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Millennials Don’t Have a Monopoly on Burnout | The New Republic
"This is a societal scourge, not a generational one. So how can we solve it?"



"Because the causes are systemic, the solution to burnout will need to be too. Peterson noted why “many millennials increasingly identify with democratic socialism and are embracing unions: We are beginning to understand what ails us, and it’s not something an oxygen facial or a treadmill desk can fix.” But overthrowing capitalism isn’t a complete solution, either. The things that cause burnout – from overwork and shoddy management to a lack of recognition – would likely persist in socialist systems. Workers burn out in social democracies like Sweden, too.

We can’t just throw cash at the burnout problem, either, like Don Draper does on “Mad Men” when his younger business partner Peggy Olson complains that her tireless work goes unrecognized. “That’s what the money is for!” he bellows. Of course, workers would benefit from higher wages, but a bigger paycheck won’t keep you from burning out if you’re treated unfairly, or your employer’s values differ from yours, or your boss is a tyrant. Besides, burnout isn’t just a reaction to bad jobs. I had a great job, but there were still problems with my workload and rewards I couldn’t bear over the long term.

And this is where the problem lies: There’s no obvious solution. “Change might come from legislation, or collective action, or continued feminist advocacy, but it’s folly to imagine it will come from companies themselves,” Peterson writes. “Our capacity to burn out and keep working is our greatest value.” But it’s hard to see how Congress could legislate the problem away, especially given that Washington is also keenly interested, for economic reasons, in having as many Americans working as possible—and doing so as efficiently as possible. As for collective action and feminist advocacy, they may help improve employment at the edges, but it’s worth noting that even 9-to-5 workers with generous vacation time can burn out.

It may be impossible to eliminate burnout altogether. As long as we toil, there will be pain. But we can surely ease it. Burnout arises in our organizations, but it’s a product of the unhealthy interpersonal relations we have there. That means it’s not fundamentally an economic or political problem. It’s an ethical one. It stems from the demands we place on others, the recognition we fail to give, the discord between our words and actions. The question can’t just be how I can prevent my burnout; it has to be how I can prevent yours. The answer will entail not just creating better workplaces, but also becoming better people."
burnout  2019  psychogeography  work  labor  jonathanmalesic  economics  generations  annhelenpetersen 
january 2019 by robertogreco
The Psycho-Geography of Gentrification in L.A. – más allá de la política
"Gentrification as the intensification of the psycho-geography of the real subsumption of everything to Capital. No place for cultural remanants outside its logic. The banalisation of all spaces, streamlining consumption. You don't live here, you just buy here. [https://twitter.com/edcns_ineditos/status/988603623276871682 ]

But what does this mean?

Much has been written about gentrification, but simply put it is the name for the rise of property values (and then ipso facto rent prices), resulting in displacement and often cultural erasure of those who were displaced. As Stuart Hall said, “race is the modality in which class is lived” and so by this logic gentrification is also deeply racialized. But what is the cause of this rise is more contentious. Some point to art galleries/spaces; others to international & national real estate speculation looking for new markets to profit off of; some see it is as a natural process of re-vitalization of areas once thought of as blight (if life under Capital could be seen as natural); some see the incursion of the (white) hipster as the cause. Suffice to say the cause is complex and may include all of these.

Now what is psycho-geography? In 1955, Guy Debord [a French anti-state communist who wrote much about art & cinema & The Spectacle] defined it as “the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals.” Of course, as gentrification attests, the physical environment we encounter does not effect all of us in the same way. Later in 1961, he clarified things a bit by saying, “sectors of a city…are decipherable, but the personal meaning they have for us is incommunicable.” We may all be able to see how hostile architecture (as seen below) works to discourage loitering and/or camping by the homeless, though others may not understand why the appearance of a juice bar (also seen below) may be just as offensive to some of us (especially since a Mexican juice & snack shop is right up the street selling the same thing at cheaper prices).

[images]

So psycho-geography could be a way to think about how certain spaces in a city could be seen as either welcoming, hostile or open-ended. Most spaces are very controlled in Los Angeles, though their control is highly racialized. For instance, public drinking is illegal in Los Angeles but curiously at art gallery openings, where a largely white audience take their Tecates or cheap red wine onto the sidewalks or street, there seems to be little enforcement of this law. The video below, take from a 2010 documentary on Skid Row, sheds some light on this racialization:

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MB_P3eljq1Y ]

Part of the power of whiteness is that those emboldened by it feel they can and should be able to go anywhere and be safe. Freedom of movement and safety are two things we all desire, but because whiteness is something which demands defense under the White-Supremacist society we live in — that enforcement comes along with an armed gang with a monopoly on violence: The Police. There are countless of stories of white people calling the police on Black or brown people where there was indeed no threat and the Black or brown person ends up being brutalized or killed by the police. One of the clear fears of Black and brown proletarians who live in a neighborhood being gentrified is that with new white neighbors with money, so will come a police force who either would ignore their neighborhood in the past or would already terrorize their neighborhood. What were normal house parties would now attract aggressive police attention (house parties which occur because often bars/clubs prove too expensive for proletarians).
But what does “the real subsumption of everything to Capital” mean? This is a topic which has been explained much better in Ultra-Left communist texts than could be explained here, but briefly as Endnotes note in their second volume: “formal subsumption affects only the immediate labour-process, while real subsumption extends beyond the sphere of production to society as a whole.” Or as Théorie communiste put it, it is “capital becoming capitalist society.”

So, at one point in time Capital only absolutely controlled proletarians when at work, but over time Capital has been able to control proletarians non-labor time as well (“free time)”. Gentrification could very well be seen as the intensification of this control within (typically) the realm of the city. One of the tell-tale signs of gentrification is how what were once old mom-and-pop shops which likely fulfilled a need within a specific ethnic neighborhood (fresh tortillas and tamales!), transition to boutique or high-end shops which fulfill needs much more based on commodity-fetishism: the purchase of things (or services) not so much based on need but based on what they say about the purchaser:

[images]

I buy a coffee at Café de Leche because it says that I have refined taste in coffee and also that I have the disposable income to spend much more for something as banal as coffee, rather than picking up a cup from a Cambodian-owned donut shop for much less. I buy crystals supposedly-imbued with healing or other properties because I see they are part of a trend I've come across on Instagram (and I will post them on Instagram) vs. buying candles in a local botánica from a culture I don't know enough about to spin for social capital.

Interestingly enough many times defenders of gentrification advocates say that the changes brought by gentrification amount to bringing much needed services and/or access to certain commodities to poorer neighborhoods; or some even claim they are bringing culture & difference. The first claim assumes that residents wished they could pay more for the things already for sale in their neighborhoods. This second claim is rather ludicrous as anyone who has visited more than a few gentrified neighborhoods will attest to their sameness: juice shop, high-end café, yoga studio, crystal shop, wine shop, etc. What gentrification is bringing is the blight of middle-class/bourgeois whiteness. A blight which sees itself as the default and cannot imagine that those outside of it could not want what they want.

El Sereno starts to look like Highland Park which looks more and more like Echo Park which inevitably becomes annexed by Silver Lake.

More and more what could have been a street where people hung out on and could buy cheap snacks to pass the time becomes a place where one cannot visit without spending less than $20 (currently LA’s minimum wage can be as low as $10.50/hr). The last remnants of what some would call community disappears. A recent LA Times article on the creeping gentrification faced in Lincoln Heights notes how some people stay in this L.A Eastside neighborhood not just because it is still relatively cheap, but because they have found a place they cherish and call home. For the petit-bourgeois/bourgeois who see themselves as cosmopolitan and shuttle from living in one city to another and then on to another city based on whim or fancy, Lincoln Heights has no historical or personal meaning. Their newly-flipped rental (or mortgage) is just a nice place (with maybe a nice view).

• "Oh you can see Downtown L.A. from here."
• "It's so conveniently close to everything."
• "It feels like a real L.A. neighborhood -- not like Echo Park does now."
• "It's really an up-and-coming neighborhood!"
• "If only it had a Trader Joe's!"

Gentrification is the further realization of the power of Capital over the lives of proletarians. And this realization says one thing loudly & clearly: you don’t matter and your connection to a place does not matter. Perhaps the coming years will continue to show a Los Angeles which says:

FUCK YOU, WE DON'T WANT TO LIVE WITHIN THE LOGIC OF WHAT CAPITAL THINKS MATTERS. WE WANT TO LIVE OUTSIDE OF ITS LOGIC AND WILL DESTROY CAPITAL IF NECESSARY.

Cuz we know when we drive or walk around a gentrifying Los Angeles we know that what we see is akin to a fuck you to the revolt of 1992. Capital is taking the city back and it’s time we remind Capital of what we can and will do."
losangeles  gentrification  psychogeography  2018  guydebord  whiteness  capitalism 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Teju Cole en Instagram: “⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The Starbucks thing hit me harder than I expected. I've been brooding for days. On the face of it, it's inconsequential. It is…”
"The Starbucks thing hit me harder than I expected. I've been brooding for days. On the face of it, it's inconsequential. It is certainly inconsequential in direct comparison to the "newsworthy" horrors we are used to. No one was shot. Nobody died.
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It happened on an ordinary day in an ordinary place. But that's also the reason it stings: precisely because of that ordinariness. Show of hands: who's ever been to a Starbucks? It happened in Starbucks, with their overpriced faux-Italian drinks, to people like us, doing the things we do, waiting for a friend to arrive before ordering.
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Keen-eared Professor Iyer notes that playing overhead during the arrest was Dizzy Gillespie's Salt Peanuts. A compact contemporary history of public space could be written with the title "Black Music, Yes! Black People, No!"
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We are not safe even in the most banal place. We are not equal even in the most common circumstances. We are always five minutes away from having our lives upended. Racism is not about actively doing stuff to you all the time—it's also about passively keeping you on tenterhooks. We are always one sour white away from having the cops arrive. And the cops! The cops are like a machine that can’t stop once set in motion, what Fela called "zombie." When the cops arrive, the human aspect of the encounter is over.
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This is why I always say you can't be a black flaneur. Flanerie is for whites. For blacks in white terrain, all spaces are charged. Cafes, restaurants, museums, shops. Your own front door. This is why we are compelled, instead, to practice psychogeography. We wander alert, and pay a heavy psychic toll for that vigilance. Can't relax, black."
tejucole  2018  starbucks  flaneur  psychogeography  race  racism  blackness  us 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Folklore Situationism – MORNING, COMPUTER
"NORTHERN EARTH gives me joy.  The September issue has a big, rich piece on psychogeography, phenomenology, landscape writing, history and, most tellingly for me, folklore.  For me, it tied right in to the mechanic of myth in STAR SHIPS – the transmission of lore through story. I’m still thinking about this talk I have to do next month, Myth And The River Of Time.

Moving through America, I always find myself noticing and thinking that American roads and bridges are named after Americans. I live in a country where roads and bridges are named for ghost stories.  Screaming Boy Lane and Boggart’s Bridge.

Dramatising the landscape, which we’ve done since megalithic times and before.

Landscape writing seems to eventually take a turn into nationalism.  I never quite got that. Myth is a commonwealth.  And you know that, somewhere, sometime, someone drives on one of those roads or bridges in America and leans back and tells a myth of the person it’s named for, a truth grown in time, a thing they did or saw that becomes story in the telling.

They have a website where you can buy a year’s subscription for ten pounds British."
warrenellis  2017  folklore  situationist  landscape  writing  us  naming  lore  myth  psychogeography  phenomenology 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Go Back to School With Mike Kelley's "Educational Complex" | Art for Sale | Artspace
"Though he has been based in Los Angeles since 1976, Mike Kelley’s birthplace of Detroit has always been a locus of his practice, as has his working method of creating psychologically charged architecture—as scale models and as life size environments—for chaotic, often scatological accumulations of personal memories and cultural detritus. Examples include works in which an imagined territory gives structure to a larger narrative, as with the landscape photographs in Three Valleys (1980) or the drawings in Monkey Island (1982-83); sculptural landscapes composed of found children’s blankets and pathetic pre-owned dolls or pet toys, such as Mooner or Arena 5 (both 1990); and the sock monkeys and related stuffed animals grouped and organized on generic industrial work tables in Craft Morphology Flow Chart (1991).

Kelley’s integration of personal, architectural, and cultural memory reached its apotheosis in 1995 with Educational Complex. In American culture of the 1980s and 1990s, the suburban school became a territory heavily charged with symbolism in the wake of several high-profile school shootings and child-abuse cases. Locations such as Columbine, Colorado, and Manhattan Beach, California—home of the McMartin preschool, another subject of Kelley’s—are indelibly etched in the American psyche as painful examples of aggression or “repressed memory syndrome” incubated in neighborhoods that had once held promise for upwardly mobile families fleeing the inner city. In Kelley’s work, this dark and paranoid side of American culture is exploited and filtered through the artist’s own memories of his childhood experiences in Detroit, one of the most economically blighted cities in the United States. Like other American artists, such as Paul McCarthy, who mines the territory of his own Mormon upbringing, or Matthew Barney, who has used the American West as the cinematic backdrop for his epic films, Kelley is interested in icons of the benign relics of his own psyche—in his case, the wishing well, the office, the museum, the classroom.

In 1995, addressing what he calls his “bias against architecture” Kelley created Educational Complex, a tabletop model that delineates the psychogeography of his childhood by reconstructing from memory the schools he attended and the house in which he grew up. “Buildings that I had occupied almost every day for years could barely be recalled. The teachers, courses and activities held within them are a vast undifferentiated swamp.” Generated through a process of drawing and modeling, the complex of structures was a combination of excavation and spatialization of memory. Classrooms, hallways and offices were recalled, drawn, and then matched to actual floorplans. The resulting form became a conflation of the two.

