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robertogreco : rapidprototyping   19

Art Teaching for a New Age - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education
[NB: Tagging this one Black Mountain College and BMC, not because it is references in the text, but that it reminds me of BMC.]

[Also related, in my mind: http://robertogreco.tumblr.com/post/15046238819/our-middle-school-is-an-art-school and http://www.graphpaper.com/2007/10-17_what-i-learned-in-art-school-is-it-design-thinking ]

"The technological changes we are witnessing will not threaten conceptual rigor or craft, nor will the ease of expression and communication make art obsolete. But these shifts are changing what we mean by art making and what counts as meaningful, crafted expression. To say so is not to judge the quality of that expression or to lament the rise of vulgarity or the lowering of standards. It is simply to observe that this democratization of expression will alter fundamentally how students—aspiring artists—think about art, its meaning and purpose, and the ways in which it is made.

These shifts will also change the professions for which educational institutions like mine prepare students. After all, if technology becomes smart enough to make design decisions, then designers could increasingly become technicians, operators of machines instead of creative professionals. But the more profound—and less visible—impact will be on how students think about their creative pursuits.

We cannot say with certainty what that impact will be. The first generation of so-called digital natives is reaching college only now; the environment they grew up in—which seemed so radical and new to many of us just a decade and a half ago—is already a punchline. Soon it will be an antiquated joke that doesn't even make sense anymore. Remember AOL? Remember plugging in to access the Net? Today's students don't.

They arrive at college having shot and edited video, manipulated photographs, recorded music—or at least sampled and remixed someone else's—designed or assembled animated characters and even virtual environments, and "painted" digital images—all using technologies readily available at home or even in their pocket. The next generation of students will have designed and printed three-dimensional images, customized consumer products, perhaps "rapid-prototyped" new products—I can't imagine what else.

Students today are not simply bombarded by images, consuming them in great gulps, as previous generations did; they are making the environments they inhabit, and making meaningful connections among images, stories, mythologies, and value systems. They are creative and creating.

But their notion of what it means to create is different from ours. It's something one does to communicate with others, to participate in social networks, to entertain oneself. Making things—images, objects, stories—is mundane for these students, not sacred. It's a component of everyday experience, woven tightly into the fabric of daily life.

So what is the task of arts educators? Is it to disabuse these young people of what we think are their misconceptions? Is it to inculcate in them an understanding of the "proper" way to create, to make art or entertainment? Is it to sort out the truly artistic from the great mass of creative chatterers—and to initiate them into some sacred tradition?

Maybe. Maybe not.

Or maybe the task of the educator is to help them develop judgment, to help them to see that creating, which they do instinctively, almost unconsciously, is a way of learning, of knowing, of making arguments and observations, of affecting and transforming their environment. And perhaps that's not so very different from what we do now.

We do it now, though, in the context of a curriculum and institutional histories oriented toward specific professional training and preparation. We seek to develop in students the critical faculties needed to thrive in clearly defined professions. But in the future, we may have to rethink our purpose and objectives. We may have to reimagine our curricula, recast the bachelor-of-fine-arts degree as a generalist—not professional—degree.

In a media-saturated culture in which everyone is both maker and consumer of images, products, sounds, and immersive experiences like games, and in which professional opportunities are more likely to be invented or discovered than pursued, maybe the B.F.A. is the most appropriate general-education experience, not just for aspiring artists and designers but for everyone.

That poses challenges for arts educators. We are good at equipping students who are already interested in careers in art and design with the skills and judgment necessary to succeed in artistic fields and creative professions that are still reasonably well defined. We are less good at educating them broadly, at equipping them to use their visual acuity, design sensibility, and experience as makers to solve the problems—alone or in collaboration with others—that the next generation of creative professionals may be called on to solve. These will be complex problems that cross the boundaries of traditional disciplines, methodologies, and skill sets—ranging from new fields like data visualization, which draws on graphic design, statistical analysis, and interaction design, to traditional challenges like brand development, which increasingly reaches beyond logos on letterhead to products and environments.

To do that, arts colleges would have to reorganize their curricula and their pedagogy. Teaching might come to look a lot more like what we now call mentorship or advising. Rather than assume that young people know what they want to do and that we know how to prepare them to do it, we would have to help them to explore their interests and aspirations and work with them to create an educational experience that meets their needs.

Curricula would not be configured as linear, progressive pathways of traditional semester-long courses, but would consist of components, such as short workshops, online courses, intensive tutorials, and so forth. Students would pick and choose among components, arranging and rearranging them according to what they need at a particular moment. Have a problem that requires that you use a particular software program? Go learn it, to solve that problem or complete that project. Want to pursue a traditional illustration-training program? Take multiple drawing and painting studios.

