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How to Make Homemade Pizza, Grandma Pie-Style | Bon Appétit
“A chewy-crisp crust, endless topping ideas, and do-ahead ease. Pizza made in a sheet pan is the simplest, tastiest way to feed a crowd.”
recipes  pizza  2019  glvo 
july 2019 by robertogreco
Samin Nosrat’s 10 Essential Persian Recipes - The New York Times
"The author of “Salt Fat Acid Heat” and star of the related Netflix show chooses the dishes that define the cuisine for her."
food  recipes  saminnosrat  2019  persian 
may 2019 by robertogreco
Eros Black Sauce and Noodles – The Slow Zone
"If you pay no heed to what certain foods, in certain situations, tell us then we are missing something important and fundamental about the plot of a story.

Food in fiction allows the reader to share an intimate moment with a character, place or event. [Spoiler warning if you haven’t read Leviathan Wakes : Chapter 22 or S01E06]

“He’d stopped at a noodle cart, two new yens’ worth of egg noodles in black sauce steaming in their cone, when a hand clapped on his shoulder.” (Leviathan Wakes: 22 : Miller)

When Josephus Miller loses his job and travels to Eros searching for Julie Mao, he stops at a noodle cart for a steaming cone of “two new yens’ worth of egg noodles in black sauce.”

What do these noodles and sauce really represent?

The price gives us a first glance at the budget restrictions on Miller. We aren’t really sure what two new yen can really buy, but we infer that it isn’t much. Noodle carts are seen throughout the book and television series. They represent an irreplaceable part of the culture in which they feed. They are cheap, easy and abundant.

Out of all of the sauces James S. A. Corey could’ve have used, why does Miller select black sauce?

This imagery of black sauce represents two aspects of Miller’s current situation,

1. His sense of self-worth is low and the color black represents the dark thoughts, and confusion, that go unsaid. James S. A. Corey could have simply said that Miller wasn’t himself felt sad for the cards he’d been dealt. Instead we order some noodles alongside Miller taking in the scene. We, the readers, get to view the depth of his anguish for just two new yen.

2. We imagine the sauce as something dark and thick. It is a symbol of the situation Miller finds himself in. The troubles he has encountered, and will in the future, are seemingly inescapable. His difficulties seem so impassable. so dense and impenetrable.

All of this is communicated to us in a single sentence. This is the power of food in fiction. In a story that may seem distant and difficult to comprehend, we are able to engage with the story on a very human level.

Eros Black Sauce and Noodles

[recipe follows, with video]"

[See also: http://theslowzone.com/

"I, Carlo, created this site dedicated to everything Expanse: novels, novellas, and the series. The inspiration to make this site came from a literal hunger. Yes, my stomach made me do it!

Every time James S. A. Corey made reference to food, my stomach growled and protested. The meals presented were different, but described so well that I could almost smell the curry or peanut sauce.

My focus is not only on the food of the Expanse, but also the literary elements of the novels and novellas.

Please follow and comment on my quest for everything Expanse!

Cordially,

Carlo"]
theexpanse  recipes  srg  food  noodles  via:lukeneff  2019  belters  jamescorey  books  fiction 
may 2019 by robertogreco
James Luckett en Instagram: “people ask me all the time, they say James, that toasted black sesame + nori sourdough sounds neat but what do you do with it, and i always…”
"people ask me all the time, they say James, that toasted black sesame + nori sourdough sounds neat but what do you do with it, and i always say, make a grilled Amish havarti + Black Forest ham + Korean kkaennip-jangajji sandowich - pair this umami rich layered melty with a minerally sauvingon blanc or spicey bitter pilsner and your evening porching just went from decidedly good to decadently great and kool as ever."
food  recipes  jamesluckett  breat  sandwiches  grilledcheese  2019 
april 2019 by robertogreco
The Secret to Fried Cauliflower That Is Savory Yet Light - The New York Times
"When I’m craving a lunch that’s special but not fancy, or when lunchtime catches me by surprise, I head to the tiny restaurant Standard Fare in Berkeley. Run by Kelsie Kerr, one of the chefs at Chez Panisse who taught me to cook, Standard Fare is mostly kitchen; at lunchtime, customers turn the wide sidewalk into an ad hoc dining room, perching atop a row of metal stools with bowls of soup and focaccia sandwiches on their laps.

My lunch mantra is “as many vegetables as possible,” so I usually order the vegetarian sandwich, which is always piled high with whatever greens and vegetables catch Kerr’s eye at the farmers’ market, all enriched and brightened by generous doses of sauces and vinaigrettes. But when I stopped in a month or so ago, the daily special of cauliflower steaks with turmeric-spiced chickpeas sounded equally virtuous but more satisfying. Besides, I love caramel-sweet roasted cauliflower and will take any opportunity to eat it. I was typically harried, hungry and running late, so I felt lucky when I snagged one of the few inside seats. As I turned to scan the kitchen and gauge how long it might take the cooks to prepare my lunch, Kerr brought over a plate of fried cauliflower on a bed of fragrant spiced chickpeas, all showered with herbs and sizzled cumin seeds.

I hadn’t expected the cauliflower to be fried, but I was delighted by the way the tender, golden crust shattered in my mouth. Fried vegetables, often overbattered and undercooked, tend to disappoint me with their tough or soggy crusts. This cauliflower, though, was savory yet light. And though it had clearly been battered, it was also somehow sweet with the sort of browning that results from long, steady roasting. I looked back at the kitchen to thank the person who’d done such a nice job of preparing my lunch. But no one was frying anything! Fried food — especially when it’s battered — must be cooked to order and served immediately; otherwise it grows limp as it cools. And while there’s plenty of pleasure to be taken in sneaking a bite of cold, leftover fried chicken from the fridge late at night, you cannot serve soggy fried chicken — or soggy anything else — at a restaurant. Especially if you’re Kelsie Kerr, one of the most steadfast, exacting chefs the Bay Area has ever known.

On my way out, I asked Kerr for her recipe. I wanted to know how she had managed the technical feat of producing cauliflower that boasted the best characteristics of both roasted and fried. “Oh,” she responded with a knowing chuckle that sent her freckles dancing, “it’s Ella’s recipe.” I was stunned. I met Ella, Kelsie’s lithe, red-haired daughter, in 2001, when she could barely walk. It took me a moment to get used to the thought that she’s now 19 and able to develop recipes that hold muster in her mother’s kitchen. I begged Kerr to email me the recipe.

What she sent seemed simple enough. Made with a mixture of brown rice and tapioca flours, the batter lacked gluten, which explained the cauliflower’s delicate crust. When wheat flour is mixed with water, gluten strands develop and strengthen, giving structure to a batter or dough — a characteristic desirable in a crusty loaf of bread, but less so in a light pastry or crust.

When I tried the recipe at home, the cauliflower’s thin batter turned an amber lace as it fried in coconut oil. By the time I flipped each slice, the batter no longer covered the entirety of the second side, but those exposed bits of cauliflower — hugging the hot metal of the pan — took on a dark caramel color, growing extra sweet along the way.

