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robertogreco : protests   25

25 small ways to make SF a better place - Curbed SF
"When it comes to making change at the local level, sometimes the tiniest actions can spark the biggest changes—and in San Francisco, where the options for helping the greater good can seem overwhelming, starting with small daily tasks is the best place to start. As more wealth pours into the city and the economic divide grows wider than ever before, it’s important to help out your fellow San Franciscan, zip code and tax bracket be damned.

For San Franciscans looking to make their hometown a better place, we present these small, but substantial, ways that you can help make a difference.

From your home

1. Stay informed about local news. It’s hard not to be aware of national news these days, but to get a sense of what’s changing in your immediate surroundings, soak in some local news by making local papers and blogs a part of your daily media diet. The San Francisco Chronicle is, of course, important, but other SF outlets can help you stay informed—from hyperlocal blogs (Richmond SF Blog, Mission Local, etc.) to established sources (Hoodline, San Francisco Magazine, etc.) and even more. Oh, and don’t forget Curbed SF.

2. Compost. Don’t believe the malodorous lies! Composting is easy and a great way of helping the environment from your kitchen. If your building or home does not yet have a green composting bin, the city will send you one free of charge.

3. Follow these pro-housing advocates and journalists on Twitter: Kim-Mai Cutler, Liam Dillon, Victoria Fierce, SF YIMBY, Laura Foote Clark, and YIMBY Action will keep you abreast of both anti-growth hypocrisy and action items that will help abate the California housing crisis.

4. Remember reusable bags. They’re easy to compile, but difficult to remember once you’re at Whole Foods. The cost of plastic and paper bags, both environmental and economical, are too much to bear. Stick a few reusable bags by your front door so you remember to bring them to your next shopping trip.

5. Donate, don’t discard, your old clothes. For those of you who simply cannot bear the thought of wearing last year’s jeans (perish the thought!) or want to whittle down your wardrobe to a minimalist offering, don’t trash your old clothes. Shelters like the St. Anthony Foundation can redistribute clean clothing to homeless San Franciscans. If you have professional women’s attire to toss, consider give them to Dress for Success. And Larkin Street Youth accepts gently worn clothing for at-risk, runaway youths.

In your neighborhood

6. Learn about your neighborhood’s history. Did you know the Castro used to be an Irish-American working-class neighborhood? Or that South of Market used the be called South of the Slot, which later became a novella by Nobel Prize-winning scribe Jack London? And who knew that Presidio Terrace was originally designed as a whites-only neighborhood? Take a deep dive into your neighborhood’s past, good and bad. After all, the city isn’t a blank slate.

7. Donate old books. Grab a handful (or trunkload) of books from your home library and add some inventory to the nearest Little Free Library. There are dozens in San Francisco and hundreds in the Bay Area. If you’d rather donate to the library, take your books to the Friends of the San Francisco Public Library. It’s a tax write-off!

8. Take care of a neighbor’s pet at PAWS. For some people, especially those who are chronically ill, frail, and isolated by disease or age, animal companionship is crucial to their health and well-being. Volunteer with PAWS (Pets Are Wonderful Support) to get paired one-on-one with members of the community (who may be LGBT seniors or people living with HIV, Hepatitis C, or cancer) who need help caring for their pet. Ideal for animal lovers with no-pet rental agreements!

9. Attend neighborhood meetings. The best way to find out about what’s up in your neighborhood is to attend public meetings organized each month by your local community association. Here’s a good place to start.

10. Wave to tourists when they pass you on cable cars or tour buses. They freakin’ love that.

Along your route

11. Take public transit. It’s the best way to get to know your city. Learn Muni and BART routes along your most-traveled roads and hop on. And you’d be surprised how convenient the cable cars and F lines are.

12. Put foot to pedal. San Francisco is one of the most bike-friendly cities in the country. Here’s a beginner’s guide to help you get started.

