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robertogreco : python   47

GitHub - jkriss/zinepdf
"This is a short Python 2 script that will take a 7-8 page pdf, legal size, and turn it into a single sheet foldable zine."
jessekriss  python  zines  papernet  typesetting  printing  print 
28 days ago by robertogreco
Webrecorder
"Webrecorder is a web archiving service anyone can use for free to save web pages. Making a capture is as easy as browsing a page like you normally would. Webrecorder automatically archives the page, along with any additional content triggered by interactions.

This open-source project is brought to you by Rhizome at the New Museum.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is lead supporter of the Webrecorder initiative. Additional outreach and research is made possible by the Knight Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services."
onlinetoolkit  rhizome  archives  archiving  python  tools  archive  web  internet  via:soulellis 
january 2019 by robertogreco
CoCalc - Collaborative Calculation in the Cloud
"CoCalc is a sophisticated online environment for

• Mathematical calculation: SageMath, GAP, SymPy, Maxima, …;
• Statistics and Data Science: R Project, Pandas, Statsmodels, Scikit-Learn, TensorFlow, NLTK, …;
• Document authoring: LaTeX, Markdown/HTML, ...
• General purpose computing: Python, Octave, Julia, Scala, …

Zero Setup: getting started does not require any software setup.

1. First, create your personal account.
2. Then, create a project to instantiate your own private workspace.
3. Finally, create a worksheet or upload your own files: CoCalc supports online editing of Jupyter Notebooks, Sage Worksheets, LaTeX files, etc.

Collaborative Environment

• Share your files privately with project collaborators — all files are synchronized in real-time.
• Time-travel is a detailed history of all your edits and everything is backed up in consistent snapshots.
• Finally, you can select any document to publish it online.

A default project under a free plan has a quota of 1.0 GB memory and 3.0 GB of disk space. Subscriptions make hosting more robust and increase quotas."
computing  collaboration  cloud  math  python  latex  chromebooks 
august 2018 by robertogreco
A Matter of Perspective | somethingaboutmaps
"Today I wanted to share with you a little project of mine from a few months ago, which may best be described by the question: What happens if you take the shoreline of a lake, cut it, and unfurl it?"
maps  mapping  math  mathematics  geography  python  via:vruba  cartography  danielhuffman 
october 2015 by robertogreco
PLAY Stories: An Interview With John Marshall
"John Marshall's latest project (with rootoftwo) is a weather vane built for the 21st Century: a headless chicken that tracks and responds to Internet “fear levels”. Five of these Whithervanes are installed on the highest points of five buildings in Folkestone, UK for the 2014 Folkestone Triennial (30 August – 2 November)."



"The chickens are four feet tall and made of polyurethane foam coated in polyester resin. Each is controlled by a credit-card sized computer that connects to the Internet and listens in real-time to news reports uploaded by journalists from around the world.

When a report comes in, the computer reads it and works out the GPS coordinates where the event happened. It then calculates the direction and distance of the event from Folkestone. The computer then reads the rest of the report, cross-checking the text with the list of keywords and phrases the Department of Homeland Security uses to monitor social networking sites for terrorist threats. The computer also looks for keywords and phrases gathered in a series of workshops we did with the people of Folkestone about what they are afraid of. The keyword list includes threats as diverse as: race riots, gastro tourists, unemployment and dog poo.

The intensity of fear is indicated by changing colored lighting and the number of spins each chicken makes. There are five levels of fear: 1. Low (Green), 2. Guarded (Blue), 3. Elevated (Yellow), 4. High (Orange) and 5. Severe (Red) - the same as the Homeland Security National Terrorism Advisory System. The five chickens revolve away from the location of each news story."



"Every Whithervane has the same list of keywords and phrases, but each has a unique "score" associated with the terms that reflect the aggregate values of the people that live in each neighborhood where the chickens are located. The "scores" have been weighted using marketing tools based on UK census data that are typically used for targeting junk mail. The computer does a calculation that considers the level of fear in the story for the local population and the distance of the event from Folkestone. For example, the same story about immigration from the European Union will have a different level of fear for different neighborhoods. Folkestone is the first point of entry in the UK for visitors arriving via the Channel Tunnel - this makes for some very complicated local opinions.