The gaps in memory—the lapses and repressed moments—are represented by actual blanks in the architecture of the model, spaces filled in. Doors recalled as opening on the left are represented as doing so on the right, while other mistakes are left uncorrected, representing what Anthony Vidler has called “a nostalgia for the homely.” As Kelley has said, “In utopian projects, moral and aesthetic dimensions are presented, often openly and dramatically, as mirrors of each other. Of course, my project is a perversion of such an attitude: I present an obviously dystopian architecture, reflecting our true, chaotic social conditions, rather than some idealized dream of wholeness.”"

[See also: http://aaaaarg.fail/thing/55a76208334fe06cd8fdc2cd]]

"One of the most influential artists of our time, Mike Kelley (1954--2012) produced a body of innovative work mining American popular culture as well as modernist and postmodernist art -- relentless examinations of subjectivity and of society that are both sinister and ecstatic. With a wide range of media, Kelley's work explores themes as varied as post-punk politics, religious systems, social class, and repressed memory. Using architectural models to represent schools he attended, his 1995 work, Educational Complex, presents forgotten spaces as frames for private trauma, real or imagined. The work's implications are at once miniature and massive. In this book, John Miller offers an illustrated examination of this milestone work that marked a significant change in Kelley's practice. A "complex" can mean an architectural configuration, a psychological syndrome, or a political apparatus, and Miller approaches Educational Complex through corresponding lines of inquiry, considering the making of the work, examining it in terms of education and trauma (sexual or otherwise), and investigating how it tests the ideological horizon of art as an institution. Miller shows that in Educational Complex, Kelley expands his political and aesthetic focus, including not only such artifacts as generic forms of architecture but (inspired by the infamous McMartin Preschool case) popular fantasies associated with ritual sex abuse and false memory syndrome. Through this archaeology of the contemporary, Miller argues, Kelley examines the mandate for education and the liberal democratic premises underpinning it."]
mikekelley  art  architecture  childhood  schools  memory  1995  psychogeography  detroit  2015  buildings 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Caminar como último acto de libertad que nos queda | VICE | España
""No hay que olvidar que el trayecto es lo mejor del camino". Así se despide en nuestra entrevista Francisco Navamuel. El fotógrafo decidió crear un grupo en Facebook:Caminar como práctica anarquista, ética, estética y de pensamiento. Ahora reconoce que esta idea se le ha ido un poco de las manos. "Cuando te comento esto tiene que ver con el propio funcionamiento de la red social, en el que la información pasa a una velocidad incompatible con la reflexión".

En estos momentos el grupo cuenta con más de 4.600 seguidores. "Pero no siempre fue así. Arrancar el grupo costó más de tres años. El grupo contaba con unos 150 seguidores y decidí hacer administrador del grupo a todos. Actualmente, el grupo se autogestiona y seguimos creciendo, no solo en cantidad sino en calidad".

¿Y por qué esa necesidad de reivindicar el acto de caminar? "Sobre todo para mí es una manera de relacionarme con el territorio, de conocer en primera persona el espacio que habito, de reconocerme en las personas que voy encontrando cuando camino. Es una forma de conocimiento personal donde el espacio-tiempo confluyen al mismo ritmo que el pensamiento. Caminar tiene la capacidad de igualarnos, de hacernos ciudadanos en la medida que ocupamos y utilizamos un espacio y lo transitamos".

VICE: Entonces, ¿caminar va más allá del acto de desplazarse?

Francisco Navamuel: Caminar es un acto de libertad. Pero también de resistencia frente a las urgencias impuestas y las velocidades ajenas. Caminar se ha convertido en algo subversivo si no se practica para producir o para consumir y me niego a renunciar a esa capacidad transformadora y de conocimiento que recibimos cuando se camina, sea la manera elegida que sea: por placer, por obligación o por salud. Caminar tiene esa parte lúdica y pedagógica que tenemos que recuperar como fuente de conocimiento. Pero también entiendo el caminar como una experiencia estética. El paseo está asociado al paisaje y me interesa la percepción que cada persona tiene sobre cómo interpreta el territorio.

Y el grupo de Facebook, ¿cómo surge?

El grupo surge en un momento en el que comienzo a realizar una tesis doctoral en la que vinculo el caminar, la fotografía y el llamado 'Modelo Barcelona'. Desde el principio empecé a ser consciente de la cantidad de información que existía sobre el caminar desde disciplinas como la antropología, la sociología, el arte, el urbanismo. No todo lo que recopilaba para la tesis me era útil y pensé que ese esfuerzo de investigación y toda esa información no debía quedarse guardada en una pestaña del navegador. Decidí crear el grupo Caminar como práctica anarquista, ética, estética y de pensamiento porque pensaba que podría ser útil a otras personas el poner en común todo lo que generaba la investigación. Al mismo tiempo daba la oportunidad a otros caminantes a compartir sus experiencias, vivencias o conocimientos sobre el tema. Soy partidario de la transmisión de conocimientos de manera horizontal y el grupo permite esa transmisión no jerárquica que existe en espacios como la enseñanza reglada o la académica. Cualquiera puede compartir la información que considere oportuna, desde un paseo alrededor se su casa hasta el último proyecto participativo o la última publicación. Si bien Facebook no es precisamente un espacio de conocimiento, respeto y libertad, sí que permite este flujo de información compartida sobre un mismo tema.

Y el anarquismo del título.

Hay algo en la acción del caminar que lo vinculo con valores del anarquismo. Caminar es una manera de posicionarse en el mundo. Cada persona decide cuáles son los motivos que tiene para caminar, tiene libertad para decidir hacia dónde se desplaza y el mismo acto genera un bien en la comunidad. Las personas que caminan respetan y protegen los espacios por donde transita. Se es solidario con las personas que encuentras a tu paso. Caminar se ha convertido en un acto de resistencia y en muchos momentos de desobediencia, de compromiso y de acción directa. Caminar como experiencia libertaria, de respeto, conocimiento y reconocimiento del 'otro', caminar como acto de rebeldía, como respuesta a la especulación urbana. Caminar como penúltimo acto de dignidad, como último acto de libertad.

¿A qué te refieres cuando hablas de ética y estética?

La ética y la estética están íntimamente relacionadas en la medida que una experiencia estética está cargada de ética. La observación responsable genera pensamiento crítico. Como consecuencia de esa observación el ser humano ha materializado esa experiencia estética en objeto artístico por medio de la literatura, la escultura, la pintura, el dibujo, el sonido o como es en mi caso por medio de la fotografía. Caminar por tu entorno más inmediato te invita a mirar, a percibir, a conocer, a reflexionar y te permite ser crítico hacia las diferentes transformaciones que el poder fáctico impone. Ese conocimiento junto a ese pensamiento crítico genera un compromiso ético.

¿Se pueden cambiar las cosas con el acto de caminar?

Las cosas no se cambian por sí solas simplemente caminando. Se necesita el compromiso de una parte de la sociedad. Las personas que deciden caminar están en continuo cambio y ese movimiento genera unas sinergias que son capaces de transformar cualquier cosa. No basta con salir a la calle a caminar si no va implícito un grado mínimo de compromiso y de acción.

¿Necesitamos volver a ocupar los espacios públicos?

Necesitamos recuperarlos en la medida en que necesitamos socializar el espacio que ya ocupamos, y el desplazarse a pie ayuda a mantener ese equilibrio entre lo privado y lo público. Si algo caracteriza ese espacio público es la posibilidad de transitarlo con total libertad. Un espacio imperfecto y en continua transformación, donde el ser humano debe ser el protagonista frente a la especulación y a los intereses partidistas. El antropólogo Manuel Delgado llega a afirmar que el espacio público no existe en esta sociedad capitalista mientras se excluya de él a las personas y colectivos más vulnerables. Creo incluso que es necesario recuperar el espacio público como espacio de confrontación, donde dejemos de ser simples autómatas obedientes y materialicemos nuestros deseos. Una parte de urbanistas modernos, junto a ciertas políticas neoliberales, se han empeñado en proyectar las calles, las plazas, los barrios de tal manera que todo esté en orden, controlado y vigilado, de crear la ciudad perfecta con la intención de desactivar cualquier tipo de discrepancia y conflicto. Esto va en contra del propio concepto de ciudadano en la medida que se hace ciudad activando y socializando el espacio público.

¿Cómo ha influido tu pasión por caminar en tu proyecto personal?

Esa experiencia estética la materializo a través de mi trabajo artístico por medio de la fotografía y los registros sonoros. Pongo en práctica diferentes maneras de caminar, desde las deambulaciones perceptivas de los surrealistas, las derivas psicogeográficas de los situacionistas hasta las transurbancias que nos propone Francesco Careri con el grupo 'Stalker/Osservatorio Nomade'. De estas experiencias nace el proyecto WALKCELONA, en el que llevo trabajando los últimos siete años. Registro mis desplazamientos por la ciudad, que no dejan de ser pequeños momentos cotidianos, donde el conflicto está presente en sus calles, donde las contradicciones urbanas nos hacen errar en todas direcciones, donde los paisajes lingüísticos nos hace más humanos, sabiendo que la mayoría de las veces acaban censurados, generando muros de estéticas imposibles. Donde la arquitectura nos habla de cómo el espacio se convierte en tiempo y éste en historia, de lugares concretos que la cámara aísla y rescata de su anonimato para ser observados con la tranquilidad que la fotografía nos permite y que el ritmo de la propia ciudad nos arrebata."
walking  freedom  fernandobernal  2015  via:javierarbona  ethics  anarchism  aesthetics  thinking  solviturambulando  walkcelona  psychogeography  francisconavamuel  barcelona  españa  spain  knowing  scale  situationist  observation  criticism  criticalthinking  publicspace  space  manueldelgado  transurbanism  urbanism  urban  cities  anthropology 
may 2015 by robertogreco
jomc.links (Types of art)
"Time based media work to examine the stages and transformations of a single loaf #staleart

An inquiry into the everyday realities of large marine cetaceans, including mimicking surface behavior #whaleart

Performances consider the use and distance of unpaved lanes. Often received in the form of a mixture of dried fruits and nuts #trailart

Practice is concerned with colors of low saturation and associated paraphernalia #paleart

Art inspired by a creature entering new homes as territories of resistance. Slime residue traces the pattern of a psychogeographic inquiry #snailart

Gestures involving sedimentary rock as accelerationism of rare systems. Steam injection as provocative enterprise and critique of unsustainable practices. #oilshaleart

Explores coverings of many forms and textures. #veilart

Appropriating tactical reconnaissance substrates. Making underlying power structures hitherto visible. #maleart

(some rando text file I wrote about a year ago. no idea where to put it so i’m putting it here….i also have no idea what the thing was that annoyed me but it apparently was a long complicated joke about surveillance art being a boys club)"

[via: http://notes.caseyagollan.com/post/109923232318/types-of-art ]
joannemcneil  2015  art  psychogeography  gender  whales  textures  texture  coverings  veils  oilshale  systems  systemsthinking  color  humor  power  patriarchy  resistance 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Sextant Works - Not Know Because Not Looked For
"Sextant Works (formerly Wanderlust Projects) is an experience design collaboration between N.D. Austin and Ida C. Benedetto.

We practice transgressive placemaking through adventure, intimacy, and exploration."
placemaking  psychogeography  exploration  adventure  idabenedetto  ndaustin  wanderlustprojects  art  experience  place  place-based  place-basededucation  place-basedlearning  place-basedpedagogy 
february 2015 by robertogreco
'Pernicious' Effects of Economic Inequality - YouTube
"It's been said that money is the root of all evil. Does money make people more likely to lie, cheat and steal? Economics correspondent Paul Solman reports on new research from the University of California, Berkeley about how wealth and inequality affects us psychologically."
wealth  inequality  generosity  psychogeography  2013  behavior  ethics  economics 
november 2014 by robertogreco
In Conversation with Raoul Vaneigem | e-flux
"HUO: You have written a lot on life, not survival. What is the difference?

RV: Survival is budgeted life. The system of exploitation of nature and man, starting in the Middle Neolithic with intensive farming, caused an involution in which creativity—a quality specific to humans—was supplanted by work, by the production of a covetous power. Creative life, as had begun to unfold during the Paleolithic, declined and gave way to a brutish struggle for subsistence. From then on, predation, which defines animal behavior, became the generator of all economic mechanisms.

HUO: Today, more than forty years after May ‘68, how do you feel life and society have evolved?

RV: We are witnessing the collapse of financial capitalism. This was easily predictable. Even among economists, where one finds even more idiots than in the political sphere, a number had been sounding the alarm for a decade or so. Our situation is paradoxical: never in Europe have the forces of repression been so weakened, yet never have the exploited masses been so passive. Still, insurrectional consciousness always sleeps with one eye open. The arrogance, incompetence, and powerlessness of the governing classes will eventually rouse it from its slumber, as will the progression in hearts and minds of what was most radical about May 1968."



"RV: The moralization of profit is an illusion and a fraud. There must be a decisive break with an economic system that has consistently spread ruin and destruction while pretending, amidst constant destitution, to deliver a most hypothetical well-being. Human relations must supersede and cancel out commercial relations. Civil disobedience means disregarding the decisions of a government that embezzles from its citizens to support the embezzlements of financial capitalism. Why pay taxes to the bankster-state, taxes vainly used to try to plug the sinkhole of corruption, when we could allocate them instead to the self-management of free power networks in every local community? The direct democracy of self-managed councils has every right to ignore the decrees of corrupt parliamentary democracy. Civil disobedience towards a state that is plundering us is a right. It is up to us to capitalize on this epochal shift to create communities where desire for life overwhelms the tyranny of money and power. We need concern ourselves neither with government debt, which covers up a massive defrauding of the public interest, nor with that contrivance of profit they call “growth.” From now on, the aim of local communities should be to produce for themselves and by themselves all goods of social value, meeting the needs of all—authentic needs, that is, not needs prefabricated by consumerist propaganda."



