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robertogreco : reputation   43

Where’s Your School On This Spectrum? Where Do You Want It To Be? | Josie Holford: Rattlebag and Rhubarb
If you’re thinking about branding and how to market your school (and who isn’t these days?) then it’s good to have a strong agreed upon sense of who you are, how you show who you are and what people actually think.

Easy of course to make fun of both ends. One is hopelessly outdated, fuddy-duddy and not meeting the needs of children. And the other end is forever chasing the latest new and shiny thing and not meeting the needs of children.

[image: ""Where is your school?" [spectrum]

1 = traditional, the best of what has been and is now, classical, teacher-centered, standards driven.

10 = experiential, discovery model, learning focussed, innovative, ever-changing, high tech /high touch."]

And in terms of program, the 1 schools probably devote time to cursive writing, teach Latin, emphasize grammar and talk a great deal about grade inflation and enforcing the dress code. And 10 schools spend their time fighting off accusations of permissiveness and failure to teach basic skills while putting in the state-of-the-art design thinking studio. And both are implementing mindfulness because students in 1 schools need a break from the testing, grading and exam stress and in 10 schools because it’s trendy and goes with the gluten-free organic options at lunch. And so on. So complete the descriptors your way.

Where are you?

So try this quick test with your board, your admin team and the faculty. You can also try it with your parents and students when you’re ready to start engaging in the conversation around change.

So try it with your group. Is there a general agreement on where your school is on the continuum?

Where do you want to be?

Now ask this: Where do you want to be? And get everyone to jot down the number before the sharing. Now where are you?

If the two numbers are close then the work is to uncover what that actually means at your school and work on doing it even better. Then getting the word out on the why, the how and the what for.

If there’s a big gap – or if your numbers are all over the place – then you need to do work around your identity. And there’s a clear need educate folks as to who you are what you do, and why.

And what if the numbers from the board are way out of sync with the faculty and admin, let alone the families and the neighborhood reputation?

What if in the course of this exercise it becomes clear that your school is nowhere really? And that in trying to please everyone you have become the all-things-to-all-people-school? Most marketing and communication experts would probably tell you that’s a recipe for disaster.

Watch this space for what you can do about that."
sfsh  schools  identity  education  josieholford  2017  progressive  experientialeducation  purpose  clarity  branding  reputation  mindfulness  permissiveness  teaching  learning  experientiallearning 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Bret Easton Ellis on Living in the Cult of Likability - The New York Times
"On a recent episode of the television series “South Park,” the character Cartman and other townspeople who are enthralled with Yelp, the app that lets customers rate and review restaurants, remind maître d’s and waiters that they will be posting reviews of their meals. These “Yelpers” threaten to give the eateries only one star out of five if they don’t please them and do exactly as they say. The restaurants feel that they have no choice but to comply with the Yelpers, who take advantage of their power by asking for free dishes and making suggestions on improving the lighting. The restaurant employees tolerate all this with increasing frustration and anger — at one point Yelp reviewers are even compared to the Islamic State group — before both parties finally arrive at a truce. Yet unknown to the Yelpers, the restaurants decide to get their revenge by contaminating the Yelpers’ plates with every bodily fluid imaginable.

The point of the episode is that today everyone thinks that they’re a professional critic (“Everyone relies on my Yelp reviews!”), even if they have no idea what they’re talking about. But it’s also a bleak commentary on what has become known as the “reputation economy.” In depicting the restaurants’ getting their revenge on the Yelpers, the episode touches on the fact that services today are also rating us, which raises a question: How will we deal with the way we present ourselves online and in social media, and how do individuals brand themselves in what is a widening corporate culture?

The idea that everybody thinks they’re specialists with voices that deserve to be heard has actually made everyone’s voice less meaningful. All we’re doing is setting ourselves up to be sold to — to be branded, targeted and data-mined. But this is the logical endgame of the democratization of culture and the dreaded cult of inclusivity, which insists that all of us must exist under the same umbrella of corporate regulation — a mandate that dictates how we should express ourselves and behave.