“When Ella was a high school sophomore,” Kerr told me when I called her for the cauliflower’s origin story, “she invited some friends over for dinner.” Not wanting to intrude where she sensed she was not welcome, Kerr kept quiet even as she watched her teenager battering and frying the cauliflower in advance. “I remember thinking there was no way it’d still be crispy that evening, but I didn’t say a word.” Then, when Ella served dinner, Kerr was taken aback. “I thought: Holy mackerel! This is delicious,” she recounted with delight. “I knew it was a keeper because it was a fried dish we could make ahead in batches at the restaurant and warm to order.”

Culinary progeny often end up in the kitchen alongside their parents, but I didn’t remember Ella’s ever showing an interest in cooking. I asked Kerr if Ella has always liked to cook. “She has, but she doesn’t like to take advice from her mother,” she answered dryly. “She prefers to learn from YouTube.” I wasn’t sure I heard Kerr right, so I asked her to clarify. “Yeah, she has all of these different YouTube cooks that she loves to watch.” Bursting into laughter, I marveled at the thought. Kerr has been cooking professionally since 1981 — probably longer than some of those YouTube chefs have been alive. She’s one of the most accomplished, knowledgeable chefs in the country. And yet, her daughter is partial to watching other folks cook online. As a student of cooking, I find this maddening. As the daughter of a steadfast, exacting mother of my own, I find it entirely relatable.

When I asked Kerr how it made her feel to be upstaged by YouTube, her generosity surprised me, “That’s Ella,” she said. “She’s so casual in her cooking. I’ve learned to trust her because she always does things I find suspicious, and they always turn out delicious.”"

[Recipe:
"Crispy Spiced Cauliflower Steaks"
https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1020168-crispy-spiced-cauliflower-steaks ]
cauliflower  recipes  2019  saminnosrat  food  cooking 
april 2019 by robertogreco
The Food Lab: How to Roast the Best Potatoes of Your Life - YouTube
"Read up on the full details here: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/12/the-best-roast-potatoes-ever-recipe.html

This year, I decided to reexamine my potato-roasting method from the ground up with the idea of completely maximizing that crisp-to-creamy contrast in each chunk of potato, testing and retesting every variable, from cut size to potato type to boiling and roasting methods. The result is this recipe, which I firmly and un-humbly believe will deliver the greatest roast potatoes you've ever tasted: incredibly crisp and crunchy on the outside, with centers that are creamy and packed with potato flavor. I dare you to make them and not love them. I double-dare you.

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS:
- Large chunks of potato maximize the contrast between exterior and interior.
- Parboiling the potatoes in alkaline water breaks down their surfaces, creating tons of starchy slurry for added surface area and crunch.
- Infusing the oil with garlic and herbs gives the potato crust extra flavor.

NOTES
Russet potatoes will produce crisper crusts and fluffier centers. Yukon Golds will be slightly less crisp and have creamier centers, with a darker color and deeper flavor. You can also use a mix of the two. The potatoes should be cut into very large chunks, at least 2 to 3 inches or so. For medium-sized Yukon Golds, this means cutting them in half crosswise, then splitting each half again to make quarters. For larger Yukon Golds or russets, you can cut the potatoes into chunky sixths or eighths.

INGREDIENTS
Kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon (4g) baking soda
4 pounds (about 2kg) russet or Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters, sixths, or eighths, depending on size (see note above)
5 tablespoons (60ml) extra-virgin olive oil, duck fat, or beef fat
Small handful picked rosemary leaves, finely chopped
3 medium cloves garlic, minced
Freshly ground black pepper
Small handful fresh parsley leaves, minced

DIRECTIONS
1. Adjust oven rack to center position and preheat oven to 450°F/230°C (or 400°F/200°C if using convection). Heat 2 quarts (2L) water in a large pot over high heat until boiling. Add 2 tablespoons kosher salt (about 1 ounce; 25g), baking soda, and potatoes and stir. Return to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until a knife meets little resistance when inserted into a potato chunk, about 10 minutes after returning to a boil.

2. Meanwhile, combine olive oil, duck fat, or beef fat with rosemary, garlic, and a few grinds of black pepper in a small saucepan and heat over medium heat. Cook, stirring and shaking pan constantly, until garlic just begins to turn golden, about 3 minutes. Immediately strain oil through a fine-mesh strainer set in a large bowl. Set garlic/rosemary mixture aside and reserve separately.

3. When potatoes are cooked, drain carefully and let them rest in the pot for about 30 seconds to allow excess moisture to evaporate. Transfer to bowl with infused oil, season to taste with a little more salt and pepper, and toss to coat, shaking bowl roughly until a thick layer of mashed potato–like paste has built up on the potato chunks.

4. Transfer potatoes to a large rimmed baking sheet and separate them, spreading them out evenly. Transfer to oven and roast, without moving, for 20 minutes. Using a thin, flexible metal spatula to release any stuck potatoes, shake pan and turn potatoes. Continue roasting until potatoes are deep brown and crisp all over, turning and shaking them a few times during cooking, 30 to 40 minutes longer.

5. Transfer potatoes to a large bowl and add garlic/rosemary mixture and minced parsley. Toss to coat and season with more salt and pepper to taste. Serve immediately."
2016  potatoes  recipes  glvo  food  jkenjilópez-alt 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Cuisine Ingredients | FlowingData
"Looking for the ingredients that make food taste different around the world."
food  ingredients  visualization  dataviz  datavis  data  recipes 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Clint Smith on Twitter: "Question for the foodies out there: What are the best vegetarian dishes for someone who realllyyyyyy loves meat (me👈🏾) but is looking to try and eat more meat-free meals?"
"Question for the foodies out there:

What are the best vegetarian dishes for someone who realllyyyyyy loves meat (me👈🏾) but is looking to try and eat more meat-free meals?

Y’all really can’t through. This is amazing! Enough veggie recipes to last us until the end of time."

[See replies.]
food  recipes  vegetarian  2018 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Seasonal recipe guide: Preparing meals fresh from the market
"These recipes showcase the best of Bay Area seasonal produce. Many come from our region's top chefs, and all have been tested in the Chronicle Test Kitchen. Go to your local market and get cooking."
food  recipes  california  sarahfritsche  seasons  produce  sanfrancisco  bayarea  glvo 
july 2017 by robertogreco
The American Thanksgiving - The New York Times
"Americans all come from somewhere. Their families may have roamed the continent for thousands of years before the Mayflower dropped anchor. They may have been on the ship. They may have come on later ones, freely or in chains. They may have come by truck, train or airplane. They came. And their journeys are reflected in the food they or their descendants eat. The Times asked 15 families from across the country to show us the holiday dishes they make that speak most eloquently about their heritage and traditions. The stories of these home cooks help tell the story of the nation, the story of who we are. — SAM SIFTON"
diversity  thanksgiving  us  2016  food  recipes  families  video  glvo  classideas  immigrants  immigration  culture  society  cooking 
november 2016 by robertogreco
How to Make Pancakes - NYT Cooking
"Through all the breakfast fads, pancakes stand resolute, the definitive breakfast dish, something almost everyone loves and all of us should master. They are the indulgent heroes of the breakfast table: eggy, salty and just this side of sweet. There may have been struggles with burned bottoms and raw interiors in your past, but with a well-made batter and some practice with your stove, you can achieve pancake perfection."
food  cooking  pancakes  recipes  srg  glvo  vi:tealtan 
june 2016 by robertogreco
How to Make Rich, Flavorful Caramel Without Melting Sugar | Serious Eats
"Want to know something crazy? Sugar doesn't melt; it undergoes thermal decomposition. That may sound like a pedantic distinction, considering we've all watched sugar effectively melt into a pool of caramel atop crème brûlée, but the implications are huge—worthy of far more explanation than a mere tl;dr.