13. Be kind to the homeless. It’s going to take great leaps and bounds from the city to solve its chronic homeless problem. In the meantime, there are small things that you can do to empower those who need help. For starters, remember that people become homeless for a number of reasons—so leave the stereotyping or judgmental attitudes behind.

14. Document your city. One of the best ways to get to know the city is to shooting photos. Better yet, post them on Instagram. You will discover thousands of photographers also share your love of the city’s many neighborhoods. It’s a great way of take a closer look at your hood and getting to know your neighbors. Just don’t forget to geotag.

15. Be a conscientious pedestrian. From moving over to the right when using your phone to helping fellow pedestrians with strollers, there are a lot of ways to improve your two-foot mode of transportation around town. Because it’s 2018 and there’s no excuse for blocking a sidewalk. Here’s a pedestrian etiquette guide to help sharpen your two-step game.

In your community

16. Say hello to people/ask people how they’re doing. San Francisco can feel like a big small town, and its residents know it. If you’re walking around a neighborhood, or stopping into a local store, say, “Hello.” Stop being rude to service industry workers. Do not order with your phone attached to your ear. It’s dehumanizing. Be friendly.

17. Be a poll worker on election day. Looking for a way to up your voting game? Become a poll worker. It takes roughly 3,000 workers on election day to bets all the ballots processed. And with this upcoming June election being a crucial one, the city could use your help. (Psst, you will also get a $195 stipend.)

18. Fight hunger in the community. The uptick in foodie trends and prices have made nourishment seem like a privilege for the lucky and well-to-do. Not so. People are still starving in the city. Get involved with groups like San Francisco Food Bank, GLIDE Church, and Project Open Hand to make sure everyone in the community has food on the table.

19. Volunteer with the San Francisco Office of Civic Engagement and Immigrant Affairs. The department’s Pathways to Citizenship Initiative program always needs volunteers, interpreters, and legal professionals to assist with their bi-monthly naturalization workshops.

20. Get off Nextdoor. Beginning with good intentions, Nextdoor has turned into a cesspool of racism and bigotry for a lot of San Francisco residents.

With a group

21. Hook up with the Friends of the Urban Forest. See how you can help add foliage to San Francisco’s streets with this choice nonprofit. They organize everything from neighborhood tree plantings to sidewalk landscaping.

22. Dedicate your time to volunteering at one of the two Friends of the San Francisco Public Library bookstores. All proceeds benefit the public library system in San Francisco.

23. Host a letter-writing party. Written letters get more traction than email or @’ing your local lawmaker. If there’s an issue you feel strongly about, it’s more than likely you’re not the only one, and a letter-writing party is a great way to organize your community for a positive cause. Best of all, you can add a few bottles of wine and turn it into a real party.

24. Volunteer at Animal Care and Control. ACC receives roughly 10,000 animals every year and rely on volunteers to help out. These pets don’t get the luxe treatment found at nearly SF SPCA, so they could use all the love they deserve.

25. Show up. When people come together—especially in times of great need—they can do amazing things. This was especially true during the AIDS crisis and of the moments following the Loma Prieta earthquake. Go to protests. Attend rallies. Fight for others’ rights. Relish the fact that you live in a city that, in one way or another, however dim it seems at times, seeks for the betterment of all humans."
classideas  sanfrancisco  civics  community  activism  engagement  pedestrians  2018  etiquette  publictransit  transportation  bikes  biking  nextdoor  volunteering  animals  pets  nature  trees  protests  friendliness  elections  neighborhoods  environment  composting  recycling 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Media coverage of Charlie Hebdo and the Baga massacre: a study in contrasts
"There are many reasons why the attacks on targets in Paris have received vastly more media attention than the attacks in Baga.

Paris is a highly connected global city with thousands of working journalists, while Baga is isolated, difficult and dangerous to reach. The attacks on Charlie Hebdo targeted journalists, and it’s understandable that journalists would cover the death of their comrades. The attacks in Paris were a shock and a surprise, while deaths at the hands of Boko Haram have become distressingly common in an insurgency that has claimed over 10,000 lives since 2009.

