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robertogreco : realworld   25

On Being Broken, and the Kindness of Others – The Tattooed Professor
"We’re not sending graduates “out into the real world”–they’ve been there for their entire lives, and most of them know at least implicitly how the deck is stacked against people regardless of how hard they’re bootstrapping. We have given our students a wide array of tools, and tried to prepare them to use those tools well for themselves and for their communities. We teach in the hopes of a better, more compassionate, and more just world. But then we tell a graduation-day story that assumes our graduates will go out into a broken world riven by hate, fear, and inequality but also that it’s their fault if that world beats them down. I don’t think we do this on purpose, but the myth is no less insidious for being unintentional. Consider this: as the college student population increases, so to has the incidence and significance of mental health concerns for our students. Substance abuse among college students exhibits several worrisome trends. The scale and scope of the sexual assault epidemic on our campuses is horrifying. The uncertainty of the post-2008 job market and the increasingly contingent and precarious nature of work in our neoliberal world present a post-graduation outlook that is bleaker for this generation than it was for any of their predecessors (to say nothing of the victim-blaming from those very forebears).

These are interrelated and telling concerns; they describe a significant portion of our students’ reality. Yet we’re telling them that effort and pluckiness will suffice to change the world, just like that effort and pluckiness got them to graduation. But it wasn’t just effort and pluckiness. For many of our students, the path to graduation was strewn with detours, interruptions, even crises like the ones detailed above–perhaps the way forward for them will be littered with similar obstacles. We celebrate the triumph over adversity, as well we should, but I wish we would give ourselves permission to recognize that adversity as something more than the thing we get over and never speak of again. If we don’t sit with the rough edges of our journey, we forget how we made it. Our students make it through like we did: sometimes through individual effort, but more often from the support, compassion, and vital companionship and affirmation of those around us. I don’t think we pay nearly enough attention to that fact. Nobody does it all by themselves, but I worry that we’re telling our students they have to do exactly that, rather than giving them permission to fail, to fall short, to admit they need help. Because those lessons are hard ones to learn, all the more so if there aren’t examples or encouragement for us to follow. Believe me, I know."



"I was afraid of other people, and afraid of what I’d learn from them. I believed asking for help was an admission of defeat. I’m in a career field that places a high value upon the appearance of professionalism; I’m expected to have it together, to know what I’m doing. To admit that wasn’t the case was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. I can see now that I wouldn’t have done it were it not for the people around me who helped me feel safe and supported when I was at my most raw and wounded. I didn’t want to talk about my past, what I’d done, or what had been done to me, but those around me helped me realize that if I didn’t, I would continue to carry it with me. Doctors, nurses, counselors, clergy, spouse, parents, siblings, co-workers, others in recovery, random strangers, Vin Scully, my pets–it was their voice, their connection, and their freely-given kindness that sustained me.

It was not the smoothest or easiest road from there to here; don’t cue the happy closing music yet. I still struggle. I still need lots of help. I still act like a jerk to the people who are helping. But I have learned this truth: there are times when life will break me. The problem isn’t being broken, it’s in not letting others help put me back together. When I graduated, I went out into the world, and the world beat me up while I sat and watched. I thought fighting back was a solo project, so I failed. Only when I gave others the chance to help me, and accepted that support and affirmation honestly and without begrudging it, did I stop getting beaten up.

That’s my advice, then, to you graduates. You will go forth and hopefully forge many successes for you and your loved ones. But you will also fall short. There will be failures. There will be wounds inflicted by yourself and by others. You will find yourself in places you did not plan to be. You may even find yourself broken. And when that happens, remember that you are neither the first nor the last to end up there. Others have, too, and they can help. It is no defeat to ask for others to help you, and to depend upon that assistance. It’s a victory over fear and anger, that’s what it is. As a society, we tell ourselves that the individual reigns supreme. But it does serious damage when we take that ethos too seriously. Not every problem can be solved by an individual. Not every success is the product of an individual. There is no shame in recognizing those facts as they operate in our lives."
via:audreywatters  kevingannon  2017  resilience  pluckiness  grit  education  realworld  highered  highereducation  adversity  mentalhealth  well-being  uncertainty  expectations  kindness  compassion  companionship  substanceabuse  academia  colleges  universities  brokenness  professionalism  help  helplessness  success  individualism  support  assistance 
may 2017 by robertogreco
The Overflowing Froth of Realness: Iowa BIG | ThinkThankThunk
"It’s been slow, especially because I’m used to running my own little kingdom of a classroom, but Iowa BIG is bearing the fruit of a community-focused, project-based model.