"RV: The crisis of the ‘30s was an economic crisis. What we are facing today is an implosion of the economy as a management system. It is the collapse of market civilization and the emergence of human civilization. The current turmoil signals a deep shift: the reference points of the old patriarchal world are vanishing. Percolating instead, still just barely and confusedly, are the early markers of a lifestyle that is genuinely human, an alliance with nature that puts an end to its exploitation, rape, and plundering. The worst would be the unawareness of life, the absence of sentient intelligence, violence without conscience. Nothing is more profitable to the racketeering mafias than chaos, despair, suicidal rebellion, and the nihilism that is spread by mercenary greed, in which money, even devalued in a panic, remains the only value."



"HUO: My interviews often focus on the connections between art and architecture/urbanism, or literature and architecture/urbanism. Could you tell me about the Bureau of Unitary Urbanism?

RV: That was an idea more than a project. It was about the urgency of rebuilding our social fabric, so damaged by the stranglehold of the market. Such a rebuilding effort goes hand in hand with the rebuilding by individuals of their own daily existence. That is what psychogeography is really about: a passionate and critical deciphering of what in our environment needs to be destroyed, subjected to détournement, rebuilt.

HUO: In your view there is no such thing as urbanism?

RV: Urbanism is the ideological gridding and control of individuals and society by an economic system that exploits man and Earth and transforms life into a commodity. The danger in the self-built housing movement that is growing today would be to pay more attention to saving money than to the poetry of a new style of life.

HUO: How do you see cities in the year 2009? What kind of unitary urbanism for the third millennium? How do you envision the future of cities? What is your favorite city? You call Oarystis the city of desire. Oarystis takes its inspiration from the world of childhood and femininity. Nothing is static in Oarystis. John Cage once said that, like nature, “one never reaches a point of shapedness or finishedness. The situation is in constant unpredictable change.”2 Do you agree with Cage?

RV: I love wandering through Venice and Prague. I appreciate Mantua, Rome, Bologna, Barcelona, and certain districts of Paris. I care less about architecture than about how much human warmth its beauty has been capable of sustaining. Even Brussels, so devastated by real estate developers and disgraceful architects (remember that in the dialect of Brussels, “architect” is an insult), has held on to some wonderful bistros. Strolling from one to the next gives Brussels a charm that urbanism has deprived it of altogether. The Oarystis I describe is not an ideal city or a model space (all models are totalitarian). It is a clumsy and naïve rough draft for an experiment I still hope might one day be undertaken—so I agree with John Cage. This is not a diagram, but an experimental proposition that the creation of an environment is one and the same as the creation by individuals of their own future."



"HUO: Will museums be abolished? Could you discuss the amphitheater of memory? A protestation against oblivion?

RV: The museum suffers from being a closed space in which works waste away. Painting, sculpture, music belong to the street, like the façades that contemplate us and come back to life when we greet them. Like life and love, learning is a continuous flow that enjoys the privilege of irrigating and fertilizing our sentient intelligence. Nothing is more contagious than creation. But the past also carries with it all the dross of our inhumanity. What should we do with it? A museum of horrors, of the barbarism of the past? I attempted to answer the question of the “duty of memory” in Ni pardon, ni talion [Neither Forgiveness Nor Retribution]"

[long quote]

HUO: Learning is deserting schools and going to the streets. Are streets becoming Thinkbelts? Cedric Price’s Potteries Thinkbelt used abandoned railroads for pop-up schools. What and where is learning today?

RV: Learning is permanent for all of us regardless of age. Curiosity feeds the desire to know. The call to teach stems from the pleasure of transmitting life: neither an imposition nor a power relation, it is pure gift, like life, from which it flows. Economic totalitarianism has ripped learning away from life, whose creative conscience it ought to be. We want to disseminate everywhere this poetry of knowledge that gives itself. Against school as a closed-off space (a barrack in the past, a slave market nowadays), we must invent nomadic learning.

HUO: How do you foresee the twenty-first-century university?

RV: The demise of the university: it will be liquidated by the quest for and daily practice of a universal learning of which it has always been but a pale travesty.

HUO: Could you tell me about the freeness principle (I am extremely interested in this; as a curator I have always believed museums should be free—Art for All, as Gilbert and George put it).

RV: Freeness is the only absolute weapon capable of shattering the mighty self-destruction machine set in motion by consumer society, whose implosion is still releasing, like a deadly gas, bottom-line mentality, cupidity, financial gain, profit, and predation. Museums and culture should be free, for sure, but so should public services, currently prey to the scamming multinationals and states. Free trains, buses, subways, free healthcare, free schools, free water, air, electricity, free power, all through alternative networks to be set up. As freeness spreads, new solidarity networks will eradicate the stranglehold of the commodity. This is because life is a free gift, a continuous creation that the market’s vile profiteering alone deprives us of."
raoulvaneigem  art  politics  economics  life  living  situationist  humans  consumerism  learning  education  unschooling  deschooling  curiosity  power  anarchism  anarchy  totalitarianism  creativity  johncage  détournement  psychogeography  models  derive  servitude  love  oarystis  humanity  everyday  boredom  productivity  efficiency  time  temporality  money  desire  chaos  solidarity  networks  guydebord  freedom  freeness  museums  culture  hansulrichobrist  2009  nomadiclearning  lcproject  openstudioproject  work  labor  artleisure  leisure  leisurearts  artwork  profiteering  explodingschool  cityasclassroom  flow  universallearning  cedricprice  thinkbelts  dérive  shrequest1 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Tom Armitage » Driftwood
"What this means is: I can check into a location and find myself, a year ago, standing there too. Does that make sense?

(The terms and conditions say I can’t imitate other people, but that doesn’t stop me imitating myself, right?)

So there’s me in the present, and also me-a-year-ago brought forward into the present.

What I learned from this is: you can very viscerally remember a year ago. I see old-me somewhere, and remember who I was in that pub with, or why I was at an event, or what terrible film I saw, or how sad – or happy – I was at any particular point in time."



"It’s interesting for me to look back on this body of work when considering the final – and perhaps largest – project I’d like to talk about today. It takes a lot of these impulses – the psychogeographic; the act of creating situations; the act of dérive; the use of leftovers; the barely-game – and pieces them together to create a new kind of interaction that played out in the city."



"And we wanted to do that in as accessible a way as possible: for the most people, at the largest scale. I’ve worked around ARG-like things before, and to be honest: it’s not that hard to create a cool experience for a few hundred people that’s not very good value for money. Making something fun and immediate for thousands – that’s far harder. But if we were to make the city playable, it had to be at the biggest scale possible.

Firstly, that meant making it super-accessible. An app for a smartphone might be cool and have GPS and that, but it limits your audience. Everybody understands SMS – every mobile phone has SMS – and it’s super-simple to implement now; Twilio does the legwork for us. Superficially unexciting technology made super-simple by web-based services.

And secondly, to use as much of the city as possible without incurring too many costs – we’d need to use things that were already there. We wanted instead to find a way of hijacking the existing infrastructure – we spent a lot of time scouring the city for opportunities. We noticed that a lot of street furniture – lampposts, postboxes, bus stops, cranes, bridges – have unique reference/ maintenance labels. We thought it would be interesting for these objects to be intervention points – something more tangible than GPS and quite commonplace. Just telling us where you are.

At the time, I jokingly said that the Smart City uses technology and systems to work out what its citizens are doing, and the Playable City would just ask you how you are.

What we ended up with was a playful experience where you could text message street furniture, hold a dialogue with it, and find out what other people had been saying."



"We heavily “front-loaded” the experience – the first experience of Hello Lamp Post has to be really good. It’s no good putting all the best content behind hours of play – most of it won’t get seen, as a result. So we chose to make the early interactions completely fully-featured – and then treat the players who continued to engage, to come back again and again, to more subtle shifts in behaviour that were still rewarding – but that didn’t hide most of the functionality from casual players. The Playable City had to be playable by everyone."



"Now that I look back on it, I can see that Hello Lamp Post acts as a lovely summation of five years of toys and games built around cities. It’s an experience that doesn’t so much interrupt your experience of the city as it layers on top of it, letting you see the paving and the beach all at once. It builds ritual and new interactions into routine. It requires almost nothing to engage with it – and most of the systems it uses – SMS, Twilio, the city – are already built by other people. We just built the middle layer. (Which, in this case, is rather complex. But you get the picture.)

What can we learn from all this?

By building on top of other services, we also create a kind of sustainability. When Noticings closed, the photos were still on Flickr – just with an unusual tag. If the ghostbots break, their activity is still preserved forever.

We don’t destroy the value we’ve created the second we turn it off. Which is more like how a city behaves: it degrades, or is reused, or gentrified, but history becomes another layer of patina on top of it – it isn’t torn down instantly.

We’re not planting fully grown trees and then tearing them out: we’re building an ecosystem, and perhaps other games or tools will build on top of us. We hoped – once people twigged how Hello Lamp Post worked – they might start drawing codes on things, on posters, on street art, in order to attach messages to it.

If the city is a beach, it is littered in driftwood. When I think of driftwood, I think about flotsam and jetsam. Flotsam is that which floats ashore of its own accord; jetsam is that which is deliberately thrown overboard from a boat – man-made detritus, as opposed to natural wastage (or wreckage).

I think those two categories also apply to the materials I’m terming “driftwood” today. And I genuinely believe the things I’m about to describe are materials, just like wood or steel. That might be obvious with regards to some of these – but not all. If a material is something we manipulate and shape as designers, then all these things could be considered materials.

Leftover infrastructures – services like Twitter and Foursquare, more tactile infrastructure like transit networks or maintenance codes on objects. And leftover technologies, too; print-on-demand, SMS, telephony – all are now available over straightforward web APIs. These things have become commoditised and tossed overboard, made available to all.

In this way, we can spend our time working on unique experiences and interactions, rather than the underlying platforms.

If that’s our jetsam, what’s the flotsam – the stuff just floating around?
Data

The city is drowning in data.

I tend to describe data as an exhaust: you give it off whether you like it or not, and it follows you around like a cloud. People give it off; machines give it off; systems give it off. Given all the data we emit by choice – our locations stored in Foursquare, or Twitter, or Facebook; our event attendance tracked by Lanyrd and Eventbrite; as well as that we emit regardless of whether we want to – discount card usage; travelcard usage; online purchasing data – well, what are the experienes you could build around that? This is all there (with end-users permission) for the taking, and it can lead to unusual new ambient interactions.

Environments

What are the environments you can repurpose? Not just the City as a whole but smaller spaces – institutions, establishments, public spaces, parks, transit networks. All these are spaces and contexts to build within, and they all come with their own affordances. Even when they’re controlled or marshalled by others, they are spaces to consider reclaiming and repurposing.

Routine

And just as we can reclaim space, consider Time as a material to be reclaimed to: what are the points of the day we can design for – not just active, 100% concentration, but all the elements where there is surplus attention? We can’t create Debord’s focused, committed dérive – but how can we create a tiny fragment of it, without invading the daily routines we all have to live with?"



"I don’t think, ultimately, the city can resist the beach it sits upon. There are so many things we can build atop it, be it on semi-public, semi-private, corporate spaces – or the genuine publics of the city.

To build and make them, we don’t even need to invent architectures and infrastructures – we don’t even have to make it obvious they’re happening. We can use what’s already there - making new experiences out of the driftwood that lives in the city and across the network. Lifting up the paving slabs to reveal the beach underneath."
tomarmitage  2013  driftwood  ghostcar  hellolamppost  muncaster  noticing  noticings  foursquare  flickr  leftovers  playablecity  cities  derive  psychogeography  towerbridge  toys  play  fun  dérive  situationist  games 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Experimental travel - Wikipedia
"Experimental tourism is a novel approach to tourism in which visitors do not visit the ordinary tourist attractions (or, at least not with the ordinary approach), but allow whim to guide them. It is an alternative form of tourism in which destinations are chosen not on their standard touristic merit but on the basis of an idea or experiment. It often involves elements of humor, serendipity, and chance.

There are a number of approaches to experimental tourism:

• Aerotourism - in which a tourist visits the local airport and explores it without going anywhere.

• Alphatourism - in which a tourist finds the first street alphabetically on a map, and the last street alphabetically, draws a straight line (or any other figure they desire) between them, and walk the path between the two points.

• Alternating Travel - in which a tourist leaves their front door, turns right, turns left at the next intersection, turns right at the next, and so on, alternating each direction, until they are unable to continue because of an obstruction.

• Cecitourism - in which a tourist is blindfolded and allows a friend to escort them through the city.

• Contretourism - in which a tourist visits a famous tourist site, but turns their back on the site and takes photos of, or just examines, the view from that direction.

• Erotourism - in which a couple travels separately to the same city and then tries to find each other.

• Monopolytourism - in which a tourist takes the local version of a Monopoly board with them and visits places on the board as determined by a roll of the dice.

• Nyctalotourism - in which the tourist only visits tourist attractions between dusk and dawn.

Other ideas do not have particular names:

• "Touring" a home town. Stay at a youth hostel, backpack through town, meet new people, do not go home until the vacation is over.

• Taking a map of the town being visited, selecting a random map grid, and exploring every bit of the grid.

• Visiting a bar, asking the bartender where their favorite bar is and what they drink there. Visit that bar, do the same with the bartender there, and continue.

The concept of experimental travel was developed by writer Joel Henry, the French director of the Laboratory of Experimental Tourism (Latourex).

