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robertogreco : recording   63

Landscape Circuitry – Nick Sowers Architecture
"What happens when you wire up parts of a landscape and amplify its own remixed sounds? This is the next iteration of my series with SEAP : Sonorous Environment Amplification Panel. I have set up this four channel audio installation on the edge of Seaplane Lagoon on the former Naval Air Station in Alameda to explore the sonic textures in magnified detail.

Through live amplification of sounds picked up by a variety of microphones (contact, omnidirectional, shotgun, and hydrophone) I am able to reveal elements of the landscape which may otherwise go unnoticed. The sounds of birds, waves, pebbles, electricity, and wind through a security fence travel through the wires and merge digitally before being projected through the acrylic sound panel.

Even the more visible and audible parts which pass through such as Southwest jets taking off from nearby Oakland Airport are filtered through the sound installation, mixing and resonating with bird sounds and howling wind. We can hear all of this without augmentation, yet the ability to turn the dial up or down on certain sounds gives the observer a new form of participation in the landscape.

The forms of participation enabled by SEAP can be unexpected. One thing that surprised me is how the slight delay between the sounds initially heard and the sounds played back through amplification immediately creates a new atmosphere. The delay is like what you hear in a hard concrete alley, your own footsteps bouncing back to you in a kind of pangy-hollow sound. But you wouldn’t expect to find that echo effect in an open landscape. When a security guard pulled up to ask me what I was doing, his own voice was thrown back to him. He seemed satisfied with my description “Just testing out an art installation” and drove away.

Another unexpected sound comes from this security fence blocking access to the breakwater. I wired up a contact microphone to the galvanized steel post supporting the fence. The wind which slips through the fence is not audible to the naked ear, yet the metal absorbs the sound and can be amplified and mixed in with the rest of the environment. Listen:

In the recording you’ll hear the sounds of birds picked up by this omnidirectional microphone aimed down into the rocks. Crevices contain their own little sonic worlds. The space between rocks shelters a bowl of stiller air. In this placement, the microphone avoids clipping from wind. Tinier sounds like pebbles trickling down and birds whose calls would otherwise be drowned out are easily picked up.

I found myself thinking about artist Jenny Odell‘s practice of observation at the Morcom Amphitheatre of Roses in Oakland, about how this place on the fringes of a former Navy base could be my rose garden. From the perspective of an architect, I’m not doing anything here. I’m not analyzing a site as a precursor to making a building. Yet I am doing more than bird watching or walking or fishing– all fine activities for absorbing the nuances of a place and experiencing the passage of time. SEAP is an evolution of the many years I have walked landscapes and recorded sounds. Now I have an apparatus with which to gauge the subtle textures of a soundscape and add my own interpretation back into it. I expect to return to Seaplane Lagoon with an ever evolving set of processes to fold in between the processes of erosion and construction."
nicksowers  sound  audio  landscape  listening  2019  microphones  jennyodell  oakland  morethanhuman  recording 
june 2019 by robertogreco
Austin Kleon on Twitter: "I think a lot about how the phone call — hearing the sound of a real human voice — is becoming a more intimate, meaningful option in the face of 24/7 text/image connection… https://t.co/dDx24gJ62v"
"I think a lot about how the phone call — hearing the sound of a real human voice — is becoming a more intimate, meaningful option in the face of 24/7 text/image connection

There’s a really interesting part of @dada_drummer’s THE NEW ANALOG, where he talks about how different phone calls became when they went digital — background noise was reduced, and so the sense of distance https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1620971976/

He points out that the iPhone has 3 microphones, but they're not used to capture extra sound, they're for noise-cancelling — they're used to isolate signal from noise [image]

On the iPhone, “*what* is being said is very clear — but *how* the message is delivered is lost. Is the voice loud or soft? Are we being addressed intimately or publicly? Can we hear hints of other meanings in the speaker’s voice, or does the delivery match the words exactly?”

There’s a “cell yell” that @dada_drummer points out: when we're out in the world on the phone, we tend towards shouting — even though we can be clearly heard in a noisy environ thanks to noise cancellation — b/c the phone doesn't feed our voice back to us, so we can’t regulate it

"essay idea: how the rise of podcasts corresponds to the decline of (personal) phone calls for millennials"
[https://twitter.com/popespeed/status/971940280709603328 ]

This is an interesting point. When I do podcast interviews, I have an extremely good USB mic and headphones to monitor my voice, so I can move closer to the mic, speak softer,

Maybe people like podcasts so much because they replicate more of what a real world or analog telephone conversation sounds like? Something to ponder!