The public can also influence the individual Whithervanes by Tweeting to @whithervanes #keepcalm (to reduce) or #skyfalling (to increase) the ambient fear level in the system. If they don't have a Twitter account we have built a website where you can submit a Tweet by clicking a button. There are public access terminals in the Triennial visitor's center in Folkestone."
johnmarshall  art  weathervanes  internet  fear  2014  news  twitter  rootoftwo  whitervanes  python  raspberrypi  projectideas  bigdata 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Arbitrary Names / Fake is the new real
"A twitter account that contains a stream of fictional, but likely names. Built using a list of name distributions provided by the US Census, these names function as a regular reminder of the millions of strangers that we will never meet, as a preemptive memorial. The software used to build generate the names is available as open source."
names  naming  bots  twitter  random  namegenerator  python  neilfreeman  2014 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Border Check
"What is Border Check?

Border Check (BC) is a browser extension that maps how your data moves across the internet’s infrastructure while you surf the web. It will show you through which countries and networks you surf to illustrate the physical and political realities of the internet’s infrastructure. using free software tools.
It maps the internet

Why is this relevant?

As one surfs the net, data packets are sent from the user’s computer to the target server. These data packets go on a journey hopping from server to server, potentially crossing multiple countries, until the packets reach the desired website. In each of the countries that are passed different laws and practices can apply to the data, influencing whether or not authorities can inspect, store or modify that data.

Who?

Border Check is a project by Roel Roscam Abbing. Programming by Lord Epsylon. Design by Bart Van Haren. BC was developed during Summer Sessions 2013 with with the support of V2_ Institute For The Unstable Media at Laboral Centro De Arte and the MP19 Openlab. It uses Python, OpenStreetMap, Leaflet and others."
data  borders  bordercheck  infrastructure  roelroscamabbing  lordepsylon  bartvanharen  openstreetmap  osm  python  firefox  chrome  safari  browsers  extensions  plugins  addons  browser 
december 2013 by robertogreco
dan/hivelogic-flickrtouchr · GitHub
"A Python script to grab all your photos from flickr and dump them into a directory, organized into folders by set name."
flickr  backup  python  via:maxfenton 
november 2013 by robertogreco
In Defense of Messiness: David Weinberger and the iPad Summit - EdTech Researcher - Education Week
[via: http://willrichardson.com/post/67746828029/the-limitations-of-the-ipad ]

"We were very lucky today to have David Weinberger give the opening address at our iPad Summit in Boston yesterday. We've started a tradition at the iPad Summit that our opening keynote speaker should know, basically, nothing about teaching with iPads. We don't want to lead our conversation with technology, we want to lead with big ideas about how the world is changing and how we can prepare people for that changing world.

Dave spoke drawing on research from his most recent book, Too Big To Know: How the Facts are not the Facts, Experts are not Experts, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room.

It's hard to summarize a set of complex ideas, but at the core of Dave's argument is the idea that our framing of "knowledge," the metaphysics of knowledge (pause: yes, we start our iPad Summit with discussions of the metaphysics of knowledge), is deeply intertwined with the technology we have used for centuries to collect and organize knowledge: the book. So we think of things that are known as those that are agreed upon and fixed--placed on a page that cannot be changed; we think of them as stopping places--places for chapters to end; we think of them as bounded--literally bounded in the pages of a book; we think of them as organized in a single taxonomy--because each library has to choose a single place for the physical location of each book. The limitations of atoms constrained our metaphysics of knowledge.

We then encoded knowledge into bits, and we began to discover a new metaphysics of knowledge. Knowledge is not bound, but networked. It is not agreed, but debated. It is not ordered, but messy.

A changing shape of knowledge demands that we look seriously at changes in educational practice. For many educators at the iPad Summit, the messiness that David sees as generative the emerging shape of knowledge reflects the messiness that they see in their classrooms. As Holly Clark said in her presentation, "I used to want my administrators to drop in when my students were quiet, orderly, and working alone. See we're learning! Now I want them to drop in when we are active, engaged, collaborative, loud, messy, and chaotic. See, we're learning!"

