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robertogreco : raspberrypi   26

Brent Jackson on Twitter: "New phone who dis… "
“New phone who dis [image: "iPad Pro connected to Raspberry Pi 4 running Gatsby develop with Theme UI docs site open"]

Basic setup:
- iPad Pro 11" (with USB-C)
- Raspberry Pi 4 (ssh + power via USB-C)
- Blink Shell for SSH
- Raspian with Node.js, Git, Vim, etc.

The most frustrating part is that I know the iPad’s hardware is fully capable of what the Raspberry Pi is doing here

To run Gatsby develop and view in it iOS, I use the `--host 0.0.0.0` flag and open the dev server at `raspberrypi.local:8000`– webpack hot reload works most of the time but sometimes needs a hard refresh

To install Node.js, I use `wget` to download the tar from http://nodejs.org , extract it and manually move it to /usr/local/bin

Setting up the RPi4 to run in OTG gadget mode, the steps are very similar to how you do it for the Pi Zero (there’s a few guides out there)

Download the image from http://raspberrypi.org and write to an SD card.
- Add dtoverlay=dwc2 to /boot/config.txt
- Add modules-load=dwc2,g_ether to /boot/cmdline.txt (after rootwait)
- touch /boot/ssh to enable ssh

For vim, I cloned the repo from github and built locally according to the instructions in the readme

I tried to build Zeit Now CLI, but it didn’t work and I couldn’t find any relevant documentation

Also ran into issues where some USB-C cables just did not work at all (sounds like an issue with the RPi), so if you don’t see a light, try another cable. Currently using the Apple MacBook USB-C charge cable (iPad cable was a no-go)”

[via: https://www.are.na/block/4577252 ]
ipad  ipadpro  programming  coding  whatisacomputer  2019  brentjackson  raspberrypi  gatsby  node.js  vim  usb-c  git  ios  ipados 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
Very Slow Movie Player – Bryan Boyer – Medium
"Walking around Brasília some years ago I had the distinct feeling that I was doing it “wrong” because, of course, I was. The center of Brasilía is organized along the Exio Monumental, featuring an array of government and other important buildings that form a long spine. This is a place designed to be “read” at the speed of a vehicle, so taking in Brasília by foot is like watching a movie in slow motion. It turns out, both can be rewarding in unexpected ways.

With a little bit of patience, the details of both reveal unexpected and delightful moments. In Brasília, pedestrians are rewarded with an opportunity to discover the subtle variations between what look to be mega-scaled buildings. Rhythmic reflections and shadows bring surfaces to life under the tropical sunlight in beautiful and nuanced ways. Just don’t forget to put on sunscreen, because the distances are intended to be enjoyed from the comfort of a motor vehicle.

On the other hand, watching movies in slow-mo is not something that I’ve had experience with outside of seeing the occasional Bill Viola installation. Until, that is, I started to tinker with ePaper components and Javascript in the depth of Michigan winter, looking for a way to celebrate slowness.

Can a film be consumed at the speed of reading a book? Yes, just as a car city can be enjoyed on foot. Slowing things down to an extreme measure creates room for appreciation of the object, as in Brasília, but the prolonged duration also starts to shift the relationship between object, viewer, and context. A film watched at 1/3,600th of the original speed is not a very slow movie, it’s a hazy timepiece. A Very Slow Movie Player (VSMP) doesn’t tell you the time; it helps you see yourself against the smear of time.

I’ve described VSMP in more detail below, but watch this video [https://vimeo.com/307806967 ] explains it more readily."
bryanboyer  slow  film  brasília  brasilia  modernism  urban  urbanism  raspberrypi  class  diy  movies  billviola  vsmp  cars  travel  movement  time  moments 
december 2018 by robertogreco
GitHub - Microsoft/ELL: Embedded Learning Library
"The Embedded Learning Library (ELL) allows you to build and deploy machine-learned pipelines onto embedded platforms, like Raspberry Pis, Arduinos, micro:bits, and other microcontrollers. The deployed machine learning model runs on the device, disconnected from the cloud. Our APIs can be used either from C++ or Python.

This project has been developed by a team of researchers at Microsoft Research. It's a work in progress, and we expect it to change rapidly, including breaking API changes. Despite this code churn, we welcome you to try it and give us feedback!