Most people of a certain age probably noticed this when they joined their first corporation, Facebook, which has its own rules regarding expressions of opinion and sexuality. Facebook encouraged users to “like” things, and because it was a platform where many people branded themselves on the social Web for the first time, the impulse was to follow the Facebook dictum and present an idealized portrait of their lives — a nicer, friendlier, duller self. And it was this burgeoning of the likability cult and the dreaded notion of “relatability” that ultimately reduced everyone to a kind of neutered clockwork orange, enslaved to the corporate status quo. To be accepted we have to follow an upbeat morality code where everything must be liked and everybody’s voice respected, and any person who has a negative opinion — a dislike — will be shut out of the conversation. Anyone who resists such groupthink is ruthlessly shamed. Absurd doses of invective are hurled at the supposed troll to the point that the original “offense” often seems negligible by comparison.

I’ve been rated and reviewed since I became a published author at the age of 21, so this environment only seems natural to me. A reputation emerged based on how many reviewers liked or didn’t like my book. That’s the way it goes — cool, I guess. I was liked as often as I was disliked, and that was OK because I didn’t get emotionally involved. Being reviewed negatively never changed the way I wrote or the topics I wanted to explore, no matter how offended some readers were by my descriptions of violence and sexuality. As a member of Generation X, rejecting, or more likely ignoring, the status quo came easily to me. One of my generation’s loudest anthems was Joan Jett’s “Bad Reputation,” whose chorus rang out: “I don’t give a damn about my reputation/ I’ve never been afraid of any deviation.” I was a target of corporate-think myself when the company that owned my publishing house decided it didn’t like the contents of a particular novel I had been contracted to write and refused to publish it on the grounds of “taste.” (I could have sued but another publisher who liked the book published it instead.) It was a scary moment for the arts — a conglomerate was deciding what should and should not be published and there were loud arguments and protests on both sides of the divide. But this was what the culture was about: People could have differing opinions and discuss them rationally. You could disagree and this was considered not only the norm but interesting as well. It was a debate. This was a time when you could be opinionated — and, yes, a questioning, reasonable critic — and not be considered a troll.

Now all of us are used to rating movies, restaurants, books, even doctors, and we give out mostly positive reviews because, really, who wants to look like a hater? But increasingly, services are also rating us. Companies in the sharing economy, like Uber and Airbnb, rate their customers and shun those who don’t make the grade. Opinions and criticisms flow in both directions, causing many people to worry about how they’re measuring up. Will the reputation economy put an end to the culture of shaming or will the bland corporate culture of protecting yourself by “liking” everything — of being falsely polite just to be accepted by the herd — grow stronger than ever? Giving more positive reviews to get one back? Instead of embracing the true contradictory nature of human beings, with all of their biases and imperfections, we continue to transform ourselves into virtuous robots. This in turn has led to the awful idea — and booming business — of reputation management, where a firm is hired to help shape a more likable, relatable You. Reputation management is about gaming the system. It’s a form of deception, an attempt to erase subjectivity and evaluation through intuition, for a price.

Ultimately, the reputation economy is about making money. It urges us to conform to the blandness of corporate culture and makes us react defensively by varnishing our imperfect self so we can sell and be sold things. Who wants to share a ride or a house or a doctor with someone who doesn’t have a good online reputation? The reputation economy depends on everyone maintaining a reverentially conservative, imminently practical attitude: Keep your mouth shut and your skirt long, be modest and don’t have an opinion. The reputation economy is yet another example of the blanding of culture, and yet the enforcing of groupthink has only increased anxiety and paranoia, because the people who embrace the reputation economy are, of course, the most scared. What happens if they lose what has become their most valuable asset? The embrace of the reputation economy is an ominous reminder of how economically desperate people are and that the only tools they have to raise themselves up the economic ladder are their sparklingly upbeat reputations — which only adds to their ceaseless worry over their need to be liked.