These linkages are exactly what we hope can happen when we start our conversations about teaching with technology by leading with our ambitions for our students rather than leading with the affordances of a device.

I want to engage David a little further on one point. When I invited David to speak, he said "I can come, but I have some real issues with iPads in education." We talked about it some, and I said, "Great, those sound like serious concerns. Air them. Help us confront them."

David warned us again this morning "I have one curmudgeonly old man slide against iPads," and Tom Daccord (EdTechTeacher co-founder) and I both said "Great." The iPad Summit is not an Apple fanboygirl event. At the very beginning, Apple's staff, people like Paul Facteau, were very clear that iPads were never meant to be computer replacements--that some things were much better done on laptops or computes. Any educator using a technology in their classroom should be having an open conversation about the limitations of their tools.

Tom then gave some opening remarks where he said something to the effect of "The iPad is not a repository of apps, but a portable, media creation device." If you talk to most EdTechTeacher staff, we'll tell you that with an iPad, you get a camera, microphone, connection to the Internet, scratchpad, and keyboard--and a few useful apps that let you use those things. (Apparently, there are all kinds of people madly trying to shove "content" on the iPad, but we're not that interested. For the most part, they've done a terrible job.)

Dave took the podium and said in his introductory remarks, "There is one slide that I already regret." He followed up with this blog post, No More Magic Knowledge [http://www.hyperorg.com/blogger/2013/11/14/2b2k-no-more-magic-knowledge/ ]:
I gave a talk at the EdTechTeacher iPad Summit this morning, and felt compelled to throw in an Angry Old Man slide about why iPads annoy me, especially as education devices. Here's my List of Grievances:
• Apple censors apps
• iPads are designed for consumers. [This is false for these educators, however. They are using iPad apps to enable creativity.]
• They are closed systems and thus lock users in
• Apps generally don't link out
That last point was the one that meant the most in the context of the talk, since I was stressing the social obligation we all have to add to the Commons of ideas, data, knowledge, arguments, discussion, etc.
I was sorry I brought the whole thing up, though. None of the points I raised is new, and this particular audience is using iPads in creative ways, to engage students, to let them explore in depth, to create, and to make learning mobile.

I, for one, was not sorry that Dave brought these issues up. There are real issues with our ability as educators to add to the Commons through iPads. It's hard to share what you are doing inside a walled garden. In fact, one of the central motivations for the iPad Summit is to bring educators together to share their ideas and to encourage them to take that extra step to share their practice with the wider world; it pains me to think of all of the wheels being reinvented in the zillions of schools that have bought iPads. We're going to have to hack the garden walls of the iPad to bring our ideas together to the Common.

The issue of the "closedness" of iPads is also critical. Dave went on to say that one limitation of the iPad is that you can't view source from a browser. (It's not strictly true, but it's a nuisance of a hack--see here or here.) From Dave again:

"Even though very few of us ever do peek beneath the hood -- why would we? -- the fact that we know there's an openable hood changes things. It tells us that what we see on screen, no matter how slick, is the product of human hands. And that is the first lesson I'd like students to learn about knowledge: it often looks like something that's handed to us finished and perfect, but it's always something that we built together. And it's all the cooler because of that."

I'd go further than you can't view source: there is no command line. You can't get under the hood of the operating system, either. You can't unscrew the back. Now don't get wrong, when you want to make a video, I'm very happy to declare that you won't need to update your codecs in order to get things to compress properly. Simplicity is good in some circumstances. But we are captive to the slickness that Dave describes. Let's talk about that.

A quick tangent: Educators come up to me all the time with concerns that students can't word process on an iPad--I have pretty much zero concern about this. Kids can write papers using Swype on a smartphone with a cracked glass. Just because old people can't type on digitized keyboards doesn't mean kids can't (and you probably haven't been teaching them touch-typing anyway).