A good place to start is the tutorial, which allows you to do image recognition on a Raspberry Pi with a web cam, disconnected from the cloud. The software you deploy to the Pi will recognize a variety of common objects on camera and print a label for the recognized object on the Pi's screen."
machinelearning  embedded  arduino  ai  raspberrypi  microsoft  code  microcontrollers  via:clivethompson 
july 2017 by robertogreco
PINE 64
"We set out to create a simple single board computer – smart and affordable. As affordable as your double Big Mac combo meals you had last night with your friend. By creating the world’s first affordable 64-bit single board supercomputer, we’ve enabled your dreams to build the next invention, possible. PINE64 comes from the combination of two constant variables – Pi and Euler’s Number e and 64 comes from our 64-Bit computing power.

The PINE64 can be purchased with the latest Android software built in, or you can upload the latest version of Linux. Out of the box, with Android Lollipop 5.1 version installed, you immediately get access to over 1.6 million apps on the Google Play market, downloadable in a few clicks.

Build your own computer, 3D Printer control panel, video game console, 4K streaming media player, robotics project, connected home device, and more… Run apps immediately out of the box such as Angry Birds, Minecraft, office productive software, or add a camera and run Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and more.

PINE64 is simple, affordable, and expandable. Make it yours – share your creations by uploading photos and tag #mypine64. We’re working on additional add-ons in the IoT industry and enabling other devices to work with PINE64."
raspberrypi 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Getting started with Raspberry Pi — PaulStamatiou.com
"What you can do with a tiny $35 computer and how I built a digital photo frame

In early 2012 an intriguing single-board computer with a weird name hit the market. For the low price of $35, you could get a fully functioning computer that could run a real operating system.

It was called the Raspberry Pi and it was the brainchild of a UK charity called the Raspberry Pi Foundation. They saw the need for an affordable computer after seeing a consistent drop in students applying to study computer science.

Well it turns out this tiny and cheap fully-functional computer had a much larger audience than anticipated. Multiple models have been created since, including the $5 Pi Zero, and over 9 million Raspberry Pis have been sold.

This is a long post so I more than likely made some errors along the way. Feel free to let me know on Twitter, thanks!"
raspberrypi  classideas  hacking  howto  paulstamatiou  tutorials  2016 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Patricio Gonzalez Vivo on Vimeo
"What Are The Chances? – This talk investigates the relationships between chaos and chance, cause and effect. It is built from volcanoes, ashes, wind, love, and new life. Along the way Patricio talks about The Book of Shaders, mapping at Mapzen, and other recent collaborations and works in progress.

Many of these slides are interactive: patriciogonzalezvivo.github.io/eyeo16/# "

[The Book of Shaders: http://thebookofshaders.com/ ]
expressivearttherapy  lygiaclark  mapzen  processing  code  coding  arttherapy  psychology  2016  eyeo  eyeo2016  psychoanalysis  freud  carljung  dreams  collectiveunconscious  caseyreas  shaders  nightmares  community  opensource  maps  mapping  openframeworks  fragility  jenlowe  thebookofshaders  mandalas  synchronicity  interconnectedness  patriciogonzalezvivo  edg  raspberrypi  classideas  interconnected  interconnectivity 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Raspberry Pi XBMC Media Center – A Complete Solution - Jason Carr
"I have to admit it’s taken a good amount of research and experimentation, but I finally have an XBMC media center solution on the Raspberry Pi that rivals what I used to have on my old power-sucking full-size PC.

I’m writing this guide to help others get up and running with a stable solution as quickly as possible. I’ll be covering everything from the hardware pieces to the software and configuration. I’m also hoping this guide will be accessible to those who aren’t overly tech-inclined, and I’ll provide some support in the comments.

Continue on after the break for the complete guide."
raspberrypi  mediacenters  2012  via:maxfenton  hardware 
february 2015 by robertogreco
N O D E: HOW TO CREATE A HANDHELD LINUX TERMINAL
"This tutorial will teach you how to create your own handheld linux terminal with built in screen, QWERTY thumb keyboard and battery. It has four passive USB ports for expansion and extra connectivity. It’s super portable and is about the size of a Nintendo DS (if slightly thicker).

I initially made it because I thought it’d be cool to fit down into such a small form-factor, but it also has some interesting purposes. It’s basically a full handheld linux system that can do almost everything a normal sized computer can do. It’s not going to destroy any benchmark tests, so it’s best suited to command line stuff. Since this is the case, it’s actually a pretty good tool for learning the command line interface as well as basic scripting. The keyboard has all the special characters you need which is really handy.

Almost all the design choices here are made entirely out of necessity for space. If I had a chance to make a custom keyboard and case, it’d be alot sleeker. Considering it’s a bunch of off the shelf stuff, I think it turned out pretty nicely."
diy  electronics  linux  raspberrypi  2015  chrisrobinson  projectideas 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Sonic Pi
"Audible Computing.