Oh, I’m reminded now: @cordjefferson told a beautiful story at @PopUpMag about a voicemail message his mother left him, and how it changed the way he thought about phone calls. (I don’t think it exists online, or I’d link to it.)"
austinkleon  audio  microphones  mobile  phones  telephones  intimacy  voice  sound  recording  noise  noisecancellation  analog  conversation  phonecalls  humans  connection  2018  digital  iphone  podcasts 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Zoom H1 Tutorial - YouTube
"Audio settings:
- WAV
- 48/16
- Auto level OFF
- Lo cut OFF"
zoomh1  howto  audio  recording  2013 
september 2017 by robertogreco
The sounds in your backyard are unique, go record them - The Verge
"Pristine soundscapes are so important that the National Park Service works to preserve wilderness sounds in many natural parks. There's even federal legislation in the US, like the 1987 National Park Overflights Act, that aims to keep noise from airplanes out of the lands below. Of course, it's impossible to escape noise where I live in New York City, but recently I've been inspired to look for quieter pastures.

After reading Bernie Krause’s The Great Animal Orchestra, I took the first chance I had to get out of the city for the weekend and head up to my hometown in Connecticut to listen and record soundscapes from a less industrialized environment. As an audio engineer I was well-prepared for these kind of projects, since I have to record outside frequently.

But you don't have to be an audio engineer to capture your own favorite natural soundscapes. Here are some basic gadgets, tools, and tips for recording soundscapes in your own backyard. I’m a big fan of recording in stereo and I think you get a fuller and more immersive sound this way so here’s some ways you can do that."
soundscapes  nature  2016  audio  sound  recording 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Throat microphone - Wikipedia
"A throat microphone, also laryngophone, is a type of contact microphone that absorbs vibrations directly from the wearer's throat by way of single or dual sensors worn against the neck. The sensors, called transducers, can pick up speech even in extremely noisy or windy environments such as on a motorcycle, or in a nightclub. Other types of microphones do not function well under these conditions because of high levels of background noise. Advanced laryngophones are able to pick up whispers, and therefore perform well in environments where one has to keep quiet while communicating with others at a distance, such as during covert military operations. Throat microphones are also very useful when helmets or respiratory protection is required. Many full-face SCBA, CABA, SAR, PAPR or re-breather masks do not have a provision for a microphone inside the mask. The throat microphone can be used safely, as it is positioned outside the mask's face seal and as such does not compromise the respiratory protection provided by the mask, nor does it violate mask approvals and certification."
microphones  sound  via:soundscrapers  laryngophones  audio  recording 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Instagramming Dinosaurs: Clive Thompson on Digital Memory (1 of 4) | Moosha Moosha Mooshme
"I wouldn’t necessarily say they’re actually expanding their memory, because it’s not clear when you record things that it necessarily cements it in our heads any better. They’re expanding their abilities to reflect on the past. When we decide that we want to go back and look at something, we now have the ability to go back and look at it in a much more granular detail, in much more richer emotional and semantic detail-"



"That’s one of the great fears people have, that we’re not going to look at the world around us while we are holding our phones up. The truth is, I think that’s kind of an overblown sentiment. Even if you look around us here, even the kids that have phones, they pull them out, they look at something and then they put them down. And they’re still using their eyes 99% of the time. We see someone holding up a phone at a concert and we are like, “Oh my God! They are not looking at the concert.” But they don’t spend two hours with the phone in front of them. I think we have a healthy fear of life becoming over-mediated, but if you look at it more like a scientist and study what’s going on you will still see a lot of people looking at things.

I think, actually, the bigger danger, in a weird way, is what happens when we almost store too much. Everyone who you know, who comes to the museum here, might take 40 or 50 photos in one day, maybe more. I’ve got friends that tell me when they go on vacation they walk away with 800 photos. There is no way you are going to look at those pictures. So really the problem becomes that you can sort of build up this corpus of information that is functionally sort of useless, because you are really never going to look at that stuff. And one of the great challenges to me that’s really interesting is how do we make productive use of this enormous explosion of digital memory, right? And it turns out that some of the really interesting solutions are very simple little techniques for algorithmically finding interesting patterns in this stuff, patterns that we are never going to bother to find ourselves.

Here is a really simple example: there is this app that is becoming enormously popular called Time Hop. Every day, it goes in to your archives of stuff that you recorded a year ago. It could be a photo you took. It could be a text message you shared. It could be like a posting on Facebook. And it gives you a little daily gazette, saying, Here is what you did a year ago. Here is photo. Here is your text message. People regularly tell me how delightful it is to wake up to this momentary reflection of what they were doing a year ago. They say it’s a sort of philosophically-enlarging experience because they think about the shape of their life. It retriggers things they wouldn’t have thought about it, provoking new, interesting thoughts. And so if you came in here with Time Hop, and you took all these pictures, a year later you will be getting ready to go to the dentist or something, and you look at your phone and you go. Oh, you know here is a pictures of the Tyrannosaurus Rex, and your children and something that you posted about it, on Facebook. And suddenly this day will come swimming back in to your memory.

