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robertogreco : recommendations   34

You Wanted A List
"You Wanted A List is an online magazine publishing interviews with exciting individuals sharing what they read, hear, watch or use.
Focusing on people whose work we admire, the blog is committed to help our readers to find new stuff out there that is worth checking.
Our hope is to create a resource for our visitors who are seeking to be inspired by subjects ranging from cool music to never heard apps."
tools  howwework  recommendations  interviews  film  television  books  technology  applications  music 
12 weeks ago by robertogreco
David Berman, Slacker God
"Remember those postadolescent days when a work of art could make your heart thump? Remember the physical symptoms of infatuation? Before your tastes ossified?

The book had been given to me by my sister, given to her by her friend Shannon, given to Shannon by who knows who. Back then, before the internet became the recommendation engine it is today, media were passed from hand to hand like samizdat. Your friend would show up at your apartment and give you a book. And then you’d read whatever it was without knowing anything else about it. It was like in movies when the characters take drugs together and one joker says, See you on the other side. You didn’t know what was going to happen, but it was going to be an adventure. You would feel things and you would be changed."
information  davidberman  2019  books  art  recommendations  audiencesofone  media  samizdat  internet  online  web  sharing  erinsomers  poetry  poems  life  living  actualair 
august 2019 by robertogreco
Check This Box if You’re a Good Person - The New York Times
"HANOVER, N.H. — When I give college information sessions at high schools, I’m used to being swarmed by students. Usually, as soon as my lecture ends, they run up to hand me their résumés, fighting for my attention so that they can tell me about their internships or summer science programs.

But last spring, after I spoke at a New Jersey public school, I ran into an entirely different kind of student.

When the bell rang, I stuffed my leftover pamphlets into a bag and began to navigate the human tsunami that is a high school hallway at lunchtime.

Just before I reached the parking lot, someone tapped me on the shoulder.

“Excuse me, ma’am,” a student said, smiling through a set of braces. “You dropped a granola bar on the floor in the cafeteria. I chased you down since I thought you’d want your snack.” Before I could even thank him, he handed me the bar and dissolved into the sea of teenagers.

Working in undergraduate admissions at Dartmouth College has introduced me to many talented young people. I used to be the director of international admissions and am now working part time after having a baby. Every year I’d read over 2,000 college applications from students all over the world. The applicants are always intellectually curious and talented. They climb mountains, head extracurricular clubs and develop new technologies. They’re the next generation’s leaders. Their accomplishments stack up quickly.

The problem is that in a deluge of promising candidates, many remarkable students become indistinguishable from one another, at least on paper. It is incredibly difficult to choose whom to admit. Yet in the chaos of SAT scores, extracurriculars and recommendations, one quality is always irresistible in a candidate: kindness. It’s a trait that would be hard to pinpoint on applications even if colleges asked the right questions. Every so often, though, it can’t help shining through.

The most surprising indication of kindness I’ve ever come across in my admissions career came from a student who went to a large public school in New England. He was clearly bright, as evidenced by his class rank and teachers’ praise. He had a supportive recommendation from his college counselor and an impressive list of extracurriculars. Even with these qualifications, he might not have stood out. But one letter of recommendation caught my eye. It was from a school custodian.

Letters of recommendation are typically superfluous, written by people who the applicant thinks will impress a school. We regularly receive letters from former presidents, celebrities, trustee relatives and Olympic athletes. But they generally fail to provide us with another angle on who the student is, or could be as a member of our community.

This letter was different.

The custodian wrote that he was compelled to support this student’s candidacy because of his thoughtfulness. This young man was the only person in the school who knew the names of every member of the janitorial staff. He turned off lights in empty rooms, consistently thanked the hallway monitor each morning and tidied up after his peers even if nobody was watching. This student, the custodian wrote, had a refreshing respect for every person at the school, regardless of position, popularity or clout.

Over 15 years and 30,000 applications in my admissions career, I had never seen a recommendation from a school custodian. It gave us a window onto a student’s life in the moments when nothing “counted.” That student was admitted by unanimous vote of the admissions committee.

There are so many talented applicants and precious few spots. We know how painful this must be for students. As someone who was rejected by the school where I ended up as a director of admissions, I know firsthand how devastating the words “we regret to inform you” can be.

Until admissions committees figure out a way to effectively recognize the genuine but intangible personal qualities of applicants, we must rely on little things to make the difference. Sometimes an inappropriate email address is more telling than a personal essay. The way a student acts toward his parents on a campus tour can mean as much as a standardized test score. And, as I learned from that custodian, a sincere character evaluation from someone unexpected will mean more to us than any boilerplate recommendation from a former president or famous golfer.