A free sound synthesiser for live coding designed to support computing and music lessons within schools.

Use code to compose and perform in classical and contemporary styles ranging from Canons to Dubstep."
music  code  coding  sound  audio  raspberrypi  mac  osx  synthesizer  edg  classideas  learning  education  teaching  children  programming 
september 2014 by robertogreco
PLAY Stories: An Interview With John Marshall
"John Marshall's latest project (with rootoftwo) is a weather vane built for the 21st Century: a headless chicken that tracks and responds to Internet “fear levels”. Five of these Whithervanes are installed on the highest points of five buildings in Folkestone, UK for the 2014 Folkestone Triennial (30 August – 2 November)."



"The chickens are four feet tall and made of polyurethane foam coated in polyester resin. Each is controlled by a credit-card sized computer that connects to the Internet and listens in real-time to news reports uploaded by journalists from around the world.

When a report comes in, the computer reads it and works out the GPS coordinates where the event happened. It then calculates the direction and distance of the event from Folkestone. The computer then reads the rest of the report, cross-checking the text with the list of keywords and phrases the Department of Homeland Security uses to monitor social networking sites for terrorist threats. The computer also looks for keywords and phrases gathered in a series of workshops we did with the people of Folkestone about what they are afraid of. The keyword list includes threats as diverse as: race riots, gastro tourists, unemployment and dog poo.

The intensity of fear is indicated by changing colored lighting and the number of spins each chicken makes. There are five levels of fear: 1. Low (Green), 2. Guarded (Blue), 3. Elevated (Yellow), 4. High (Orange) and 5. Severe (Red) - the same as the Homeland Security National Terrorism Advisory System. The five chickens revolve away from the location of each news story."



"Every Whithervane has the same list of keywords and phrases, but each has a unique "score" associated with the terms that reflect the aggregate values of the people that live in each neighborhood where the chickens are located. The "scores" have been weighted using marketing tools based on UK census data that are typically used for targeting junk mail. The computer does a calculation that considers the level of fear in the story for the local population and the distance of the event from Folkestone. For example, the same story about immigration from the European Union will have a different level of fear for different neighborhoods. Folkestone is the first point of entry in the UK for visitors arriving via the Channel Tunnel - this makes for some very complicated local opinions.

The public can also influence the individual Whithervanes by Tweeting to @whithervanes #keepcalm (to reduce) or #skyfalling (to increase) the ambient fear level in the system. If they don't have a Twitter account we have built a website where you can submit a Tweet by clicking a button. There are public access terminals in the Triennial visitor's center in Folkestone."
johnmarshall  art  weathervanes  internet  fear  2014  news  twitter  rootoftwo  whitervanes  python  raspberrypi  projectideas  bigdata 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Raspberry Pi Compute Module: new product! | Raspberry Pi
"The compute module contains the guts of a Raspberry Pi (the BCM2835 processor and 512Mbyte of RAM) as well as a 4Gbyte eMMC Flash device (which is the equivalent of the SD card in the Pi). This is all integrated on to a small 67.6x30mm board which fits into a standard DDR2 SODIMM connector (the same type of connector as used for laptop memory*). The Flash memory is connected directly to the processor on the board, but the remaining processor interfaces are available to the user via the connector pins. You get the full flexibility of the BCM2835 SoC (which means that many more GPIOs and interfaces are available as compared to the Raspberry Pi), and designing the module into a custom system should be relatively straightforward as we’ve put all the tricky bits onto the module itself.

So what you are seeing here is a Raspberry Pi shrunk down to fit on a SODIMM with onboard memory, whose connectors you can customise for your own needs.

The Compute Module is primarily designed for those who are going to create their own PCB. However, we are also launching something called the Compute Module IO Board to help designers get started.

The Compute Module IO Board is a simple, open-source breakout board that you can plug a Compute Module into. It provides the necessary power to the module, and gives you the ability to program the module’s Flash memory, access the processor interfaces in a slightly more friendly fashion (pin headers and flexi connectors, much like the Pi) and provides the necessary HDMI and USB connectors so that you have an entire system that can boot Raspbian (or the OS of your choice). This board provides both a starting template for those who want to design with the Compute Module, and a quick way to start experimenting with the hardware and building and testing a system before going to the expense of fabricating a custom board.

Initially, the Compute Module and IO Board will be available to buy together as the Raspberry Pi Compute Module Development Kit.