So little clever simple techniques like this, where you use what computers are really good at doing, which is following routines, and you use what humans are really good at doing, which is making meaning out of these traces and records, is really the future of how we are going to pull enormous emotional and intellectual and spiritual values out of these digital memories."

[The full set: http://www.mooshme.org/?s=clive+thompson ]
clivethompson  2014  memory  socialmedia  photography  mobile  phones  instagram  museums  barryjoseph  amnh  timehop  facebook  digital  recording  reflection  review  outboardmemory  attention  noticing  media  history 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Why (Not) Wearables
"Students are watched. They are monitored. They are assessed. They are quantified.

Calls for a “quantified student” are connected in part to the “quantified self” movement, whose proponents use various technologies – apps, sensors, and wearables – to monitor aspects of their daily life (most commonly related to health and wellness, tracking things like caloric intake, sleep quality, and physical activity). The notion of the “quantified self” isn’t new – there are merely new devices for tracking, new ways to count “what counts.” “What counts” remains largely the same.

So even if a student gets to track for herself her own data there’s still, again, a very limited sense of “what counts,” based in part on the education system’s existing data demands and measurements. (This is one of the great ironies of disrupting “seat time”: we’re turning to other similarly flawed metrics.)"

"And so education technology opts to track more data. Rarely do we stop to ask to whom all this is being revealed or to what end. If both education and education technology view students as objects – objects to be tracked and monitored and shaped and surveilled – what role can we expect wearables to play?"
surveillance  audreywatters  2015  horizonreport  hype  policy  rfid  wearables  quantification  data  recording  video  googleglass  gps  students  schools  tracking  control  fitbit  edtech  technology  education  altschool 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Sounds We Hear - Binaural Headphones on Vimeo
"Experimenting the use of head-worn binaural headphone CS-10EM with static directional sound in a visual mix.

Binaural hearing has been emulated in sound laboratories by using mannequin heads with built-in microphones. Except this time, I'm the living breathing head. :) From these signals, human beings can determine characteristics such as inter-aural time and level differences and—based on the listening experience—information about the spatial origin of the sounds being heard. Are they coming from in front or behind, from the left or right, or above or below? This ability to perceive where a sound originates from is referred to as binaural hearing.

Read more about binaural audio
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binaural_recording

Also noted, that GoPro WiFi app does not work well in snow somehow. It was -5ºC that morning and the range was somehow drastically reduced. My iPhone sees an connect to the GoPro ad hoc WiFi connection but buttons initiation does not relay well even at this rope length. It could be either the iPhone or GoPro. But phone is warm in my pocket while GoPro is close to the freezing floor.

Tech specs:

Binaural Mic
Roland CS-10EM
roland.com/products/en/CS-10EM

Field Recorder
Roland R-26 powering the binaural mics internally
roland.com/products/en/R-26

GoPro Hero2 + Wifi BacPac + Dive Housing
gopro.com/hd-hero2-cameras

Manfrotto Super Clamp
manfrotto.com/super-clamp-without-stud

Velbon Alu Mini Ball Head QHD-51Q
velbon.co.uk/products/heads/ball_and_socket.html "
recording  soundscapes  binaural  audio  video  gopro  hasanismail  binauralrecording 
november 2014 by robertogreco
The App Place :: ACLU of New Jersey
"Citizens can hold police accountable in the palms of their hands with "Police Tape," a smartphone application from the ACLU of New Jersey that allows people to securely and discreetly record and store interactions with police, as well as provide legal information about citizens' rights when interacting with the police. Thanks to the generosity of app developer OpenWatch, the ACLU-NJ is providing Police Tape to the public free of charge.

Android
Download it here from Google Play.

iOS
Download it here from iTunes."
ios  phone  android  aclu  citizenship  video  recording  police 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The sound of one ant walking – inside the world of a wildlife audio expert | Radio Times
"Chris Watson, who has worked on Attenborough's Frozen Planet and Life in the Undergrowth, shares a remarkable insight into sound recording, some exclusive clips - and his feelings about music in wildlife shows"



"The only way that Watson was able to capture sound in such detail was thanks to the help of Peng Lee, a man with perhaps the greatest job title in the world – Principal Investigator of Insect Acoustics at the University of Mississippi.

Lee was researching how to record within ants' nests and had made a highly specialised piece of equipment to do so. When Watson told him he was making a programme about ants at the same time, Lee sent over two of his strange, home-made devices.