Linking all of this together would not be a traditional liberal-arts curriculum but what one faculty member at the University of the Arts has called a liberal art curriculum—one focused on design as problem solving, on artistic expression as the articulation and interrogation of ideas. Instead of an arts-and-sciences core curriculum separate and disconnected from studio instruction, we would build a new core that integrates the studio and the seminar room, that envisions making and thinking not as distinct approaches but as a dynamic conversation.

This fantasy of an alternative arts education—which resembles experiments that other educators have attempted in the past—begins to veer into utopianism, though, and a vague utopianism at that. It would be impossible to administer and to offer to students cost-effectively. And most students would probably find it more perplexing than liberating.

But I see an urgent need for new models that respond to the changing conditions affecting higher education—models that can adapt to conditions that are in constant flux and to an emerging sensibility among young people that is more entrepreneurial, flexible, and alert to change than our curricula are designed to accommodate.

We need an educational structure that takes instability and unpredictability as its starting point, its fundamental assumption. If a university is not made up of stable, enduring structures arranged linearly or hierarchically—schools, departments, majors, minors—but rather is made up of components that can be used or deployed according to demand and need, then invention instead of convention becomes the governing institutional dynamic."
arteducation  art  education  expression  artisticexpression  internet  web  making  unpredictability  uncertainty  liberalarts  generalists  specialists  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  multimedia  lcproject  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  ncmideas  openstudioproject  2013  seanbuffington  teaching  learning  criticalthinking  problemsolving  communication  bfa  mfa  highered  highereducation  generaleducation  curriculum  altgdp  design  craft  internetage  medialiteracy  media  newmedia  rapidprototyping  projectbasedlearning  bmc  blackmountaincollege  pbl 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Algorithmic Rape Jokes in the Library of Babel | Quiet Babylon
"Jorge Luis Borges’ Library of Babel twisted through the logic of SEO and commerce."

"Part of what tips the algorithmic rape joke t-shirts over from very offensive to shockingly offensive is that they are ostensibly physical products. Intuitions are not yet tuned for spambot clothes sellers."

"Amazon isn’t a store, not really. Not in any sense that we can regularly think about stores. It’s a strange pulsing network of potential goods, global supply chains, and alien associative algorithms with the skin of a store stretched over it, so we don’t lose our minds."
algorithms  amazon  culture  internet  borges  timmaly  2013  jamesbridle  apologies  non-apologies  brianeno  generative  crapjects  georginavoss  rape  peteashton  software  taste  poortaste  deniability  secondlife  solidgoldbomb  t-shirts  keepcalmand  spam  objects  objectspam  quinnnorton  masscustomization  rapidprototyping  shapersubcultures  scale  libraryofbabel  thelibraryofbabel  tshirts 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The Extrapolation Factory & 99¢ Futures
"..is an imagination-based assembly line for developing snapshots of future scenarios- embodied as artifacts for sale in a local store. In this 'workshop,' participants use our future-scope to cast present-day news, statistics and developments into future products to be exhibited in these nearby stores."
extrapolationfactory  chriswoebken  nyc  brooklyn  futures  rapidprototyping  elliottmontgomery  studio-x 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Why 3-D Printing Isn't Like Virtual Reality  - Technology Review
"It's also important not to confuse 3-D printing & desktop-class fabrication. These aren't the same thing. There is more to desktop manufacturing than 3-D printers. A well-appointed contemporary maker workshop has working CNC mills, lathes, and laser cutters. A well-appointed design studio has the tools to make and finish prototypes that look very nice indeed. Aside from the 3-D printer, none of these tools are terribly science-fictional; they're well-established technologies that happen to be getting cheaper from year to year.

Something interesting happens when the cost of tooling-up falls. There comes a point where your production runs are small enough that the economies of scale that justify container ships from China stop working. There comes a point where making new things isn't a capital investment but simply a marginal one. Fab shops are already popping up, just like print shops did."
timmaly  2012  printing  rapidprototyping  prototyping  fabshops  economiesofscale  technology  fabbing  3dprinting 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Monitor: More than just digital quilting | The Economist
"Technology and society: The “maker” movement could change how science is taught and boost innovation. It may even herald a new industrial revolution"

"It is easy to laugh at the idea that hobbyists with 3D printers will change the world. But the original industrial revolution grew out of piecework done at home, and look what became of the clunky computers of the 1970s. The maker movement is worth watching."
makers  technology  innovation  diy  glvo  programming  making  fabbing  3dprinting  reprap  2011  rapidprototyping 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Venessa: Superhero School An Epicenter for Disruptive Innovation
"I put a short post up a few days ago in an online group I’m in, with the above image and this brief description:

superhero school. center for disruptive innovation. continuous learning zone. collective intelligence. live/work startup incubator. community center. hackerspace. makerlab. autonomous zone. permaculture and sustainable food production. cooperatively owned communications infrastructure. resilience. r&d; lab. a place for creative troublemakers. hudson valley. i want this to exist.