The details of the Baga attacks, where civilians fled a marauding army into the swamps of Lake Chad, where they faced attacks from hippos, are almost impossible for audiences in developed nations to empathize with.

By contrast it’s tragically easy for most North Americans and Europeans to imagine terrorists striking in their cities.

The net effect: the attacks in Baga and Maiduguri seem impossibly distant, while the attacks in Paris seem local, relevant and pressing even to people equidistant from the two situations.

In part, it’s hard to imagine events in Nigeria because we encounter so little African news in general.

Dearth of African news impacts public debate

Media Cloud, a tool developed at MIT’s Center for Civic Media and Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society measures comparative attention to topics and locations in different segments of the news media.

A study we conducted in April 2014 suggests that media outlets publish three to ten times as many stories about France than about Nigeria. This disparity is striking as Nigeria’s population (estimated at 173 million) is almost three times the size of France’s population (66 million).

There’s bad news for those hoping online media will change existing patterns of media attention: while broadcast news outlets ran 3.2 times as many stories about France as about Nigeria, online media outlets published more than ten times as many French as Nigerian stories (10.4 to be precise).

We tend to read about countries like Nigeria only when they are in crisis, from terrorist attack or epidemics like Ebola. Despite the shocking magnitude of the attacks in Baga, the story can feel predictable, as the news we get from Nigeria is generally bad news.

If the attacks in Nigeria feel like they are happening somewhere incomprehensibly far away, those in Paris feel close to home, and many commentators have reflected on the tragedy in Paris as a result."



"Most victims of Islamic terrorism are Muslim: between 82 and 97%, according to a study from the US National Counter Terrorism Center.

Attacks like the one on Paris are shocking, visible and rare, while attacks on Baga are common (though the scale of the Baga attack is unprecedented.)

When we understand extremist violence as attacks on urban, developed, symbolic targets, we’re missing a much broader, messier picture, where religious extremism blends with political struggles and where the victims are usually anonymous, uncelebrated and forgotten.

We miss the point that Islamic extremists are at war with other Muslims, that the source of terror is not a religion of 1.6 billion people, but a perverse, political interpretation held by a disenchanted few.

It’s right to mourn those killed in Paris, to celebrate the city’s resilience and to honor the heroes. But if we fail to mourn and to understand Baga as well, we see a picture of terrorism that’s simple, clear and deeply inaccurate."
ethanzuckerman  2015  bokoharam  media  charliehebdo  paris  france  nigeria  terrorism  protest  protests  islam  islamophobia  journalism  #JeSuisCharlieHebdo  #JeSuisCharlie 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Interdome - Race and Capital
"Separating economics from racism is something that I’ve been hearing lately. There are numerous good reasons for this. Economic oppression is not the same as racial oppression. The experience of suffering economic oppression is not the same as suffering racial oppression. Even if a component of racial oppression is suffering a disproportionate amount of economic oppression, the two are not equal and will never be. And while protests against economic oppression have followed a certain trajectory over the last few years, protests against racist oppression are following a different trajectory, bringing new protests and new leaders to the foreground, who have different experiences because of the context that is bringing them into the street.

However, let’s not forget that economic oppression is used as racial oppression, and is its lifeline. Nothing happens in this country without money spent to support it. The fight to raise the minimum wage, while benefiting all workers everywhere, will most initially support a class of workers who are disproportionately of color. Economics is indivisible from racism. This is the entire argument for monetary reparations.

People have been saying that #BlackLivesMatter isn’t about anti-capitalism—and this is correct, because anti-capitalism is not the reason these protests have started, and anti-capitalism is not the motivation, or the goal. But, the fight against racism in this country is about capitalism, because capitalism is the perpetuating force of the racism we are fighting.