I'm not concerned that kids can't learn to write English on an iPad, I'm concerned they can't learn to write Python. If you believe that learning to code is a vital skill for young people, then the iPad is not the device for you. The block programming languages basically don't work. There is no Terminal or Putty or iPython Notebook. To teach kids to code, they need a real computer. (If someone has a robust counter-argument to that assertion, I'm all ears.) We should be very, very clear that if we are putting all of our financial eggs in the iPad basket, there are real opportunities that we are foreclosing.

Some of the issues that Dave raises we can hack around. Some we can't. The iPad Summit, all technology-based professional development, needs to be a place where we talk about what technology can't do, along with what it can.

Dave's keynote about the power of open systems reminds us that knowledge is networked and messy. Our classrooms, and the technologies we use to support learning in our classrooms, should be the same. To the extent that the technologies we choose are closed and overly-neat, we should be talking about that.

Many thanks again to Dave for a provocative morning, and many thanks to the attendees of the iPad Summit for joining in and enriching the conversation."
justinreich  ipad  2013  ipadsummit  davidweinberger  messiness  learning  contructionism  howthingswork  edtech  computers  computing  coding  python  scratch  knowledge  fluidity  flux  tools  open  closed  walledgardens  cv  teaching  pedagogy  curriculum  tomdaccord  apple  ios  closedness  viewsource  web  internet  commons  paulfacteau  schools  education  mutability  plasticity 
november 2013 by robertogreco
RoboFont | The UFO Editor You Have Been Waiting For ;-)
"RoboFont is a UFO based, mac only, font editor.

Written from scratch in Python with scalability in mind.
The editor allows full scripting access to objects and interface.
The application is a platform for drawing and modifying
typefaces and much more... 

 

The tools you choose influence your creative process."
fonts  mac  python  software  typography  osx  via:robinsloan 
april 2013 by robertogreco
a beginners guide to streamed data from Twitter (tecznotes)
"This is a brief guide on using the Twitter live streaming API, extracting useful data from it, and converting that data into a spreadsheet-ready text form, all using tools available on Mac OS X by default. There’s also a brief Python tutorial for scrubbing basic data buried in here someplace."
2012  michalmigurski  howto  bigdata  streaming  data  python  api  twitter 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Remote Sensor Connections - Scratch Wiki
"Remote sensor connections is a feature allowing other programs to connect to Scratch. This allows it to be extended to connect to devices, access the internet, or perform other functions not possible inside Scratch. For example, JoyTail allows you to use a joystick with Scratch."
sensors  actionscript  flash  objective-c  processing  python  wiimote  edg  scratch 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Kartograph – rethink mapping
"Kartograph is a simple and lightweight framework for building interactive map applications without Google Maps or any other mapping service. It was created with the needs of designers and data journalists in mind.

Actually, Kartograph is two libraries. One generates beautiful & compact SVG maps; the other helps you to create interactive maps that run across all major browsers."

"Kartograph.py
A powerful Python library for generating beautiful, Illustrator-friendly SVG maps.

Kartograph.js
A JavaScript library for creating interactive maps based on Kartograph.py SVG maps."
webdev  framework  kartograph  via:jenlowe  dataviz  datavisualization  visualization  datavisualisation  javascript  python  mapping  maps  webdesign 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Google Blockly Lets You Hack With No Keyboard | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
"Google has released a completely visual programming language that lets you build software without typing a single character.

Now available on Google Code — the company’s site for hosting open source software — the new language is called Google Blockly, and it’s reminiscent of Scratch, a platform developed at MIT that seeks to turn even young children into programmers.

Like Scratch, Blockly lets you build applications by piecing together small graphical objects in much the same way you’d piece together Legos. Each visual object is also a code object — a variable or a counter or an “if-then” statement or the like — and as you piece them to together, you create simple functions. And as you piece the functions together, you create entire applications — say, a game where you guide a tiny figurine through a maze…

From Google’s site, you can translate Blockly applications into existing languages, including Javascript; Dart, Google new take on Javascript, and Python."
dart  python  javascript  googlecode  scratch  edg  srg  2012  googleblocky  blocky  children  coding  visual  visualprogramminglanguage  programming  google  teaching 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Gmvault: gmail backup
"Backup all your emails on disk.
Use the full sync mode to backup your entire gmail account in a unique directory. Your email backup repository can then be easily tar and moved from one machine to the other.