The dream was to create a schooling experience with a seamless connection and sometimes blurred difference between who’s doing the learning and who’s doing the supporting of that learning. As I watch my students move out into the community to pitch their projects and seek support from local experts and interested parties, I can’t help but beam with pride.

I woke up this morning to an inbox full of reports and evidence of community building that I had no direct control of: students telling me that they met with local counselors and psychologists that have steered a project on mental health in a totally new direction; I didn’t do that. 300 people gathering to support a student’s long-term study of gender equality this Friday. I had such a small role in that.

Community Building, Inc.

It all comes down to the view of community building as a profession. I was brought into that fold by a local media company; their constant drum beat being that a built community, a connected network where the central node becomes less and less so, is vital to the success of schools, businesses, and the ability for residents to thrive.

I have to admit I didn’t get it at first… So, we should, um, have hang-outs at coffee shops? Sure, but what should the conversation be? You don’t get to plan that, but you do get to support it and help drive it. But don’t these Luddites have a complete lack of understanding of my beautiful vision for education? No/Yes, but they’re integral in creating a vision for education that’s more doable and effective than your “beautiful vision.”

At Iowa BIG, students, faculty, and, most importantly, the community at large pitch projects into our pool. The students then pull from that pool know already that the project matters to someone. The teaching and learning of the students overflows beyond any individual teacher so quickly, it’s almost amazing that we’ve intentionally left the community out of education for so long. Sure, parents support sporting events, and some donate money to the schools, but actual involvement in the educational process has been becoming more and more divorced.

Why else would we have such complicated conversations about grading? I know I’ve spilled some serious digital ink on the subject. If Wormeli is right, that grades are supposed to be communicative over time, instead of summative of a time, then why wouldn’t we carry that naturally beyond the preposterously reductionist practice of grading directly into instruction and mentoring?

As a teacher, my only real talent is the experience I have of working with young people. I can take the smallest tell and imagine what misconception or hang-up may be preventing that project/student from moving forward. That’s my profession. I am not so good at generating a thousand project ideas for every student and having all those ideas hit the mark. Many teachers suffer needlessly over this ineffable hubris that has been placed on the teaching profession: somehow, student interest and buy-in must stem from the teacher or else, I must be a bad teacher.

That’s impossible! For every student!? Impossible!

Yet, I see burned out teachers every May wishing for a break. I then see those same idealists stand up with a firmed chin in August to try it again. You know what they say about repetition…

Without creating a network of interconnected communicative nodes, all dedicated to the education of the network’s students, bringing them into how the community gets work done and needs work done, you’ll never achieve the individualized instruction that everyone claims to want. You’ll never attain the quandrant-D-OMG-engaging-real-world-real-real-World lessons everyone’s trying to design. The school budgets aren’t big enough, but a symbiotic, intentionally-built relationship between education, business, nonprofit, government, and so on?

That’ll do it.

Schools that are Just Killing It:

Blue Valley CAPS [http://www.bvcaps.org/s/1403/start.aspx ]
Northland CAPS [http://www.nkcschools.org/northland-caps ]
Makerspace@Lakewood City Schools [http://www.makerspacelcs.com/ ]
Eagle Rock, CO [http://www.eaglerockschool.org/ ]
Iowa BIG (obvi) [http://iowabig.org/ ]"
shawncornally  iowa  community  mentors  mentorships  generalists  teaching  education  openstudioproject  lcproject  learning  relationships  networks  explodingschool  iowabig  bluevalleycaps  nortlandcaps  eaglerockschool  control  connections  2014  interconnectedness  realworld  projectbasedlearning  pbl  interconnected  interconnectivity 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Simple Genius: Pockit, A Game Console With No Screen And No Graphics | Co. Design
"Is a video game still a video game if there's no... video? Designer Adam Henriksson grabs that question by the horns with Pockit, a game console concept that has no graphics whatsoever. Instead, it's a Wii-like motion-sensing wand that "encourages everyone to be physical and have a reason to break norms," he writes. Rather than waving the wand around in front of a screen -- which is the only way you get to see what your wand is representing--the Pockit moves that aspect of the game experience into your own mind's eye. Whether you've configured the Pockit to be "running" a swordfighting game or something else, the point is that the players are focusing their attention on each other in real life, not virtualized avatars."