It blew up to over 100 comments in less than 48 hours, with many people sharing their own thoughts and plans and existing initiatives to create similar things in their areas. I was inspired! Is this an idea whose time has come?"

[Also here (with comments): http://emergentbydesign.com/2011/11/09/superhero-school-an-epicenter-for-disruptive-innovation/ ]
lcproject  cv  hackerspaces  unschooling  deschooling  glvo  kaospilots  incubator  communitycenter  communitycenters  creativity  sharedspace  collectiveintelligence  continuouslearningzone  learning  superheroschool  sharing  collaborativeconsumption  cocreation  makers  knowmads  twinoaks  tamera  kibbutzim  findhornfoundation  lionkimbro  centerforalternativetechnology  friendsofgaviotas  gaiauniversity  edenproject  schumachercollege  teamacademy  generalassembly  unreasonableinstitute  maisonnotman  blackbox  barcamp  unconferences  fablabs  workshops  chaordinatedevents  prototyping  rapidprototyping 
november 2011 by robertogreco
You Are Solving The Wrong Problem « Aza on Design
"MacCready’s insight was that everyone working on solving human-powered flight would spend upwards of a year building an airplane on conjecture & theory w/out the grounding of empirical tests. Triumphantly, they’d complete their plane & wheel it out for a test flight. Minutes latter, a years worth of work would smash into the ground. Even in successful flights…would end with the pilot physically exhausted. W/ that single new data point, the team would work for another year…Progress was slow…

The problem was the problem. Paul realized that what we needed to be solved was not, in fact, human powered flight. That was a red-herring. The problem was the process itself, and along with it the blind pursuit of a goal without a deeper understanding how to tackle deeply difficult challenges. He came up with a new problem that he set out to solve: how can you build a plane that could be rebuilt in hours not months. And he did…"
learning  design  creativity  itteration  azaraskin  gossamereagle  gossamercondor  paulmaccready  problemsolving  definingtheproblem  problems  iteration  process  innovation  research  rapidprototyping  howwework  howwelearn 
september 2011 by robertogreco
COMMON | Home
"What would you do if you could do anything?

Have you ever felt like the world is divided into two groups of people? The people who just talk about making something and the people who actually make something.

COMMON is about making something. To be more specific, COMMON is about connecting people together and harnessing the power of true, rule-breaking creativity to launch socially beneficial businesses. Businesses that are designed to spread love and prosperity to all stakeholders.

Our COMMON Community and COMMON Accelerator Events are dedicated to shifting from talking about problems to actually engaging in new solutions. And we believe the fastest way to do that is through collaboration. We believe the tired old concept of competitive advantage must give way to a more meaningful system of collaborative advantage.

Our mission is to give creative people a chance to design and prototype the new capitalism."
design  designactivism  humanitariandesign  environment  social  community  collaboration  glvo  creativity  tcsnmy  lcproject  business  socialentrepreneurship  incubator  branding  entrepreneurship  startups  rapidprototyping  prototyping 
may 2011 by robertogreco
KIBU-WAMP Designer Challenge 2011! | Kitchen Budapest
"What alternative roles might designers take and what new strategies and ideas might the ‘design community‘ employ in response to these challenges?

What happens when we move from severing corporate interests to the interests of the community?

How can new tools and resources of rapid prototyping, digital and bio hacking, and DIY culture as a whole be used to create new economies?

What services might we design if our constraints move from concerns about legal implications to personal ethical considerations?