“They're literally like black box devices with a knitting needle on a wire. But they were actually classified at the time and we had to battle to get clearance to have them exported from US customs.”

Deploying new technology to interesting effect is something Watson has been doing all his recording life. The first step he took on his journey into sound happened back in the 60s, during his early teens, after his parents had bought him a reel-to-reel tape recorder. It involved a kind of aural epiphany, and is something he describes in detail in the Radio 4 documentary The Listeners (available on BBC iPlayer here).

One day he was standing in the family kitchen watching starlings feeding at the bird table in the garden, when he realised he was merely watching; he could hear nothing of the birds' activity.

“I was watching through a large picture window that gave it a large CinemaScope frame. But it was like watching a silent film.”

Realising he could use his new present to rectify this, he attached the tape recorder and microphone to the bird table, pressed record and waited. The results were a revelation.

“I was just amazed at what I heard. This was the sound of another world. A world where we cannot be because our presence would affect it. All this beautiful, exquisite, fascinating detail came out.”"



"Though there may be certain places on Earth you just can't hear, such as volcanos, Watson is one person who has gone further than any in uncovering hidden worlds of sound.

One of his favourite pieces is from another David Attenborough documentary, Frozen Planet. It's the sound of Weddell seals singing under the sea ice.

“It is another world, but it does sound as if it's from outer space, this wailing voice. But because it's recorded under the sea ice, there's no wave action, so it doesn't sound underwater but there are these haunting voices that are absolutely amazing.”'
ants  audio  sound  nature  recording  via:shannon_mattern  2013  chriswatson  davidcrawford  wildlife  insects  soundtracks  soundscapes  penglee  acoustics 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Sonic Terrain | listening, field recording, environmental sound
"Sonic Terrain is dedicated to field recording: Audio and sound recording not inside the studio environment, but in the outside world around us. We encourage not just hearing the world around you, but to listening to it, and recording it, for reflection, relaxation, art, science, or entertainment.

We don’t draw hard boxes around disciplines or styles, because field recording is used by an incredibly wide array of people and professions: laypeople, sound designers, sound mixers, multi-media artists, musicians, scientists, researchers, acoustic ecology conservationists, and more. Sonic Terrain offers a place for these disciplines to be cross-pollinated, in order to expose everyone to aspects of sound and recording they may not have considered."
fieldrecording  sound  space  methodology  soundscapes  recording  audio  via:shannon_mattern 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Rogue Amoeba | Piezo: Charmingly Simple Recording From Applications and Audio Devices
"Piezo makes it a snap to record audio on your Mac. In seconds, you'll be recording audio from any application or from audio inputs like microphones.

Piezo requires almost no configuration, and it's a blast to use. Simple and inexpensive - that's a winning combination."
via:nicolefenton  applications  mac  osx  audio  recording  piezo  skype  microphones 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The Lives of Images Peter Galison in conversation with Trevor Paglen [.pdf]
"What is observation? What is seeing? What counts as “right depiction”? Are images today now doing more than showing? What is objectivity? What does the future of imaging hold?

Peter Galison, one of the world’s leading historians of science, has written widely on how visual representation shapes our understanding of the world. Trevor Paglen is an artist whose work with photography has explored governmental secrecy and the limits of seeing. For his most recent project, The Last Pictures, Paglen worked with a group of scientists to create a disc of images marking our historical moment; the project culminated in last year’s launch of a satellite, carrying those images, that will remain in Earth’s orbit perpetually. The following conversation took place at Aperture’s office earlier this year."



"Well, what is it that the digital really does? There are many ways in which the digital is shaped by the legacy of analog photography and film. Both for political reasons and aesthetic reasons, what’s really important is the fact that digital is small, cheap, and searchable. The combination of these three features is dramatic. It means that your smartphone does facial recognition—no longer is that an inaccessible and futuristic piece of the state-security apparatus. It’s ubiquitous.

Aesthetically, this can mean a kind of decentering, a vision of the world that is not directly human. It also means that cameras are everywhere, and you’re not even aware of them. There’s an interesting film by a colleague and friend, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, working with Véréna Paravel, called Leviathan (2012), filmed on fishing boats in the North Atlantic. A lot of the film would have been completely unimaginable just a generation ago. They use little high-resolution digital cameras to achieve points of view in places that would previously have been impossible: amidst the pile of dead fish, or underwater as the tank is being filled, or looking back at the front of the boat. These are not impossible camera angles, but they’re nonhuman points of view."