[See also: http://adamhenriksson.com/?p=72 AND http://www.tuvie.com/pockit-revolutionary-gaming-console-concept-enhances-social-engagement/ via: http://inspirationfeed.a-small-lab.com/post/13234063326/ ]
gaming  games  play  videogames  pockit  adamhenriksson  2011  ios  iphone  interactivity  realworld  johannsebastianjoust  johansebastianjoust 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Business Innovation Factory | Participatory Design Studio
"What if we put students in the driver's seat of a new kind of R&D to transform education? One that provided a platform for engaging students more fully in a real world effort that also involves faculty, education administrators and other system players? Could we improve a student's education experience? Yes. Could we take it a step further and transform education itself? Yes.

The Business Innovation Factory's participatory design studio gives students the opportunity to use real-world research and design methodologies to transform their student experience. Framed within the context of a real problem, the lab leads students through the design process, ultimately landing on a set of solutions to improve their experience."

[See also: http://businessinnovationfactory.com/projects/sxl ]
businessinnovationfactory  via:monikahardy  lcproject  learning  innovation  education  transformation  realworld  research  design  problemsolving  apprenticeships  student-centered  studentdirected  tcsnmy  bigpictureschools  projectbasedlearning  unschooling  deschooling  pbl 
august 2011 by robertogreco
James Brown as school principal « Re-educate Seattle
"We talked about “Cultural Relations”…in which the school would rearrange the class schedule for an entire week while students led forums on issues like racism & sexism. The students led the forums. Adults were instructed to sit at their desks & stay out of the way.<br />
<br />
The result, of course, was mayhem. It was the same every year, with some of the discussions spiraling out of control, hordes of students skipping out to grab coffee…attendance counts hopelessly inaccurate. The administration had lost control of the school.<br />
<br />
But when you talk to alumni from that era, many will tell you that Cultural Relations was a life-changing experience. Because amid all the chaos, there were still moments when black kids, white kids, Asian kids, Latino kids, gay and lesbian kids, kids who had been abused, rich kids and poor kids . . . they engaged each other in authentic conversations about their lives and their experiences. These conversations were raw and unfiltered. They were real…"
stevemiranda  unschooling  deschooling  education  messiness  learning  chaos  control  administration  whatmatters  memories  highschool  school  schooliness  2011  authenticity  realworld 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Problem With Silicon Valley Is Itself - TNW Entrepreneur
"As a Brit who gave up cheerleading the European tech scene to make the pilgrimage to Silicon Valley to live, eat & breath the world’s leading hub for technology startup innovation, I’ve been largely unimpressed and disappointed by the quality of startups here.<br />
<br />
…I’ve interviewed around 200 startups & there’s only 2, out of 200, I think are game changers. Now, don’t get me wrong, Silicon Valley is an incredibly inspiring place to be. Everyone is doing something amazing and trying to change the world, but in reality much of the technology being built here is not changing the world at all, it’s short-sighted and designed for scalability, big exits & big profits…<br />
<br />
…building technology to solve trivial issues…entrepreneurship in the Valley has become productized…Many entrepreneurs are in it for the wrong reasons, they should be more focused on doing something big and good for the world…entrepreneurs are not exposed to enough real-world problems…"
entrepreneurship  via:javierarbona  siliconvalley  vc  realworld  realworldproblems  clones  goldrush  rinseandrepeat  gamechanging  2011  money  funding  socialentrepreneurship  airbnb  startups  ycombinator  capitalism  getrichquick  hermioneway 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Real-World Math - storify.com
"Hey, kids! Ever wonder how math is done in the real world? This is the way math is done in the real world."