Man, who am I kidding; you're here for the tl;dr, aren't you? Okay, fine. Here goes: Caramelization occurs independent of melting. Consider the above photo exhibit A—neither brown sugar nor turbinado, but granulated white sugar that I caramelized without melting. It's dry to the touch, and performs exactly like granulated white sugar.

Except, you know, the part where it tastes like caramel.

That opens up a world of possibility, as it works flawlessly in recipes for buttercream, mousse, or cheesecake, which can accommodate only a small amount of caramel sauce before turning soupy or soft. It's also ideal for desserts that would be ruined by caramel syrup, which is by nature too hot for fragile angel food cake, and too viscous for soft candies like marshmallows or nougat. And, compared to caramel powder (made from liquid caramel, cooled and ground), it won't compact into a solid lump over time.

Some bakers work around these issues by swapping in brown sugar for caramel, but why accept an imitation when you can have the real thing? Unlike quirky brown sugar, this "granulated caramel" won't alter the pH of doughs and batters, which can negatively impact how our favorite cookies and cakes spread, rise, and brown (in turn affecting their texture and crumb). For example, sugar cookies made with granulated caramel stay crisp at the edges, and oatmeal cookies spread like they should.

What's more, granulated caramel is free from the impurities that cause molasses-rich sugars to smoke and burn at high heat. Granulated caramel also won't curdle boiled milk, which can happen when you're making eggless custards and cajeta with brown sugar.

Now, with enough technical know-how, almost any recipe can be reformulated to accommodate brown sugar or caramel sauce/syrup/powder, but granulated caramel requires no such precaution. It's a perfect one-to-one replacement for white sugar; no calculations, no adjustments, no tinkering. Just use it to replace sugar in any recipe you love, from the meringue on Gramma's chocolate cream pie to my own angel food cake.

So what makes this magic possible, and why haven't we been doing it since the dawn of time? Well, the answer goes back to that whole melting-versus-thermal-decomposition thing, so bear with me for a sec as we wade into the nitty-gritty.

Melting is a phase change that has no impact on chemical composition, like the transition from ice to water. It's still good ol' H2O either way, right? Under normal conditions, the melting point of any given substance is fixed—when ice hits 32°F, there's nothing we can do to stop it from melting. Phase changes are also reversible; you can melt and refreeze ice as many times as you like, with no loss of quality on either end.

Thermal decomposition, on the other hand, is a chemical reaction that breaks down molecular bonds to produce new substances. While it's not a perfect analogy, imagine a pile of grass clippings releasing carbon dioxide as it turns to mulch in the sun—an irreversible process with variable results (i.e., no two handfuls of mulch are exactly alike, or composted to the same degree). Instead of occurring at a specific point, thermal decomposition occurs over a range of temperatures determined by the intensity and duration of heat."
sugar  chemistry  cooking  caramel  recipes  food  2016  stellaparks  baking  srg 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Ceviche, Poke, Crudo, Carpaccio: Your Guide To Raw Fish Dishes Around The World - Modern Farmer
"Most seafood-heavy cultures have figured out that you don't need heat to eat fish and shellfish. The latest: the Hawaiian dish poke, which after a few years of trendiness out on the west coast has officially breached New York City's borders.

Given that this list is inspired by the poke-craze, we should narrow our criteria down a bit. Merely the absence of heat doesn’t necessarily qualify a dish for inclusion on this list; lox, gravlax, and nova, for example, are brined and/or cold-smoked to cure them, but are typically eaten as an appetizer, rather than a main course. Escabeche (or the Caribbean version, escovitch), appears very similar to a ceviche, but is typically cooked, either fried or poached, which disqualifies it. Crudo and carpaccio, too, aren’t really dishes, but more just adjectives meaning “raw”: They can refer to any protein served in any way.

What we’re getting at here are raw or marinated fish dishes, served as a main course. These dishes are gaining steam even away from the coastal regions where raw fish is an old tradition, partly because the US is ever-hungry for new and more exotic foods, but also because raw is an excellent way to appreciate high-quality seafood. These dishes came about as a way to celebrate and make use of the local catch, and have taken on different characters based on the different fish caught in different parts of the world. Eating a raw fish dish is a way to really see and taste what it’s like to live along a certain coast.

That said, there is, as with any seafood dish, a high risk of eating something you shouldn’t. In general, you should opt for pretty high-quality stuff here, to avoid the risk of food poisoning (which, to be fair, is a lower risk than you might think). But even more, you should be careful not to eat certain species of fish. Seafood Watch, run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, is the leading resource for learning about fish—you’d be surprised how many common species (bluefin tuna, for example) you should just…never, ever eat. Anyway, here’s our list!

Ceviche

Most associated with the coastal region of Peru, ceviche has spread to most of Latin America and even up into North America. At its core, ceviche consists of raw seafood marinated in strong citrus juice. The variety of seafood, type of citrus, length of marination, and garnishes (often herbs, vegetables, and chiles) vary considerably based on where the ceviche comes from; a Mexican ceviche may have little in common with a Peruvian ceviche. Types of seafood often include shrimp, squid, white fish like sea bass, and shark. Often it’s served with something crunchy, like fried green plantains, popcorn, or fried tortillas. Occasionally it’s mixed with tomato sauce or even ketchup. In Peru, the marinade itself is incredibly acidic, salty, and spicy, and is sometimes served in a shot glass before the meal. This is called leche de tigre, which mean’s “tiger’s milk.”

Sashimi

Sashimi is a very old Japanese preparation, and one of the seemingly simplest. The dish consists of carefully sliced raw fish (and occasionally meat) that’s not typically marinated and often served with no sauce and minimal garnishes. Unlike other raw fish dishes, sashimi is not preserved with acid or smoke, but given a slight extension in shelf-life due to the method with which the fish is killed, a spike through the brain known as ike jime. (Sushi, for what it’s worth, refers to the vinegared rice and not the fish; any topping with sushi rice is considered sushi.) Common fish for sashimi include salmon, tuna, squid, mackerel, and sea urchin. The Korean dish hoe, when it includes seafood, is extremely similar and differs only in that it is usually served with a sauce (soy, chili paste, that kind of thing).

Poke

A sort of hybrid ceviche/sashimi dish, the Hawaiian poke (POH-kay) is, these days, usually a bowl of cubed raw fish, sometimes served over rice, in a sauce. Most commonly it’s dressed with soy sauce, seaweed, and sesame oil, but it’s not uncommon to see Japanese mayonnaise, wasabi, hot sauce (often Sriracha), onions, avocado, or basically anything else in poke. It’s a fairly young dish; raw fish has been eaten by Hawaiians for centuries, but the dish recognizable as poke dates back perhaps to the late 19th century. It’s also one informed by immigrants, so poke is a particularly fluid dish. On the US mainland, the word “poke” tends to be used to refer to any dish of cubed raw fish in a bowl.

