internet paradigm altogether, the project is exploring how camera phones and a library of digital stories (the story-bank) can be used to extend existing initiatives in community radio."
mobile  storytelling  images  anthropology  projects  india  phones  sharing  storybank 
july 2008 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: More Zach DeBord Pummers
"Zach DeBord, who did the bots and photos in my Pummer, Dude! piece in MAKE Volume 08, and collab'd with me on the Vibrobots and Solar Roller pieces for Street Tech, has posted a bunch of new pics of his Pummers on his Flickr sets."
make  robots  electronics  projects  classideas  edg 
july 2008 by robertogreco
My Home 2.0 - DIY - STEPS - Twittering Teddy Bear
"The result: a real-time Twittering, talking, live-streaming social media phenomenon. I worked with my team at the Drexel Music and Entertainment Technology Lab to develop Teddy’s text-to-speech software."
arduino  twitter  projects  make  diy  glvo  toys  plush 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Ypulse: Reboot Learning! [nothing really new here, nice summary though and getting a wider audience]
"educational experience should be more individualized and customized for the student; Still there has to be some structured goals/desired outcomes; role of teachers will and must change; about preparing them to be adaptive vs. having one job or career for
education  schools  schooling  reform  curriculum  change  schooldesign  flexibility  adaptability  interdisciplinary  homeschool  community  responsibility  teaching  deschooling  unschooling  projects  projectbasedlearning  experience  ux  learning  students  administration  management  leadership  lcproject  gamechanging  pbl  charterschools 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Field Notes — “I’m not writing it down to remember it later, I’m writing it down to remember it now.”
"Customize Field Notes for your event, company, website, youth soccer team, birdwatching club–you name it, we’ll custom-print it. We’ll accept custom orders anytime, but since we’re going on press soon to print more AEA books, the economies of sca
gifts  notebooks  projects  make  writing  shopping  studentsupplylist  classideas 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Maker's Notebook
"Put your own ideas, diagrams, calculations & notes down in these 150 pages of engineering graph paper. We've also included 20 bonus pages of reference material, from useful stuff like electronics symbols, resistor codes, weights and measures, basic conve
gifts  howto  notebooks  projects  make  writing  shopping  studentsupplylist  classideas 
june 2008 by robertogreco
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