In 2005, Lonely Planet published The Lonely Planet Guide to Experimental Travel [http://www.amazon.com/Lonely-Planet-Guide-Experimental-Travel/dp/1741044502 ], which formalised and developed many of Henry's ideas."
travel  serendipity  experimental  experimentaltravel  tourism  psychogeography  situationist  chance  humor 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Penguin Lines - Celebrate 150 years of the London Underground - Penguin Books
"The city is filled with stories. For the 150th anniversary of the London Underground, twelve writers tell their tales, each inspired by a different Tube line. Some are personal, some are polemical; every one is unique, showing how we are connected, and how the space in which we live shapes us and our imaginations."
london  tube  via:debcha  penguin  penguinlines  subways  psychogeography  2013  books  storytelling 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Space and Culture › Moving across landscapes (and one ocean)
"At Tesugen, Peter Lindberg takes a close look at Bruce Chatwin’s beautiful novel*, The Songlines. One of my favourite exchanges is this:

Certain phrases, certain combinations of musical notes, are thought to describe the action of the Ancestor’s feet. Once phrase would say, ’salt-pan’; another ‘creek-bed’, ’spinifex,’ ’sandhill,’ ‘mulga scrub,’ ‘rockface’ and so forth. An expert songman, by listening to their order of succession, would count how many times his hero crossed a river, or scaled a ridge–and be able to calculate where, and how far along a songline he was.

“So a musical phrase,” I said, “is a map reference?”

“Music,” said Arkady, “is a memory bank for finding ones’ way about the world.”

Hear hear!"
annegalloway  2004  brucechatwin  memory  maps  mapping  wayfinding  thesonglines  music  language  words  cartography  mapmaking  place  psychology  psychogeography  landscape 
march 2013 by robertogreco
walking as knowing as making
[Intro here: http://www.walkinginplace.org/converge/intro.htm ]

"...sense of place can be seen as a commonplace occurrence, as an ordinary way of engaging one's surroundings and finding them significant. Albert Camus may have said it best. "Sense of place," he wrote, "is not just something that people know and feel, it is something people do". And that realization brings the whole idea rather firmly down to earth, which is plainly, I think, where a sense of place belongs."

Keith Basso (Wisdom Sits in Places)

"Walkscapes deals with strolling as an architecture of landscape. Walking as an autonomous form of art, a primary act in the symbolic transformation of the territory, an aesthetic instrument of knowledge and a physical transformation of the "negotiated" space, which is converted into an urban intervention. From primitive nomadism to Dada and Surrealism, from the Lettrist to the Situationist International, and from Minimalism to Land Art, this book narrates the perception of landscape through a history of the traversed city.

Francesco Careri (Rome, 1966) graduated in architecture in 1993 in Rome. His doctoral research began in Naples in 1996, resulting in a thesis entitled "The Journey". He is a member of the Stalker urban art workshop, an open interdisciplinary structure that conducts research on the city through experiences of transurbance in open spaces and in interaction with the inhabitants. He has taught at the Institut d'Arts Visuels d'Orléans and the Schools of Architecture of Reggio Calabria and Roma Tre, experimenting together with the students on methods of reappropriation and direct intervention in public space. He has recently published a book on Constant and the Situationist city Constant imagined in the late 1950s and early 1960s (Constant / New Babylon, una città nomade, Testo & Immagine, Turin 2001), and participated with Stalker in many international exhibitions of contemporary art and architecture."

http://www.osservatorionomade.net/
http://www.stalkerlab.it/
http://digilander.libero.it/stalkerlab/tarkowsky/manifesto/manifesting.htm


From the intro:

"Despite its ubiquity in the everyday walking is an activity obscured by its own practical functionality. It is employed literally and understood metaphorically as a slow, inefficient, and increasingly anachronistic means to a predetermined end. Rarely is walking considered as a distinct mode of acting, knowing, and making. As its necessity diminishes and its applications rarefy, the potential of walking as critical, creative, and subversive tool appears only to grow. Conceived of as a conversation between the body and the world, walking becomes a reciprocal and simultaneous act of both interpretation and manipulation; an embodied and active way of shaping and being shaped that operates on a scale and at a pace embedded in something seemingly more authentic and real.

Based in Urbana-Champaign at the University of Illinois, Walking as Knowing as Making is a multifaceted effort that seeks to nurture both a theoretical and applied approach to knowing and interpreting place as we experience and construct it through walking. Using the walk as a guiding metaphor the format of this symposium has been designed to encourage a sustained, rigorous, and layered yet experimental, diffuse, and meandering consideration of walking and its associated activities, systems, and values. Between February and May 2005 we will bring to campus a diverse group of scholars, activists, and pedestrians to present ideas, engage in conversation, generate questions, tell stories, and, of course, walk. Supplementing and also weaving together this series of convergences will be a new interdisciplinary course about walking, an informal film series about place, a reading group, a series of informational and experimental walks and tours, production of a monthly sound collage for broadcast on local community radio stations, a museum exhibition, and a digital and print archive of all the events and activities."
architecture  culturalstudies  culture  space  walking  psychogeography  keithbasso  francescocareri  reggiocalabria  situationist  urban  urbanism  cities  art  transurbance  place  territory  landscape  via:anne  davidabram  dannisbanks  timcresswell  johnfrancis  hamishfulton  chellisglendinning  davidmacauley  trevorpaglen  mikepearson  danicaphelps  andrephelps  janerendell  davidrothenberg  garysnyder  christaylor  jackturner  annewallace  msimonlevin  laurielong  knowing  making  slow  small  subversion  scale 
march 2013 by robertogreco
CW&T » Crow's Flight
"Crow’s Flight is a GPS compass app for the Android platform. Enter an address and the GPS compass will continuously update your position and point towards the destination. Distance to the point is displayed in meters or kilometers along with a visual distance gauge.

The red line always points north. The triangle points in the direction of the destination. The brightness of the triangle indicates the accuracy of your GPS fix. White being accurate and darker shades being less accurate.

To get it on your android device, go to the Market app on your phone and search for “crowsflight”. or click on the link->crowsFlight (only on Android devices)

Usage:
Go to the menu to record your current location so you can point back to it later.
Enter an address at the top textbox and press go.

crowsFlight is primarily meant for walking. Use it to track where you parked your car, camping, hiking, geocaching, getting lost, finding your way, hiding treasure, etc.

more features coming soon
-closest subway
-mark “here”
-show in maps
Crow’s Flight is open source and FREE.

source: http://code.google.com/p/crowsflight/

If your compass is acting weird, try calibrating it by spinning the phone on a flat surface really fast. Really. It worked for me."
cw&t  iso  applications  iphone  psychogeography  location  compass  directions  mobile  gps  ios 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Tina Richardson: Schizocartography
"Schizocartography is a form of urban critique that studies the aesthetic and psychological response that individuals have to the built environment.

Developed by Tina Richardson - based at the University of Leeds - it encourages individuals to question, and respond to, the outside spaces in which they work and live.

Schizocartography reveals the ideological contradictions that appear in urban space, while simultaneously enabling creative expression for those who inhabit it."

"What is Schizocartography?

I have developed schizocartography from the psychoanalyst Félix Guattari’s term “schizoanalytic cartography”. Schizocartography enables alternative existential modes for individuals in order to challenge dominant representations and power structures. This provides an opportunity for multiple ways of operating in space and reading the environment; it critiques the conventional ways of viewing, interpreting and mapping space. While the term “schizoanalysis” is derived from “schizophrenia”, it does not promote mental illness; rather, “schizo” is used as a way of offering up the possibility of multiple voices, and alternative world-views, amongst other factors.

This is my definition of ‘schizocartography’:

Schizocartography offers a method of cartography that questions dominant power structures and at the same time enables subjective voices to appear from underlying postmodern topography. It is both the process and output of a psychogeography of particular spaces that have been co-opted by various domineering operations, routines or procedures. It attempts to reveal the aesthetic and ideological contradictions that appear in urban space while simultaneously reclaiming the subjectivity of individuals by enabling new modes of creative expression. Schizocartography challenges anti-production, the homogenizing character of overriding forms that work towards silencing heterogeneous voices."
psychogeography  schizocartography  cartography  urban  urbanism  place  builtenvironment  via:selinjessa  tinarichardson  power  powerstructures  multiplicity  ant-production  theory  geography  félixguattari 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Wrights & Sites
"Wrights & Sites is a group of artist-researchers with a special relationship to site, city/landscape and walking."

"Formed in UK, 1997, Wrights & Sites are four artist-researchers (Stephen Hodge, Simon Persighetti, Phil Smith and Cathy Turner) whose work is focused on peoples' relationships to places, cities, landscape and walking. We employ disrupted walking strategies as tools for playful debate, collaboration, intervention and spatial meaning-making.

Our work, like walking, is intended to be porous; for others to read into it and connect from it and for the specificities and temporalities of sites to fracture, erode and distress it. We have sought to pass on our dramaturgical strategies to others: to audiences, readers, visitors and passersby.

The outcomes of our work vary from project to project, but frequently include site-specific performance, Mis-Guided Tours (e.g. Stadtverführungen in Wien, Tanzquartier Wien and Wiener Festwochen, Vienna, 2007), published Mis-Guides (e.g. A Mis-Guide To Anywhere, 2006), 'drifts', mythogeographic mapping, public art (e.g. Wonders of Weston, CABE/Situations, Weston-super-Mare, 2010) or installations (e.g. mis-guided, Belluard Bollwerk International Festival, Fribourg, 2008), and public presentations and articles.

Today, walking and exploring the everyday remains at the heart of all we do, and what we make seeks to facilitate walker-artists, walker-makers and everyday pedestrians to become partners in ascribing significance to place."
psychogeography  art  landscape  stephenhodge  simonpersighetti  philsmith  cathyturner  place  walking  porosity  exploring  exploration  via:anne  wrights&sights  sensemaking  meaningmaking  spatial  situationist 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Deep map - Wikipedia
"Deep map refers to an emerging practical method of intensive topographical exploration, popularised by author William Least Heat-Moon with his book PrairyErth: A Deep Map. (1991).

A deep map work most often takes the form of engaged documentary writing of literary quality; although it can equally well be done in long-form on radio. It does not preclude the combination of writing with photography and illustration. Its subject is a particular place, usually quite small and limited, and usually rural.

Some[who?] call the approach 'vertical travel writing', while archeologist Michael Shanks compares it to the eclectic approaches of 18th and early 19th century antiquarian topographers or to the psychogeographic excursions of the early Situationist International[1] http://www.mshanks.com/2012/07/10/chorography-then-and-now/ [2] http://documents.stanford.edu/michaelshanks/51.

A deep map goes beyond simple landscape/history-based topographical writing – to include and interweave autobiography, archeology, stories, memories, folklore, traces, reportage, weather, interviews, natural history, science, and intuition. In its best form, the resulting work arrives at a subtle, multi-layered and 'deep' map of a small area of the earth.

In North America it is a method claimed by those interested in bioregionalism. The best known U.S. examples are Wallace Stegner's Wolf Willow (1962) and Heat-Moon's PrairyErth (1991).

In Great Britain, the method is used by those who use the terms 'spirit of place' and 'local distinctiveness'. BBC Radio 4 has recently undertaken several series of radio documentaries that are deep maps. These are inspired by the 'sense of place' work of the Common Ground organisation."
via:selinjessa  writing  williamleastheat-moon  verticaltravelwriting  documentary  documentation  radio  photography  illustration  place  rural  michaelshanks  topography  psychogeography  situationist  autobiography  archaeology  stories  storytelling  memory  memories  weather  interviews  naturalhistory  bioregionalism  parairyerth  wolfwillow  wallacestegner  localdistinctiveness  bbcradio  bbs  radio4  deepmaps  maps  mapping  commonground  folklore  science  intuition 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Making Psychogeography Maps | Making Maps: DIY Cartography
"During the week of June 15-19 (2009) five intrepid Ohio students and myself engaged in improvisational psychogeography, culminating in the map opening this post. A printable 11″ x 17″ (300dpi 1.4mb) PDF of the map is here [http://mappingweirdstuff.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/owjl-finalmap2.pdf ]."
derive  dérive  maps  mapping  psychogeography  situationist  mapmaking  cartography 
march 2013 by robertogreco
DIY Magic book by Anthony Alvarado | ARTHUR MAGAZINE
"In short, rather than advertise this as a book of magick, it could just as well have been labeled a book of psychology hacking. Or a cookbook. Think of it as jail-breaking the iPhone of your mind. Teaching it to do things that its basic programming was never set up for. Advanced self-psychology."

“Anthony Alvarado has concocted a cookbook for vivid living: poetry that’s lived rather than written. His “spells” are actually practical suggestions by which the reader may coax the extraordinary from the everyday—and from themselves.” – Lord Breaulove Swells Whimsy, author of The Affected Provincial’s Companion

“Few books are as immediately useful as this delightful, inspirational tips ‘n’ tricks tome. I’m having a backyard betel nut party in five minutes and everyone’s invited!” -Jay Babcock, editor of Arthur Magazine

[See also: http://www.arthurmag.com/contributors/diy-magic-by-anthony-alvarado/ AND http://www.floatingworldcomics.com/main/2012/02/23/d-i-y-magic-by-anthony-alvarado/ ]
senses  perception  self-psychology  howto  psychogeography  arthurmagazine  toread  2012  mindhacks  psychology  books  anthonyalvarado 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Directions From our Dreams: Imagining a More Amazing iOS 6 Maps App | Wired Design | Wired.com
"Buried in Baio’s post was this intriguing tidbit: “Developers can specify a category (Car, Bus, Train, Subway, Streetcar, Plane, Bike, Ferry, Taxi, Pedestrian, Other).”

“Other”? What kind of thing can you do with “other”? Media inventor Robin Sloan saw it first.