Storify that I put together to document a conversation on Twitter about a specific math problems that Diana Kimball asked for help with.
math  mathematics  realworld  cv  storytelling  storify  collaboration  twitter  2011  timcarmody  robinsloan  dianakimball  games  boardgames  problemsolving  statistics  probability  conversation  comments 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Future Of College: Forget Lectures And Let The Students Lead | Co.Design
"The technological power of the "cloud" as an aggregator of global knowledge & social network capital combines w/ natural tendency to learn through sharing & playing to create a multidimensional, interconnected network that solves complex problems. Simply put: Purpose & play drive learning.

These students help us discern what is valuable about higher-ed learning & what needs to be shed to save it from complete ossification. The insular nature of academia could lead to its demise, but these students also see tremendous value in its ability to incubate. Unis become testing grounds where students can find mentors, receive funding, & iterate initiatives with real-world consequences. The design community can debate where innovation comes from, but we can no longer look to authoritarian, top-down dictation to drive societal change. If the blossoming of this pattern doesn’t point to a new trend in education, then it at least represents what these higher-ed institutions must become."
unschooling  deschooling  hierarchy  trungle  highereducation  highered  colleges  universities  organizations  education  learning  mentoring  mentorship  apprenticeships  problemsolving  criticalthinking  realworld  entrepreneurship  lcproject  johndewey  life  sugatamitra  peterthiel  via:lukeneff  play  purpose  academia  networkedlearning  networks  cloud  socialnetworks  authority  authoritarianism 
june 2011 by robertogreco
cloudhead - school
"Subjects and textbooks are just fences
arbitrary boundaries that corral learners
and keep them from wandering off into other territory.
A plot of land in exchange for a horizon.
Exploration replaced with Epcot Center.

Outside of school
science stumbles into art which tumbles into economics.
which is one click away from Picasso
which is right next to the photo you just posted on facebook.

Knowledge divided into subjects divided into classrooms
divided into textbooks divided into chapters
makes no sense
when everything touches everything."
cloudhead  headmine  unschooling  deschooling  education  learning  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  crosspollination  messiness  glvo  cv  lcproject  poetry  science  art  boundaries  cityasclassroom  realworld  knowledge  curriculum  curriculumisdead  teaching  schools  schooliness  shiftctrlesc 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Life is Not Standardized
"Life is Not Standardized:

One of the most powerful sentiments expressed by these students was that “life is not standardized nor should education” and it links many of the common threads from the presentations about the experience that students desire and feel are needed in education:

Engaged; Learner-Centered and Participatory; Passion-Based; Personalized; Customized; Intrinsically Motivated; Exploratory and Inquiry-Based; Real World, Interdisciplinary Project-Based Learning; Community and Change Focused; Collaborative and Cooperative Learning; Creative and Critical Thinking…

…students wanting to find ways to de-emphasize grading and shift our focus to intrinsic rather than extrinsic motivation…

…[students] cut right through the idea [of flipping the classroom] and saw it as nothing more than the same ol’ homework assignment dressed up in new media…"
homework  ryanbretag  education  lcproject  tcsnmy  teaching  pedagogy  learning  unschooling  deschooling  standardizedtesting  standardization  learner-centered  student-centered  studentdirected  self-directedlearning  intrinsicmotivation  progressive  schools  customization  passion-based  exploration  collaboration  cooperative  engagement  participatory  criticalthinking  creativity  realworld  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The City As School - Gilberto Dimenstein - Revitalizing Cities - Harvard Business Review
"I then realized that the educational process happens not just inside the school walls, but in three different places: school, family and community.