Empowerment doesn’t come from liking this or that thing, but from being true to our messy contradictory selves. There are limits to showcasing our most flattering assets because no matter how genuine and authentic we think we are, we’re still just manufacturing a construct, no matter how accurate it may be. What is being erased in the reputation economy are the contradictions inherent in all of us. Those of us who reveal flaws and inconsistencies become terrifying to others, the ones to avoid. An “Invasion of the Body Snatchers”-like world of conformity and censorship emerges, erasing the opinionated and the contrarian, corralling people into an ideal. Forget the negative or the difficult. Who wants solely that? But what if the negative and the difficult were attached to the genuinely interesting, the compelling, the unusual? That’s the real crime being perpetrated by the reputation culture: stamping out passion; stamping out the individual."
socialmedia  facebook  culture  2015  likeability  presentationofself  breteastonellis  online  internet  conservatism  via:rushtheiceberg  uber  relatability  genx  generationx  ratings  criticism  critics  yelp  society  authenticity  liking  likes  reputation  data  biases  imperfections  subjectivity  virtue  anxiety  sharingeconomy  paranoia  blandness  invention  risktaking  conformity  censorship  groupthink 
december 2015 by robertogreco
reading and thinking, one more time - Text Patterns - The New Atlantis
"The link is simply this: that one of the most reliable ways to sharpen your own thinking is to find out what other smart people have thought and said about the things you’re interested in — that is, to take the time to read. But the content-hungry world of online publishing creates strong disincentives for writers to take that time. Almost every entity that has an online presence wants to publish as frequently as possible — as long as the quality of the writing is adequate. And often “adequacy” is determined by purely stylistic criteria: a basic level of clarity and, when possible, some vividness of style. That the writer may be saying something indistinguishable from what a dozen or a hundred writers have said before is rarely a matter of editorial concern. Get the content out there!

And of course, writers want to be published and be read. If they can’t have their work in print magazines or books, then having it tied to a URL is the next best thing — sometimes even a better thing. The passion for self-expression is incredibly powerful. Consider, for instance, the unvarying lament of literary journals: that they have far more people submitting stories and poems to them than they have readers. (Would-be and actual creative writers rarely read, and often know nothing about, the journals to whom they submit their work and whose approval-via-acceptance they so desperately crave.)

So between the writers who desperate to be published and the editors desperate for “content,” the forces militating against taking time — time to read, time to think — are really powerful. So writers tend to trust the first thoughts that come to them, rarely bothering to find out whether others have already considered their topic and written well about it — and in fact not wanting to know about earlier writing, because that might pre-empt their own writing, their publication — the “content” that editors want and that will keep readers’ Twitter feeds clicking and popping with links. In the current system everyone feels stimulated or productive or both. And hey, it’s only reading and thinking that go by the wayside."

[See also: http://text-patterns.thenewatlantis.com/2014/01/the-confidence-of-elect.html ]
publishing  alanjacobs  reading  writing  listening  noise  2014  learning  thinking  howtolisten  attention  reputation 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Webstock '13: Mike Monteiro - How Designers Destroyed the World on Vimeo
"You are directly responsible for what you put into the world. Yet every day designers all over the world work on projects without giving any thought or consideration to the impact that work has on the world around them. This needs to change."

[See also: http://tumblr.austinkleon.com/post/63489760418 ]

Victor Papanek quote:
There are professions more harmful than industrial design, but only a very few of them. And possibly only one profession is phonier. Advertising design, in persuading people to buy things they don’t need, with money they don’t have, in order to impress others who don’t care, is probably the phoniest field in existence today. Industrial design, by concocting the tawdry idiocies hawked by advertisers, comes a close second. Never before in history have grown men sat down and seriously designed electric hairbrushes, rhinestone-covered file boxes, and mink carpeting for bathrooms, and then drawn up elaborate plans to make and sell these gadgets to millions of people. Before (in the ‘good old days’), if a person liked killing people, he had to become a general, purchase a coal-mine, or else study nuclear physics. Today, industrial design has put murder on a mass-production basis. By designing criminally unsafe automobiles that kill or maim nearly one million people around the world each year, by creating whole new species of permanent garbage to clutter up the landscape, and by choosing materials and processes that pollute the air we breathe, designers have become a dangerous breed. And the skills needed in these activities are taught carefully to young people.

In an age of mass production when everything must be planned and designed, design has become the most powerful tool with which man shapes his tools and environments (and, by extension, society and himself). This demands high social and moral responsibility from the designer. It also demands greater understanding of the people by those who practise design and more insight into the design process by the public.

[See also: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:060e3ab46793 ]
mikemonteiro  victorpapanek  2013  design  ethics  responsibility  howwework  systemsthinking  destruction  harm  care  recklessness  gatekeepers  purpose  meaningmaking  reputation  integrity  cv  whatareyouwillingtobefiredfor  wheredoyoudrawtheline  self-respect  fear 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Approval Economy: In Practice | GeorgieBC's Blog
"I have talked a lot in this blog about money and society and the need for new solutions. My opinion from years of volunteering is that money ruins every volunteer effort. As soon as a need receives funding, it becomes a noun and a product instead of an action. As soon as a project is allowed to fundraise, there is a need to manufacture scarcity, to withhold work until payment is received and to continue the need for the project. And as soon as a project receives money, the motives of the person receiving money are suspect.