The militarization of the police exists because of the military-industrial profiteers of the defense industry. They are the reason the weapons were made, and they are the reason the weapons will continue to come to police departments. Congress dropped its efforts to stop the flow of weapons. Think about who has money in the congressional races to stall that. It’s not the KKK.

The lack of oversight for police forces across the country stems from similar economics. The District Attorney who purposefully botched the grand jury in Ferguson has long ties to the police and to Democratic party politics in the area. There are rumors about even more troubling ties than that. But what is the machinery that keeps him in office? Local donors to the political machine, who want their police force and courts run the way this man is running them. Local businesses pay for the police. That they are local, does not make their money any less harmful. The same goes for any other city. Our government and police forces run on money, and the money tells them which way to turn their heads.

Nearly every stereotype about black people (and it holds true for other minorities as well) has an economic anchor. What is the bigoted view of black people in America? They are “thugs”, “lazy”, “angry”, “on drugs”, and “violent”. What are these demons, if not economic demons? They don’t work hard enough, they take your stuff, they are too emotional to be productive in the workplace, they waste their money, they can’t be counted on, which is the essence of a contract. Therefore, black people are hired less, paid less, fired more often. There is redlining, there is gentrification. There is abuse at the hands of a for-profit medical system. There is the prison system, a system filled with people of color because they don’t have the resources to fight back legally, because they can be sapped for what resources they do have and no one will stand up for them. These long-held, deep-seated bigotries that white people have against people of color cannot walk the face of the earth without kicking over the stacks of money that they generate, that props up these bigotries, that keeps people holding the worst of these bigotries in positions of power.

So yes: let us remember and repeat how this current movement is not about anti-capital. But let us also remember that the history of American racism is entirely inseparable from capital. If we are going to do something about the former, we will eventually have to tangle with the latter."
racism  capitalism  2014  ferguson  economics  blacklivesmatter  race  us  policy  militaryindustrialcomplex  oppression  schooltoprisonpipeline  protests  adamrothstein 
december 2014 by robertogreco
East of Borneo: Museums in Crisis
"A selection of essays, historical documents, interviews and op-eds on the controversial history of museums and patronage in Los Angeles—from early censorship debates, protests, and struggles over representation at LACMA to the financial collapse of the Pasadena Art Museum—intended to contextualize the ongoing crisis at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA)."
losangeles  museums  history  crisis  protests  debates  censorship  lacma  nortonsimon  pasadenaartmuseum  rosamundfelsen  johncoplans  1975  anneayres  thomaslawson  chonnoriega  asco  1970s 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Taksim Gezi Parkı
"In the context of Taksim Square restoration project, the prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan announced the replacement of Taksim Gezi Park by a shopping mall. The bulldozers started invading the area at late hours of night in May 27, 2013. Consequently, civilians occupied the area to stop the destruction. Due to the government's increasing pressure and the severe violent actions taken by the police, the occupation quickly turned into a giant protest with the attendance of thousands of people. This archive of photos collected from Twitter shares is dedicated as a memorial to the Taksim Gezi Park protest meeting."
turkey  istanbul  taksimgezipark  2013  documentation  photography  protests 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Why I Feel Bad for the Pepper-Spraying Policeman, Lt. John Pike - Alexis Madrigal - National - The Atlantic
Structures, in the sociological sense, constrain human agency. And for that reason, I see John Pike as a casualty of the system, too. Our police forces have enshrined a paradigm of protest policing that turns local cops into paramilitary forces. Let's not pretend that Pike is an independent bad actor. Too many incidents around the country attest to the widespread deployment of these tactics. If we vilify Pike, we let the institutions off way too easy.
police  policing  alexismadrigal  ows  occupywallstreet  davis  UCD  systems  protests  brokenwindows  history  sociology  psychology  institutions  negotiatedmanagement  2011  1960s  1970s  wto  1999  9/11  strategicincapacitation  hierarchy  policy  politics  lawenforcement  alexvitale  order  disorder  violence  blackbloc  anarchism 
november 2011 by robertogreco
#Occupy: The Tech at the Heart of the Movement - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic
"This essay inaugurates a series of stories on the ways that protesters have shaped technologies to fit their needs -- and how technologies opened up new space for their messages.