Update your backup in minutes.
Gmvault can run a quick sync mode regularly (ie. every day) to keep your backup up to date.`

Restore emails in any Gmail acc.
With the restore command Gmvault can recreate your gmail mailboxes in any Gmail account. All attributes such as Gmail labels are preserved and recreated. With restore, you will recover your Gmail account exactly as it was.

Handle all Gmail IMAP hiccups.
Even being the world best ever email service, Gmail and especially its IMAP service is not without bugs. Gmvault handles all these issues to provide the smoothest experience to the user. Gmvault deals with the most common issues and always let the user with an uncorrupted email database."
windows  osx  mac  linux  google  data  restore  software  python  opensource  backup  gmail  gmvault 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Don't Distract New Programmers with OOP
"The shift from procedural to OO brings with it a shift from thinking about problems and solutions to thinking about architecture. That's easy to see just by comparing a procedural Python program with an object-oriented one. The latter is almost always longer, full of extra interface and indentation and annotations. The temptation is to start moving trivial bits of code into classes and adding all these little methods and anticipating methods that aren't needed yet but might be someday.

When you're trying to help someone learn how to go from a problem statement to working code, the last thing you want is to get them sidetracked by faux-engineering busywork. Some people are going to run with those scraps of OO knowledge and build crazy class hierarchies and end up not as focused on on what they should be learning. Other people are going to lose interest because there's a layer of extra nonsense that makes programming even more cumbersome."
coding  howto  learning  developer  oop  programming  python 
february 2012 by robertogreco
How To Build an Interactive Map with Open-Source Tools | Jon Bruner
"Great post on building interactive maps with open source tools (Raphael + sprinkling of Python): via @visualisingdata"
opensource  maps  mapping  python  raphael  via:gpe 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Tutorial - Learn Python in 10 minutes - Stavros' Stuff
"So, you want to learn the Python programming language but can't find a concise and yet full-featured tutorial. This tutorial will attempt to teach you Python in 10 minutes. It's probably not so much a tutorial as it is a cross between a tutorial and a cheatsheet, so it will just show you some basic concepts to start you off. Obviously, if you want to really learn a language you need to program in it for a while. I will assume that you are already familiar with programming and will, therefore, skip most of the non-language-specific stuff. The important keywords will be highlighted so you can easily spot them. Also, pay attention because, due to the terseness of this tutorial, some things will be introduced directly in code and only briefly commented on."
python  howto  coding  tutorials 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Volunteered Geographic Information » ‘Compactness’ in Zoning: the circle as the ideal.
"I saw a thought provoking presentation recently, given by Wenwen Li of the University of California Santa Barbara, the talk was a wide ranging insight into Cyber Infrastructure, its uses for geospatial information, and some of the computational techniques that underpinned the project. One element of the project involved zone design for the greater Los Angeles region, and involved the implementation of an algorithm that was intended to aggregate small areal units into larger zones whilst meeting a number of conditions, principle among these conditions was ‘compactness’. The output looked very much like a single hierarchy of Christaller hexagons, and this got me thinking about the nature of space and compactness."
compactness  density  cities  losangeles  geography  hexagons  circles  zoning  clustering  python  builtenvironment  demographics  infrastructure  space  centralplacetheory  wenwenli  ucsb  cyberinfrastructure  geospatial  information 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Google: Exploring Computational Thinking
"Easily incorporate computational thinking into your curriculum with these classroom-ready lessons, examples, and programs. For more resources, including discussion forums and news, visit our ECT Discussion Forums."