"It seems that we’re moving away from thinking about images interms of representation and toward thinking about their creation as part of a networked process, guided by political or economic “scripts” embedded in the algorithms controlling these image-making networks. If we look at Facebook’s facial-recognition and search technologies, or at Instagram, we see similar things going on, but in a commercial context."



"If images become tools, it’s easier to see them as stepping-stones to other things. For me, the fundamental separation between art and science is not an eternal characteristic of science. The split happened in a historical moment. If you said to Leonardo da Vinci—pardon me, historians—“Are your studies of turbulent water art or science?” he would reply (so I imagine): “You’re crazy! What are you talking about? I don’t even recognize this choice.” But in the nineteenth century, you begin to have the idea of an objective image and of a scientist who is defined by being self-restrained, followed by the idea of maximal detachment from the image. At that moment, Charles Baudelaire criticized photography, saying (approximately): “You know, this isn’t really part of art because it’s insufficiently modulated by the person who says he’s an artist.” In that sense, what Baudelaire is saying and what late-nineteenth-century scientists are saying is the same thing, except they come to opposite conclusions. What they agree on is that art is defined by intervention and science is defined by lack of intervention.

I believe the trunk split, at that point, into two branches. But in many ways the branches are coming back together again in our moment. People in the art world aren’t frightened, in the way they once were, of having a scientific dimension to what they do. It’s not destabilizing for Matthew Ritchie to collaborate with scientists, nor is it a professional disqualification for scientists to work with artists."
trevorpaglen  petergalison  aperture  images  photography  perception  interpretation  history  science  art  seeing  sight  leviathan  recording  video  film  processing  photoshop  digital  luciencastaing-taylor  vérénaparavel  presentation  manipulation  capture  distortion  depiction  universalism  language  communication  symbols  semiotics  aesthetics  interdisciplinary  glvo  instagram  networkedfictions  canon  matthewritchie  leonardodavinci  facebook  uniquity  gopro  charlesbaudelaire  newaesthetic  convergence 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Venue
"Venue — a portable media rig, interview studio, multi-format event platform, and forward-operating landscape research base — will pop up at sites across North America from June 2012 through fall 2013.

Under the direction of Geoff Manaugh of BLDGBLOG and Nicola Twilley of Edible Geography, Venue officially launches Friday, June 8, with a public event from 6-8pm at the Nevada Museum of Art in downtown Reno, Nevada.

In collaboration with the Center for Art + Environment at the Nevada Museum of Art and with Columbia University’s Studio-X Global Network Initiative, Venue will traverse North America in a series of routes, visiting such sites as New Mexico’s Very Large Array, Arches National Park, the world’s largest living organism in the Blue Mountains of Oregon, and the 2012 Aspen Ideas Festival.

At these and many other locations, Venue will serve as a backdrop — or venue — for original interviews with people from an extraordinary range of disciplines, even as it records and surveys…"
2013  mediarig  gregorynanney  brendancallahan  thomjones  jon-kylemohr  folkertgorter  nomadic  2012  outpost  keithscharwath  architecture  design  atleykasky  joealterio  jeffreyinaba  centerforlanduseinterpretation  ediblegeography  futureplural  recording  thevenuebox  mattrichardson  descriptivecamera  surveying  tripods  us  westaf  nea  landscape  interviews  pop-upstudios  pop-ups  chriswoebken  venue  verylargearray  nevadamuseumofart  gloablnetworkinitiative  studio-xny  studio-x  nicolatwilly  geoffmanaugh  bldgblog 
june 2012 by robertogreco
City Sonic on Vimeo
"LA is loud. Cars roar, helicopters buzz, waves crash and (occasionally) subways rumble. Instead of muffling the noise out, Alex Braidwood decided to tune in.

Video by Mae Ryan
Music: Revolving Record Loop by Matthew Aguilez"
alexbraidwood  matthewaguilez  maeryan  music  recording  noise  sound  losangeles 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Remix Your City - Fresh Push Play by HIFANA - YouTube
"Armed with their Fresh Push Play iPhone App, HIFANA took to the streets of a once again bustling and vibrant Tokyo to sample the city sounds, followed by an electrifying live set at night performed with only iPhone and iPad. We invited a small group of fans to the exclusive Yakatabune boat party on Tokyo Bay and recorded their performance."