I do not want to go to a ‘crowd funding website’ and ask a centralized go-between to stand between me and anyone who chooses to support me. I do not want to waste my time creating glossy videos and applications to explain to strangers what you already know, my work. I do not want to ally myself with corporate media or NGO’s, I am trying to make both obsolete. I do not want to develop a persona, tell you all about my personal life, appear on panels and talks to become a character and a brand; I am an action not a noun and I value my right to privacy.

I do not want to be the designated official person for any action I initiate, I want to be free to let others take my place whenever I find people willing. I want to continue to promote others instead of seeking to enhance my own reputation for a livelihood. I want to give freely my ideas and work to anyone who can use them instead of hoarding them to myself for profit.

I do not want to ask you to support every action I take. I will not delay my work waiting for approval or funding. Most of what I work on are things that nobody knows of or supports, that is why I give them my priority. I do not want to jump on popular, widely supported causes to gain support. I want to continue to speak even when everyone disagrees with me as they very frequently do. I want to speak for Gaza when the world says it is anti-semitic to do so, I want to speak for the DRC when the west doesn’t know or care where that is, I want to speak for the Rohingya when no one believes me. I want to criticize democracy, consensus, peer to peer economies, libertarianism and Marxism when everyone I know supports them. I want to advocate for people who have no supporters or funding behind them and tell people about things they may not want to know about.

I do not want to sell you a book, a talk, art, advocacy, a button or a T-shirt, anything I do is available to you as always, for free. But I want it recognized that what I do is not ‘unemployment’, that I am a contributing and valuable member of society entitled to the benefits of society. I want to have the human dignity of societal approval and recognition. I want to be able to support myself and others in society without any of us becoming a product."
heathermarsh  economics  work  motivation  advocacy  consulting  crowdfunding  withholding  2013  labor  privacy  cv  freedom  livelihood  reputation  ideas  sharing  artleisure  artlabor  character  selfbranding  branding  democracy  consensus  hierarchy  horizontality  hierarchies  employment  unemployment  society  recognition  dignity  p2p  libertarianism  marxism  funding  via:caseygollan  leisurearts 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Why we must remember to delete – and forget – in the digital age | Technology | The Guardian
"Mayer-Schönberger envisages that each digital camera could have a built-in process to select expiration dates for a photo. Before taking a picture the camera would send out "picture requests" to what he calls "permission devices" (about the size of a key fob that, perhaps, might dangle from our necks) that respond to the request with the owner's preferred expiration date. That date could range from zero to three years to 100 years from now (an option reserved for really memorable pictures).

He concedes expiration dates are no overall solution to the problem, but what he likes about them is that they make us think about the value of forgetting and, also, that they involve negotiation rather than simply imposing a technical solution to a technical problem. There are alternatives, such as turning your back on the digital age. "I don't like digital abstinence. I want us to embrace participation in digital culture and global networks. Just not at any cost.""
jonathanzittrain  reputationbankruptcy  reputation  streetview  self-censorship  society  foucault  panopticon  jeremybentham  hgwells  worldbrain  expirationdates  expiration  data  viktormayer-schönberger  stuartjeffriess  time  forgetting  2011  facebook  flickr  google  drop.io  deleting  delete  information  culture  technology  psychology  socialmedia  privacy  memory  michelfoucault 
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Unselfish Gene - Harvard Business Review
"Executives, like most other people, have long believed that human beings are interested only in advancing their material interests.

However, recent research in evolutionary biology, psychology, sociology, political science, and experimental economics suggests that people behave far less selfishly than most assume. Evolutionary biologists and psychologists have even found neural and, possibly, genetic evidence of a human predisposition to cooperate.

These findings suggest that instead of using controls or carrots and sticks to motivate people, companies should use systems that rely on engagement and a sense of common purpose.