[See also: http://googleresearch.blogspot.com/2010/10/exploring-computational-thinking.html ]
computerscience  computationalthinking  via:lukeneff  algebra  biology  calculus  compsci  geometry  python  programming  math  lessons  teaching  thinking  edtech  education  elearning  danmeyer  google  science  learning  glvo  edg  srg 
november 2010 by robertogreco
presenting tilestache (tecznotes)
"Really what we're looking at is a future filled with work like Brett Camper's amazing 8-Bit Cities, "an attempt to make the city feel foreign yet familiar ... to evoke the same urge for exploration, abstract sense of scale, and perhaps most importantly unbounded excitement." What are the tools that help make this possible? Get TileStache."
cartography  mapping  maps  tilestache  stamen  python  geo  visualization  local  tiles  michalmigurski 
august 2010 by robertogreco
census-tools (tecznotes)
"this small amount of information can be quite hard to get to. Between the impenetrable formatting of the geographic record files, the bewildering array of different kinds of geographic entities, and the depth of geographic minutiae, it can take quite a bit of head-scratching to extract even the first bits of information from the U.S. Census.

I hope this first tool makes it a little bit less of a hassle. I'd accept whatever patches people choose to offer: support for summary files beyond SF1, additional geograph summary levels, general patches, and more."
census  api  data  python  michalmigurski  us  2000  2010 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Chris Heathcote: anti-mega: griotism
"So employing an internal data griot makes a lot of sense: someone who can spend the time looking for both large trends and individual needs and uses that illuminate and portend. It’s a hard job, needing a mix of skills rarely found – a smidgen of hard maths and statistics, a pinch of programming, and dessert spoons of various liberal arts. The Economist (sub required) posits them as data scientists (a position Flickr are currently looking for), but this misses the ability to ask interesting questions, and having hunches – being so immersed in the data that relevancy screams out."
chrisheathcote  last.fm  data  griot  processing  python  stories  visualization  web  storytelling  interdisciplinary  hunches  questioning  math  mathematics  relevance  patternrecognition  patterns  newliberalarts  programming  statistics  trends  griotism  datagriots  lastfm 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Gwibber in Launchpad
"Gwibber is an open source microblogging client for GNOME developed with Python and GTK. It supports Twitter, Identi.ca, StatusNet, Facebook, Flickr, Digg, FriendFeed, and Qaiku."
flickr  jaiku  linux  microblogging  twitter  socialnetworking  facebook  digg  blogging  python  opensource  ubuntu  identi.ca 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Textbook remix « Snarkmarket
"This is super cool, both in con­tent and process: Python for Infor­mat­ics is a new text­book that Chuck Sev­er­ance, a pro­fes­sor at the Uni­ver­sity of Michi­gan, com­piled in eleven days. It’s based on an exist­ing Python text­book that was released under a Cre­ative Com­mons license; Sev­er­ance culled, sharp­ened, and extended it.'
informatics  python  books  programming  creativecommons 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Invent with Python
""Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python" is a free e-Book that teaches you how to program in the Python programming language. Each chapter gives you the complete source code for a new game, and then teaches the programming concepts from the example.
python  programming  books  edg  srg  tcsnmy  howto  ebook  tutorial  coding 
december 2009 by robertogreco
skulpt - Project Hosting on Google Code
"Skulpt is an entirely in-browser implementation of Python."
skulpt  web  python  interpreter  opensource  programming  webdev  software  webdesign 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Bill Kerr: taking guzdial seriously
"My plans to transition kids from scratch to python have not been particularly successful so I'm thinking of giving the Mark Guzdial approach a trial - using python to tweak multimedia

Kids find the transition from the scratch visual drag and drop to python only text based daunting, or, more likely they just get bored without the multimedia. It's a huge daily problem for practicing teachers to walk the line between engagement and rigour. The Guzdial approach would keep some visuals, sounds, movies etc. involved (as outputs) for student text based programming inputs. It might work."
python  scratch  programming  learning  teaching  education  math  compsci  tcsnmy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Scratchtweet - Scratch Connections
"Scratchtweet is a bare-bones program that allows a Scratch project to send tweet updates to Twitter.com via a small Python program that accesses the Twitter API while also communicating with Scratch through its external sensors. This is a simple program that you can build on to do other cool things with twitter."
scratch  twitter  python  networking  edg  via:blackbeltjones 
march 2009 by robertogreco
iPhone / iPod Touch Backup Extractor
"What does it do? This application converts the iPhone / iPod Touch backups that are created by iTunes into readily usable Mac OS X files. It is designed to run on Mac OS X Leopard only.
iphone  applications  utilities  development  backup  python  ios 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Jason R Briggs · Snake Wrangling for Kids
"“Snake Wrangling for Kids” is a printable electronic book, for children 8 years and older, who would like to learn computer programming. It covers the very basics of programming, and uses the Python programming language to teach the concepts.