"So Apple’s iOS 6 Maps delegates public transit to third-party apps. That, my friends, is a storytelling opportunity. Two words: Catbus app."

Yes! Why limit ourselves to mundane, workaday transit (especially given how hellish this is for developers) when now we can map anything.

With that in mind, we humbly present this list of suggestions:

* An app that routes your trip via LA’s lost streetcars.
* A psychogeography directions app, perhaps a port of Near Future Laboratory’s Drift deck, which directs aimless wandering around a city.
* An app to help The Warriors get home.
* An app to celebrate Bloomsday by following James Joyce’s Leopold Bloom through Dublin.
* An app for Batman that routes by rooftop."
publictransit  api  mapping  wandering  batman  jamesjoyce  bloomsday  driftdeck  psychogeography  catbus  apple  ios6  ios  mapsoftheimagination  maps  robinsloan  timmaly  2012  andybaio 
june 2012 by robertogreco
The Society for Exploratory Research
"The Society sends out a variety of exploration assignments on a semi-regular basis. These assignments are designed to encourage non-traditional exploration of your immediate environment, or an environment of your choosing. Assignments are completely optional."

"…began as an underground organization sometime around the beginning of the 20th century. While it is still a relatively unknown entity, the Society is rumored to have included some of the most brilliant thinkers of the last century as members.

Despite the organization's amorphous nature, it's central preoccupations appear to be a dedication to the non-conventional exploration & documentation of unexplored, unnoticed or unused landscapes within a local or wider community, as well as the development of new, non-conventional exploratory techniques. Members believe that learning is best accomplished through direct experience."

[Guide: http://www.societyforexploratoryresearch.com/tactical_guide_sfer.pdf ]
observation  place  landscape  research  yi-futuan  learning  societyforexploratoryresearch  noticing  situationist  psychogeography  local  edg  srg  glvo  exploration  kerismith 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Drift: an app for getting lost in familiar places | Broken City Lab
"Finally launched and available in the iOS App Store! [http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/drift/id524083174 ]

Drift helps you get lost in familiar places by guiding you on a walk using randomly assembled instructions. Each instruction will ask you to move in a specific direction and, using the compass, look for something normally hidden or unnoticed in our everyday experiences.

As you find these hidden or unnoticed things, you will be asked to document them with the camera, creating a photographic record of you walk. Drift also keeps track of where and when you took the photos and makes your documentation optionally available for others to view through the Drift website.

Drift was made possible with the generous support from the Ontario Arts Council Media Arts Grant for Emerging Artists.

Drift was developed by Justin Langlois in collaboration with Broken City Lab.

This project was generously supported by the Ontario Arts Council Media Arts Grant for Emerging Artists."
2012  observation  documentation  photography  justinlanglois  psychogeography  experience  everydaylife  everyday  compass  cities  brokencitylab  drift  iphone  ios  applications  noticing  exploration  walking  situationist  flaneur  derive  dérive 
may 2012 by robertogreco
How Do You Run Away from Home?
"For some people, psychological home has clearly moved online. I recall an op-ed somewhere several years ago, comparing cellphones to pacifiers. Appropriate, if they represent a connection to psychological ‘home.’ Putting your phone away is like suddenly being teleported away from home to a strange new place.

For others, the three R’s still dominate the idea of home. Online life is not satisfying for these people. I think this segment will shrink, just as the number of people who are attached to paper books is shrinking.

For a speculative third category, we have the sitcom-ish idea of interchangeable people in roles. I am not sure this category is real yet. I see some evidence for it in my own life, but it is not compelling.

But for a fourth category of people, the need for a psychological home itself is reduced. A utilitarian home is enough. The getting away drive has irreversibly altered psychology."
psychogeography  2012  davidgraeber  gettingaway  thirdculture  runningaway  interchangability  offline  internet  web  digital  online  belonging  culture  anarchism  existentialism  libertarianism  francisfukuyama  robertsapolsky  psychology  history  place  homes  home  rootedness  identity  individualism  venkateshrao 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Det Kongelige Danske Kunstakademie Billedkunstskolerne
"The School of Walls & Space investigates contemporary notions of space, its production, privatization & the role of the artist as a critical and political agent within it, & uses both traditional & more experimental pedagogical methods.

The School is a multi-layered micro-institution that encourages the development of an inter-disciplinary research-based practice. It balances individual mentoring w/ collective group activities. The school uses traditional pedagogical methods: group & one-to-one crits, seminars and talks, in conjunction w/ the exploration of more experimental collaborative teaching models which the School researches and develops collectively as a group. These include brain storming techniques, games, charettes, group activities, actions & happenings. It also explores historical practices, such as psychogeography & the derive, & the experimental teaching methods of Paolo Freire, Roy Ascott, Paul Goodman, & Colin Ward…"

[See also: http://wallsandspace.wordpress.com/ ]
copenhagen  theschoolofwallsandspace  2837university  lcproject  derive  collaborativeteaching  collaborative  charettes  arteducation  situationist  psychogeography  paulofreire  colinward  paulgoodman  royascott  nilsnorman  permaculture  denmark  art  space  education  place  pedagogy  dérive 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Utopia Seminar A Reader The School of Walls and Space Copenhagen 2010 [.pdf]
"This course explores the history, concepts and the real and imaginary worlds of Utopia. As an extension of Nils Norman’s ongoing research of Utopia, the Utopic World will be investigated using a broad artistic, rather than academic, method of inquiry.

Utopia is nowhere, but historically and conceptually it cannot be just anywhere. The course will navigate the analytic study and long tradition of mainly Western Utopia going back to the Ancient Greeks, through the Judeo-Christian tradition of Millenarianism, sailing past the Utopias of the 16C, and on towards the mad and fantastic plans and programs of Utopian Socialists like Charles Fourier, Robert Owen and Saint Simon. From there we will steer towards the history of communalism in the United States, feminist utopias, the communitarian experiments of the 60s and 70s, and the intentional communities of the present."
karlmarx  marxism  socialism  ecology  intentionalcommunities  communitarian  saintsimon  robertowen  charlesfourier  millenarianism  anarchist  anarchism  utopia  place  space  psychogeography  situationist  art  denmark  copenhagen  theschoolofwallsandspace  2010  nilsnorman 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Will Self: Walking is political | Books | The Guardian
"A century ago, 90% of Londoners' journeys under six miles were made on foot. Now we are alienated from the physical reality of our cities. Will Self on the importance of walking in the fight against corporate control"

"Borges's animals and beggars are those who still seek the disciplines of physical geography – we understand that to walk the city and its environs is, in a very powerful sense, to use it. The contemporary flâneur is by nature and inclination a democratising force who seeks equality of access, freedom of movement and the dissolution of corporate and state control."
humanconnection  humanconnectivity  connectivity  human  society  indifference  friedrichengels  gps  london  thomasdequincey  moritzretszch  edgarallanpoe  wandering  wanderlust  rebeccasolnit  epicurus  thecityishereforyoutouse  geography  democracy  freedomofmovement  freedom  access  movement  flaneur  borges  cities  place  space  limitedspace  psychogeography  urbanism  urban  transportation  control  corporatism  willself  2012  walking 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Flaneurism shouldn’t be easy | I Am Pete Ashton
"When you think about it, relying on the likes of Google, YouTube, Facebook et al stand up for the niche and the curious is pretty naive. Where their interests coincide they will side with the mainstream, and those interests will coincide more and more. We can’t rely on large Internet companies to look after this stuff – Yahoo’s half-arsed custody of Flickr should have taught us that. If we’re going to have an infrastructure that enables the spirit of the cyberflaneur to thrive we’re going to have to build and maintain it ourselves, above and beyond the financial blinkers of the mainstream.

One of the most surprising things about the Internet is how people think there’s a single monolithic culture. There used to be, back when access was difficult and determined by circumstance. But it’s not like that now. The Internet is for everything and everyone, which means it’s like everything else, prone to mediocrity and abuses of power…"
monoculture  discovery  diy  serendipity  stateoftheweb  exploration  psychogeography  online  web  flaneur  cyberflaneurism  2012  evgenymorozov  peteashton 
february 2012 by robertogreco
AWOL — A Guide To Getting Lost — The Pop-Up City
"Recent Chelsea College of Art & Design graduate Dan Cottrell has created a guide for the sole aim of getting lost. Pyschogeography is nothing new, but AWOL provides a beautifully simple design approach to the subject.

AWOL comes as a pack, consisting of a compass that doesn’t work, a simple poster and and a map that feature algorithmic walks, which always lovingly return you to your departure point – ensuring you can explore your surroundings worry-free."
awol  dancottrell  2012  psychogeography  anti-navigation  navigation  situationist 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Urban Adventure in Rotterdam: Psychogeography bingo
"Explore – Below you will find 50 psychogeographic observations. Go out and explore. Rediscover one of the observations. Document it in pictures or text and mark its number.

Get bingo - You get bingo when you fill any column, row or diagonal.

Profit - Document your bingo observations in the comments of this blog. Provide pictures if possible. Do this before 1-1-2012. We will try to send the first few winners a random book from the Rotterdam secondhand book market. It may be in Dutch but then it will have pictures."

[All posts on the blog tagged 'psychogeography': http://uair01.blogspot.com/search/label/psychogeography ]
netherlands  rotterdam  exploration  play  bingo  urbanism  urban  poetry  psychogeography  via:litherland 
january 2012 by robertogreco
youarehere2011 | Just another WordPress.com site
"Imagine an alternative version of the city archive. Rather than collecting documents and images focused on important historical events, it values the varied, daily experiences of present-day city residents. Instead of filling box after box with records about major landmarks and the city center, it preserves the sounds, emotions, and observations of neighborhood life. What might you find in such an archive? What would you contribute to it? Can such an archive strengthen our personal and collective ties to place? A hundred years from now, could it help us remember urban life in a different way?"

[via: http://twitter.com/lubar/status/139305923255599104 ]

[See also this reading list: http://youarehere2011.wordpress.com/suggested-reading/ ]
providence  rhodeisland  cities  psychogeography  readinglists  geography  place  guydebord  deniswood  josephhart  simonsadler  katharineharmon  gayleclemans  krisharzinski  kevinlynch  yi-futuan  micheldecerteau  donaldmeinig  christiannold  ericfischer  hitotoki  jasonlogan  conflux  provflux  situationist 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Stadtblind » The Colors of Berlin
"The Colors of Berlin is for tourists and Berliners. The book is a unique tool for urban exploration, serving both as inspiration for a personal vision and documentation of the city. It is a declaration of love to Berlin. It helps the flaneur and the city-lover see and experience the urban landscape in a new way. Stadtblind’s aim is to create a distance from that which is familiar, to re-frame the familiar in such a way that it becomes fresh, worthy of attention and affection. We present the everyday spaces, objects and surfaces of contemporary Berlin ina manner that provides a new means of perceiving cities. It is precisely the everyday aspects of our lives that are most often overlooked; and it is precisely the everyday that most constitutes our lived experience of cities."

[via: http://youarehere2011.wordpress.com/suggested-reading/ ]
berlin  travel  psychogeography  derive  2005  cities  cityguides  exploration  urban  urbanism  flaneur  situationist  dérive 
november 2011 by robertogreco
The London Perambulator (full length documentary) - YouTube
"Featuring: Russell Brand, Will Self, Iain Sinclair and Nick PapadimitriouDirected by John Rogers

John Rogers' film looks at the city we deny and the future city that awaits us. Leading London writers and cultural commentators Will Self, Iain Sinclair and Russell Brand explore the importance of the liminal spaces at the city's fringe, its Edgelands, through the work of enigmatic and downright eccentric writer and researcher Nick Papadimitriou - a man whose life is dedicated to exploring and archiving areas beyond the permitted territories of the high street, the retail park, the suburban walkways.

 The ideas of psychogeography and Nick's own deep topography are also explored."
london  cities  psychogeography  willself  russellbrand  iainsinclair  nickpapadimitriou  walking  topography  situationist  2011  via:preoccupations  place  urban  urbanism  history  thelondonperambulator  uk  johnrogers  maps  mapping  space  research  documentation  photography  video  discovery  noticing  classideas 
september 2011 by robertogreco
The Beach Beneath the Street by McKenzie Wark – review | Books | The Guardian
"British situationists of late 60s thought Debord & others had taken a wrong turn. SI apostate Christopher Gray, whose band of London-based provocateurs King Mob included future Sex Pistols manager Malcolm McLaren, opined: "What they [Debord et al] gained in intellectual power & scope they had lost in terms of the richness & verve of their own everyday lives." The SI, Gray argued, "turned inward". "Cultural sabotage" & "drunken exuberance" had been replaced by theoretical austerity.

But that turning inward didn't prevent the Parisian situationists from exerting the most profound influence on the French student movement in May 1968. More than 300,000 copies were printed of a pamphlet, On the Poverty of Student Life, written by an SI cadre named Mustapha Khayati. & it was a protégé of Debord's, René Viénet, who was responsible for some of the more memorable of the graffiti that appeared all over Paris during that tumultuous month – including one Wark has taken for title of book."
situationist  guydebord  malcolmmclaren  doing  psychogeography  france  1968  uk  marxism  ralphrumney  books  reviews  alexandertrocchi  attilakotányi  dérive  détournement  art  latecapitalism  capitalism  spectacle  class  willself  derive  mckenziewark 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Grey Area
"Grey Area changes the way games are understood as part of the life in the city. The Company was founded to create a breakthrough gaming experience using real world locations as the context for mobile games.

We see cities as playing fields, neighborhoods as front lines.