When I came back to São Paulo - a chaotic metropolitan area with 20 million people - I decided to do an experiment using this knowledge. The city was going through its worst period of violence and degradation. In my neighborhood, Vila Madalena, we developed the learning-neighborhood project in cooperation with a group of communicators, psychologists and educators. The core idea was to map the community's resources: theater, schools, cultural centers, companies, parks, etc. We created a network and trained the community to take advantage of all these assets, turning them into social capital. With this model, the school is trained to function as a hub, connecting itself to the neighborhood, and then, to the city."
cities  schools  explodingschool  urban  infrastructure  colinward  education  lcproject  informallearning  informal  thecityishereforyoutouse  socialcapital  gilbertodinmenstein  sãopaulo  cityasclassroom  experience  experientiallearning  realworld  schoolwithoutwalls  bolsa-escola  via:cervus  opencities  opencitylabs  networkedlearning  ivanillich  deschooling  unschooling  catracalivre  neighborhoods  community  communities  communitycenters  learning  families 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Technology and the Whole Child - Practical Theory
"For years, in our schools, teachers have told students that school is preparation for real life - a statement that divorced the meaning of school from the lives kids led in that moment. With the research, creation and networking tools at our disposal, we have the ability to help students see that the lives they lead now have meaning and value, and that school can be a vital and vibrant part of that meaning. We can help students to see the powerful humanity that exists both within them and all around them. And technology can be an essential piece of how we teach and learn about that."
technology  education  wholechild  constructivism  chrislehmann  johndewey  humanism  networking  socialnetworking  socialmedia  socialnetworks  teaching  learning  schools  change  reform  edtech  policy  progressive  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  realworld 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The School Day of the Future is DESIGNED | MindShift
"Unpredictable, inconsistent, & designed to be wildly relevant for learners, their engagement, & their development."

"Designing the day around discovery of information, connections to real world challenges, discussions digging into our experiences with the world."

[But then The School of One is brought up… goes to show that we need to move beyond slogans and mission statements to concrete examples of what we mean.]

[Oh, & Delicious is suggesting 'hybrid' as a tag for this bookmark. (I've used it to point back to these thoughts, which are now almost blog-length.) I've lost tolerance for that word ('blended' might eventually have the same effect) considering how I've heard it used for the past few months. More and more, I'm convinced that a hybrid of the traditional and the progressive (I know, another term that needs clarification) breaks both and likely creates something that is less effective or valuable than either of the two in their unaltered state.]

[My remarks seems appropriate considering Jim Groom's divorce from Edupunk http://bavatuesdays.com/dear-edupunk/ ]
schools  education  hybrid  mindshift  tcsnmy  progressive  onebreakstheother  purity  unpredictability  inconsistency  learning  studentdirected  student-centered  discovery  criticalthinking  realworld  schoolofone  missionstatements  clarity  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  experientiallearning  ellioteisner 
february 2011 by robertogreco
A Networked Learning Project: The Connected Day
[Broken link, alternative refs here:
https://steelemaley.io/2014/03/06/a-networked-learning-ecology/
http://www.networkedresearch.net/index.php/Networked_Learning_Ecology_Design
http://steelemaley.io/2015/10/25/the-rise-of-micro-schools/ ]