[See also: http://www.wk.com/campaign/remix_your_city AND http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/fresh-push-play/id450761414?mt=8 ]
sound  urbanism  urban  recording  iphone  ipad  via:javierarbona  cities  tokyo  japan  hifana  music  remix  applications  ios 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Mobile Media Toolkit
"The Mobile Media Toolkit shows you how to record audio, from finding a good recording environment to recording phone calls, editing audio, and listening to and sharing reports with others."
mobile  media  tools  audio  video  mobilemedia  onlinetoolkit  recording  journalism  editing  via:danielsinker  english  español  spanish  arabic 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Web Journalist Blog » How to live broadcast your Google+ Hangout
"But today’s tech development goes to Livestream.com (formerly Mogulus) that has been owning the desktop/laptop broadcasting space. They have a downloadable application called Procaster.<br />
The piece of software has a simple interface and is loaded with a ton of features, including the ability to broadcast your desktop. What’s also great is that you can zoom in/out to frame your shot, which makes it the ideal Google+ Hangout broadcasting tool."
google+  hangouts  recording  video  broadcast  broadcasting  streaming  livestream 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Week 113 - Helsinki Design Lab
"If I had a time machine…could change one thing I would hop back to beginning of last week & remove all post-it notes from studio space…reason for this is simple: post-it notes trick people into being lazy.

…way post-it notes are commonly used in workshop settings is to capture an idea on portable piece of paper…can then be moved around at will & eventually accumulated on bigger piece of paper…rolled up & put into closet & kept forever. Ideas captured…

Post-it notes record ideas & allow them to be easily migrated & reorganized, but it's not a good medium for mutating & synthesizing ideas.

One of the reasons that we prefer large sheets of paper or whiteboards is that they encourage collaborative mutation. If you realize that something is drawn in wrong place, it must be erased & re-drawn or somehow altered to meet the new intent. By drawing & redrawing, writing & rewriting, opportunities to adjust the content & format—to literally re-present the ideas—continually emerge."
sitra  bryanboyer  helsinkidesignlab  post-its  whiteboards  process  recording  ideas  sharing  mobility  mutation  synthesis  howwework  classideas  2011  postits 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Deb Roy: The birth of a word | Video on TED.com
"MIT researcher Deb Roy wanted to understand how his infant son learned language -- so he wired up his house with videocameras to catch every moment (with exceptions) of his son's life, then parsed 90,000 hours of home video to watch "gaaaa" slowly turn into "water." Astonishing, data-rich research with deep implications for how we learn."
debroy  language  science  ted  languageacquisition  learning  infants  children  childhood  environment  visualization  video  mit  neuroscience  social  spacetimeworms  naturenurture  speech  words  memorymachines  memory  lifelogging  tracking  audio  recording  classideas  patternrecognition  patterns  vocabulary  media  television  tv  socialmedia  eventstucture  conversation  semanticanalysis  wordscapes  communication  communicationdynamics  engagement  data  socialgraph  contentgraph  coviewing  behavior  socialstructures 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Robert Krulwich on Wondering
"Noticing is tough, yet rewarding work, & it begs to be documented. We’ve more tools than ever to do so. I’ve done some documenting of my own. I walk everywhere with a phone camera in my pocket, & I suspect you do too, so documenting visuals is easy. I can type on my phone, so I can capture text or overheard conversations. I can record video if necessary. And then? I can dump it to a Twitter account or a Tumblr blog to catalog everything. And then, if it is good? Maybe if the noticing started to arrange into larger patterns or there got to be a lot of documentation, I could maybe even print up a book of all the things I had noticed. …

As a person constantly in a position to produce words or designs or ideas, or whatever it may be, it feels good to give myself permission to kick back and inquisitively absorb things as they come. Part of noticing isn’t seeking, it’s highly reliant on serendipity and unexpected relevancy."
frankchimero  noticing  photography  sound  recording  audio  robertkrulwich  serendipity  patterns  patternrecognition 
september 2010 by robertogreco
SoundPaper - A notes app for iPad
"SoundPaper is the best way to take notes on your iPad.

It tracks what you type and draw while recording audio, so you'll never worry about missing an important detail.

While playing back your recording, just tap a word; SoundPaper will jump right to that point in the audio.

If you need to use another document or app, SoundPaper will automatically pause the recording. When you come back, just tap the "Record" button. SoundPaper will continue from where you left off.

Use SoundPaper's powerful drawing tool for quick sketches. It's easy to edit them, too. Tap a drawing to select it, or tap twice to select an individual stroke. From there, you can drag it to wherever you want, or tap "Delete" to get rid of it. Use two fingers to zoom and scroll."
ipad  applications  notes  notetaking  recording  audio  soundpaper  tcsnmy  lcproject  gestures  scrolling  zooming 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Cantos De Aves Do Brasil - Boing Boing
"I recently learned that some birds have been found to be able to isolate and control different parts of their vocal tract independently, allowing them to sing simultaneous double tones or alternate between frequencies very rapidly. I'm not sure about the particular species below, but I think it's safe to say that numerous birds on this album are at least using similar 'mad avian skills' to sound like synthesizers."
brasil  birds  music  recording  audio  nature  brazil 
march 2010 by robertogreco
55 Great Websites To Download Free Sound Effects | Tools
"Sound effects are used to emphasize artistic or other content of films, television shows, live performance, animation, video games, music, or other media. These trick of sound are mostly achieved by combining technology, ingenuity and creativity. Sound effects are important for digital media because an appropriate sound effect can easily resemble a real occurrence for a situation.