Several levers can help executives build cooperative systems: encouraging communication, ensuring authentic framing, fostering empathy and solidarity, guaranteeing fairness and morality, using rewards and punishments that appeal to intrinsic motivations, relying on reputation and reciprocity, and ensuring flexibility."
business  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  reciprocity  theunselfishgene  cooperation  wikipedia  empathy  solidarity  fairness  morality  human  humanism  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  rewards  punishment  reputation  flexibility  cooperativism  cooperativesystems  engagement  purpose  commonpurpose  evolutionarybiology  biology  psychology  sociology  politicalscience  experimentaleconomics  economics  evolutionarypsychology  yochaibenkler  complexity  simplicity  self-interest  selfishness  behavior  extrinsicmotivation  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Teachers Without Students | First Things
"Here’s an arresting statistic that economist Richard Vedder thinks goes a long way to explaining the rapid rise in college tuitions: 80% of faculty at the University of Texas, Austin teach fewer than half the students. In view of the fact that faculty salaries make up the largest expense at the university, one simple change would reduce tuition. Get the 80% back into the classrooms.<br />
<br />
Vedder anticipates the objection that forcing the bulk of professors into the classroom will harm the research mission of the university. His most devastating response is again a simple statistic—20% of faculty account for 99.8% of external research grants and funding. That leaves 60% of faculty who have very low teaching loads whose research—or in many cases lack of research—is financed by the general operating budget of UT. His proposal: have them teach two classes each semester, adds up to 200 hours per year in the classroom. As they say in Texas, that ain’t too bad for a payin’ job."
education  teaching  politics  economics  universities  highereducation  highered  academia  higheredbubble  faculty  via:lukeneff  2011  utaustin  tuition  rankings  usnewsandworldreport  reputation  quality  teachingfaculty  yaledisease 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Olbermann's Exit: The Inside Story
"I'm difficult for management. That's why I have the reputation because nobody challenges management." He adds that his run-ins are simply out of good conscience: "I stand up to people. I do not believe that simply because I signed a contract that that gives people the right to make [unilateral] decisions. As part of the process by which you hire me, you hire me. You just don't hire an hour of me to do a performance." [More people should approach their work this way, see part of their job as challenging management, have some conviction, be willing to be fired for speaking out.]
keitholbermann  convictions  cv  management  administration  leadership  reputation  conscience  decisionmaking  process  hiring  employment  employees  challenge  2011  tcsnmy 
june 2011 by robertogreco
A List Apart: Articles: Orbital Content
"Attribution is authorship metadata that is bound to content. No matter how far and wide a piece of content spreads, it never forgets who created it and where it’s from. Despite its importance, web attribution is already in shambles. A quick review of Tumblr blogs or the image stream at FFFFound! will show just how difficult it is to find the original sources for most content. This lack of attribution means that content creators receive neither financial nor reputational gains when others spread their work. As good citizens of the web, we have to be vigilant in retaining authorship as we liberate and share content.

If we can keep attribution firmly in place, content collections and orbital content offer publishers new opportunities for both financial and reputational gain. Traditionally, site owners monetize their content by generating traffic to get as many “eyeballs” in front of their advertisements as possible…"

[via: http://tumblr.quisby.net/post/4835196927 ]
content  web  publishing  online  internet  alistapart  attribution  orbitalcontent  ffffound  tumblr  onlinepublishing  monetization  reputation  sharing  open  api  instapaper 
april 2011 by robertogreco
A 5-minute framework for fostering better conversations in comments sections | Poynter.
Five key principles of online conversations: Don’t blame (or credit) “The Internet.”; For better outcomes, use better filters; The very best filter is an empowered, engaged adult; The difference between conversation and graffiti; The output of a great community is great content.

Five key aspects of online commenting environments: Authentication; Reputation and scoring; Moderation; Policies; Threading