Next year there might be a flood of custodian recommendations thanks to this essay. But if it means students will start paying as much attention to the people who clean their classrooms as they do to their principals and teachers, I’m happy to help start that trend.

Colleges should foster the growth of individuals who show promise not just in leadership and academics, but also in generosity of spirit. Since becoming a mom, I’ve also been looking at applications differently. I can’t help anticipating my son’s own dive into the college admissions frenzy 17 years from now.

Whether or not he even decides to go to college when the time is right, I want him to resemble a person thoughtful enough to return a granola bar, and gracious enough to respect every person in his community."
colleges  universities  admissions  kindness  sfsh  small  slow  2017  rebeccasabky  recommendations  edg  srg 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Home (Machine Supply)
"I'm making Machine Supply so I can easily share book recommendations.

e.g. you can see a book recommendation on this website here, and here's what one looks like on Twitter:"

[About: http://interconnected.org/home/2015/07/22/machine_supply

"I read a bunch of books -- here are the books I read in 2008 which was a particularly good year. Some books are comfort blankets (Red Mars, Kim Stanley Robinson), some are like the best hikes: a steady workout on the muscles accompanied by epiphany after epiphany after epiphany (Philosophy & Simulation, Manuel DeLanda). Ursula le Guin makes me forget where I am. Three Men in a Boat (Jerome K. Jerome) makes me laugh out loud, and was the first book recommended to me by Angela. We're now married. So.

Last week I was having a beer with Ben and Tom (literally everyone in this industry is called Ben or Tom or Matt), swapping sci-fi recommendations. It wasn't for finding new books, or at least not exclusively -- knowing what books someone loves is to know a person. I read 104 books in 2008, that was tough going. In the maybe 70 reading years I have available - mod a life-extending singularity cascading its way into reality - I could read a maximum 7,280 books. At all, ever. There are 6,000 books published every day. Knowing what books someone loves is to know their perspective and their journey, to have something special in common, to share a language.

I heard once that geeks come in two flavours: those who read A Thousand Plateaus; those who read Godel, Escher, Bach.

I'm ATP through and through. It changed my life. Here's chapter 1 as a PDF, I used to keep it printed by the door to give out to Jehovah's Witnesses. It's a philosophy roller coaster, a call to arms. Didn't get on with GEB.

I'm Starship Troopers not Dune, The Beatles not the Stones.

Recommendations
Anyway, I like to collect book recommendations. Sometimes I even read the books. At conferences, for years, I've asked people for their 3 recommendations.

Not favourites. Not the books they think I ought to read. Just 3 recommendations, whatever's on their mind. I try to find a board and some post-its and get people to share. Here are some recommendations from Design Engaged in 2004 where I met so many friends for the first time. Here's Matt Jones' version of the same question from Foo in 2014 -- I wasn't there, but touchingly the board is titled "The Matt Webb question: What 3 books should I read this year?" Thank you! I'll be at Foo in a couple of weeks, let's do the same session.

I love to share my recommendations with other people. Here are the books I read in April and May 2015.

So I made a website.

Machine Supply
At Machine Supply I can make a book recommendation by pasting in an Amazon link and writing a short paragraph. Then when I share a link to that (on my blog or on Twitter), my reason comes joined together with two Amazon links... one to the US site and one to the UK site. That's always been a niggle for me, to bundle those things together, to make a recommendation which is easy to share.

I'm classing this as a hobby, which means I'm trying to make the kind of website that I'd use. I'm not a hugely early adopter generally. I don't spend much time kicking the tyres of online services, I need encouragement to keep using things because I'm enormously forgetful, and I'm hugely sceptical about putting words I write into other people's databases rather than plain text on my own laptop.

All of which means -- that's what I'm making. A website to make it easy for me to share book recommendations. Here's my recommendation for The Peripheral (William Gibson), and here it is again as it appears on Twitter.

What was amazing -- and honestly what I hoped would happen, and what I'll make sure the site encourages to happen, but didn't know whether it would happen or not - what was amazing is that a few friends tried out Machine Supply when I tweeted about it yesterday.

And already I've seen @blech recommended Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo. (Now bought on Amazon.) And @chrbutler recommended The Book of Strange New Things - which I also love - and by the way mentioned four other books, one of which is a deeply loved favourite of mine, and the other three I hadn't heard of. So those are now on my books-to-check-out list.

What next?
As it says on the front page, Current status: Pre-pre-alpha, hobby. Links will break. Cities will fall.