"Piper is a 15 year old who lives in Midcoast Maine, US. A year ago, Piper heard about a new way to learn, and decided to take part in a new learning experience called the Maine Networked Learning Project. Known as “the Mesh” to participants, this learning ecology offered Piper the chance to apply her passion for learning in highly experiential and collaborative ways with groups of young people of varied ages, adult and youth mentors with knowledge territory specialties and organizations focused on ensuring sustainable and resilient societies, economies, and the environment. This is a snapshot of her day…"
connectivism  cck11  thomassteele-maley  maine  mlearning  mobilelearning  mobile  networks  netoworking  lcproject  bighere  longhere  bignow  elearning  self-organizedlearning  self-organizedlearningenvironment  self-organization  sugatamitra  mesh  meshnetworks  twitter  googlereader  projectbasedlearning  realworld  farming  sustainability  ecology  projects  local  glocalism  experientiallearning  meetups  education  speculativefiction  designfiction  pbl  agriculture 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Are 1:1 tech initiatives the wrong kind of reform? « Teaching as a dynamic activity
"In a discussion I had with Russ Goerend several weeks ago, he noted that he and I are both 4:1. The rhetoric of 1:1 often focuses on the “real world”.  Unfortunately, 1:1 is not real world.  As more and more computing becomes cloud based, having one machine is less and less common.  Instead, Russ had the idea to have access to multiple devices in schools – laptops, netbooks, desktops, ipods, ipod touches, etc.  Then students can learn how to pick the best tool for the job.  Furthermore, students learn how to harness cloud computing so that they can access content and create from multiple devices.  Lastly, our conversation noted how cell phones and other mobile platforms have invaded adults’ free time.  That is, as access to email and other work oriented apps have become mobile, people haven’t worked less, they’ve actually worked more.  Why would we want to contribute to the disappearance of childhood by asking our students to take up the same yoke."
technology  educon  russgoerend  irasocol  1to1  4:1  jerridkruse  edtech  schools  realworld  tcsnmy  1:1 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Eight-year-old children publish bee study in Royal Society journal | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine
"The trick was to get the children to see the scientific process as a game – we play by a set of rules to discover hidden patterns and relationships in the world around us. It’s a viewpoint that Lotto firmly believes in and one that turns science education into “a more enlightened and intuitive process of asking questions and devising games to address those questions.” With games on their minds, the children started talking about how animals see the world, using everything from bug-eye lenses to videos of silly dog tricks. The conversation moved onto bees and how they forage for nectar, and the questions came thick and fast. In the childrens’ own words:

“We came up with lots of questions, but the one we decided to look at was whether bees could learn to use the spatial relationships between colours to figure out which flowers [to visit]…"
science  research  bees  children  teaching  learning  experimentation  pedagogy  realworld  tcsnmy  biology 
december 2010 by robertogreco
8-Year-Olds Publish Scientific Bee Study | Wired Science | Wired.com
"A group of British schoolchildren may be the youngest scientists ever to have their work published in a peer-reviewed journal. In a new paper in Biology Letters, 25 8- to 10-year-old children from Blackawton Primary School report that buff-tailed bumblebees can learn to recognize nourishing flowers based on colors and patterns.

“We discovered that bumblebees can use a combination of colour and spatial relationships in deciding which colour of flower to forage from,” the students wrote in the paper’s abstract. “We also discovered that science is cool and fun because you get to do stuff that no one has ever done before.”"
science  education  biology  research  bees  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  experimentation  realworld  via:cervus 
december 2010 by robertogreco
College Unbound
"College Unbound is designed to harness the passion of students. By connecting students with live-learning (internship) experiences that are rich with working knowledge and building skills, students become immersed in their learning. College Unbound is a vibrant, fast-paced learning environment. The College Unbound program brings educational concepts and theories to life and unites personal motivation and discipline with progressive coursework and real-world learning."
alternativeeducation  college  dennislittky  education  progressive  innovation  highereducation  schools  teaching  learning  creativity  lcproject  internships  apprenticeships  unschooling  deschooling  experientiallearning  realworld  collgeunbound  rhodeisland  providence 
october 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - Royston Maldoom - Vertrauen, Leidenschaft, Tanz, Pädagogik [Rhythm Is It]
"I think what children respond to in education at all ages is passion and people who want to share that passion and their experience with them. So, I don't usually use the word education. I call it adults sharing their passion and experience with children."

"There is a very strong case for getting artists into schools, but I don't think it's just artists. Schools should be porous. Children should be able to go out and others should be able to come in whether its carpenters, businessman, dancers, whatever. For me, school should be a meeting place, and not a ghetto where you take a child and say, "Despite the fact that everything of real interest is happening outside, you are going to sit there for the next fifteen years and we are going to educate you in isolation.""
arts  dance  education  roystonmaldoom  passion  tcsnmy  trust  teaching  learning  via:cervus  porous  schools  schoolascommunitycenter  realworld  explodingschool  openschools 
september 2010 by robertogreco
New Designs for Learning: A Conversation with IDEO Founder David Kelley | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights
"Analytical thinking is great. It’s the way you learned to be step-by-step—to collect data, analyze it & come up w/ a conclusion, like you did in science class. It is really useful, & I hope people keep doing it. It's very important. Design thinking is more experimental & less step-by-step. It's fuzzier. It's intuitive. It's empathic. We often say that it’s integrative thinking, where you put together ideas from different sources—it’s synthesis. This is a way of thinking that is not quite so linear, but you can build confidence in it if you do it over & over again…the basic premise of design thinking revolves around empathy, being understanding of what other people want, & how the world is put together from a social & emotional point of view…wouldn’t you have multiple faculty members with different points of view in the same classroom, so that the kids are not biased"