Let's start with what seems self-evident, but what I'm sure is more complex than it appears: Occupy is different from the protests that preceded it. To be honest, I'm not sure anyone can explain why. The list of factors contributing to its outstanding run is long: economic circumstances, a distance from the enforced patriotism that followed 9/11, disappointment on the left with Obama's presidency, the failure to adequately regulate banks, the neverending foreclosure crisis, the Adbusters provenance, severe cuts to social programs at the state and local level, the language of occupation, and the prolonged nature of the engagement.

But among those factors, technology plays a central role…"
ows  occupywallstreet  technology  2011  alexismadrigal  habitsofmind  twitter  socialmedia  facebook  protests  organization  networks  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  corporatism  news  communication  coordination 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Humo de Piñera en Harvard (2011) on Vimeo
"Tras 4 meses (casi 5) de protestas y manifestaciones que defienden la educación en Chile, el Presidente Piñera visita (entre otros lugares) la Universidad de Harvard. Ahí es increpado y interrogado sobre su doble discurso al decirle a la comunidad internacional (en la Asamblea General de la ONU) que apoya la causa de los/as estudiantes mientras reprime todo tipos de derechos civiles y humanos en Chile. El siguiente video es la respuesta de Piñera la cual está llena de mentiras. Piñera habla en un inglés rudimentario pero hay subtítulos. Gracias a Iñigo Adriasola @theoriesofmambo por el video y por estar siempre con los/as estudiantes de Chile, más allá de las fronteras nacionales."
sebastiánpiñera  chile  2011  lies  mentiras  politics  policy  education  protests 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Nonformality | The revolt of the young
"From revolutions and protests to riots and unrests: young people are taking their fight for the future to the streets. Intergenerational contracts have become obsolete, with many young people feeling robbed of their future in the light of the employment crisis, a damaged environment and social inequality. Observers and activists describe a world awakening with rage, and a revolt of the young that has only just begun. But what will happen next?"
2011  unrest  politics  policy  generations  generationalstrife  classwarfare  economics  environment  inequality  disparity  unemployment  youth  arabspring  crisis  wealth  awakening  engagement  uk  chile  egypt  tunisia  zizek  manuelcastells  wolfganggründiger  future  pankajmishra  dissent  revolt  revolution  algeria  iraq  iran  morocco  oman  israel  jordan  syria  yemen  bahrain  greece  spain  españa  portugal  iceland  andreaskarsten  change  protests  riots 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Cien mil personas marcharon sin incidentes bajo la lluvia y la nieve - Cooperativa.cl
""• Multitudinaria convocatoria desafió las condiciones meteorológicas para manifestarse.
• Los mismos estudiantes controlaron a quienes intentaban realizar desmanes…