Tartare

Traditionally a French dish consisting of minced raw beef, seasoned heavily, and often served with a raw egg yolk, the basic preparation has been extended out to other proteins. Tuna tartare is perhaps the most common: It’s also a mound of finely chopped raw flesh, seasoned with basically anything, and served with something to put it on, like toast. Tuna tartare dates to the 1970s at a restaurant called Le Duc, in Paris.

Kinilaw

Ceviche, Poke, Crudo, Carpaccio: Your Guide To Raw Fish Dishes Around The World
By Dan Nosowitz on February 4, 2016

Mmmmm, delicious ceviche.y6y6y6, Flickr
Most seafood-heavy cultures have figured out that you don't need heat to eat fish and shellfish. The latest: the Hawaiian dish poke, which after a few years of trendiness out on the west coast has officially breached New York City's borders.

Given that this list is inspired by the poke-craze, we should narrow our criteria down a bit. Merely the absence of heat doesn’t necessarily qualify a dish for inclusion on this list; lox, gravlax, and nova, for example, are brined and/or cold-smoked to cure them, but are typically eaten as an appetizer, rather than a main course. Escabeche (or the Caribbean version, escovitch), appears very similar to a ceviche, but is typically cooked, either fried or poached, which disqualifies it. Crudo and carpaccio, too, aren’t really dishes, but more just adjectives meaning “raw”: They can refer to any protein served in any way.

What we’re getting at here are raw or marinated fish dishes, served as a main course. These dishes are gaining steam even away from the coastal regions where raw fish is an old tradition, partly because the US is ever-hungry for new and more exotic foods, but also because raw is an excellent way to appreciate high-quality seafood. These dishes came about as a way to celebrate and make use of the local catch, and have taken on different characters based on the different fish caught in different parts of the world. Eating a raw fish dish is a way to really see and taste what it’s like to live along a certain coast.

That said, there is, as with any seafood dish, a high risk of eating something you shouldn’t. In general, you should opt for pretty high-quality stuff here, to avoid the risk of food poisoning (which, to be fair, is a lower risk than you might think). But even more, you should be careful not to eat certain species of fish. Seafood Watch, run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, is the leading resource for learning about fish—you’d be surprised how many common species (bluefin tuna, for example) you should just…never, ever eat. Anyway, here’s our list!

Ceviche
cevichey6y6y6, Flickr
Most associated with the coastal region of Peru, ceviche has spread to most of Latin America and even up into North America. At its core, ceviche consists of raw seafood marinated in strong citrus juice. The variety of seafood, type of citrus, length of marination, and garnishes (often herbs, vegetables, and chiles) vary considerably based on where the ceviche comes from; a Mexican ceviche may have little in common with a Peruvian ceviche. Types of seafood often include shrimp, squid, white fish like sea bass, and shark. Often it’s served with something crunchy, like fried green plantains, popcorn, or fried tortillas. Occasionally it’s mixed with tomato sauce or even ketchup. In Peru, the marinade itself is incredibly acidic, salty, and spicy, and is sometimes served in a shot glass before the meal. This is called leche de tigre, which mean’s “tiger’s milk.”

Sashimi
ShutterstockShutterstock
Sashimi is a very old Japanese preparation, and one of the seemingly simplest. The dish consists of carefully sliced raw fish (and occasionally meat) that’s not typically marinated and often served with no sauce and minimal garnishes. Unlike other raw fish dishes, sashimi is not preserved with acid or smoke, but given a slight extension in shelf-life due to the method with which the fish is killed, a spike through the brain known as ike jime. (Sushi, for what it’s worth, refers to the vinegared rice and not the fish; any topping with sushi rice is considered sushi.) Common fish for sashimi include salmon, tuna, squid, mackerel, and sea urchin. The Korean dish hoe, when it includes seafood, is extremely similar and differs only in that it is usually served with a sauce (soy, chili paste, that kind of thing).

Poke
via Flickr user Grant ShindoGrant Shindo, Flickr
A sort of hybrid ceviche/sashimi dish, the Hawaiian poke (POH-kay) is, these days, usually a bowl of cubed raw fish, sometimes served over rice, in a sauce. Most commonly it’s dressed with soy sauce, seaweed, and sesame oil, but it’s not uncommon to see Japanese mayonnaise, wasabi, hot sauce (often Sriracha), onions, avocado, or basically anything else in poke. It’s a fairly young dish; raw fish has been eaten by Hawaiians for centuries, but the dish recognizable as poke dates back perhaps to the late 19th century. It’s also one informed by immigrants, so poke is a particularly fluid dish. On the US mainland, the word “poke” tends to be used to refer to any dish of cubed raw fish in a bowl.

Tartare
tuna tartareShutterstock
Traditionally a French dish consisting of minced raw beef, seasoned heavily, and often served with a raw egg yolk, the basic preparation has been extended out to other proteins. Tuna tartare is perhaps the most common: It’s also a mound of finely chopped raw flesh, seasoned with basically … [more]
food  recipes  ceviche  fish  cooking  2016  via:anne  sashimi  poke  tartare  kinilaw  yusheng  sushi  raw  crudo  carpaccio  rawfish 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Five Minutes a Day for Fresh-Baked Bread - Real Food - MOTHER EARTH NEWS
[I’ve been recommending this bread recipe in person and via email for years and I keep hearing back about it from others that the habit sticks, as it has for my family. I'm not sure why it wasn't bookmarked here earlier.]

[Don't miss these additional links within:

Master Boule Bread Recipe
http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/master-boule-bread-recipe-zmaz08djzgoe.aspx

Neapolitan Pizza Dough Recipe
http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/neapolitan-pizza-dough-recipe-zmaz08djzgoe.aspx

100 Percent Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread Recipe
http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/100-percent-whole-wheat-sandwich-bread-recipe-zmaz08djzgoe.aspx

Sticky Pecan Caramel Rolls Recipe
http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/sticky-pecan-caramel-rolls-recipe-zmaz08djzgoe.aspx

Easy Naan Bread Recipe
http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/easy-naan-bread-recipe-zmaz08djzgoe.aspx

Caramalized Onion and Herb Dinner Rolls Recipe
http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/caramelized-onion-and-herb-dinner-rolls-recipe-zmaz08djzgoe.aspx ]

[Printable version:
http://www.motherearthnews.com/print.aspx?id={B65A8F37-D482-4A0B-81B6-91611E284D11} ]
recipes  bread  2008  baking  food 
january 2016 by robertogreco
jackswifefreda on Instagram: “The Prego Roll is a Portuguese Garlic Steak Sandwich, found on cart vendors on the streets of Portugal. Mozambique was a Portuguese colony (1505-1975) and naturally their food crossed the border into South Africa. As a chil
"The Prego Roll is a Portuguese Garlic Steak Sandwich, found on cart vendors on the streets of Portugal. Mozambique was a Portuguese colony (1505-1975) and naturally their food crossed the border into South Africa. As a child the Prego Roll was the biggest treat you could get. 🌍

You just might find yourself saying: "damn, that's a good sandwich"."

