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robertogreco : recess   10

Charter School Nightmares
[via: https://twitter.com/rboren/status/946971918170775553 ]

"This is what recess at a *~bAy aReA cHaRteR~* is like.

The time allotted for recess is officially 25 minutes, but it is more like 15 with the transitions.

Teachers walk their students down to the black parking lot (without painted lines) structure. That same parking lot functions as the parent drop-off area in the mornings so there is oil and leaves galore on the ground. What you see in any area trafficked by cars. When the teachers drop the students off, the students sit in lines on the floor waiting until their entire grade is dropped off. Teachers are required to wait with students until the recess teachers come.

There are usually between 1 to 4 recess teachers. They are usually the PE or art teachers. The kids are not allowed to talk, because if they do, the recess teachers blow a whistle and everyone has to start over. They wait in lines until the recess teacher picks the quietest line, then they are allowed to WALK to whichever game they want. They are only offered a few choices - hopscotch, soccer, basketball, jump rope or organized races. There is no running allowed anywhere else other than the organized 30-foot or so races.

The picture above is the “basketball hoop”. Kids line up to shoot baskets into that milk crate. They are not allowed to play basketball with defense, offense, etc. They are only allowed to line up and shoot. Students have complained to me that they stood in line during all of recess to shoot a basketball but never had the chance because the line was too long.

The school just got their first real basketball hoop, but this is what the children used for god knows how long.

If anyone is caught running or touching another person (in any way), the recess teacher blows their whistle and everyone needs to sit down wherever they are standing for them to decide if it is something worth calling a principal down for or just a grade-wide talk.

After a very short recess, the students have to return to the lines that they started and silently walk back to their classroom, where lunch is served. Lunch is not served in a cafeteria. Lunch is exactly 15 minutes and it takes about 5 minutes to transition back to the classroom and get everyone lined up to receive lunch - which is how recess ends up being 15 minutes.

Again, no custodians so it’s normal to come back to your classroom and see piles of corn or rice on the floor, with no way of cleaning it."
schools  schooling  control  recess  play  prisons  2017  bayarea  behavior  children  abuse  charterschools 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Dear America: If you love kids, let your schools show your affection. - Taught by Finland
"I told them about how Finnish first and second graders have about four hours of school every day, which is more like a half-day back in the United States. Not only that, but kids in Finland have a 15-minute break built into every hour of instruction (more on that later); this means that a 4-hour school day involves just three hours of classroom time for first and second graders! This is incredible news to American parents and teachers, but it’s even more amazing to Italians. I spoke with one parent who told me that her daughter, a student at a public elementary school in Bologna, does 8-hour school days (8:00 am to 4:00 pm) with barely any time for recess. Oh. My. And I used to think that a typical schedule at an American elementary school was too much for kids!

The Finnish approach of providing less academic instruction to young kids is sensible. As students in Finland grow older, they generally spend more hours at school. For example, my sixth graders are in school about six hours every day compared with the four they used to have as first and second graders. 7- and 8-year-olds thrive on shorter school days because they need lots of time for free play. Sixth graders, not as much.

When you are in school for eight hours (or even six), there is little time and energy to play afterwards. School this long can easily kill creativity, not necessarily by what happens during lessons, but by the space it takes up in the lives of young children. Research has shown that kids only start to enter a deeper level of play—where creativity and problem-solving skills develop—after 30 minutes of uninterrupted free time. If you’re a young American and Italian student, these long stretches of free play are non-existent in schools, so the only hope is that you’d have time after the school day. But that’s unlikely to happen when you’re flat-out exhausted, your homework is burning a hole in your backpack and your bedtime is just a couple of hours from when you return home.

Finns—who are typically reserved—may not be pinching and coddling babies on the street, but they’re making sure that their children are getting what they need at school. Sometimes this looks like keeping the school day short for young kids. Of course, my argument hinges on the assumption that 7- and 8-year-old Finns are spending their after school hours engaged in free play, not structured tasks like private tutoring and organized sports (as is common practice in the United States).