I've got a hobby! Haven't had one of those in a while.

Have a play. Let me know if anything breaks. My aim is to make a handy, finely-tuned little crystal. Any and all ideas welcome.

Machine Supply is over here."]
mattwebb  books  recommendations  webdesign  webdev 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Just One Book - Great Book Recommendations By Great People
"Welcome to Just One Book, a selection of great book recommendations written by great people. For now, they're in no particular order, nor do we aspire to anything resembling comprehensiveness in genre, style, or time period. They're simply the go-to recommendations of some of our favorite writers and readers, for all occasions. Please enjoy them. Oh, and follow us on Twitter."
books  literature  recommendations  booklists 
november 2013 by robertogreco
I’m just a working-class guy trying to take part in the conversation that all the smart people are having. What books should I read?
QUESTION (in part):

"I’m just a working-class guy trying to take part in the conversation that all the smart people are having. This brings me to my question: What books should I read? There are so many books out there worth reading, that I literally don’t know where to start."

ANSWER (in parts):

"We’re not on a ladder here. We’re on a web. Right now you’re experiencing a desire to become more aware of and sensitive to its other strands. That feeling you’re having is culture. Whatever feeds that, go with it. And never forget that well-educated people pretend to know on average at least two-thirds more books than they’ve actually read."

"Come up with a system of note-taking that you can use in your reading. It’s okay if it evolves. You can write in the margins, or keep a reading notebook (my preference) where you transcribe passages you like, with your own observations, and mark down the names of other, unfamiliar writers, books you’ve seen mentioned (Guy D. alone will give you a notebook full of these). Follow those notes to decide your next reading. That’s how you’ll create your own interior library. Now do that for the rest of your life and die knowing you’re still massively ignorant. (I wouldn’t trade it!)"

"Ignore all of this and read the next cool-looking book you see lying around. It’s not the where-you-start so much as the that-you-don’t-stop."

SEE ALSO: the books recommended

[Orginal is here: http://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2012/08/31/dear-paris-review-john-jeremiah-sullivan-answers-your-questions/ ]
books  reading  literacy  2013  advice  learning  lifelonglearning  canon  wisdom  ignorance  readinglists  lists  recommendations  curiosity  booklists  notetaking  notes  observations  education  religion  libraries  truth  howilearnedtoread  readingnotebooks  notebooks  howwelearn  culturalliteracy  culture  hierarchy  hierarchies  snobbery  class  learningnetworks  oldtimelearningnetworks  webs  cv  howweread  borges  film  movies  guydavenport  huntergracchus  myántonia  willacather  isakdinesen  maximiliannovak  robertpennwarren  edithwharton  denisjohnson  alberterskine  karloveknausgaard  jamesjoyce  hughkenner  richardellmann  stephengreenblatt  harukimurakami  shakespeare  vladimirnabokov 
march 2013 by robertogreco
en.Slow Media
The Slow Media Manifesto [ http://en.slow-media.net/manifesto ]

“1. Slow media are a contribution to sustainability. …
2. Slow media promote monotasking. …
3. Slow media aim at perfection. …
4. Slow media make quality palpable. …
5. Slow media advance prosumers. …
6. Slow media are discursive and dialogic. …
7. Slow media are social media. …
8. Slow media respect their users. …
9. Slow media are distributed via recommendations, not advertising. …
10. Slow media are timeless. …
11. Slow media are auratic. …
12. Slow media are progressive, not reactionary. …
13. Slow media focus on quality. …
14. Slow media ask for confidence and take their time to be credible. …”
culture  philosophy  society  2010  attention  patience  lifestyle  simplicity  manifesto  manifestos  jörgblumtritt  sabriadavid  benediktköhler  via:litherland  timelessness  recommendations  credibility  respect  socialmedia  discourse  dialogics  prosumers  longreads  quality  monotasking  singletasking  sustainability  slowmedia  slow 
february 2012 by robertogreco
QUOTE.fm - Closed beta
"QUOTE.fm makes it possible for you to take text that you have found on the internet and share it with your friends. You quote your favorite piece of the text, comment on it, and pass it on as recommendations to your friends. While sharing your recommendations, you also receive recommendations from your friends; keeping fresh, relevant, reading material right at your fingertips."
quote.fm  onlinetoolkit  sharing  quotes  annotation  commenting  reading  online  web  text  recommendations 
october 2011 by robertogreco
The Technium: The Satisfaction Paradox
"Let's say that after all is said and done, in the history of the world there are 2,000 theatrical movies, 500 documentaries, 200 TV shows, 100,000 songs, and 10,000 books that I would be crazy about. I don't have enough time to absorb them all, even if I were a full time fan. But what if our tools could deliver to me only those items to choose from? How would I -- or you -- choose from those select choices?"
kevinkelly  serendipity  choice  paradox  paradoxofchoice  satisfaction  satisfactionparadox  netflix  amazon  scarcity  abundance  google  spotify  music  film  curation  filters  filtering  discovery  recommendations  psychology  economics 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Jonah Lehrer on Problems With SATs, GREs, the NFL Combine and Other Performance Tests | Head Case - WSJ.com
"Though the SAT does a decent job of predicting the grades of college freshmen—the test accounts for about 12% of the individual variation in grade point average—it is much less effective at predicting levels of achievement after graduation. Professional academic tests suffer from the same flaw. A study by the University of Michigan Law School, for instance, found that LSAT scores bore virtually no relationship to career success as measured by levels of income, life satisfaction or public service."