Five tips for fostering great conversations: Learn the ladder of escalation; Practice aikido; You don’t have to prove anything; Assume good faith; Be accountable."
mattthompson  comments  community  conversation  journalism  web  blogs  interaction  moderation  threading  escalation  communitymanagement  management  relationships  goodfaith  accountability  respect  2011  metafilter  content  reputation  scoring  policies  online  internet  commenting 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Vowch
"Vowch makes it easy to recommend people, places, and things to your friends."
recommendations  vowch  reputation  social 
july 2010 by robertogreco
College, Inc. « The Quick and the Ed
"problem with for-profit higher education...people like Clifford are applying private sector principles to an industry w/ a number of distinct characteristics. Four stand out. [1] it’s heavily subsidized. Corporate giants like the U of Phoenix are now pulling in 100s of millions of dollars per year from taxpayers, through federal grants & student loans. [2] it’s awkwardly regulated. Regional accreditors may protest that their imprimatur isn’t like a taxicab medallion to be bought & sold on open market. But as the documentary makes clear, that’s precisely the way it works now. (Clifford puts the value at $10 million.)
money  education  forprofit  profits  markets  highereducation  highered  collegeinc  corruption  taxes  subsidies  experience  value  reputation  consumption  consumers  consumerprotection  regulation 
may 2010 by robertogreco
cnewmark: Trust and reputation systems: redistributing power and influence
"In real life, personal networks are pretty small, maybe in the hundreds. Mass media plays a role in shaping reputation for a small number of people, including celebrities and politicians. A very small number of people have influence in this environment.

* people tend to work with each other
* people are normally trustworthy
* despite their large media footprint, there aren't many bad guys out there
* message spreads quickly
* message is persistent, it's there forever
* connectivity is increasingly pervasive
* people are finding that reputation and recommendation systems can be used to drive a lot of profit.

Okay, so we want to be able to see who we might be able to trust, maybe by seeing some explicit measurement, or maybe something implicit, like seeing their history, and who trusts them."
via:hrheingold  media  network  reputation  networking  networks  trust  twitter  blogging  business  community  craignewmark  craigslist  internet  influence  socialnetworking  socialmedia  behavior  culture  future  identity  communication  making  social 
april 2010 by robertogreco
The Importance of Managing Your Online Reputation « emergent by design
"Last week during #journchat, I saw a reference to a post titled Does Your Twitter Handle Belong on Your Resume? The author is a PR college student, and the conversation around the post is mainly tactical, but the bigger picture surrounding our online identities is one I’ve been wanting to address for some time, so this gives me the opportunity. I’ll briefly cover some basic points about the nature of online space, but then I want to dig into the opportunities that are available in a networked culture."
digitalcitizenship  digitalfootprint  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  influence  internetsafety  socialmedia  identity  culture  reputation  2010  branding  community  footprint  facebook  social  twitter  networks  education  online  personalbranding  web  google  web2.0 
march 2010 by robertogreco
ongoing · After Branding
So much great advice. I'm highlighting this one because I was just warning a friend about the same a few days ago. "8. Do not invest any time or money with anyone whose title, or company name, includes the words “Search Engine” or the abbreviations “SEO” or “SEM”. While one hears that there are a few honest souls out there, lots are just looking for sheep to fleece; don’t be one.
design  culture  homepage  socialnetworking  identity  networking  reputation  presence  business  web  webdev  blogging  marketing  spelling  personal-branding  timbray  internet  branding  seo  sem  flash  glvo  via:cburell  webdesign 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Joho the Blog » Transparency is the new objectivity
"objectivity is discredited these days as anything but an aspiration...[one that] is looking pretty sketchy. The problem with objectivity is that it tries to show what the world looks like from no particular point of view...like wondering what something looks like in the dark...Transparency prospers in a linked medium, for you can literally see the connections between the final draft’s claims & the ideas that informed it...transparency subsumes objectivity. Anyone who claims objectivity should be willing to back that assertion up by letting us look at sources, disagreements & the personal assumptions & values supposedly bracketed out of the report. Objectivity without transparency increasingly will look like arrogance. & then foolishness. Why should we trust what one person — with the best of intentions — insists is true when we instead could have a web of evidence, ideas & argument?...Objectivity is a trust mechanism you rely on when your medium can’t do links. Now our medium can."

[also at: http://www.everythingismiscellaneous.com/2009/07/19/transparency-is-the-new-objectivity/ ]
davidweinberger  politics  journalism  blogs  objectivity  transparency  trust  ethics  information  media  authority  reputation  credibility  newspapers  knowledge  news  blogging  bias  epistemology  2009  internet  philosophy  culture 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Vodafone | receiver » Blog Archive » Ambient Intimacy
"So, all of this is leading us to the 'why bother?' of ambient intimacy. Why do we bother participating in this kind of communication with others and why do we bother to keep track of others in our social network, or even have a social network at all? The following is a list that I first saw in Tom Coates' excellent presentation on social software. It shows four key reasons why people participate in on-line communities. I think it's pretty self explanatory and it works really well when you think about why we've participated in methods of communicating with each other, right from back when we were picking fleas, through to now, when we check our phones for messages from Twitter:

1. anticipated reciprocity
2. reputation
3. sense of efficacy
4. identification with a group"
lisareichelt  ambientintimacy  twitter  connectivity  infooverload  online  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  technology  tomcoates  community  reputation  identity 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Dog Eared “Distraction”
"When “DIY” attains to its logical zenith, fake becomes the new real. I actually can’t wait for this to happen. The pinnacle of knowledge circulation in the networked age. How-to, tutorials, maker culture, sharing of knowledge (or maybe just descriptions and step-by-step procedures) all coming together so that people make their own stuff, from new materials that do not have to be tuned for epic scale levels of manufacturing. You need something, make one or two rather than having 100,000 of them made offshore someplace and shipped at great expense and with enormous carbon footprint. Natural experimentation with alternative materials, features, etc."
julianbleecker  brucesterling  future  diy  reputation  making  make  tinkering  materials  experimentation  fabbing  manufacturing  howto  sharing  knowledge  sciencefiction  scifi 
april 2009 by robertogreco
Building Web 2.0 Reputation Systems: The Blog: Leaderboards Considered Harmful
"This may be the most insidious artifact of a leaderboard community: the very presence of a leaderboard changes the community dynamic and calls into question the motivations of everyone for any action they might take. If that sounds a bit extreme, consider Twitter: friend counts and followers have become the coins of that realm, and when you get a notification of a new follower...? Aren't you just a little more likely to believe that it's just someone fishing around for a reciprocal 'follow'? Sad, but true. And this is a site that itself has never officially featured a leaderboard. Twitter merely made the statistics known and provided an API to get at them: in doing so, they may have let the genie out of the bottle."
twitter  reputation  socialnetworking  followers  following  authority  popularity 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Advice from Patton Oswalt's commencement speech given at the high school he graduated from. (kottke.org)
"Reputation, Posterity and Cool are traps. They'll drain the life from your life. Reputation, Posterity and Cool = Fear. AND There Is No Them." "Amen, brother. Although, think about all of the great art we'd be missing out on if 18yo actually took it."
kottke  schools  schooling  reputation  posterity  life  happiness  meaning  art  commencementspeeches 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Reputation Parent - Yahoo! Design Pattern Library
"A person participating in a social structure expects to develop a reputation and hopes for insight into the reputations of others, but each designed model of participation and reputation embodies its own set of biases and incentive structures. Balancing
patterns  reputation  yahoo  community  design  ux  social  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  socialsoftware  abuse  blogosphere  collectiveintelligence  commenting  interaction  networking  trust  society  ratings  ranking  identity 
june 2008 by robertogreco
After a Facebook Scandal, Horace Mann Is Forced to Ask What Values It Should Teach -- New York Magazine
"students created Facebook pages viciously attacking teacher...wealthy parents on school board defended them,...[school] forced to confront series of questions: Is Facebook page private, like diary? Is big money distorting private-school education?"
culture  education  society  school  facebook  socialnetworking  ethics  politics  money  socialnetworks  reputation  privacy  students  power  schools 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Seth's Blog: Why bother having a resume?
"If you don't have a resume, what do you have? How about three extraordinary letters of recommendation from people the employer knows or respects? Or a sophisticated project they can see or touch? Or a reputation that precedes you? Or a blog that is so co
future  careers  work  education  reputation  employment  sethgodin  business  resumes  lifehacks  marketing  hiring 
march 2008 by robertogreco
How To Manage Your Online Reputation - ReadWriteWeb
"There are already many different ways to monitor your online reputation as it is. Let's see how they stack up."
reputation  online  onlinetoolkit  internet  web  branding  attention  socialnetworks  services  resumes  howto  identity  privacy  profile  socialmedia 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The Future of Reputation
"This engrossing book, brimming with amazing examples of gossip, slander, and rumor on the Internet, explores the profound implications of the online collision between free speech and privacy"
freedom  identity  privacy  reputation  sociology  law  libel  opencontent  internet  online  web  books  free  ebooks 
february 2008 by robertogreco
wrapping up 2007 (28 December 2007, Interconnected)
"Stafford Beer in his book Platform for Change. Beer talks about social institutions such as 'schooling,'... These are self-organising and self-regulating systems. As their environment changes, how do they not collapse? How are they not sensitive to shock?

