recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : regeneration   4

reform toxicity bhopal india
“The scar is a deeper level of reconstruction that fuses the new and the old, reconciling, coalescing them, without compromising either one in the name of some contextual form of unity. The scar is a mark of pride and of honor, both for what has been lost and what has been gained. It cannot be erased, except by the most cosmetic means. It cannot be elevated beyond what it is, a mutant tissue, the precursor of unpredictable regenerations. To accept the scar is to accept existence. Healing is not an illusory, cosmetic process, but something that—by articulating differences—both deeply divides and joins together.”
—Lebbeus Woods, Radical Reconstruction
seams  scars  lebbeuswoods  reconstruction  regeneration  differences 
august 2014 by robertogreco
The Detroit Project | The New Republic [via: http://archinect.com/news/article.php?id=95178_0_24_0_C]
"All this might make Detroit seem like the most hopeless case in the global history of the city. But it is hardly the worst and certainly not hopeless. Europe is filled with cities that have risen from similarly miserable conditions. ... Bilbao Ria spent 184 million euros on site cleanup; the provincial and regional governments kicked in 144 million euros--the full cost--for the Frank Gehry–designed Guggenheim museum. But the city also created a new metro system and a tram line for the revitalized waterfront. Airports, ports, and regional train systems were also modernized. And, critically, the city spent two decades and one billion euros (mostly from higher levels of government) on a new water-sanitation system to keep untreated household and industrial waste out of the river, which would make waterfront development possible."
urbanplanning  detroit  cities  us  architecture  manufacturing  innovation  urbanism  development  planning  preservation  regeneration  industrial  urban  bilbao  turin  michigan  revitalization 
january 2010 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Health | The man who grew a finger
"How?...It wasn't a transplant. Mr Spievak re-grew his finger tip. He used a powder - or pixie dust as he sometimes refers to it while telling his story. Mr Speivak's brother Alan - who was working in the field of regenerative medicine - sent him the powd
medicine  health  biology  science  regeneration  technology  body  bodies 
may 2008 by robertogreco
News in Science - Newt protein makes legs grow back - 02/11/2007
"Scientists have found a key protein that helps newts regrow severed limbs and which may guide future research into human regenerative medicine."
biotechnology  body  medicine  regeneration  animals  biology  science  bodies 
november 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read