"The reason maximal measures are such bad predictors is rooted in what these tests don't measure. It turns out that many of the most important factors for life success are character traits, such as grit and self-control, and these can't be measured quickly."

"The larger lesson is that we've built our society around tests of performance that fail to predict what really matters: what happens once the test is over."
education  teaching  testing  gre  sat  standardizedtesting  2011  jonahlehrer  tcsnmy  whatmatters  predictions  measurement  well-being  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  assessment  recommendations  learning  perseverance  self-control  nfl 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The best five books on everything | FiveBooks [via: http://www.septivium.com/b/2010/08/13/five-books/]
"Become an instant expert. Every day an eminent writer, thinker, commentator, politician, academic chooses five books on their specialist subject. From Einstein to Keynes, Iraq to the Andes, Communism to Empire. Share in the knowledge and buy the books."
aggregator  recommendations  books  economics  education  information  literature  toread  reading  publishing  politics  learning  expertise  encyclopedia  knowledge  readinglist  fivebooks 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Vowch
"Vowch makes it easy to recommend people, places, and things to your friends."
recommendations  vowch  reputation  social 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Six Writers on Their Favorite Reading -- New York Magazine
"Beach reads don’t have to be new best sellers or formulaic romances. In fact, summer is the perfect time to dig deep into books, classics and otherwise, you’ve missed. We asked exemplary authors in particular fields to recommend the books that matter most to them—the ones they keep going back to and, in many cases, that made them want to write. Their literary mix tapes, of a sort." [William Gibson here: http://nymag.com/arts/books/features/66294/index2.html
books  lists  toread  reading  recommendations  sciencefiction  scifi  williamgibson  fiction  science  history  historicalfiction  rebeccaskloot  memoirs 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Official Google Reader Blog: May we recommend...
"Long time readers of our blog will note that we occasionally throw in links to crazy, interesting, and fun items in our posts. You may be wondering, “How can I find such interesting content to share?” Today we’re launching two new features that are designed to help you do just that"
rss  feeds  recommendations  googlereader 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: Weblog: Ambient Recommendation
"I think the reasons these more casual recommendation and discovery methods work better for me are 3-fold: 1. They allow me to employ my fuzzy, intuitive perception of peoples’ broader personality and taste to determine how likely I am to like the things they like (I thought the person on Brightkite looked cool, so I trusted her taste; I think my Last.fm friends are cool, so I trust that new stuff I see them playing will be interesting to me). 2. They aren’t explicitly recommendation systems, but rather allow people to implicitly recommend things just by going about their normal business (someone likes a web page so they post it to Delicious to remember it later, the hipsters at Frankies like Gene Clark so they play his music while they work and I hear it incidentally). I think people are more likely to participate in this kind of system than one where they are expected to formally recommend things. 3. They don’t require me to narrow what I’m looking for by overly specific criteria"
del.icio.us  design  learning  social  recommendations  brightkite  yelp  flickr  ubicomp  iphone  community  portland  oregon  travel  taste  discovery  serendipity  seach  ambient  inspiration  perception  intuition  interest 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: Weblog: The Long Tail of Humor
"As I’ve used it, I’ve found I like Tweeteorites better than the Favrd leaderboard for the same reason I like Foursquare but not Yelp; or the reason I like the Last.fm page that shows what my friends are listening to, but not actual music recommendations; or the reason I like my Delicious network or Tumblr dashboard but not Digg. The latter services are usually only reliable ways to find the broadest possible stuff, because things have to appeal to the masses to bubble up to the top. The former services, however, show me what individual people whose opinion I respect think is cool simply by allowing me to observe them appreciating (if this sounds familiar, it’s because I’ve written about this principle before)."
social  media  recommendations  aggregator  serendipity  tweeteorites  tumblr  del.icio.us  feeds  longtail 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Fifty Books for Our Times | Newsweek.com
"We know it's insane. We know people will ask why on earth we think that an 1875 British satirical novel is the book you need to read right now—or, for that matter, why it even made the cut. The fact is, no one needs another best-of list telling you how great The Great Gatsby is. What we do need, in a world with precious little time to read (and think), is to know which books—new or old, fiction or nonfiction—open a window on the times we live in, whether they deal directly with the issues of today or simply help us see ourselves in new and surprising ways. Which is why we'd like you to sit down with Anthony Trollope, and these 49 other remarkably trenchant voices."