[See also: https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prego_(culin%C3%A1ria)
http://www.cozinhatradicional.com/prego-no-pao/ ]
food  sandwiches  portugal  mozambique  pregonopão  recipes  tomake 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Recipe: Tomato Cobbler with Cornmeal-Cheddar Biscuits — Recipes from The Kitchn | The Kitchn
"I'm declaring this cobbler the Recipe of Summer. It take those pints of cherry tomatoes that you can't help bringing home from the farmers market and transforms them into silky, oh-so-tender bites. Plus, you know, cheddar biscuits. Trust me: It's worth turning on the oven for this one.

Make sure your cast iron skillet is well-seasoned for this recipe. Tomatoes are acidic, and they can dissolve the seasoning somewhat. This isn't a big deal with a well-seasoned skillet — just rub it with a little oil after cleaning — but it can set you back a few seasonings with a new skillet. New skillets can also sometimes give acidic foods an unpleasant metallic flavor.

If you'd prefer not to use cast iron for this, you can also cook the cobbler in a 12-inch stainless steel skillet with high sides or in a 13x9-inch baking dish.

On its own, this cobbler makes a very satisfying vegetarian main dish. One biscuit each, plus a generous scoop of warm tomatoes, and dig in! It's filling, but not actually too heavy — it still feels like a good summer dinner. It would also go nicely with some grilled chicken on the side."
recipes  cornbread  tomatoes  cobbler  2015 
august 2015 by robertogreco
The Ultimate Croque-Monsieur Recipe
"Dominique Ansel, the inventor of the Cronut, gave us the recipe to his favorite sandwich [XL Croque-Monsieur]. We'll never look at grilled cheese the same way again."
recipes  sandwiches  grilledcheese  cheese  food  glvo 
july 2015 by robertogreco
National Center for Home Food Preservation
"The National Center for Home Food Preservation is your source for current research-based recommendations for most methods of home food preservation. The Center was established with funding from the Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (CSREES-USDA) to address food safety concerns for those who practice and teach home food preservation and processing methods."
diy  food  recipes  glvo  via:jannon 
july 2015 by robertogreco
A Quiet Taco Revolution is Happening in South L.A. | The Nosh | Food | KCET
"Now that bulgogi tacos are de rigueur and foie gras tacos are back, the taco landscape is expanding once again. Introducing North African tacos via Revolutionario Tacos in South Los Angeles.

Chef and owner Farid Zadi worked in fine dining for years and taught at Le Cordon Bleu, but the French Algerian chef from Lyon is returning to the cuisine he knows best: the food of his childhood. In the case of one Tuesday afternoon, it's shakshuka.

In the kitchen, Zadi seasons layers of onions and red and green bell peppers with his homemade ras al hanout, a staple of North African cooking. He recites what goes into his spice mix: "Lavender, saffron, paprika, cumin, coriander. Some people put garlic powder, but I don't."

While he goes through his spice shelf, he continues: "Cumin, coriander...."

Zadi loses his train of thought when it's time to add the tomatoes and he re-seasons the sweating vegetables. "I'm making shakshuka in a wok, so I call it wok-shuka," he says.

He's also making a large stock pot of harissa at the same time, occasionally stirring the mixture of chilies. It's also made with what seems like an infinite number of spices: "Coriander, turmeric, lavender, saffron, sumac, anise seed, fennel seed, Spanish paprika, chili powder," he says. "I use three types of chilies: chile de California, chile de Mexico, and chile de árbol."

As the shakshuka cooks down, he takes it all in. "Now this is starting to smell like my childhood."

The smells swirling around the kitchen are of the Maghreb, the North African region that includes Tunisia, Morocco, and Algeria. And while most of us may be familiar with typical North African fare like Merguez sausage, lamb tagine, brik, and mint tea, Zadi uses ras al hanout and harissa in a very accessible, knowable way for Angelenos. His tacos, which include smoked beef and lamb smoked outside for four hours, are topped with his red, green, and Habanero harissa. Zadi says these flavors are very similar to Mexican food, due to the cultures' shared Spanish and Moorish influences.

Zadi and his wife and partner Susan quietly opened Revolutionario Tacos on May 31. They didn't do any marketing, but they already have something of a following from Zadi's pop-up events around town and from his previous restaurant Cafe Livre et le Marche in Culver City.

Weekends started to pick up and they've added weekend brunches in collaboration with chef Rui Mateo to make Japanese Peruvian-inspired food: ceviche and tiradito.

That might sound fancy, but they're still going to keep the prices down. As Susan puts it, their no-frills restaurant is a "quirky model" meant to challenge the fast casual dining experience. They want to provide convenient, fresh, and affordable meals for their new South L.A. community. Their menu includes a value menu of tacos under $2, but points out that a fuller meal won't cost any more than $10. They're also eager to get other chefs to do the same, but so far, no one has taken on their #FastFoodRevolution challenge when they put the call out on social media.

They're also trying to accomplish what other restaurants in this neighborhood aren't doing: cooking fresh vegetables that people crave. They say that 70% of their orders are vegetarian dishes, the blacked eyed pea falafel taco being the most popular.

They have a small table devoted to garnishes, pickled vegetables, and chilies. Perhaps thumbing their noses at high end establishments, a sign reads: "We source water locally straight from the TAP."

As Zadi finishes simmering the chilies, he strains some of the liquid and processes it until it becomes a thick paste. This should be enough for the week.

"I want to do something different," he says when he talks about his new restaurant concept. "But I'm still a purist in some ways. Everything needs to be properly cooked."

*********

Recipe: Preserved Lemons

From Chef Zadi: "You can use preserved lemons in any number of Mediterranean and Latin American soups, stews, and braises. Depending on how salty you want a recipe, you can use them un-rinsed with the pulp, or discard the pulp, rinse the skin, and finely chop the lemon quarters."

6 Meyer lemons
2/3 cup coarse salt (kosher or sea salt)
1 pint size mason jar or other food safe glass jar with non-corrosive lid

Wash and quarter lemons.

Put a layer of lemon quarters inside the jar and sprinkle with a tablespoon of salt. Repeat until you have added all the lemons. Pack them down, as much as you can, while adding more salt. There should be enough juice from the lemons to completely submerge the lemons. If not, add more lemon juice to top off.

Seal the jar and let it preserve for at least 30 days before using."
tacos  food  losangeles  2015  faridzadi  recipes  northafrica  morocco  tunisia  algeria  glvo  ruimateo  japanese  perú  restaurants 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Koshari (National Dish of Egypt) Recipe - The Daring Gourmet
food  recipes  koshari  egypt  glvo 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Classic Italian Risotto with Strawberry & Balsamic | Gennaro Contaldo - YouTube
"Yes -- that's right: Strawberry Risotto! It's not a pudding but a beautiful savoury recipe made easy by the maestro of Italian cooking. Gennaro shows you how to make a quick, simple risotto base which tastes great and then introduces the amazing combination of strawberries and balsamic vinegar. It looks great and tastes even better."
food  risotto  strawberries  glvo  gennarocontaldo  via:javierarbona  recipes 
may 2015 by robertogreco
MITCH IN THE KITCHEN : chermoula
"Chermoula is part of the beloved international family of garlicky herb sauces, which includes pesto, pistou, chimichurri, gremolata, persillade, and Italian salsa verde. It hails from North Africa and can be used as a marinade for seafood or meat, as well as a sauce that you slather on a beautiful piece of halibut, as I’ve done here. I also like it simply mixed with cooked chickpeas.