The core group comprises Mikko Hämäläinen, Andreas Karlsson, Teemu Tuulari and Ville Vesterinen with a network of world class investors and advisors. We are currently looking for more talent to join our team of 15. Regardless of where you reside, if you get games and just got interested, get in touch!"
games  gaming  greyarea  location  situationist  helsinki  urban  urbanism  play  iphone  ios  finland  shadowcities  psychogeography 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Shadow Cities, a New iPhone Video Game - Review - NYTimes.com
"I have played the future of mobile gaming. It is called Shadow Cities.

If you have an iPhone, you simply must try this game. Shadow Cities isn’t just the future of mobile gaming. It may actually be the most interesting, innovative, provocative and far-reaching video game in the world right now, on any system.

That’s a strong, perhaps outrageous, statement. But it’s merited because Shadow Cities delivers a radically fresh sort of engagement. Shadow Cities fully employs the abilities of the modern smartphone in the service of an entertainment experience that feels almost impossibly exciting and new."

"Until now games on phones and tablets have basically used those devices as small versions of traditional game machines; they did not allow you to play directly with other users in real time and they certainly took no note of where you were in the real world…

But in Shadow Cities the network and the real world it pervades become the game, which is so much more powerful."
iphone  ios  applications  shadowcities  via:adamgreenfield  situationist  place  games  gaming  toplay  2011  play  gps  location-based  location-aware  greyarea  psychogeography 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Between the By-Road and the Main Road: Being in the Middle: Learning Walks
"So imagine a commitment to learning that involved making regular learning walks with high school students as a normal part of the "school" day. Now, these learning walks should not be confused with walking tours, which are designed based on planned outcomes. One walks to point X in order to see object or artifact Y. The points are predetermined, hierarchical in design.

Instead, learning walks are rhizomatic. They are inherently about being in the middle of things and coming to learn what could not been predetermined. Learning walks are part of the "curriculum" for instructional seminar (which I described here)."

[My comments cross-posted here: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/7182110515/walking-and-learning ]
maryannreilly  comments  walking  walkshops  adamgreenfield  flaneur  psychogeography  derive  dérive  education  learning  schools  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  noticing  observation  seeing  2011  rhizomaticlearning  johnseelybrown  douglasthomas  unguided  self-directedlearning  serendipity  johnberger  willself  rebeccasolnit  sistercorita  maps  mapping  photography  alanfletcher  lawrenceweschler  kerismith  exploration  exploring  johnstilgoe  noticings  rjdj  ios  situationist  situatedlearning  situated  hototoki  serendipitor  flow  mihalycsikszentmihalyi  experience  control  ego  cv  coritakent 
july 2011 by robertogreco
No More Play: Los Angeles on the verge of a new era: Places: Design Observer
[now here: https://placesjournal.org/article/no-more-play/ ]

"Los Angeles has been compared to a laboratory — an urban ground for experiments both prescribed and accidental. Laboratory is a perfect word. Enveloping, chaotic and mutable, LA is a nocturnal workshop where the constant experiments leave no time to tidy up and reset the data in order to start fresh in the morning. In LA, you are both the experiment and the scientist. One is forced to be the object of fascination and fray, while simultaneously judging and monitoring the urban experiment…

what is the new identity for a city whose entire life has been marked by its ability and desire to endlessly expand? Perhaps the lack of perceptible hierarchies — or, likely, the reality that traditional thresholds and boundaries in this city are hidden and constantly transgressed — makes LA a difficult case study in the urban milieu…

As an evolving being, its dynamics make description difficult. Perhaps it is not a city — perhaps it can only be described as Los Angeles."
psychogeography  losangeles  hierarchy  hierarchies  cv  michaelmaltzan  architecture  urban  urbanism  history  cities  sprawl  2011  1992  limits  change  experimentation  maturation  density  levittown  future  present  design  jessicavarner  nomoreplay  iwanbaan 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Experiment | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"Would like a camera/location app that made something like these - something that acknowledged vistas, prospects, aspects etc... sort of photosynth meets psychogeography and wanderings"
mattjones  psychogeography  location  cameras  photography  photosynth  place 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Leigh Blackall: Situated art, situated learning - En Route by One Step At A Time Like This
"I think the artistic intent of these concepts could be enhanced with study of Joseph Beuys' work, particularly the Free International University, as well as Situationist International and their desire to create environments for discovering and appreciating the true value of things rather than their staged value.

All of this makes for excellent examples to add to my essay in progress on Ubiquitous Learning - a critique, where I'm trying to argue that the words ubiquity and learning have nothing inherently to do with technology, and are instead words of ethical dimension, so the phrase ubiquitous learning should become one more to do with an ethical approach or framework to learning, and not one suggesting a technological determination of it."
context  situated  situationist  leighblackall  comments  josephbeuys  newpublicthinkers  technology  art  situatedlearning  ubiquitouslearning  2837university  agitpropproject  agitprop  williamhanks  randallszott  colinward  learning  unschooling  deschooling  education  messiness  ethics  georgesiemens  curation  curating  curatorialteaching  connectivism  space  place  explodingschool  adamgreenfield  guydebord  enroute  street  urban  urbanism  cities  cityasclassroom  thecityishereforyoutouse  cv  lcproject  psychogeography  urbanscale  salrandolph  situatedart 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Neogeography - Wikipedia
"Neogeography literally means "new geography" (aka Volunteered Geographic Information), and is commonly applied to the usage of geographical techniques and tools used for personal and community activities or for utilization by a non-expert group of users. Application domains of neogeography are typically not formal or analytical.…

The term neogeography was first defined in its contemporary sense by Randall Szott on 7 April 2006, and elaborated on May 27, 2006. He argued for a broad scope, to include artists, psychogeography, and more. The technically-oriented aspects of the field, far more tightly defined than in Szott's definition, were outlined by Andrew Turner in his Introduction to Neogeography (O'Reilly, 2006). The contemporary use of the term, and the field in general, owes much of its inspiration to the locative media movement that sought to expand the use of location-based technologies to encompass personal expression and society."
design  mapping  geography  collaborative  slippymaps  gis  maps  cartography  location-based  psychogeography  randallszott  non-experts  amateur  amateurism  informal  community 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Sal Randolph
"…lives in NY & produces independent art projects involving internet-mediated gift economies, social architectures & 1-on-1 interactions…founder of Opsound, an open sound exchange of copyleft music (opsound.org). Other recent projects include The Free Biennial (freebiennial.org) & Free Manifesta (freemanifesta.org) which brought together several hundred artists in open shows of free art in public spaces of NY & Frankfurt am Main, as well as Free Words (freewords.org) in which 3000 copies of a free book have been infiltrated into bookstores & libraries worldwide by a network of volunteers…recent project Free Press created open access publishing house at Röda Sten Contemporary Art Space in Göteborg, Sweden…currently developing work in the areas of experiential & participatory art including a series of works where she gives away money…works w/ sound as situationalaudio & as member of band Weapons of Mass Destruction,…also part of the psychogeographical artist network, Glowlab."

[Also on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sal_Randolph ]
art  culture  urban  activism  situationist  psychogeography  glowlab  salrandolph  nyc  diy  participatory  sound  copyleft  music  del.icio.us  ncm  participatoryart 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Drift Deck
"Welcome to Drift Deck, a different sort of city guide. Think of it as a set of playing cards that help you playfully find your own, untouristy way through city streets. It's a set of simple cues, clues, actions, and provocations to see your way about the city, looking at it from a different angle. It will make you an active part of your own romp around.

Drift Deck will help you capture and share your discoveries. You'll be able to share your journey through the maps you make and the photos you take. Share your Drifts with others around the world! Be active, not passive. Enjoy."
situationist  driftdeck  exploration  derive  dérive  julianbleecker  dawnlozzi  jonbell  davidspencer  brucesterling  bencerveny  kevinslavin  katiesalen  janemcgonigal  ianbogost  janepinckard  urban  urbanism  ios  iphone  applications  cities  perspective  noticing  engagement  observation  interaction  serendipity  maps  mapping  photography  psychogeography  context  context-awareness  undesign  design  arttechnology  landscape  landscapeasinterface  play  games 
april 2011 by robertogreco
ANTONIO SERNA: www.antonioserna.com
"Antonio Serna is an artist working in New York City. His work has been exhibited in New York, Spain, Mexico, The Netherlands, and Texas. In the spring of 2010, he completed his MFA with Masters Seminar Professor Vito Acconci at Brooklyn College. Antonio has taught and lectured at Parsons School of Design, St. Johns University, and at Brooklyn College as a teaching fellow.

Additionally, Antonio has been fortunate enough to collaborate on several internet projects with seminal artistic figures in New York such as Laurie Anderson, David Byrne, and Trisha Brown."
antonioserna  nyc  davidbyrne  laurieanderson  trishabrown  art  situationist  cities  architecture  psychogeography 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Cryptoforestry
"Inner City Reforestation in Utrecht and the G/Local Amazon; Psychogeography is involved."

[from https://cryptoforest.blogspot.com/p/what-is-cryptoforest.html

"According to biological theory all properly drained lands left to themselves will eventually become forested as the final phase of ecological succession. It is not the whole story as forests do change overtime but for now it will do.

Cryptoforests are:
1) Feral forests (Planted tree zones, for instance along motorways, that have been allowed to become wild to the point that their wildness is outgrowing their manmadeness.)
2) In limbo forests (Tree-covered plots that feel like forests but technically probably aren't; states of vegetation for which lay-language has no name.)
3) Incognito Forests (Forests that have gone cryptic and are almost invisible, forests in camouflage, forests with a talent for being ignored.)
4) Precognitive forests (Lands that are on the brink of becoming forested, a future forest fata morgana.)
5) Unappreciated forests (Forests regarded as zones of waste and weed, forests shaming planners, developers, and the neighbourhood. NIMBY forestry.)

But! Based on personal observation, these are pointers only, not universally valid guidelines. The cryptoforest is a cultural and not a biological way to classify nature and the recognition of a cryptoforest is a visionary act, not a mechanical operation: there is no machine vision here. In this respect the 'cryptoforest' is no different from common, but ultimately ambiguous, terms like 'weed' or 'forest'. One UN forestry position paper (1) reports finding 950 different definitions for forest, some legal, some biological, some practical, some counter-intuitive, none of them trivial. According to some definitions a suburb can double as a lush jungle and according to others a forest doesn't need to contain a single tree. The etymology of the words 'forest' is instructive, it is derived from the Medieval Latin 'forestis (silva)' or 'outside (woods)': a forest is a wood (silva itself via 'silvaticor' leading to the word 'savage') of exclusively use to the crown, it's a kingdom inside a kingdom, a box inside a box with a licensed-to-kill royal guard at the gate. The 'for' of 'forest' reappears in 'foreigner', the forest, in other words, is a Neolithic twilight zone where social stratification is coloured green on the map. These old connotations carry over, laterally, into the cryptoforest project. Cryptoforests are social rejects, urban outsiders and cryptoforestry is an anarchic and primitivist 'art brut'.

In the first use of the word cryptoforests named fallowed islands of uncivilization that could serve as seeds and catalysts for full urban afforestation, but that is superficial thinking right there. The entire city is already a cryptoforest on the rebound. It might not casually show but the forest is right here, in the cracks between the pavement, waiting for an opportunity to break free. Weeds accept no authority and I have counted 15 different species of plants growing through the paving of a pool that had been waterless for three months, that's almost a complete bioregional botanic garden for free. Alejo Carpentier writes about 'the worm', a speculative force threatening every city in the rainforest. At the moment the city stops to resist this force it will be composted in days. "Something like a baleful pollen in the air - a ghost pollen - impalpable rot, enveloping decay - suddenly became active with mysterious design, opening what was closed, closing what was opened, upsetting calculations, contradicting specific gravity, making guarantees worthless. One morning the ampoules of serum in hospital were found to be full of mould; precision instruments were not registering correctly; certain liquors began to bubble in the bottle; the Rubens in the National Museum was attacked by an unknown parasite immune to sprays." The cryptoforest shows that this power is also present in moderate climates, with less brute force with but with equal stubbornness.

Cryptoforests are those parts of the city in which ‘nature’, in 'secret', has been given the space and the time to create its own millennia-millennia-old, everyday-everyday-new order mysteries by using the materials (seeds, roots, nutrients, soil conditions, waste, architectural debris) and conditions (urban micro-climates, soils, pollution) at hand. Cryptoforests are sideways glances at post-crash landscapes, diagrammatic enclaves through which future forest cities reveal their first shadows, laboratories for dada-do-nothingness, wild-type vegetable free states, enigma machines of uncivilized imagination, psychogeographical camera obscuras of primal fear and wanton desire, relay stations of lost ecological and psychological states. Cryptoforests are wild weed-systems, but wildness is equated not with chaos but with productiveness at a non-human level of organization. Citoyen: the diminutive cathedral effect of the high forest is absent in the cryptoforest, long live the cryptoforest. What starts with weed ends with a cryptoforest, and in between there is survivalism, with plants eking out a living against all odds, slowly but determinedly creating the conditions for the emergence of a network of biological relationships that is both flexible and stubborn, unique and redundant, fragile and resilient. Cryptoforests are honey pots for creatures that have no other place to go. Animals live there, the poor forage there, nomads camp there and the cryptoforester who has renounced the central planning commission re-creates there (free after Henri Thoreau). In the future, young people will no longer want to play in bands and they will become guerrilla gardeners and cryptoforesters instead.