[more book lists and articles here: http://www.newsweek.com/id/204478 AND http://www.newsweek.com/id/204052 AND http://www.newsweek.com/id/204176 ]
books  lists  toread  education  culture  recommendations  literature  newsweek  reading  fiction  history  teaching  tcsnmy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
BookArmy
"Bookarmy is a social networking website for every sort of reader. Whether you’re a bookaholic or someone who picks up a book only once a year while relaxing on holiday, bookarmy is the place to discuss and review books, build reading lists, get the best book recommendations, and where you and your friends, family or classmates can read books together.
books  socialnetworking  networking  bookarmy  community  recommendations  reading 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Best Stuff
"an open, organic, polymorphous site which, depending on the user, could take on diverse forms and meanings. The site simply asks you to input your "best stuff" in the world: whether it be a song that inspires you, your favourite little Indian restaurant
community  social  sharing  books  music  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  ranking  ratings  recommendations  networking  network  collaboration  tagging  things 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Peter Gabriel's The Filter - scrobbling your life | PDA: The Digital Content Blog | guardian.co.uk
"Gabriel explains this principle of recommendation is the most effective way to navigate the huge amount of content around us, because those recommendations combine human and automated processes."
arg  multimedia  recommendations  media  petergabriel  thefilter  film  music  video  youtube  mp3 
june 2008 by robertogreco
The Filter
"The Filter, the vision of Peter Gabriel, the Grammy award-winning artist and digital media pioneer, is an online discovery experience that filters the world of online entertainment and information, personalising it for each individual user."
music  software  itunes  mp3  playlist  ipod  aggregator  filtering  generator  attention  discovery  webapps  recommendations  video  arg  petergabriel 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Guys Lit Wire
"Guys Lit Wire exists solely to bring literary news and reviews to the attention of teenage boys and the people who care about them. We are more than happy to welcome female readers - but our main goal is to bring the attention of good books to guys who m
boys  books  reading  literature  blogs  classideas  recommendations  reviews 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Preschool ratings and Preschool reviews: The Savvy Source for Parents
"We believe that the depth and quantity of parent reviews and the first-hand information from school directors makes this the most informative web site about preschools in the country. We hope that you will agree."
children  parenting  preschool  recommendations  education  toys  books 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Evolution and Wisdom of Crowds
"reason that Wikipedia is as good as it is (and the reason that living organisms are as sophisticated as they are), is not due to the average quality of the edits (or mutations). Instead, it is due to a much harder to observe process: selection."
wikipedia  evolution  wisdom  datamining  statistics  folksonomy  crowdsourcing  behavior  reason  religion  human  information  intelligence  darwin  databases  collaboration  collective  collectiveintelligence  commons  community  economics  learning  algorithms  crowds  systems  recommendations  networks  socialsoftware  psychology  predictions  charlesdarwin 
october 2007 by robertogreco
disambiguity - » Gardening Tools for Social Networks
"I want more information to help me ‘fine tune’ my social network so that I can make better decisions about who I include in my network so that I can continually fine tune it in a way that gives me the best ongoing value over time."
socialnetworking  overload  human  limits  scale  information  dopplr  jaiku  socialsoftware  informationmanagement  management  time  ai  recommendations  googlereader  trends  socialnetworks  social  twitter  flickr  del.icio.us  collections  tools  gamechanging  future 
october 2007 by robertogreco
San Francisco Restaurant Reviews, Doctors, Bars, Salons, Dentists and More | Yelp
"Yelp is the fun and easy way to find, review and talk about what's great (and not so great) in your world. You already know that asking friends is the best way to find restaurants, dentists, hairstylists, and anything local. Yelp makes it fast and easy b
consumer  ratings  reviews  search  restaurants  community  local  social  shopping  advice  business  comparison  recommendations  reputation  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  stores  tourism  travel  trust 
august 2007 by robertogreco

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