[via: http://stevemiranda.wordpress.com/2010/09/05/david-kelley-on-design-thinking-from-the-archives/ ]
analysis  synthesis  d.school  creativity  design  education  learningspaces  emergent  tcsnmy  schools  lcproject  designthinking  empathy  intuition  criticalthinking  21stcenturyskills  socialemotionallearning  bias  k12lab  prototyping  toshare  topost  nclb  making  doing  realworld  storytelling  generalists  scaling  davidkelley  socialemotional 
september 2010 by robertogreco
John Dewey: The School and Society: Chapter 3 : Waste in Education
"From the standpoint of the child, the great waste in the school comes from his inability to utilize the experiences he gets outside the school in any complete and free way within the school itself; while, on the other hand, he is unable to apply in daily life what he is learning at school. That is the isolation of the school -- its isolation from life. When the child gets into the schoolroom he has to put out of his mind a large part of the ideas, interests, and activities that predominate in his home and neighborhood. So the school, being unable to utilize this everyday experience, sets painfully to work, on another tack and by a variety of means, to arouse in the child an interest in school studies." [via: http://preoccupations.tumblr.com/post/476650780/from-the-standpoint-of-the-child-the-great-waste]
learning  pedagogy  johndewey  schools  schooling  tcsnmy  experientiallearning  experience  children  disconnect  progressive  realworld  unschooling  education  deschooling  lcproject 
march 2010 by robertogreco
dy/dan » Blog Archive » (One Of Many Reasons) Why Students Hate Algebra
"Would a real person need to solve this problem?...the solution realistic?...using a system of 2 equations?...in what ways does this problem help our students become better problem solvers?"...problem you will only find in a textbook...bizarre...how many different ways just 50 words can fail to square with reality. Why does each chaperone have to drive? Why can't we take 5 vans? Why do our vehicles have to seat the exact number of people in our group & no more?...Algebra teachers sell students a cheap distortion of the real world while insisting at the same time that it really is the real world. The cognitive dissonance is obvious & terrible. Students know the difference. It cheapens my relationship to them & their relationship to mathematics when you ask me to lie to them...Not only are the short-term consequences devastating but it makes that person distrustful or wary of the real thing. Make no mistake. We are making an alien of algebra. We are doing real damage here."
math  algebra  education  tcsnmy  teaching  learning  reality  disservice  realworld  realism  distortion  schools  schooling  textbooks  cognitivedissonance  deschooling  unschooling  authenticity  danmeyer 
january 2010 by robertogreco
How We Know § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM
"Moses spent the next five years developing a completely new curriculum. He called it the Algebra Project. Instead of confronting students with abstract equations, Moses took them out into the real world, traveling around Boston in search of experiences that could demonstrate the practical uses of math. A ride on the T became a lesson in coordinate graphing and negative numbers. Neighborhood landmarks stood in for integers. When Moses taught students about displacement, he had them measure the dimensions of their own bodies. The first rule of Moses’ math class was that students always had to “participate in a physical event.”
learning  research  intelligence  human  math  algebra  learningbydoing  education  tcsnmy  schools  curriculum  realworld  experience 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Douglas Rushkoff » New School: The New School
"I’ll be teaching my first course next Fall, Technologies of Persuasion. The beauty of the New School University’s model is that courses are not limited to those enrolled in a particular school or program - or even to full time students. So this means people from the real world can come in on an a la carte basis and just take my course. Meanwhile, grad students are exposed to people from the real world, already working in the industries we’re studying."
technology  academia  douglasrushkoff  propaganda  education  learning  aternative  open  realworld  crosspollination  thenewschool  highereducation  tcsnmy  explodingschool  alternative  deschooling  unschooling  openclassroom 
february 2009 by robertogreco

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