These kits will be available from RS and element14 some time in June. Shortly after that the Compute Module will be available to buy separately, with a unit cost of around $30 in batches of 100; you will also be able to buy them individually, but the price will be slightly higher. The Raspberry Pi Foundation is a charity, and as with everything we make here, all profits are pushed straight back into educating kids in computing."

[See also: http://www.fastcompany.com/3033850/most-creative-people/whats-next-for-raspberry-pi-the-35-computer-powering-hardware-innovatio ]
raspberrypi  diy  microcontrollers  via:alexismadrigal  computing  internetofthings  iot 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Beyond Pong: why digital art matters | Artanddesign | The Guardian
"When critical thinking is at its strongest, it often comes from exactly the sort of fluidity of practice that does run through Digital Revolution. The London-based architect and artist Usman Haque has been creating innovative software products alongside interactive artworks for more than 15 years. In 2007, he founded Pachube, a global data-sharing network that anticipated by years the current buzz around big data and the internet of things. In 2011, Pachube enabled hundreds of Japanese civilians to quickly and easily share weather and radiation data in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, boosting monitoring and relief efforts. Haque's Umbrellium team has produced a new artwork for Digital Revolution, which takes up the entirety of The Pit, the Barbican's subterranean theatre space. Called Assemblance, the piece allows about 25 people at a time to physically shape beams of light with their hands, pushing and pulling them around the space – while also bumping into and potentially messing up the shapes created by other people.

Haque calls it "a virtual reality", but not in the sense of a purely digital realm: "It's there, it's responding to you, you can see it, but as you try and approach it you can't actually feel it. For me, the idea is to question this distinction between the physical and the virtual." The process is akin to building a sandcastle on the beach, where you are building a structure that anyone else, or the elements, can destroy in a moment.

Assemblance attempts to answer the question: "How do we create things together in a shared environment, where we can't always trust each other, but we need to act together regardless?" This, indeed, is the situation we find ourselves in now. In the modern digital world, the question of participation is crucial as our various networks – social, media, national – require us to constantly mediate between acting as individuals and acting as a group. For Haque, the digital has given us "the capacity to have an effect on the other side of the world almost instantaneously", from news events and economic flows to disaster response and warfare. "We can do things to other people in distant lands, and so the question of our responsibility, and our culpability, is thrown up in ways that it hasn't been before. On the other hand, we now have the capacity to connect with each other, and develop new ways to work together, rather than against each other."

Assemblance asks the audience to see itself as part of a networked whole, where actions have consequences. It also points towards the fact that "the digital" is not a medium, but a context, in which new social, political and artistic forms arise. After 50 years, at least, of digital practice, institutions are still trying to work out its relevance, and how to display and communicate it – a marker, perhaps, that it is indeed a form of art."
jamesbridle  2014  digital  digitalart  art  usmanhaque  dotsasmen  umbrellium  assemblance  criticalthinking  pachube  collaboration  internet  web  online  audience  participatory  networks  context  social  socialnetworks  digitalarchaeology  olialialina  susankare  timberners-lee  liamyoung  dronestagram  jamesgeorge  jonathanminard  christophernolan  pong  raspberrypi  minecraft  geocities  martinbircher  chrismilk  aaronkoblin  wecreate  conradbodman  gta  cpsnow  eniac  grandtheftauto 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Kano
"It's a computer — and you make it yourself"
raspberrypi  kids  children  computers  hardware  kano  kits  classideas 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Raspberry Pi - Lapdock Connection
"Now that you have your nifty new Raspberry Pi, you'll need a display for it. Teensy analog monitors are pretty cheap, but what you really want is a decent HDMI display. Unfortunately, they're expensive, running from $150 on up into the thousands for the huge ones. But, for about $75 (or even as low as $40, used, on eBay) you can get a discontinued model of the notorious Motorola Atrix Lapdock, the one that sold for $500 a couple of years back, and it was a bargain at that price. The lapdock incorporates a razor-sharp 11" HDMI display, an almost-adequate keyboard-with-trackpad, twin speakers, and a high-capacity battery -- all in a thin two-pound package.

The Atrix Lapdock was manufactured to mechanically connect with the now-discontinued Motorola Atrix smartphone, in effect turning it into a laptop computer. The lapdock has two plugs on a foldout hinge -- a male micro-HDMI plug and a male micro-USB-A plug. These neatly mate with an Atrix phone, slipping right into appropriately positioned jacks on the side of the phone.

Fortunately for us, the lapdock's USB and HDMI ports are electrically standard, even if the physical connectors aren't. If we could just find the correct cables and adapters, we might be able to hook up our Raspberry Pi.

Maybe. Hopefully. . . .

Yes, it can indeed be done!