To make it, blend the following together:

parsley
cilantro
garlic
a bit of fresh or dried hot chile pepper
ground cumin and/or ground coriander seeds
saffron if you’re so inclined
salt
lemon juice and chopped up preserved lemons if you have them
olive oil"
food  recipes  chermoula  chimichurri  pesto  gremolata  persillade  glvo  garlic  northafrica 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Lucky Peach: Toasted Farro Linguine with Wild Mussels, Rainier, Fir Tips, Wild Watercress, and Sea Lettuce
"In The Seashore Issue, we took a trip to the Oregon coast, where we met up with a few of our friends (Portland chefs Johanna Ware, Johnny Leach, and Joshua McFadden) and took a Goonies-themed adventure: visiting the key sites where the movie was filmed, riding THE REAL JEEP from the movie right on the beach, and cooking food that honored both The Goonies and all of the seashore-y abundance of the Pacific Northwest. Joshua McFadden, of the Portland restaurant Ava Gene’s, made this dish on a portable stove out on the street in Astoria, Oregon, and we shot it on every surface possible in our hostel—on the floors of our room, other people’s rooms, closets, bathrooms, carpets, the cement outside—all while dragging around that huge clanking chain. Nobody seemed to care, or even notice.

If you can’t find some of these ingredients, don’t sweat it. Any sort of whole grain linguine will work, and it will still taste good without the fir tips. Both sea lettuce and arugula are delicious; use what you’ve got. But make sure to cook your pasta just shy of al dente, so that it can finish cooking in the beer-sea goodness without getting too soft.

Toasted Farro Linguine with Wild Mussels, Rainier, Fir Tips, Wild Watercress, and Sea Lettuce

Makes 4 servings

+ salt
2 dozen mussels
+ extra-virgin olive oil
4 garlic cloves
1 pound farro linguine
3 big pinches red chili flake
2 handfuls fir tips, when in season
½ can Rainier (or your local cheap beer equivalent) + extra for drinking
2 T butter
1 bunch scallions, sliced
2 handfuls watercress, preferably wild (if it’s small, add more as it will wilt down)
a handful parsley leaves, torn
a handful sea lettuces (or sub arugula, bibb lettuce, or anything green and delicious)
1 lemon
½ cup fresh breadcrumbs, toasted

1. If you get all the ingredients together ahead of time, this recipe should be on the table by the time you finish one can of Rainier. Bring a big pot of water to a boil and salt aggressively—it should taste like the sea. Meanwhile, scrub and de-beard the mussels under cold water.

2. Get a large sauté pan nice and hot and add two tablespoons of olive oil. Smash the garlic cloves with your hand and toss them into the hot oil. Do not burn the garlic. Remove from the heat if you’re in danger of doing so. Use the back of a spoon to smash the garlic into the oil.

3. Cook the pasta in the boiling salted water for 1 to 2 minutes fewer than what the package says. Stir often to prevent clumping.

4. Once the garlic is toasted but, again, not burned, add the chili flakes, mussels, and fir tips. Toss for 10 seconds, then pour in a ½ can of Rainier and cover with a lid. After a minute, the mussels should begin to open up. When most of them have opened, carefully pull them out with a spoon and set aside, doing your best to drain the sweet mussel liquor into the pan as you pull each mussel. If the pan looks particularly dry (there should be about a 1/8” of liquid), add more beer.

5. If all has gone according to plan, your pasta should be finishing just as you reach this step. Drain the pasta and add to the mussel pan, along with the butter. Coat the noodles with buttery sea-beer goodness, taste, and adjust seasoning. If it needs salt, add a splash of pasta water. If it needs spice, add more chili flakes.

6. Toss in the scallions, watercress, parsley, and lettuce. Toss and give it a squirt of fresh lemon. Remove from the heat, and hit with a glug of olive oil. Add back the cooked mussels, mix, garnish with breadcrumbs, and serve."
food  recipes  pasta  mussells  seafood  oregon  astoria  luckypeach  joshuamcfadden 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Hayao Miyazaki Makes Ramen at Studio Ghibli - YouTube
"This is my favorite segment from the "Making of Spirited Away" special on the DVD. It turns out that crunching on an animated movie is a lot like crunching on a video game. The staff starts making dinner in rotation and one night, it's the director's turn..."
hayaomiyazaki  ramen  cooking  noodles  via:lukeneff  srg  edg  glvo  studioghibli  recipes 
june 2013 by robertogreco
BOOK STAND
"BOOK STAND is an online art book shop based in Los Angeles specializing in unique art books, films and vintage publications. Inspired by the quirky personal libraries of imaginative individuals, our carefully edited catalogue is organized by ever-changing offbeat categories.

We believe the best book shops have the exceptional ability to create community, so stop by regularly for an inspiring program that includes conversations with emerging artists, artists' favorite recipes, field trips to beautiful bookstores, limited edition handmade bookmarks and guides to help you develop your creative reference library.

One dollar from every purchase goes towards supporting The Library Foundation of Los Angeles. Helping to promote greater awareness of the library's valuable resources, The Library Foundation of Los Angeles supports and enriches the capabilities, resources, and services of the Los Angeles Public Library."
recipes  food  cooking  photography  color  beauty  webdesign  glvo  design  art  gifts  books  artbooks  losangelespubliclibrary  lapubliclibrary  losangeles  via:nicolefenton  artistsbooks  webdev 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Ignacio's Mostly Latin Lunch, A Selby Film. Presented by T, The New York Times Style Magazine on Vimeo
"Chef Ignacio Mattos (formerly of Isa and Il Buco) makes a mostly Latin lunch at his home in Brooklyn with his wife, Gabi Plater; their son, Paco Plater Noya; and their friends David Tanis (a New York Times contributor and the author, most recently, of “A Platter of Figs“), Fernando Aciar (owner of O Café) and Pam Yung (a former pastry chef at Isa). Click here to see what’s on the menu."

[Recipes here: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/06/19/t-magazine/19selbyvideo.html ]
drink  caipirinhas  pamtung  fernandoaciar  davidtanis  gabiplater  ignaciomattos  fish  howto  video  theselby  edg  glvo  srg  recipes  cooking  brasileiro  brasil  brazil 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Taste Bites | Food at home & on the streets in Shanghai and around the world
"Taste Bites is a project that loves recipes, restaurants and eating. Based in Shanghai it shares recipes that focus on easy-to-find in China ingredients, reviews restaurants, and goes behind the scenes with other local food lovers."
recipes  cooking  china  restaurants  eating  srg  blogs  food  laurengollasch  shanghai  tastebites 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Food | KCET
Nice redesign  of the KCET food page
kcet  food  socal  losangeles  cooking  restaurants  recipes  srg  glvo 
september 2011 by robertogreco
McSweeney’s: Lucky Peach
"Lucky Peach is a new journal of food writing, published on a quarterly basis by McSweeney’s.