There are 3 different versions of the book (one for Mac, one for Linux and one for Windows), and the printable 1.4MB PDFs can be downloaded from the following links for free (zipped size is 1MB):"
srg  python  programming  beginner  howto  children  coding  learning  education  free  ebooks  kids  tutorials  teaching  books  edg 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Webmonkey | Get_Started_With_Python
"The scripting language Python takes after its reptilian namesake -- it's simple by design, yet flexible and powerful. It can't exactly swallow large rodents whole, but it can be used for a wide variety of applications. Whether you need to automate some p
python  tutorials  programming  learning  coding  howto  webmonkey  wiki 
may 2008 by robertogreco
NodeBox | Home
"NodeBox is a Mac OS X application that lets you create 2D visuals (static, animated or interactive) using Python programming code and export them as a PDF or a QuickTime movie. NodeBox is free and well-documented."
mac  osx  software  python  coding  visualization  graphics  programming  design  processing  nodebox 
may 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] We do it for the war stories, right?
"Would filtr run under Maemo? At its core it is just a glorified shell script that calls a whole bunch of other command line utlities. It took a little bit of wrangling on a Saturday afternoon to satisfy all the dependencie but, lo, it works!"
nokia  python  n810  filr  lomo  photography  lomography 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Develop - OLPC
"The Develop activity is the activity for making or modifying other activities. Currently, it comprises a tree view of files in an activity's directory and a python source code editor (tabbed). Other features are actively being worked on."
olpc  programming  constructivism  python  development 
april 2008 by robertogreco
dev.laptop.org Git - users/cscott/pippy-examples/tree
"Some Pippy examples, based on the BASIC examples in the Commodore 64 manual."
glvo  pippy  python  programming  tutorials  coding  basic 
april 2008 by robertogreco
PottyMouth
"PottyMouth transforms completely unstructured and untrusted text to valid, nice-looking, completely safe XHTML."
coding  conversion  converter  email  filters  xhtml  html  internet  markup  python  webdev  security  formatting  text  webdesign 
april 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] What if web pages “foxed” like paper?
"I love slippy maps as much as the next person but...I have a paper fetish...I mean, I hate the Internet. At least the web. And probably electricity...still worming my way through the boring details that grow like barnacles on the side of the Papernet."
maps  mashup  paper  python  design  papernet  mapping  slippymaps 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Hackszine.com: Record more than 45 seconds of audio or video on the XO laptop
"If you go into the Record activity on the XO laptop, you'll find that you can only record a maximum of 45 seconds of video and audio. But since almost everything in this little green wonder is written in Python, it's very easy to fix this."
olpc  hacks  python  technology  audio  recording  video 
january 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] del.icio.us maps
"marker can dragged around map to correct location...double-click the marker - loads the del.icio.us posting interface in iframe passing geocoded + lat/lon data...In addition it sends some extra marker tags, notably del:bookmark=geo."
mapping  maps  python  webapps  del.icio.us  bookmarks  geotagging  geography  location  location-based  nokia  mashup 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Mark Guzdial's Amazon Blog: What is the role of language in learning programming? (Part 2 of "What makes programming so hard?") Permalink
"teachers love Alice...more likely to adopt it...than Python. Why?...Alice is about storytelling, and we teach Python for media computation. Storytelling...bigger motivator...more fundamental driver of human behavior, than manipulating media."
education  programming  alice  python  storytelling  stories  motivation  teaching  learning  engagement 
october 2007 by robertogreco

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