See http://rasathus.blogspot.com/2012/10/a-raspberry-pi-laptop-easy-way.html
for example.

In this Instructable I will break down the process in detail, with appropriate explanation and close-up pictures."

[See also: http://liliputing.com/2012/06/turn-a-raspberry-pi-into-laptop-with-a-70-motorola-lapdock.html and http://www.adafruit.com/blog/2012/09/05/make-a-raspberry-pi-laptop-with-an-atrix-4g-dock-video/ ]

[via (kinda): https://www.flickr.com/photos/http_gallery/sets/72157643689705505/ ]
diy  edg  raspberrypi  laptops  motorola 
april 2014 by robertogreco
RGB-LED Lesson 2 (Scratch GPIO) – Getting Started | Meltwater's Raspberry Pi Hardware
"Since Scratch comes pre-installed on the recommended Raspberry Pi distribution (Raspbian “wheezy”), that part is available as soon as you start your Raspbian desktop.

Normally, Scratch’s powers of control extend only to the screen and speakers attached to the Raspberry Pi, and usually actions are directed by the program flow or by external inputs such as the keyboard and mouse.

However, Raspberry Pi blogger “SimpleSi” (http://cymplecy.wordpress.com/) has produced a plug-in to allow Scratch to talk to the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi too.  This allows Scratch to control “real things” and to respond to the “real environment”, which literally opens up a whole new world of possibilities."
scracth  raspberrypi  projectideas  edg  arg 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Radius Networks
"Want a standalone iBeacon to use for development? Here's a procedure you can use to build your own for under $100. If you don't want to go to the trouble, we can ship you a pre-built development kit including everything below (except the cell phone charger -- you probably have one already!)

If you want to build one yourself, you'll need basic Linux command line skills. In the instructions, commands you type on the Raspberry Pi look like the block below. Lines starting with $ are things you type (you do not actually type the $) and other lines are responses from the computer."
ibeacon  raspberrypi  howto 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Coder for Raspberry Pi
"Coder is a free, open source project that turns a Raspberry Pi into a simple platform that educators and parents can use to teach the basics of building for the web. New coders can craft small projects in HTML, CSS, and Javascript, right from the web browser."
raspberrypi  coder  google  googlecreativelab  html  css  javascript  teaching  learning 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Design for the New Normal (Revisited) | superflux
"I was invited to talk at the NEXT Conference in Berlin by Peter Bihr, as he felt that a talk I gave last year would fit well with the conference's theme Here Be Dragons: "We fret about data, who is collecting it and why. We fret about privacy and security. We worry and fear disruption, which changes business models and renders old business to ashes. Some would have us walk away, steer clear of these risks. They’re dangerous, we don’t know what the consequences will be. Maintain the status quo, don’t change too much.Here and now is safe. Over there, in the future? Well, there be dragons."

This sounded like a good platform to expand upon the 'Design for the New Normal' presentation I gave earlier, especially as its an area Jon and I are thinking about in the context of various ongoing projects. So here it is, once again an accelerated slideshow (70 slides!) where I followed up on some of the stories to see what happened to them in the last six months, and developed some of the ideas further. This continues to be a work-in-progress that Superflux is developing as part of our current projects. "

[Video: http://nextberlin.eu/2013/07/design-for-the-new-normal-3/ ]
anabjain  2013  drones  weapons  manufacturing  3dprinting  bioengineering  droneproject  biotechnology  biotech  biobricks  songhojun  ossi  zemaraielali  empowerment  technology  technologicalempowerment  raspberrypi  hackerspaces  makerspaces  diy  biology  diybio  shapeways  replicators  tobiasrevell  globalvillageconstructionset  marcinjakubowski  crowdsourcing  cryptocurrencies  openideo  ideo  wickedproblems  darpa  innovation  india  afghanistan  jugaad  jugaadwarfare  warfare  war  syria  bitcoins  blackmarket  freicoin  litecoin  dna  dnadreams  bregtjevanderhaak  bgi  genomics  23andme  annewojcicki  genetics  scottsmith  superdensity  googleglass  chaos  complexity  uncertainty  thenewnormal  superflux  opensource  patents  subversion  design  jonardern  ux  marketing  venkateshrao  normalityfield  strangenow  syntheticbiology  healthcare  healthinsurance  insurance  law  economics  ip  arnoldmann  dynamicgenetics  insects  liamyoung  eleanorsaitta  shingtatchung  algorithms  superstition  bahavior  numerology  dunne&raby  augerloizeau  bionicrequiem  ericschmidt  privacy  adamharvey  makeu 
april 2013 by robertogreco

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