Psychologically the forest has always been an upsetting force, a place of oppressing loneliness and deep silence, a territory of unspeakable dangers and dark secrets; it is where the witches live and the outlaws hide and where, following Joseph Conrad, an implacable force broods over inscrutable intentions. The ruined clear cut landscapes of the West have deprived us of truly understanding a part of our own selves. The cryptoforest is its own psychological category, a synthetic mind-state all its own. The fallow is a living landscape, the 'edible city' is already eaten and the cryptoforest is a lacuna managed by indifference and inability. Trails appear out of nowhere and reach into nothingness. Lone tents and make-shift pseudo-forest-Eskimo dwellings of the type Ray Mears shows you how to make on the Discovery Channel are often to be found and its anonymous occupants, you never find them at home, leave huge piles of garbage and their defecation attracts clouds of buzzing flies. I have the pictures to prove it. It is said that agriculture started with the observation that many desired species of plants and trees appeared near 'dumpheaps'. Waste is everywhere, brought in by the wind or illegally dumped. All year round people come in to collect wood and chop down trees for camp-fires. Some level of maintenance may be in process, perhaps once a year a cryptoforest is checked for dangerous situations or possible damage to fences or cables; perhaps soil samples are collected every three months; perhaps the grass is partly mowed. Hey, where does that spade suddenly come from? Total neglect, in our boorish nanny-state societies, can only exist under supervision. Stressing the cryptoforest as a zone of non-human independence would turn reality into a Ballardian garden fiction. The cryptoforest is the non-intentional artefact of the city, the semi-domesticate aura of Hercynia.

The cardinal rule of cryptoforestry is that you can't search for a cryptoforest. You stumble upon them, they are already right in front of you, you find them when you get lost or when you are on your way to an area where you suspect you will find one (but don’t). This is not me being pedantic: it is just how it is. A cryptoforest always appears larger from the inside than from the outside. Again this is not a mysticism but based on the realities of the sensory apparatus. With trees blocking your view and the horizon barred from view the natural tendency is to underestimate distance and the Cryptoforest appears vast. It takes determination to enter a cryptoforest, to find your way through a dense thicket, on a small, steep slope along one of the busiest motorways in the country, there is no trail, unsure where you will end up, every wrong step may snap your ankle, derelict gloom confronts you, travelling back to the end of tourism, spider webs glued to your forehead, your face plastered with sticky forest sweat, microscopic gnats crash into your forehead, thorns rip your clothes, nettles attack your bare skin and, no, you best not worry too much about that bloodsucking dementor of the cryptoforest: the tick. You will be scratching your back for the rest of the afternoon but it is as the Fight-The-Google-Jugend savage said: "don't come here and complain to us about the mosquitoes, go back to your air-conditioned room and stay there!" The cryptoforest is not there to entertain us, and the insects and the various thorny bushes are its first line of defence against intruders. The insects are an obvious source of discomfort and a good population of them will shy away any half-hearted visitor. The aggressive, immensely fast growing blackberry, its dense clutter of branches spiked with long painful thorns are an underrated architectonic force creating pathways and blocking access to the backstage of the Cryptoforest. The willingness to confront these obstacles with a sense of good humour is the litmus test for any aspiring cryptoforester. If you are ready to confront the cryptoforest on its own terms, if you are ready to become a 'practitioner of the wild' (after Gary Snyder), you will find that all cryptoforests offer a unique experience that can translate into an ethical and artistic proposition. Find them, enter them, take your friends there, be careful, become a native. You never know what … [more]
psychogeography  urbanism  urban  history  maps  culture  utrecht  williamhoujebek  cryptoforestry  cryptoforests  culturehacking  situationist  derive  dérive 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Re-Inscribing the City: Unitary Urbanism Today
"In the late 50s up until about the end of the 60s a group of rebels and artists known as the Lettrist/Situationist International (LI/SI) made a desperate attempt to re-imagine the city so that its inhabitants could break free from the bleak urban routine of work and consumption. During this period numerous strategies were developed under the name of "Unitary Urbanism." This panel reflects on the historical importance of these strategies in order to critically examine how they relate to their own work, and the possible uses and subversive potential of these practices today."
situationist  readinglists  urban  urbanism  anarchism  events  via:adamgreenfield  2011  nyc  unitaryurbanism  cities  1960s  1950s  lettrist  art  rebellion  history  ethanspigland  adeolaenigbokan  dillondegive  blakemorris  thewalkstudygroup  williamhoujebek  antonioserna  guydebord  psychogeography  derive  dérive 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Archiving the City
"Archiving the City is an archive of urban experience, concerned with how researchers interested in the sensations, perceptions, aesthetics and politics of living in cities today might expand their methods beyond the traditional tools accepted in the social sciences. Archiving the City is a peek inside one researcher’s field notebook."
urbanism  architecture  design  archivingthecity  urban  threory  situationist  sensations  perception  geography  experience  urbanplanning  research  via:adamgreenfield  anarchism  adeolaenigbokan  humangeography  psychogeography  nyc  environmentalpsychology  environment  urbanstudies  mediastudies  sociology  anthropology  cities 
april 2011 by robertogreco
INTHECONVERSATION: Notes on Social Architectures as Art Forms by Sal Randolph
"To put it differently, sculpture and architecture can both be meaningful, but they typically mean in different ways. Nicholas Bourriaud, in his more recent book Postproduction offers, "why wouldn't the meaning of a work have as much to do with the use one makes of it as with the artists intentions for it." Or, Bourriaud again, quoting Tiravanija, quoting Wittgenstein: "Don't look for the meaning, look for the use.""
wittgenstein  architecture  urban  psychogeography  design  art  socialarchitectures  salrandolph  nicholasbourriaud  josephbeuys  johncage  dadaism  alankaprow  fluxus  gutai  situationist  performance  performanceart  rirkrittiravanija  johndewey  robertirwin  perception  consciousness  niklasluhmann  structure  urbanism  communication  audience  observation 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Situationist App By Benrik
[Now banned by the iTunes Store]

"What is Situationist? Situationist is an iPhone app that makes your everyday life more thrilling and unpredictable. It alerts members to each other's proximity and gets them to interact in random "situations". These situations vary from the friendly "Hug me for 5 seconds exactly" or "Compliment me on my haircut", to the subversive eg "Help me rouse everyone around us into revolutionary fervour and storm the nearest TV station". Members simply upload their photo and pick the situations they want to happen to them from a shortlist, in the knowledge that they might then occur anywhere, and at any time.

Who is behind it? Benrik, artists and authors of the cult bestselling "Diary Will Change Your Life" series."

[via: http://thenextweb.com/apps/2011/03/07/dont-like-strangers-situationist-for-the-iphone-wants-to-change-that/ ]
iphone  ios  situationist  behavior  applications  art  derive  flaneur  dérive  psychogeography 
march 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm
"CITYterm, a semester program for thirty intellectually adventuresome juniors and seniors in high school, makes New York City its Laboratory and Classroom.

At CITYterm you will explore the city. You will immerse yourself in the city's five boroughs, connecting with them. You will meet authors, city officials, historians, urban planners, the homeless. you will come to understand New York City, its inhabitants and your own learning potential, returning to your home school ready to embark upon new adventures."
nyc  cityterm  classtrips  conferences  teaching  experientiallearning  education  cities  lcproject  cv  exploration  urban  urbanism  psychogeography  classideas  fieldtrips  highschool  learning  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  residential  camps  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary 
february 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm: Admission » Admitted Students » Outside Lies Magic
"Get out now. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people at the end of our century. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run. Forget about blood pressure and arthritis, cardiovascular rejuvenation and weight reduction. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore.

Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now, and seek out the resting place of a technology almost forgotten. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings.

Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around--the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic."
architecture  books  via:britta  johnstilgoe  pedestrians  walking  biking  bikes  psychogeography  noticing  learning  landscape  classideas  openstudio  classtrips  fieldtrips  bighere  exploration  looking  cities  urban  urbanism  builtenvironment  visibility  meandering  deliberate 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Shadowed Spaces - Arika™ | Underground Music | Film Festivals | Tours
"There are places in the towns and cities where you live that exist not by planned design, but by circumstance. Their elusive ambience attracts those with nowhere else to go, and those who wish to go elsewhere.

overlooked bypassed unwatched detached unconsidered shadowed

They offer respites from society and routine. They are found by necessity, by those driven by desire, more than destination. Shadowed Spaces is a tour of nooks and crannies like these, in your towns and cities: forgotten steps that lead nowhere, alleyways, old railway tunnels. We’ll place musical performances in these spaces that will hopefully help us to think about the continued need for a sense of privacy in public."
architecture  psychogeography  space  foucault  via:javierarbona  michelfoucault 
january 2011 by robertogreco
space clearing (15 Jan., 2011, at Interconnected)
"Constrained walks and the dérive both reveal the city's psychogeography, and force the city to give up more of itself. It's funny to find, right on my doorstep, the streets I didn't know that I didn't know, the ones I'd got the unknown habit of avoiding. The city grows.

Space clearing makes visible and disrupts the psychogeography of my home. By standing in far corners, I find new perspectives. I strengthen rarely visited spots in my own mental map. Later, I find myself noticing the corners more. My house looks larger. The changed shape of my rooms encourages me to walk differently about the space. I stand in slightly unfamiliar spots, look at my bookshelves with a new-found unfamiliarity, and this prompts new combinations of titles to come to my attention, and new ideas.

I wonder if I could make something to do this for me? Maybe a robot vacuum cleaner programmed to find rarely visited corners and play an attention-grabbing sample, hey, over here, over here."
space  perspective  mattwebb  situationist  dérive  psychogeography  robots  constraints  flaneur  cities  homes  spaceclearing  mentalmaps  mapping  maps  attention  2011  derive 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Shadow Cities | Your city is a game.
"Step in. Take the role of a modern mage, learn magic and see your surroundings with new eyes. Hunt Shadow Spirits and use spells and strategy to battle for the control of your city with other players.

Shadow Cities is a new location based MMORPG for iPhone. Neighborhoods and familiar streets are part of the game world that is visible to you through your iPhone. Your city is a game."
games  gaming  psychogeography  augmentedreality  iphone  mmorpg  geospatial  mobile  locative  location  pervasive  gps  shadowcities  ios  applications  location-based  location-aware  ar 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Conquer The Neighborhood With Your iPhone — The Pop-Up City
"Described as the next step in social gaming, Shadow Cities is a location-based Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG) that takes the urban environment as platform. Neighborhoods and familiar streets are part of the game world that is visible on the screen of the iPhone. Familiar to the purpose of psychogeographic games such as Serendipitor, Shadow Cities enables its players to explore their surroundings with new eyes. It combines local, location aware gaming with global web gaming and aims to attach new meaning to once mundane places, “as you learn their magical properties. Your office building might just be the most important spot in the whole city”. Every city in the world transforms into a battle arena."
gaming  mmorpg  psychogeography  iphone  application  location  situationist  ios  serendipitor  shadowcities  cities  pop-upcity  urban  urbanism  greyarea 
november 2010 by robertogreco
What colour is the 11 route? | 11 11 11
"This year I decided to see what colour the outer circle was. I’ve been fascinated with an iPhone app called Color Identifier that does nothing else but read out the colours it detects in the centre of the camera’s sensor — based first on RGB values and then this list of colour names.

I sat on the top deck of the bus and angled the camera so the colours it was reading were around eye-level for someone on the pavement. A bit like this:

The headphone output of the phone was linked up to a recorder, recording it in real-time. The app reads a new colour about every three seconds…

So here’s what colour the outer circle is:

A beautifully relaxing two-plus hours of spoken word (please feel free to download and make your own interpretation)."
color  psychogeography  place  buses  audio  iphone  applications  cameras  coloridentifier  ios 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Serendipitor
"Serendipitor is an alternative navigation app for the iPhone that helps you find something by looking for something else. The app combines directions generated by a routing service (in this case, the Google Maps API) with instructions for action and movement inspired by Fluxus, Vito Acconci, and Yoko Ono, among others. Enter an origin and a destination, and the app maps a route between the two. You can increase or decrease the complexity of this route, depending how much time you have to play with. As you navigate your route, suggestions for possible actions to take at a given location appear within step-by-step directions designed to introduce small slippages and minor displacements within an otherwise optimized and efficient route. You can take photos along the way and, upon reaching your destination, send an email sharing with friends your route and the steps you took."

[See also: http://vimeo.com/14205766 AND http://serialconsign.com/2010/09/out-wayfinding-serendipitor AND http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/09/serendipitor-gives-maps-and-navigation-a-gaming-layer/ ]
serendipity  wayfinding  maps  iphone  applications  serendipitor  mapping  discovery  exploration  vitoacconci  yokoono  fluxus  psychogeography  situationist  meandering  flaneur  derive  dérive  ios 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Scientific Commons: Sigur Rós's Heima: An Icelandic Psychogeography (2009), 2009 [Tony Mitchell]
[now here: https://opus.lib.uts.edu.au/handle/10453/10567 ]

[PDF: https://opus.lib.uts.edu.au/bitstream/10453/10567/1/2008008719OK.pdf ]

"examines sonic geography of…Sigur Rós w/ particular reference to Heima, which documents tour…of remote places in home country. Known for causing people to faint or burst into tears during concerts, music could be said to express sonically both isolation of Icelandic location & induce feeling of hermetic isolation in listener through climactic & melodic intensity of sound…Singing both in Icelandic & invented language Hopelandic (vonlenska), Jónsi, gay & blind in one eye, channels a striking form of glossolalia in vocals…group acknowledges strong degree of Icelandic animism in music…have referred to ‘presence of mortality’ in Icelandic landscape & links to stories, sagas, magic & ritual in remote country where ‘majority…believes in elves & power spots…invisible world is always w/ us’…create geomorphic soundscapes which transport active listener into imaginary world…bass player Georg Holm, who is demophobic, has stated, ‘we provide colors & frame & you paint the picture'"

[via: http://twitter.com/ballardian/status/24613154409 ]
glossolalia  vonlenska  sigurros  heima  iceland  music  psychogeography  inventedlanguages  language  emotion  fear  demophobia  sound  animism  landscape  sagas  magic  ritual  mortality  soundscapes  geomorphicsoundscapes  jouissance  identity  myth  isolation  sigurrós  rituals 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Spots Unknown
"Forgotten places, events, and histories of San Francisco."
bayarea  sanfrancisco  photography  psychogeography  history  travel 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Serendipity Cities: Of services and situations « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"One of these days, somebody clever is going to figure out how to use mobile services to bring this effortlessly connectionist logic back to street life. With any luck, they turn out to be a way back to the bracing air of possibility the simple act of being on a great metropolitan sidewalk once entrained.