Al llegar al acto principal, un grupo minoritario de unos 20 jóvenes intentaron enfrentarse a Carabineros lanzando algunas piedras, pero fueron rápidamente controlados por los mismos estudiantes, quienes armaron cadenas humanas para cercarlos y evitar desmanes."
chile  2011  protests  politics  policy  education  government  nonviolence 
august 2011 by robertogreco
[Video] Dirigente universitario pidió a senadores no elegidos restarse de mesa de diálogo Cooperativa.cl
"La participación de la senadora Ena Von Baer, fue cuestionada por los estudiantes que asistieron a la comisión de Educación del Senado. Patricio Araujo, dirigente de la U. Arturo Prat, aclaró que no aceptarán "congresistas que no han sido electos democráticamente"."
enavonbaer  chile  2011  education  democracy  sebastiánpiñera  protest  politics  policy  protests  congress  government 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Marcel Claude en la UC - Resumen on Vimeo
"Aquí les dejo un pequeño resumen de lo que fue la conferencia del economista Marcel Claude el pasado viernes 1 de julio en la Casa Central de la UC. Actividad organizada por la Asamblea de Estudiantes Movilizados."
2011  chile  politics  policy  economics  marcelclaude  protests  education  healthcare  socialism  history  copper  industry  wealth  poverty  inequality  naturalresources  wealthdistribution  wealthdistrubution 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Chile Student Protests Links, Background and Images–El Cacerolazo « Millicent and Carla Fran
"If you’re lost as to what’s going on in Chile, I’m going to be writing a post for New APPS soon, but in the meantime, I’m posting useful links as I find them (updating periodically). The idea here is to provide a wide range of news sources to expose the range of responses in Chile. Links are not endorsements:"
chile  education  politics  policy  2011  protests 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Bajemos el paro - El Mostrador
"Porque los trabajadores de Chile no están sudando la gota gorda para que nos dediquemos a protestar. No están soportando abusos en las empresas o las mediocridades del sistema público para que sus hijos estén bailando en carnavales o participando en manifestaciones artísticas callejeras. … Ellos prefieren seguir con sus vidas. Continuar sufriendo los mismos problemas. … Seguramente no sospechan que sus hijos en pocos años vivirán lo mismo.

Detengamos todo esto porque no vamos a cambiar el hecho de que los políticos de este país no nos representen y más bien se interpongan en las necesidades y opiniones de las mayorías ciudadanas. Porque nos falta romanticismo, reflexión, cariño, lealtad. Nos sobra individualismo, egoísmo, cobardía, inseguridad. Porque la prensa se encarga todos los días de modificar hoy lo que vivimos ayer. Porque estamos solos. Porque este país no se merece la juventud que tiene. Porque en buen chileno, este país es una mierda y no pretende dejar de serlo."
chile  2011  education  politics  policy  protests  sarcasm  simóncastrogonzalez 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Students Pressure Chile to Reform Education System - NYTimes.com
"Segments of society that had been seen as politically apathetic only a few years ago, particularly youth, have taken an unusually confrontational stance twrd government & business elite, demanding wholesale changes in education, transportation & energy policy, sometimes violently…

last Friday, Mr. Piñera noted Chileans were witnessing a “new society”…people “feel more empowered & want to feel they are heard.”…rebelling against “excessive inequality” in country…[w/] highest per capita income in Latin America but also…one of most unequal distributions of wealth…

…protests leaders are also pushing for constitutional change to guarantee free, quality education from preschool through high school & a state-financed university system that ensures quality & equal access…

“For many years our parents’ generation was afraid to demonstrate, to complain, thinking it was better to conform to what was going on. Students are setting an example without the fear our parents had.”
chile  politics  reform  education  equity  equality  disparity  sebastiánpiñera  2011  protest  protests  activism  change  apathy  engagement  empowerment  income  incomegap  wealth  latinamerica  access  policy  energy  transportation  wealthdistribution 
august 2011 by robertogreco
David Byrne's Journal: 07.17.11: Santiago, Chile
"The demonstrators are incredibly creative here. They don’t just shout, make speeches and wave banners. One group organized thousands of people to dress as zombies and learn the choreography to Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video. The zombie image links to the education system, since they view it as dying and rotten. Here's a zombie/thriller demonstration link:"

"The other things the demonstrators do are what is called a ‘besaton’— a kissing marathon. Here’s a photo set. And they do a jogging thing, where they run circles around the palace."
davidbyrne  santiago  chile  education  protests  2011  bellasartes  biking  bikes  walking  cities  jorgealessandri  conchalí  centroculturalgabrielamistral 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Movilización estudiantil en Chile de 2006 - Wikipedia
"La movilización estudiantil de 2006 corresponde a una serie de manifestaciones realizadas por estudiantes secundarios de Chile entre abril y junio de 2006 y reactivadas entre septiembre y octubre del mismo año.