We understand it’s kind of fussy to record and process sound effects on one’s own. Thus, we’ve crawled into Internet and search for free sound effects which are available for download. Here’s 55 websites for free sound effects download."
free  sound  soundeffects  samples  filmmaking  editing  effects  recording  video  downloads  audio  music  sounds 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Screenr - Create screencasts and screen recordings the easy way
"Instant screencasts for Twitter.

Now you can create screencasts for your followers as easily as you tweet. Just click the record button and you’ll have your ready-to-tweet screencast in seconds."
twitter  screencasts  screencapture  socialmedia  presentations  software  webapps  onlinetoolkit  screenr  screencasting  free  webapp  recording 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Online Audio Editor - Aviary.com's Myna [an online GarageBand]
"Use Myna to remix music tracks and audio clips. Apply sound effects and record your own voice or instruments!"

[via: http://mashable.com/2009/09/16/aviary-myna/ ]
onlinetoolkit  music  garageband  recording  podcasting  freeware  aviary  multimedia  mp3  webapps  software  sequencer  audacity  myna 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Technology is Great, but Are We Forgetting to Live? - ReadWriteWeb
"The fine line between what's worth documenting and what's not is a hard one to define. We immediately assume that the most important, the biggest, the most incredible moments are those that should be recorded. But it's these very moments that are best to experience live, with our full focus."
technology  life  digitalnatives  balance  socialmedia  lifestreaming  culture  addiction  alienation  readwriteweb  firstlife  mobile  phones  digital  digitalcameras  recording  engagement  twitter  facebook  friendfeed  overload  sidelining  inbescreen  cameras 
january 2009 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: The Year of Listening
"After all, he concludes, "2009 will be a year of listening."
bldgblog  listening  sound  audio  recording  ambient  soundscapes  observation 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball Linked List: Note2Self (iTunes Store)
"Note2Self is a $3 audio recording app for the iPhone, and, I believe, the first iPhone app with a “just lift it to your ear to record” feature. (It shipped with the feature in July.) However, unlike Google Mobile, Note2Self doesn’t use the proximity sensor, only the accelerometer."
iphone  applications  audio  recording  ios 
november 2008 by robertogreco
The New Hotness: FourTrack Audio Recorder for iPhone, iPod Touch | Listening Post from Wired.com
"FourTrack (iTunes link) is the work of Sonoma Wire Works, makers of the desktop recording software RiffWorks, and The Retronyms, makers of Recorder, the top-selling (single-track) recording software in the App Store. After a few days of pre-release testing, we can safely say that this is a solid, functional app that justifies its $10 price for musicians and anyone else who messes around with audio despite -- or perhaps because of -- its rudimentary, four-track-like functionality."
iphone  music  audio  applications  recording  recorder  ios 
november 2008 by robertogreco
iPhone Apps We Like: QuickVoice Voice Recorder Is Great For Field Journos
"QuickVoice is a welcome replacement for a standalone digital voice recorder. We like QuickVoice as a late addition to our favorites for its pause feature, which allows you to start and stop recordings without creating a whole new clip."
iphone  applications  audio  recording  sound  journalism  ios 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Intua - "Intua proudly announces BeatMaker: The first music creation studio for the iPhone and iPod Touch"
"BeatMaker introduces a new generation of mobile instruments and music creation software. Inspired by hardware beatboxes, loop samplers and software sequencers, it combines them to turn the iPod into a unique, inspirational software instrument."
iphone  applications  mobile  drums  audio  sound  music  recording  ios 
july 2008 by robertogreco
TheLastRipper - "The Danish law is very unclear on this subject and therefore this is our interpretation of the copyright law" ...
"TheLastRipper can save Last.fm streams to mp3's, while downloading album cover, appending ID3v2 tags and organizing you music after Artist/Album/Track. TheLastRipper will also help you generate playlists from the data available from you Last.fm account."
via:preoccupations  onlinetoolkit  last.fm  mp3  download  software  streaming  freeware  music  opensource  osx  mac  windows  linux  record  recording  playlists  radio  lastfm 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Chilirec - Your Free Internet Recorder!
"Get your free personal radio channel recorder on the Internet with the possibility to record from hundreds of radio channels. Your personal radio recordings are stored on the Internet, and won't require any disk space on your computer."
via:preoccupations  onlinetoolkit  audio  recording  radio  broadband  dvr  discovery  multimedia  media  listening  recorder  mp3  streaming  music  internet  online  web 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Utterz - Mobile post to your blog or social network page