In January of this year, I wanted to see how most of the first and second graders at my school were using their free time after school. I wanted to be sure that I wasn’t just thinking wishfully that Finnish kids were playing deeply after their last class. I wasn’t disappointed. For three hours, I attended their iltapäivä kerho (“afternoon club”)—a subsidized public program that enrolls 70% of the first and second graders at my school—that was exclusively play-oriented. The adult supervisors told me that they don’t even encourage the kids to complete their meager amounts of homework before they head home at 4:00 pm because they believe young children just need time to play with their friends. And that’s exactly what I saw these 7- and 8-year-olds doing: playing dress-up, building with legos and drawing.

As I mentioned earlier, Finnish kids are entitled to take a 15-minute break for every 45 minutes of instruction. Finland takes this so seriously that it’s even guaranteed by law. While I was visiting Rome, I was told that typically Italian high school students get just 10-minutes of break every day (and they’re expected to eat during this time)! On top of this, they will spend most of the school day in just one classroom; teachers come to them. Meanwhile, kids in Finland—young and old—receive 15-minute unstructured breaks throughout the school day and they have the opportunity to slip outside for fresh air during these times, even when it’s freezing.

Obviously, these 15-minute breaks are not long enough to provide young students with time for deep play, but they’re just long enough to refocus children. So, first and second graders in Finland are putting in three hours of high-quality classroom work every morning—because they’re paced by frequent breaks—and in the afternoon, they’re playing deeply throughout the entire afternoon. That’s a pretty sweet deal for kids.

But the case of Italy still befuddles me. They clearly love children but their schools—with their long and nearly recess-less school days—do not show evidence of their affection. I feel the same way about many American public elementary schools. We say we love children (and I know, deep down, we do) and yet, we send our kids to kindergarten at the age of five and they receive full-day academic instruction. We give young children just 20-minutes or so of recess for an entire school day. We throw dozens of standardized tests at our kids, starting in third grade or even younger, narrowing their curriculum and stressing them out, along with their teachers. We require young American kids to attend school each day for nearly twice as long as young Finnish children, leaving them with little time and energy for play after school.

By providing things like frequent breaks, shorter school days and less standardized tests, Finnish schools are not doing anything particularly innovative. This tiny Nordic country is simply making sensible decisions that support the wellbeing of all children. And when you stop to think about it, this is exactly what all school systems should be doing."
finland  education  schedules  scheduling  classtime  recess  2014  timwalker  lcproject  openstudioproject  play  freeplay  unschooling  deschooling  policy  us  italy  schools  teaching  learning  howwelearn  unstructuredtime  openstudio 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Recess
"Recess is a nonprofit artists’ workspace open to the public.  At once a studio and exhibition space, Recess initiates lasting connections between artists and audiences, presenting ambitious projects that embrace experimentation and focus on process.

Our signature program, Session, invites artists to use our storefront space to realize long-term projects that take advantage of our built-in public audience.

Expanding upon Session’s goal to define contemporary art in collaboration with an active audience, Recess hosts performances and event series, a critical writing program, online programs, and enjoys meaningful partnerships with likeminded institutions."



"Mission

Recess’s mission is to support the rigorous process of the contemporary artist by creating a space for productive activity that initiates a partnership with the public.

Our model combines studio and exhibition platforms, offering artists flexible space in which to generate new work. With agency to determine the visibility of their project and the parameters of its presentation, Recess artists realize ambitious goals in dialogue with an inquisitive audience.

Free and open to the public, Recess offers critical exposure for the artists we support while fostering an approachable environment that promotes valuable visual and intellectual interactions.

History

Recess was formed in May of 2009 to align with evolving conditions of creative practice and its public reception. When searching for an ideal location, we were acutely aware that emerging artists cannot afford to live or work in proximity to exhibition communities. Securing a platform to gain visibility and develop their creative goals and professional career is often an insurmountable task.
On site in Soho, we began challenging the established arts community to embrace changing modes of artistic production that were taking advantage of an active public. Recess eagerly stepped into the liminal space between polished gallery and private studio to take on ambitious projects that don’t “fit” squarely within the boundaries of these customary contexts.

