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robertogreco : reliability   12

When drones fall from the sky | The Washington Post
"Drones have revolutionized warfare. Now they are poised to revolutionize civil aviation. Under the law passed by Congress, the Federal Aviation Administration is scheduled to issue rules by September 2015 that will begin the widespread integration of drones into civilian airspace.

Pent-up demand to buy and fly remotely controlled aircraft is enormous. Law enforcement agencies, which already own a small number of camera-equipped drones, are projected to purchase thousands more; police departments covet them as an inexpensive tool to provide bird’s-eye surveillance for up to 24 hours straight.

Businesses see profitable possibilities for drones, to tend crops, move cargo, inspect real estate or film Hollywood movies. Journalists have applied for drone licenses to cover the news. Amazon.com chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos wants his company to use autonomous drones to deliver small packages to customers’ doorsteps. (Bezos also owns The Post.)

First flown in 1994, it later became the first weaponized drone. Designed to conduct surveillance with powerful cameras and sensors, it can be armed with laser-guided Hellfire missiles. It often stays aloft on missions for more than 20 hours at a time and can reach an altitude of 25,000 feet. (Alberto Cuadra)
SEE MORE DRONE TYPES

The military owns about 10,000 drones, from one-pound Wasps and four-pound Ravens to one-ton Predators and 15-ton Global Hawks. By 2017, the armed forces plan to fly drones from at least 110 bases in 39 states, plus Guam and Puerto Rico.

The drone industry, which lobbied Congress to pass the new law, predicts $82 billion in economic benefits and 100,000 new jobs by 2025.

Public opposition has centered on civil-liberties concerns, such as the morality and legality of using drones to spy on people in their back yards. There has been scant scrutiny of the safety record of remotely controlled aircraft. A report released June 5 by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that there were “serious unanswered questions” about how to safely integrate civilian drones into the national airspace, calling it a “critical, crosscutting challenge.”

Nobody has more experience with drones than the U.S. military, which has logged more than 4 million flight hours. But the Defense Department tightly guards the particulars of its drone operations, including how, when and where most accidents occur.

The Post filed more than two dozen Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests with the Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Responding intermittently over the course of a year, the military released investigative files and other records that collectively identified 418 major drone crashes around the world between September 2001 and the end of last year.

That figure is almost equivalent to the number of major crashes incurred by the Air Force’s fleet of fighter jets and attack planes during the same period, even though the drones flew far fewer missions and hours, according to Air Force safety statistics.

The military divided the major accidents into two categories of severity, based on the amount of damage inflicted to the aircraft or other property. (There are three other categories for more minor accidents.)

According to the records, 194 drones fell into the first category — Class A accidents that destroyed the aircraft or caused, under current standards, at least $2 million in damage.

Slightly more than half of those accidents occurred in Afghanistan and Iraq. Almost a quarter happened in the United States."
craigwhitlock  drones  droneproject  safety  2014  military  law  legal  militaryindustrialcomplex  reliability  generalatomics  danger 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Velocity 2012: Richard Cook, "How Complex Systems Fail" - YouTube
[Apply this to the design of education systems (or any other type of system). Notice how the school reform movement can be described by 'design for reliability', not 'design for resilience'.]

[Notes here by Taryn:]

"@19:00 [eg:] shiftworkers as the sources of resilience in "as found" systems (monitoring, responding, adapting, learning)

@20:00 design for reliability (boundaries, redundancy, interference protection, assurance, accountability, hiding-of-details) whereas we want resilience (withstand transients, recover swiftly from failure, prioritize high goals, respond to abnormal situations, adapt)

@22:40 how to design for resilience: constant maintenance, transparency of operation, support mental simulations"
responsiveness  access  control  agency  education  schoolreform  monitoring  adaptablerules  adaptation  learning  via:taryn  2012  maintenance  transparency  operations  priorities  adaptability  reliability  accountability  redundancy  failure  complexity  resilience  organizations  systems  richardcook 
september 2012 by robertogreco
social media frustration - against multiphrenia
"If the technologies I use and value take steps to jeopardize the important connections and relationships cultivated and facilitated there, I will stop using and valuing those technologies. I'll entreat everyone for their email addresses and then otherwise eliminate my persistent online presence.

My interest in and patience for being a digital migrant, of moving to a different online oasis every couple years, nears null. I want a measure of reliability and stability in where I am online. No more TOS changes, no more sudden and limiting archives, no more rumors or threats of being shuttered or sold.

If this is too much to expect, then perhaps I don't belong on the internet."
frustration  socialmedia  twitter  tos  termsofservice  internet  web  online  digitalimmigrants  reliability  stability  technology  monetization  networks  spam  myspace  trust 
march 2011 by robertogreco
In the context of web context: How to check out any Web page — Scott Rosenberg's Wordyard
"As I tried to suggest in my Defense of Links posts, the convention of the link, properly used, provides more valuable context than most printed texts have ever been able to offer.