"With Utterz, you can instantly share your news by creating a multi-media posting in voice, video, picture and text, right from your mobile phone, or online. It's fast and simple, free, and works with every phone, on every carrier."
mobile  blogging  blogs  audio  multimedia  iphone  phones  online  internet  microblogging  podcasting  recording  photography  onlinetoolkit 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Hackszine.com: Record more than 45 seconds of audio or video on the XO laptop
"If you go into the Record activity on the XO laptop, you'll find that you can only record a maximum of 45 seconds of video and audio. But since almost everything in this little green wonder is written in Python, it's very easy to fix this."
olpc  hacks  python  technology  audio  recording  video 
january 2008 by robertogreco
framework
"phonography/field recording; contextual and decontextualized sound activity"
ambient  audio  field  sound  recording  sounds  streaming  radio  podcast  music 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Sound Effects, Production Music, Royalty Free Music, MP3 AIF WAV Sound Effects
"It was the world's first online commercial sound effects and production music library long before the Apple iTunes music store. We pride ourselves on having a vast, easily accessible sound library for immediate download (in .aiff, .wav., .mp3, .wma., and
free  sound  mp3  music  soundeffects  audio  archive  recording  sampling 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Learning 2.0 - The Things
"Welcome to the original Learning 2.0 Program. This site was created to support PLCMC's Learning 2.0 Program; a discovery learning program designed to encourage staff to explore new technologies and reward them for doing 23 Things."
activities  business  flickr  collaboration  howto  gamechanging  community  learning  lessons  librarians  libraries  management  workshops  web2.0  web  technology  tools  resources  training  reference  networkedlearning  online  pedagogy  professionaldevelopment  courses  progress  tagging  tags  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  wikis  work  education  elearning  folksonomy  free  media  blogs  autodidacts  lcproject  homeschool  unschooling  schools  podcasts  webdesign  myspace  recording  programming  rss  del.icio.us  onlinetoolkit  internet  content  user  webdev 
november 2007 by robertogreco
ClickTale™ :: Record - Watch - Understand
"Record visitors' every action as they browse your website. Watch movies to understand visitor behavior, gain valuable insights and improve your website's usability."
usability  webdesign  web  recording  design  user  behavior  browser  analysis  tracking  traffic  browsers  webdev 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Sketchcast.com
"1. Record a sketch with or without voice. Explain something, have fun, or create art. 2. Then embed the sketch player in your blog or point people to your sketch channel."
onlinetoolkit  sketching  drawing  tools  socialnetworking  communication  collaborative  collaboration  blogging  audio  elearning  images  socialsoftware  presentations  illustration  graphics  screenshot  screen  recording  teaching 
september 2007 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Planet of Sound
"So if you're anywhere that seems sonically interesting over the next few weeks – a waterfall, a migratory bird preserve, a shuddering freight elevator, the Cornish coast, a screeching Red Line train – feel free to give us a ring: +1 (206) 337-1474"
sound  audio  recording  space  radio 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Lost Format Preservation Society
"The society was founded in 2000 with the design of Emigre issue no. 57. It's sole purpose is to save formats from obscurity."
media  movies  music  recording  computers  collections  archive  analog  information  format  film  design  retro  storage  vinyl  technology  formats  archiving  digital  software  history 
june 2007 by robertogreco
BBC Training & Development > Free Online Broadcast & New Media Courses
"These online modules and guides are free for you to use. They were originally designed for BBC staff and in publishing them here we have not made many editorial changes to them."
training  journalism  tutorials  video  tools  sound  class  broadcast  audio  learning  online  education  e-learning  reference  bbc  editing  filmmaking  howto  television  recording  production 
march 2007 by robertogreco
TeacherSource | learning.now . Caught on Tape - For Better or Worse | PBS
"A student records a teacher violating school policies, leading to a ban on students taping teachers. What’s the story here, and who do you think is right?"
education  sousveillance  usa  video  transparency  teaching  schools  technology  audio  recording 
february 2007 by robertogreco
Dimdim: The world's free web conferencing company - Home
"Dimdim is the Open Source web conferencing company. With Dimdim you can show Presentations, Applications and Desktops to any other person over the internet. You can chat, show your webcam and talk with others in the meeting."
collaboration  online  opensource  software  tools  web  conferencing  presentations  broadcast  chat  video  utilities  media  powerpoint  communication  recording  services  social  free  share  e-learning  community  meetings  training  conferences 
august 2006 by robertogreco

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