If instead of designing for the free market, what if we designed for the street, or black market?"
design  piracy  workshops  kitchenbudapest  via:javierarbona  community  rapidprototyping  diy  economics  blackmarkets  freemarkets 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » You’d Be Right To Wonder
"What I learned through that was the importance of making things — but it’s not just the made-thing but the making-of-the-thing, if you follow. In the *making you’re also doing a kind of thinking. Making is part of the “conversation” — it’s part of the yammering, but with a good dose of hammering. If you’re not also making — you’re sort of, well..basically you’re not doing much at all. You’ve only done a *rough sketch of an idea if you’ve only talked about it and didn’t do the iteration through making, then back to thinking and through again to talking and discussing and sharing all the degrees of *material — idea, discussions, conversations, make some props, bring those to the discussion, *repeat."
julianbleecker  making  make  doing  do  tcsnmy  lcproject  rapidprototyping  prototyping  iteration  thinking  designfiction  action  actionminded  glvo  cv  reflection  discussion  conversation 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Nervous System
"Nervous System creates experimental jewelry, combining nontraditional materials like silicone rubber and stainless steel with rapid prototyping methods. We find inspiration in complex patterns generated by computation and nature."
accessories  handmade  rapidprototyping  processing  patterns  design  computation  generative  fabrication  math  wearable  shopping  nervoussystem  glvo  complexity  nature  biomimicry  coding  biomimetics  jewelry  wearables 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Jack Dorsey: The 3 Keys to Twitter's Success :: Videos :: The 99 Percent
"Jack Dorsey outlines three core takeaways from his experiences building and launching Twitter – and more recently – Square, a simple payment utility. 1) Draw: get your idea out of your head and share it, 2) Luck: assess when the time (and the market) is right to execute your idea, 3) Iterate: take in the feedback, be a rigorous editor, and refine your idea."
creativity  drawing  entrepreneurship  howto  inspiration  process  success  luck  iteration  maps  mapping  twitter  texting  sms  dispatch  information  socialmedia  jackdorsey  tcsnmy  glvo  sharing  criticism  constructivecriticism  rapidprototyping  rapid  prototyping  failure 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Bre Pettis | I Make Things - My Talk at 25c3 - Rapid Prototype Your Life
Around the 39:00 mark, when discussing hacker collectives Pettis says that he thinks "school is basically dead. What can replace school is this idea of communities that care enough about learning that they're willing to figure stuff things out and then share what they've learned and document it. I don't know exactly what this is called, but I really like it better than schools." via: http://www.boingboing.net/2009/01/07/bre-pettiss-rapid-pr.html video at: http://dewy.fem.tu-ilmenau.de/CCC/25C3/video_h264_720x576/25c3-3015-en-rapid_prototype_your_life.mp4
brepettis  education  autodidactism  autodidacts  machineproject  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  hacking  make  making  diy  community  hacks  grassroots  techlabs  collective  hackercollective  technology  prototyping  fabbing  rapidprototyping  sharing  creativity  culture  future  autodidacticism 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Ponoko Blog - Desktop Factories in Every Classroom, Business and Home
"23 years later and Desktop Factory, (previously mentioned on Ponoko Blog) are about to launch us into the 3rd dimension of desktop printing with their 125ci 3D Printer for under U$5000. The unit weighing around 90 lb (40kg) and 25 x 20 x 20 is only marginally bigger than the first Apple LaserWriter, and allowing for inflation, considerably cheaper."
fabrication  ponoko  technology  history  trends  rapidprototyping  fabbing  3d  printing 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Robots: Milling about aimlessly vs. milling - Core77
"As cool as it is, we don't like this first robot, Boston Dynamics' "LittleDog," which scuttles around like it's looking for prey:...We're much more keen on the Hexapod Robot CNC Router, because he stays put (at least in the video) and performs some handy-dandy ID functions."
robots  edg  bostondynamics  fabbing  rapidprototyping 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Shapeways
"Have you ever wanted to turn your 3D designs into reality? Enter Shapeways! Just upload your design, we print it and ship it to you - it's easy. Within ten working days you'll hold your own design in your hands."
prototyping  rapidprototyping  fabbing  via:preoccupations  3dprinter  crowdsourcing  service  printing  design  3D  publishing  models  prototype  manufacturing  modeling 
july 2008 by robertogreco
WebHome < Main < Reprap
"RepRap is short for Replicating Rapid-prototyper. It is the practical self-copying 3D printer shown on the right - a self-replicating machine. This 3D printer builds the component up in layers of plastic."
opensource  hardware  diy  3dprinter  3d  prototype  technology  rapidprototyping  fabrication  fabbing  reprap  reproduction  replicator  machines  robots  future 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Blog Archive » Finish Without Function
"This sounds about right. Rapid design and prototyping methods have slipped below all the usual barriers to entry — cost, complexity, access to tools and communities, etc. It’s almost as if you can make a prototype as real as the real thing."
prototyping  fabbing  fabrication  industrial  design  manufacturing  rapidprototyping  future  access  diy  make  artcenter  accd  education  learning  cost  tools 
december 2007 by robertogreco

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