Esta movilización es conocida informalmente como Revolución de los pingüinos o Revolución pingüina, debido al tradicional uniforme utilizado por los estudiantes."
chile  education  politics  activism  protests  2006  history  revoluciónpingüina 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Página/12 :: El mundo :: Setenta mil repudios a las escuelas de Piñera
"El reclamo dejó en claro, bulliciosamente, el descontento con la educación pública y la demanda de cambios como el fin del lucro, mayor equidad y gratuidad de la enseñanza. Crece el descontento con el gobierno conservador."
education  chile  2011  sebastiánpiñera  policy  politics  protests 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Of the 1%, by the 1%, for the 1% | Society | Vanity Fair
"Americans have been watching protests against oppressive regimes that concentrate massive wealth in hands of an elite few. Yet in our own democracy, 1% of the people take nearly a quarter of nation’s income—an inequality even the wealthy will come to regret."

"Of all the costs imposed on our society by top 1%, perhaps the greatest is this: the erosion of our sense of identity, in which fair play, equality of opportunity, & a sense of community are so important. America has long prided itself on being a fair society, where everyone has an equal chance of getting ahead, but statistics suggest otherwise: the chances of a poor citizen, or even middle-class citizen, making it to the top in America are smaller than in many countries of Europe. The cards are stacked against them. It is this sense of an unjust system w/out opportunity that has given rise to conflagrations in Middle East: rising food prices and growing and persistent youth unemployment simply served as kindling."

[via: http://scudmissile.tumblr.com/post/4314478188/of-all-the-costs-imposed-on-our-society-by-the-top ]
inequality  politics  economics  government  wealth  josephstiglitz  2011  society  insecurity  revolution  rebellion  instabiity  us  protests  wealthdistribution  instability 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Fred Benenson’s Blog » Spore losing the DRM Fight [the numbers have jumped substantially as of this bookmarking]
"Spore, the long awaited evolved version of Sim City by game genius Will Wright has a DRM problem. As of this post, there are 14 “1 Star” reviews versus six 4 and 5 star reviews, by people who said that they won’t buy it because it has DRM...The moment concentrated actions like protests lead to dis-organized collective action and rebellion en masse is very exciting. If these are actual consumers acting in concert but without prompting from a centrally organized campaign then it means that our efforts at establishing DRM as an anti-feature have been successful."
spore  drm  flashmobs  collective  protests  activism  amazon  reviews  ratings  videogames 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Luis D´Elía: "Lo único que me mueve es el odio hacia la oligarquía" | LANACION.com
"Lo único que me mueve es el odio contra la puta oligarquía"..."Piensan que nosotros somos inmundicia, escoria, barbarie. Tengo el mismo odio que nos tienen ustedes a nosotros los del norte" “No tengo problemas en matarlos a todos”
argentina  crisis  food  government  protests  violence  luisdelia  economics  money  buenosaires 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Indignación y movilizaciones de ruralistas tras el discurso de Cristina [some background info for the cacerolazos bookmarks]
"Manifestantes realizan protestas en distinas localidades bonaerenses y de otras provincias. En los cortes rechazaron en duros términos las declaraciones de la Presidenta sobre el paro. Y ratificaron que continuarán con los reclamos"
argentina  economics  taxes  government  protests  agriculture  food  money  politics  strikes 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Cristina, fuerte contra el paro del campo: "Ahora vemos los piquetes de la abundancia" [some background info for the cacerolazos bookmarks]
"Remarcó que el campo fue "el sector de mayor rentabilidad desde el 2001 a esta parte". Y agregó: "No me voy a someter a ninguna extorsión". De esta manera, puso aún más distancia con los dirigentes ruralistas, quienes más temprano anunciaron que se
argentina  economics  taxes  government  protests  agriculture  food  money  politics  strikes 
march 2008 by robertogreco

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