In fact, if done with any verve to speak of, I can see such services giving rise to the moments of heightened awareness and potential I associate with Situationist rhetoric, those precious intervals during which some fortuitous alignment of people, place and circumstance reminds you what life is for and why it’s worth the effort. (For those of us who savor such ironies, it would be particularly delicious if the final triumph and apotheosis of the flaky, incoherent Parisian left of the Sixties was delivered on the shoulders of systems like GPS and the Internet, originally devised, designed and deployed by the military-industrial apparatus for its own ends.)"
adamgreenfield  serendipity  iphone  applications  gps  janejacobs  situationist  online  web  urban  cities  urbanism  psychogeography  ios 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The urban age: how cities became our greatest design challenge yet | Justin McGuirk | Art and design | guardian.co.uk
"The question is this: how do we create cities that are not just containers for tightly-packed populations, but pleasant and equitable places to live? Someone once described the identical high-rises that ring so many capitals as the easyJet of urban living, because they offer everyone affordable access to the city; but they're not what you could call idealistic. The segregation and social polarisation of cities is getting so extreme that a violent future may be inevitable. The UN report has said as much. Now that city-making has become a priority, politicians need to have faith in designers. Because if there's one lesson to be learned from the last quarter of a century, it's that we need to shift our focus away from liberty and the free market, and move towards equality."
psychogeography  cities  architecture  2010  design  urbanplanning  urbanism  urban  trends  innovation  models  future  equality  brucemau 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Place Hacking | Savage Minds
"I rapped with reformed archaeologist Bradley L. Garrett regarding his recent visual ethnographic fieldwork about urban exploration. Here’s what we talked about, all images are his."
via:adamgreenfield  psychogeography  deleuze  cities  urban  urbanism  urbanexploration  anthropology  capitalism  activism  geography  exploration  parkour  ruins  theory  gillesdeleuze 
january 2010 by robertogreco
The City Is A Battlesuit For Surviving The Future - Future metro - io9
"If you'll excuse the spoiler, the zenith of Hawksmoor's adventures with cities come when he finds the purpose behind the modifications - he was not altered by aliens but by future humans in order to defend the early 21st century against a time-travelling 73rd century Cleveland gone berserk. Hawksmoor defeats the giant, monstrous sentient city by wrapping himself in Tokyo to form a massive concrete battlesuit.

Cities are the best battlesuits we have.

It seem to me that as we better learn how to design, use and live in cities - we all have a future."
design  mattjones  technology  urbanplanning  architecture  urbanism  scifi  postarchitectural  psychology  cities  archigram  comics  urban  future  danhill  adamgreenfield  janejacobs  warrenellis  christopherwren  psychogeography  kevinslavin  detroit  nyc  dubai  mumbai  masdrcity  fiction  film  spacesuits  battlesuits 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: Invisible Infrastructure
"When I’m not in a rush to get somewhere, I look up at the tops of telephone poles. I don’t know anything about electricity, but I find myself reading glossaries of linemen’s slang and technical definitions, learning how to refer to the grey buckets that transform electricity for home use (cans, bugs, distribution transformers) and how to identify several other pole features, especially different varieties of shiny ceramic insulators. ... In my classes about the metropolis, we've talked a lot about how the city is equally the physical place where you live and walk + a phantasmagoria, your imaginary version of the city consisting of dreams and memories and idealized stories (which is part of the collective imagination shared by everyone who thinks about that city)."
psychogeography  cities  walking  experience  tcsnmy  memory  infrastructure  place  meaning  glvo  imagination  dreams  phantasmagoria  brittagustafson 
july 2009 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Bloomsday
"That is, should you want to describe a man's walk around the city in as detailed and realistic a way as possible, capturing every minor event and instant, then you would have to include the circumstances of that walk in their often bewildering totality: every fragmentary thought process, directionless flight of fancy, and irrelevant detail noticed along the way, via a million and one dead-ends. Things remembered and then forgotten. Deja vu.

That daydream you had early today? That was, Ulysses suggests, part of the infrastructure of the city you live in.

The city here becomes a kind of experiential labyrinth: it is something you walk through, certainly, but it is also something that rears up mythically to consume the thoughts of everyone residing within it."

AND

"Inspired by Bloomsday, then, it seems well-timed to ask not only how our cities can best be mapped – and if narrative is, in fact, the ideal cartographic strategy – but what other physical possibilities exist for narrative expression. Put another way: what if James Joyce had been raised in an era of cheap 3D printers?
After all, given the possibilities outlined above, we might even someday be justified in concluding that Dublin itself is a written text, and that Ulysses is simply its most famous translation."
bldgblog  jamesjoyce  ulysses  flaneur  urbanism  psychogeography  architecture  design  cities  dublin  literature  information  geography  cartography  maps  mapping  fabrication  fabbing  books  experience  narrative 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Anti-teenager “pink lights to show up acne” :: Dan Lockton
"In a similar vein to the Mosquito, intentionally shallow steps (and, superficially at least–though not really–blue lighting in toilets, which Raph d’Amico dissects well here), we now have residents’ associations installing pink lighting to highlight teenagers’ acne and so drive them away from an area:"
design  technology  architecture  children  psychogeography  space  teens  youth  lights  acne  control  security 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Snowblog - The ExCeL centre is the land that God forgot
"Travelling in here on the security-strewn media buses, I wondered how a Mexican or a Brazilian, or indeed a German or a Frenchman would view this taste of England. Imagine if your only glimpse of Europe was this ghastly pile of metal and concrete. You would think that development meant some voyage into outer Hades."

[via: http://magicalnihilism.wordpress.com/2009/04/02/psychogeog20/ ]
architecture  politics  london  excel  channel4  jonsnow  2009  psychogeography  g20 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Rhizome | Media Studies: Experimental Geography Reading List
"The following is an initial list of readings that might be of interest to anyone researching experimental geography. It includes key theoretical texts on the nature of space, texts on locative media, and works on radical cartography. Many of them cross over into game theory, cyberfeminism, relations between real and virtual spaces, surveillance, tactical media, psychogeography, situationism, sound art, networked cultures, site-specific installation art, and other related sub-themes. It's tempting to sort these into temporal or topical categories, but to do so might be to inappropriately compartmentalize an ongoing discourse that moves in new directions every day."
art  architecture  mapping  geography  cartography  psychogeography  experimentalgeography  academia  bibliography  maps  visualization  urban  cities  books  urbanism  activism 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The Demon-Haunted World
"I want to talk about cities, and “practical city magic” City Magic is a phrase I use a lot - I have a whole bunch of things tagged with ‘City Magic’ on delicious. Where next? It comes from a comic book I love called “The Invisibles” by Grant Morrison... Where next?"
mattjones  technology  ubicomp  everyware  psychogeography  urbancomputing  architecture  urban  cities  geography  local  location-based  location-aware  culture  infrastructure  archigram  presentation  2009  talk  webstock  gamechanging  future  pivotalmoments  mobile  phones  architects  design  history  networks  socialsoftware  situationist  botanicalls  behavior  environment  sustainability  exploration  urbanism  landscape  awareness  nuagevert  bignow  longhere 
february 2009 by robertogreco
The City From Below | The City From Below - March 27th-29th, 2009 Baltimore
"The city has emerged in recent years as an indispensable concept for many of the struggles for social justice we are all engaged in [...] In cities everywhere, new social movements are coming into being, hidden histories and herstories are being uncovered, and unanticipated futures are being imagined and built - but so much of this knowledge remains, so to speak, at street-level. We need a space to gather and share our stories, our ideas and analysis, a space to come together and rethink the city from below."
psychogeography  cities  urban  politics  urbanism  grassroots  design  education  culture  architecture  art  activism  development  planning  landscape  baltimore  precarity  conferences  space  via:migurski 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Flâneur - Wikipedia
"In the context of modern-day architecture and urban planning, designing for flâneurs is one way to approach issues of the psychological aspects of the built environment. Architect Jon Jerde, for instance, designed his Horton Plaza and Universal CityWalk projects around the idea of providing surprises, distractions, and sequences of events for pedestrians." ... "The most notable application of flâneur to street photography probably comes from Susan Sontag in her 1977 essay, On Photography. She describes how, since the development of hand-held cameras in the early 20th century, the camera has become the tool of the flâneur: "The photographer is an armed version of the solitary walker reconnoitering, stalking, cruising the urban inferno, the voyeuristic stroller who discovers the city as a landscape of voluptuous extremes. Adept of the joys of watching, connoisseur of empathy, the flâneur finds the world 'picturesque.' (pg. 55)""
situationist  photography  urban  urbanism  travel  philosophy  walking  art  culture  education  architecture  history  theory  baudelaire  flaneur  hortonplaza  sandiego  universalcitywalk  jonjerde  losangeles  psychogeography  observation  technology  susansontag  glvo  cv  via:blackbeltjones  derive  dérive 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Psychogeography - Wikipedia
"Psychogeography was defined in 1955 by Guy Debord as the "the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals."[1] Another definition is "a whole toy box full of playful, inventive strategies for exploring cities...just about anything that takes pedestrians off their predictable paths and jolts them into a new awareness of the urban landscape."[2] The most important of these strategies is the dérive."
psychogeography  situationist  cities  urban  urbanism  psychology  geography  place  maps  mapping  walking  socialsoftware  architecture  art  culture  community  collaboration  philosophy  guydebord  derive  flaneur  dérive 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Situationist International -- Constant
"New Babylon envisages a society of total automation in which the need to work is replaced with a nomadic life of creative play, in which traditional architecture has disintegrated along with the social institutions that it propped up. A vast network of enormous multilevel interior spaces propagates to eventually cover the planet. These interconnected "sectors" float above the ground on tall columns. While vehicular traffic rushes underneath and air traffic lands on the roof, the inhabitants drift by foot through the huge labyrinthine interiors, endlessly reconstructing the atmospheres of the spaces. Every aspect of the environment can be be controlled and reconfigured spontaneously. Social life becomes architectural play. Architecture becomes a flickering display of interacting desires."

[see also: http://www.artfacts.net/index.php/pageType/exhibitionInfo/exhibition/15904 ]
situationist  psychogeography  architecture  design  art  play  urbanism  utopia  newbabylon  theory  nomads  neo-nomads  leisure  creativity  place  space 
february 2009 by robertogreco
The Virtues of Godlessness - ChronicleReview.com
"It is a great socioreligious irony — for lack of a better term — that when we consider the fundamental values and moral imperatives contained within the world's great religions, such as caring for the sick, the infirm, the elderly, the poor, the orphaned, the vulnerable; practicing mercy, charity, and goodwill toward one's fellow human beings; and fostering generosity, humility, honesty, and communal concern over individual egotism — those traditionally religious values are most successfully established, institutionalized, and put into practice at the societal level in the most irreligious nations in the world today."
religion  sweden  denmark  psychogeography  psychology  happiness  ethics  culture  society  atheism  morality  belief  theology  philosophy 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Marie Lorenz
"My work combines psycho-geographic exploration (most prevalent in my ongoing project ‘The Tide and Current Taxi’) with highly crafted, material work (drawing,printmaking, and installation in visually based narratives). I use boats and navigation in my artwork to create an uncertain space. My belief is that uncertainty brings about a heightened awareness of place. When we feel unstable we see more. In my very first boat projects in the canals around Providence, Rhode Island, I was struck by the perspective that navigating a city waterway allows. We see the city from below street level. The people and cars are gone. The city seems empty and it allows an unusual encounter with architecture and structure."
psychogeography  geography  glvo  art  artists  boats  nyc  manhattan  community  water  taxi  sculpture  installation  landscape 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Gel Videos - Marie Lorenz
"Marie runs the Tide and Current Taxi, which takes passengers on a boat (that she hand-built) on voyages on New York City's East River ... with no planned destination. Her work touches on design, art, and community, which helped make it one of the most popular presentations at Gel '07."
art  video  marielorenz  glvo  gel  boats  nyc  manhattan  design  travel  psychogeography  geography 
december 2008 by robertogreco
A map is not the map - Les Liens Invisibles (2008)
"Comissioned by LX 2.0 - a project by Lisboa 20 Arte Contemporânea and curated by Luis Silva - Google Is Not The Map (GISNTM) is a collection of 35+ GeoPoeMaps, a series of works in which ordinary maps become the unusual surfaces used to disarticulate perception of the world, to trace new routes accross the boundaries and to draw new imaginary geometries of the possible."
maps  mapping  google  googlemaps  psychogeography  conceptual  cartography  design  art 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Drift Deck (Analog Edition)
"The Drift Deck (Analog Edition) is an algorithmic puzzle game used to navigate city streets. A deck of cards is used as instructions that guide you as you drift about the city. Each card contains an object or situation, followed by a simple action. For example, a situation might be — you see a fire hydrant, or you come across a pigeon lady. The action is meant to be performed when the object is seen, or when you come across the described situation. For example — take a photograph, or make the next right turn. The cards also contain writerly extras, quotes and inspired words meant to supplement your wandering about the city."
psychogeography  situationist  urbanism  travel  urban  arg  architecture  art  design  dérive  games  gaming  tcsnmy  classideas  julianbleecker  brucesterling  ianbogost  janemcgonigal  dawnlozzi  bencerveny  katiesalen  robbellm  driftdeck  derive 
november 2008 by robertogreco
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