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robertogreco : pugetsound   4

EarthCorps
"You may have heard in the news recently that People for Puget Sound – the preeminent voice for Puget Sound – has closed its doors. We are honored that People for Puget Sound turned to EarthCorps to take on their habitat restoration program.

EarthCorps has worked side-by-side with People for Puget Sound for more than 15 years. We collaborated on habitat restoration projects throughout Puget Sound, led thousands of volunteers together, shared GIS interns and international “externs,” presented together at national conferences, and tapped into each other's expertise. We have deep respect for their work.

EarthCorps has 20 years experience in community-based environmental restoration and is a leader in applied ecological science…"
local  restoration  pugetsound  earthcorps  ngo  via:steelemaley  green  servicelearning  environment  seattle 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Puget Sound River History Project
"The Puget Sound River History Project studies the historical landscape of Puget Sound's lowland rivers and estuaries as a dynamically linked geophysical, ecological, and human system. The historical emphasis is on conditions at the time of earliest Euro-American settlement in the mid-19th century, but also includes the landscape's post-glacial, Holocene (10,000 yrs BP) evolution and the last century and a half of change. We undertake interdisciplinary research that integrates archival investigations, field studies, and the tools of geographic information systems and remote sensing. We also apply the results to, and make data available for, regional problems of resource management, restoration and planning."
earthscience  quaternary  holocene  geology  geography  landscape  water  cascadia  pugetsound  washingtonstate  history 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Car Capacity Is Not Sacred | PubliCola - Seattle's News Elixir [via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/1102798385]
"The crucial point is that car infrastructure not only encourages driving, it also sabotages mobility by any other means. It’s a vicious cycle: roads beget sprawl begets car dependence begets roads, and so on. And the result is an ever-expanding built environment in which walking, biking, and transit are not viable options.

The only way to break the vicious cycle is to invest our limited transportation dollars in infrastructure that will help make walking, biking, and transit more attractive than driving. And here’s where we need to start being honest with ourselves: If we are serious about creating a city in which significant numbers of trips are made by modes other than cars, then we will have to accept that driving will become less convenient than it is today."
cars  bikes  pedestrians  walking  biking  transit  transportation  energy  cities  policy  money  infrastructure  capacity  seattle  pugetsound  washingtonstate  convenience  change  cardependence  carcapacity 
september 2010 by robertogreco

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