It is a creation of David Chang, the James Beard Award–winning chef behind the Momofuku restaurants in New York, writer Peter Meehan, and Zero Point Zero Production—producers of the Emmy Award–winning Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations.

Each issue will explore a single topic through a mélange of travelogue, essays, art, photography, interviews, rants, and, of course, recipes. The journal will be full color and perfect bound, with an eye toward exploring new recipe designs. The aim of Lucky Peach is to create a publication that appeals to diehard foodies as well as fans of good writing and art in general.

The journal will be released shortly after the launch of its sister project—an iPad app produced by Zero Point Zero that will feature more than two hours of videos, plus recipes, art, and essays."
culture  food  ipad  cooking  recipes  davidchang  momofuku  mcsweeneys  magazines  quarterly 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Recipe: Malo's Ground Beef and Pickle Taco | At Home | The Public Kitchen | KCET
"Now fast forward to a rainy day in 1982. A young Robert Luna is sitting the kitchen of his East L.A. home, savoring his mom's burger: ground sirloin, cheddar cheese, kosher dill pickles, a spread of sour cream and mayonnaise and serve it on wheat bread. But there's one problem: no bread.

"I was hungry, and being the little angel that I was, started to throw a massive tantrum," he explained. "My mother, being the great chef she is, put everything in a crispy fried taco and it was delicious! And that is how her famous Ground Beef and Pickle Taco was born."

Since 2003 when Luna's restaurant Malo opened in Silver Lake, the taco has become most popular dish. The same already goes in downtown Los Angeles at Mas Malo, which opened earlier this month. Luna shares his recipe below:"
recipes  food  losangeles  tacos  improvisation 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Recipe: Malo's Ground Beef and Pickle Taco | At Home | The Public Kitchen | KCET
"Now fast forward to a rainy day in 1982. A young Robert Luna is sitting the kitchen of his East L.A. home, savoring his mom's burger: ground sirloin, cheddar cheese, kosher dill pickles, a spread of sour cream and mayonnaise and serve it on wheat bread. But there's one problem: no bread.

"I was hungry, and being the little angel that I was, started to throw a massive tantrum," he explained. "My mother, being the great chef she is, put everything in a crispy fried taco and it was delicious! And that is how her famous Ground Beef and Pickle Taco was born."

Since 2003 when Luna's restaurant Malo opened in Silver Lake, the taco has become most popular dish. The same already goes in downtown Los Angeles at Mas Malo, which opened earlier this month. Luna shares his recipe below:"
recipes  food  losangeles  tacos  improvisation 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Fresh Sriracha (aka, home made 'Rooster') - Blog - food52
"Warning: once you make edamame2003's version, you may never be able to go back to commercial sriracha again. The vibrant color and piquancy of the fresh fresno peppers, combined with plenty of garlic and a boost of vinegar, make for a zippy, versatile condiment that would be great with anything from banh mi to scrambled eggs. We'd never used palm sugar before and were intrigued by its gentle sweetness, which helps to round out the heat of the sriracha. - A&M"
sriracha  food  recipes  cooking  via:kottke 
september 2010 by robertogreco
The Jean-Paul Sartre Cookbook [via: http://twitter.com/genmon/status/20415848302]
"We have recently been lucky enough to discover several previously lost diaries of French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre stuck in between the cushions of our office sofa. These diaries reveal a young Sartre obsessed not with the void, but with food. Aparently Sartre, before discovering philosophy, had hoped to write "a cookbook that will put to rest all notions of flavor forever.'' The diaries are excerpted here for your perusal."
jean-paulsartre  sartre  humor  existentialism  philosophy  parody  cooking  satire  recipes  food  literature  classideas 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Half Dracula, Half Cinderella: Spotlight on the aperitivo for the olds: LA BICICLETTA
"It's been around for decades, and if you ever go to Tuscany you should ask at ANY bar, from the crappiest to the fanciest, for a bicicletta. Not to be confused with the Spritz that they serve around Venice.
bicicletta  drinks  drink  wine  campari  recipes  glvo 
july 2010 by robertogreco
The Curious Cook - Why Cilantro Tastes Like Soap, for Some - NYTimes.com [ends with mention of cilantro pesto]
"smell & taste evolved to evoke strong emotions because they were critical to finding food & mates & avoiding poisons & predators. When we taste a food, brain searches its memory to find pattern from past experience that flavor belongs to. Then it uses that pattern to create perception of flavor, including evaluation of its desirability.

If flavor doesn’t fit a familiar food experience, & instead fits into pattern that involves chemical cleaning agents & dirt, or crawly insects, then the brain highlights the mismatch & potential threat to our safety. We react strongly and throw the offending ingredient on the floor where it belongs.

“When your brain detects a potential threat, it narrows your attention. You don’t need to know that a dangerous food has a hint of asparagus & sorrel to it. You just get it away from mouth.”