In February of 2011, we received a wonderful invitation to collaborate with Charlotte Kidd and Dustin Yellin of Kidd Yellin Studios in Red Hook. Kidd Yellin offered Recess a project room in their dynamic art space to serve as second site for Session. With access to Kidd Yellin’s gallery, studios and vibrant artists community, Session artists began working to further Recess’ mission in this neighborhood. Recess’s final project at Kidd Yellin Studios concluded in December, 2011.

In summer of 2012, Recess began collaborating with Dustin Yellin by opening an additional space for Session at Pioneer Works, Center for Art & Innovation, the new arts space at 159 Pioneer Street in Red Hook, one of Brooklyn’s prominent arts destinations."
stuidos  art  openstudioproject  openstudio  audience  recess  nyc  collaboration  lcproject  studios  glvo 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Recess
"Recess is a social platform to organize and discover participatory sports and fitness activities in your local community. Recess connects you with other people around the sports you love to play, and makes it easy to do so. Join your friends after work for a soccer game, discover weekend kickball games in the local park, or organize morning runs with your neighbors."

[via: http://interactiondesign.sva.edu/festival/2012/recess.html ]
iphone  applications  recess  social  sports  play  ios 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Op-Ed Contributor - At Schools, Playtime Is Over - NYTimes.com
"Now that most children no longer participate in this free-form experience — play dates arranged by parents are no substitute — their peer socialization has suffered. One tangible result of this lack of socialization is the increase in bullying, teasing and discrimination that we see in all too many of our schools."
davidelkind  psychology  play  education  children  kids  childhood  socialization  social  recess  recesscoaching 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Blessing and Curse of Structured Recess - No Goofing Off - NYTimes.com
"At Broadway Elementary School here, there is no more sitting around after lunch. No more goofing off with friends. No more doing nothing.
ubstructuredtime  schools  schooling  recess  children  plan  education  control 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Philip K. Howard: Four ways to fix a broken legal system | Video on TED.com
"The land of the free has become a legal minefield, says Philip K. Howard -- especially for teachers and doctors, whose work has been paralyzed by fear of suits. What's the answer? A lawyer himself, Howard has four propositions for simplifying US law."
broken  innovation  reform  health  law  simplicity  risk  authority  us  schools  medicine  teaching  learning  education  philiphoward  trust  constitution  values  principles  rules  ted  fear  freedom  lawsuits  gamechanging  fairness  playgrounds  passion  care  waste  money  productivity  decisionmaking  hiring  judgement  paralysis  dueprocess  rights  threats  government  litigation  recess  warnings  warninglabels  labels  psychology  society 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The science of fun
"But the best argument for fun and play happens when you take it away. Deny play to young mammals and the consequences are colossal. This has been demonstrated powerfully in rats, with some of the most significant new science coming out of Canada. "What's been shown repeatedly, if you prevent juvenile rats from engaging in rough and tumble play, you get animals who have cognitive problems, emotional problems and they're socially incompetent. "In short, stop rats from horsing around and you get socially-awkward, troubled, dumbo rats. Worse still, male rats who never play become bad lovers....Fun is the brain's workshop. "If you look at countries with the lowest amount of recess time, and scholastic achievement, there's almost an exact correlation," says Pellis. "The U.S., which has the lowest recess rates, often does the worst" in scholastic achievement. It might even be the brains of children grow more at recess than in the classroom."

[via: http://www.wonderlandblog.com/wonderland/2009/11/play-makes-you-a-good-citizen.html ]
science  play  fun  intelligence  recess  schools  schooling  us  achievement  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  lcproject  learning  mammals  research  cognition  neuroscience 
november 2009 by robertogreco
School Recess Gets Gentler, and the Adults Are Dismayed - New York Times
"From Cheyenne, Wyo., to Wyckoff, N.J., recess — long seen as a way for children to develop social competence, recharge after long lessons, and resist obesity — is being rethought and pared down.
children  play  learning  schools  education  policy  recess  obesity  health 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Cartoon Network - Rescuing Recess
"So Cartoon Network has created a successful, award-winning national movement called “Rescuing Recess” and National Recess Week (9/24/07-9/28/07) to safeguard and promote daily recess!"
children  play  recess  schools  policy  learning  obesity  health  education 
december 2007 by robertogreco

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