But links aren’t the only bearers of digital context. Every piece of information you receive online emits a welter of useful signals that can help you appraise it."
evaluation  informationliteracy  education  internet  reading  literacy  hypertext  web  reliability  crapdetection  scottrosenberg 
september 2010 by robertogreco
From the Desk of David Pogue - Q and A - Rumors, Cyberbullying and Anonymity - NYTimes.com
"I think almost no emphasis is being put on giving kids the skills that they need to sort credible from non-credible information. Schools have to wake up and have to give those skills to our kids. It's the critical thinking skill of the 21st century that they're going to need, sorting credible from not credible information. And I think we're asleep at the switch."
criticalthinking  teaching  schools  tcsnmy  reliability  crapdetection  cyberbullying  socialmedia  socialsoftware  rumors  twitter  facebook  craigslist  johnpalfrey  technology  online  web  internet  anonymity  privacy  davidpogue 
july 2010 by robertogreco
hrheingold's crap_detection Bookmarks on Delicious
Howard Rheingold is " aggregating fake, cloaked, hoax websites suggested by twitter network"
crapdetection  digitalcitizenship  fakes  hoax  hoaxes  howardrheingold  lists  reliability  tcsnmy  online  web  truth 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Wikipedia trumps Britannica
"At start of writing book I bought subscription to Britannica...worried that Wikipedia might be inaccurate...discovered that Wikipedia trumps Britanncia all the time...articles are in more depth & provide better references...site design...is easily navigable & focuses on content, whereas Britannica’s site assaults eyes w/ distractions. Initially, I’d find myself double-checking facts on Wikipedia by looking in Britannica...After weeks...realized that Britannica wasn’t helping. Any errors found on Wikipedia were because I was reading original source material...more often than not [found] via Wikipedia...policy of linking to reliable sources turned out to be wonderful starting point for research. Britannica, on other hand, appears to view role as being reliable source. Because it is edited & managed, part of brand is reliability...leads to a sort of self-sufficiency which contrasts with Wikipedia’s need to prove reliability constantly...[resulting in] wealth of 3rd-party links"
wikipedia  reliability  britannica  enyclopedias  research  tcsnmy  online  web  learning  via:preoccupations  collaboration  nasa  nytimes  history  jpl  nobelfoundation 
april 2010 by robertogreco
People are creative; industries, not so much. And cities? « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"Actually, I find the recent emphasis on “creative” X, Y and Z more than a little troubling. Part of this is simply a lifelong aversion to flavor-of-the-month thinking and empty jargon, but it’s also that it all seems to be down to the influence of Richard Florida — and in my mind, Florida’s seeming advocacy of things I care about deeply winds up trivializing and ultimately undercutting them." ... "I’ve never heard anyone accuse Zürich, for example, of having a blistering DJ scene, cutting-edge galleries or forward-leaning popup shops. Yet they seem to be doing OK when it comes to the cheddar, you know? Better a world of places that are what they are, and stand or fall on their own terms, than the big nowhere of ten thousand certified-Creative towns and cities with me-too museums, starchitected event spaces and half-hearted film festivals."
adamgreenfield  cities  richardflorida  creativity  creativeclass  rhetoric  economics  urban  urbanism  local  localsolutions  localism  complexity  onesizefitsall  stocksolutions  metoosolutions  meaning  value  reliability  grassroots  place  longhere  organicsenseofplace  authenticity 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The Check Republic | EdLab
"Check Republic, an information literacy add-on for middle and high school students, was created in response to the growing number of students who use the Internet as their primary source of information. Check Republic allows users to highlight specific elements of a website, rate the validity of the information, provide supporting comments and resources, view resources of other Check Republic users and view the overall validity rating of an online resource. The current add-on description focuses on the use of the tool by middle and high school students but it could easily be used by informal and formal communities who wish to comment on and rate the accuracy of any online resource."
references  tcsnmy  verification  research  validation  reliability  onlinetoolkit  addons 
november 2009 by robertogreco
When Gmail Fails, Users Adapt
"Thanks to free (but less reliable) web services, we can face a failure and move on to the next tool in our arsenal with only a few minutes of complaining. Yes, it’s a lowering of standards to accept nothing but the fabled “five nines” provided by the wireline phone business, but it’s a road we’ve been on for years. Think about what you will accept from a cell phone in terms of lost connections and dropped calls. Reliability is not keeping us tethered to our landlines by any stretch of the imagination."
gmail  twitter  diversification  cloud  reliability  adaptability 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask
"Train eye & fingers to employ series of techniques that help quickly find what you need to know about web pages + Train mind to think critically, even suspiciously, by asking series of questions that help decide how much web page is to be trusted."
evaluation  internet  web  reference  informationliteracy  information  literacy  trust  tutorials  analysis  e-learning  research  infoliteracy  howto  education  technology  reliability 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Tom Hume: Twitter and partial unreliability
"If 5% of my emails aren't getting delivered, I'm not in a 5% worse situation than 0% of my emails not getting delivered - it's *way* worse than that. Suddenly email is rubbish, because I have to consider that my email might not arrive."
design  mobile  psychology  twitter  email  reliability  via:migurski  communication 
january 2008 by robertogreco

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