But he explained that every new experience causes the brain to update & enlarge its set of patterns, & this can lead to a shift in how we perceive a food."
genetics  food  cilantro  recipes  taste  smell  edg  srg  glvo 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Cool Hunting Video Presents: How to Make Kim Chee on Cool Hunting
"For this video we visited our friend Tim's grandma, Yu Um Chon, at her home in New York where she showed us how she makes Kim Chee. As one of dwindling numbers of Koreans who still make the spicy pickled staple themselves, she explained that everyone has their own recipe and walked us through hers (including the addition of artificial sweetener to cut down on sliminess)."
food  howto  recipes  korean  kimchee 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Backyard Bunnies Are the New Urban Chickens - GOOD Blog - GOOD
"Why rabbit is the most sustainable meat for the city farmer. (Plus: How to cook it, and how to raise your own.)"
animals  cooking  meat  rabbits  urbanfarming  sustainability  locavore  local  food  recipes  via:javierarbona 
march 2010 by robertogreco
The Best Recipe Search on the Web
"Welcome to to Food.com! Whatever flavor, ingredient or cuisine you crave, our handy application make it easy for you to search for recipes from around the web and save them into a universal recipe box. Download the toolbar, and you can save recipes from your favorite food sites in a single click. Plus, you can even upload your own, original recipes into the mix."
food  cooking  recipes  search 
january 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - OBSESSIVES: Pizza - CHOW
"An oven built by hand, tile by tile. Four pizzas on the menu, with no fancy-pants toppings. Anthony Mangieri does one thing at Una Pizza Napoletana, and he does it the very best way he can."
obsession  pizza  perfection  recipes  food  specialization  anthonymanglieri  slow  simplicity  specialists 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Ratio App | Ruhlman.com
"The best-selling cookbook, Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking, by me, Michael Ruhlman, is soon to be an iPhone app that will help you calculate amounts of ingredients in all the fundamental culinary preparations. When you know a ratio, you don’t know a recipe, you know 1,000. And this application does all the calculating for you."
iphone  applications  cooking  food  michaelruhlman  recipes  ios 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Bunchberry & Fern: Simple but no simpler
"The simple recipe only allows you to copy the crumble. An adult would want to make it their own, to make it better. We want new super-powers . This means teachers and trainers of grown-ups channeling Kathy Sierra. Or Amy Hoy. Perhaps even making yourself obsolete (with a hint of Microwave Learning Objectives).
pretending  play  learning  russelldavies  via:russelldavies  recipes  cooking  teaching  training  engagement  glvo  unschooling  deschooling  science  food  simplicity  minimalism  fun  games  gaming  tcsnmy  designthinking  design 
november 2009 by robertogreco
CONSUMED(I,THIS) - summer sandwich: crusty bread, fresh mozzarella,...
"summer sandwich: crusty bread, fresh mozzarella, green zebra tomato, salt-packed anchovies, basil, cucumber pickles (by chris).
food  recipes  anchovies  sandwiches  glvo 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Ratio: Can I really learn to be a better cook just using Michael Ruhlman's method? - By Jennifer Reese - Slate Magazine
"One Part Creativity: Zero Parts RecipeCan just using ratios really teach me to be a better cook?" ... "It's too soon to know how this thrilling fling with ratios will change the way I cook over the long term. I haven't gone back to them in the three weeks since, but I now find myself studying recipes to see if I can identify their underlying ratios. What is a recipe, after all, but an elaborate ratio someone thought delicious enough to write down? And I've begun to think that Ruhlman's narrow set of ratios might make a less useful starting point for improvisation than a traditional recipe. As I discovered with the cookies, getting fancy requires spending some quality time with the user's manual. If you're going to play around with variations on gingerbread, why not start with a gingerbread recipe?"
cooking  science  books  recipes  ratios  food 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Cheese Making Illustrated
"How to make cheese at home. This recipe for a basic hard cheese works for any kind of milk. Iprimarily use my own fresh goats' milk, but have made it quite successfullywith cow's milk purchased from the grocery as well as raw cow's milk froma local farmer. I always use rennet tablets becauseof their dependability and availability from many supermarkets . I usually make 5 gallons of milk into cheese at a time in a 5 gallon Volrath stainless steel pot. Its thick aluminum bottom pad prevents scorching. Five gallons of milk produces a 5-6 pound wheel of cheese . I suggest you try several other simplier cheese related projects beforeyou try making a hard cheese. I have written a page on Beginning Cheese Making for this purpose. It might also be wise to master the process for one gallon of milk before making cheese from 5 gallons."

[more here: http://www.kottke.org/09/02/make-your-own-cheese-at-home ]
todo  cheese  food  glvo  recipes  diy  via:kottke  cheesemaking 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Top Kitchen Toy? The Cellphone - NYTimes.com
"One high-tech cooking tool, however, has transformed the kitchen lives of many Americans: the cellphone. It has become the kitchen tool of choice for chefs and home cooks. They use it to keep grocery lists, find recipes, photograph their handiwork, look up the names of French cheeses, set timers for steak and soft-boiled eggs, and convert European or English measurements to American ones."
mobile  phones  cooking  recipes  iphone  technology  shopping  food 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Información Buenos aires Argentina Gastronomia [worth a look if you can get past the eye burning web design]
"Uno de los mejores resultados de toda esta mezcla étnica, es que paseando por la Reina del Plata, se puede encontrar en el rubro gastronómico con lo autóctono: una parrilla-restaurante que le sirven unos "asados" con las excelentes carnes argentinas acompañadas de su impresionante parrillada criolla o unas empanadas criollas y también un calórico " locro". También restaurantes árabes, las mejores pastas italianas, una paella a la valenciana espectacular, por citar sólo algunos ejemplos. Que indudablemente reflejan a las multitudinarias culturas y costumbres."
food  argentina  buenosaires  meat  asado  recipes  gastronomy 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Roasted Heirloom Tomatoes on Flickr - Photo Sharing! [more info here: http://sonotcool.typepad.com/my_weblog/2008/09/grow-heirloom-t.html]
"If you make this, I'd love to hear how it turns out and with what you serve it. Although I don't eat meat, I think that this would be really good with steak, or maybe used to make a roasted-tomato salsa. Like the supply of tomatoes in summer, the possibilities are endless."
todo  srg  food  recipes  cooking  tomatoes  glvo 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Desserts on the Grill: Chefs + Restaurants : gourmet.com [see also fig recipe: http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/08/grilled-figs] [and this article: http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0827/p18s03-lifo.html]
"I continue to make desserts on the grill whenever I have the chance, and I don’t know why more people don’t do it. Grilled treats require little prep time and minimal cleanup; and most importantly when you’re cooking on a hot day, there’s no oven to preheat. The best fruits of the season are now at their peak of flavor, and the stone fruits are a no-brainer: peaches, apricots, nectarines. Tropical fruits, like mango and pineapple, are great vehicles for a bit of sweet and smoky char. I’ve also found a quick but elegant way to create a dessert using perhaps my favorite summer fruit of all, the fig."
grilling  fruit  recipes  cooking  food  figs 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Textism: On pie
[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20090212122522/http://www.textism.com/2008/06/10/on.pie ]

"good bread and good pizza dough start with the same ingredients...More important, though, are the steps during which these are kneaded and rested: dough can’t ever develop a good complex flavour if...it’s simply left to rise in a warm place for a few
food  pizza  recipes  glvo  cooking  deanallen  textism 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Peak-Season Map at Epicurious.com
"Use our interactive map to see what's fresh in your area, plus find ingredient descriptions, shopping guides, recipes, and tips"
food  cooking  recipes  seasonal  maps  mapping  us  local 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Jeffrey Morgenthaler » The Dos and Donts of Mojitos
"Well, it’s mojito season here in the northern hemisphere, which means it’s time for a little lesson for the novice and experienced mojito drinker alike. Follow these helpful hints, dear reader, and you won’t dare go wrong."
food  drink  mojitos  recipes 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Remarkable, versatile fennel | csmonitor.com
"It looks like a vegetable designed by Dr. Seuss and tastes like licorice."
cooking  food  fennel  hinojo  recipes 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The Papernet
"There is a limit to computer magic because human language is also magic and computers are still dumb." see also: http://www.aaronland.info/weblog/2006/12/17/meat/#papernet
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december 2007 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] The Papernet
"Information wants to be used not managed...I want to use the Internets for the things they are good at — like distribution and searchification — but I am not ready to give up something I can hold in my hands."
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december 2007 by robertogreco
THE FUTURE OF FOOD Molecular Gastronomy for the Masses - Popular Science
"For the advanced kitchen chemist, or the merely curious—discover the high-tech appetizers, entreés and desserts behind today's culinary revolution"
cooking  food  moleculargastronomy  recipes  gadgets 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Summer Express: 101 Simple Meals Ready in 10 Minutes or Less - New York Times
"With a little imagination and some swift moves — and maybe a salad and a loaf of bread — you can turn any dish on this list into a meal that not only will be better than takeout, but won’t heat you out of the house."
cooking  recipes  food  howto 
july 2007 by robertogreco
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