Beer says that an ultrastable social institution will do one of three things in response to change:

1. It will change internally and still survive (I guess this is like scouting or soccer, both institutions that have changed minimally).

2. The institution's internal form will change, but its relationships to other institutions will remain. Perhaps this is like prisons, which have the same relationship to the population, police, courts and government... but operate internally very differently.

3. Dramatic change occurs. This makes me think of the Church: it has changed enormously internally and in its external relations over the last millennium, yet it's still the Church."
semanticweb  socialsoftware  markets  structures  mattwebb  lcproject  marketing  gamechanging  social  web2.0  trends  thinking  theory  technology  groups  future  organizations  simplicity  coding  science  computers  systems  collapse  institutions  society  change  reform  deschooling  staffordbeer  complexity  environment  evolution  flocking  cars  transportation  rfid  gps  physics  astronomy  astrophysics  nanotechnology  ultrastablesystems  progress  phenotropics  search  microformats  patterns  drugs  advertising  browser  web  internet  thermodynamics  freemarkets  capitalism  behavior  economics  modeling  identity  reputation  sharing  networks  networking  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  self  human  memory  forgetting  play  flickr  webdev  development  webdesign  experience  ux  flow  iphoto  interaction  design  radio  typologies  words  motivation  risk  abstraction  schooling  schools  2007  browsers 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Design Observer: What's in a name?
"If one is willing to expound, exclaim, or critique it should be done under a real name and with links to a valid email or website address. If transparency on the web is the new black, then there should be no secrets."
blogs  identity  commenting  anonymity  internet  web  culture  online  etiquette  reputation  names  naming 
december 2007 by robertogreco
TitleZ: Book trends for publishers
"makes it easy to see how a book or group of books has performed over time, relative to other books on the market. Simply enter a search phrase, book title, or author, and TitleZ returns a comprehensive listing of books from Amazon along with our historic
amazon  analysis  books  tracking  performance  sales  rankings  trends  reputation  publishers  statistics  data 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Facts Prove No Match for Gossip, It Seems - New York Times
"Gossip also told people whom to trust, and the prospect of a bad reputation discouraged them from acting selfishly, so large groups could peacefully cooperate. At least, that was the theory: gossip promoted the “indirect reciprocity” that made human
gossip  human  behavior  society  reputation  trust  relationships  evolution  communication  facts 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life - Facebook: The Social Graph Roach Motel
"When it comes to contact lists (i.e. the social graph), Facebook is a roach motel. Lots of information about user relationships goes in but there’s no way for users or applications to get it out easily. Whenever an application like FacebookSync comes a
socialgraph  api  applications  code  collaboration  communication  community  development  distributed  information  networking  networks  open  openid  people  portability  privacy  profile  socialnetworking  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  relationships  reputation 
september 2007 by robertogreco
zengestrom.com: Opening up the social graph
"People look for two qualities in this type of infrastructure provider: 1) critical mass and 2) ethics. It should appear stable enough that it's reasonable to expect it to stick around...and since we trust it with our data its intentions have to come acro
socialgraph  api  applications  code  collaboration  communication  community  development  information  networking  networks  open  openid  people  portability  privacy  profile  socialnetworking  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  relationships  reputation  facebook  jaiku  identity  standards  distributed  google  ambientintimacy  ambient  jyriengestrom 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Brad's Thoughts on the Social Graph
"People are getting sick of registering and re-declaring their friends on every site., but also: Developing "Social Applications" is too much work."
socialgraph  api  applications  code  collaboration  communication  community  development  distributed  information  networking  networks  open  openid  people  portability  privacy  profile  socialnetworking  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  relationships  reputation 
september 2007 by robertogreco
collision detection: Should online newspapers be programmed to "forget" old, incorrect articles?
"Programming a database to forget: I love it! This whole issue is another symptom of our increasingly weird digital world, where feats of memory that are superhuman -- or inhuman, or both -- are made possible via silicon"
media  memory  online  internet  journalism  forgetting  technology  archiving  reputation  binglogg  google  news  web 
september 2007 by robertogreco
San Francisco Restaurant Reviews, Doctors, Bars, Salons, Dentists and More | Yelp
"Yelp is the fun and easy way to find, review and talk about what's great (and not so great) in your world. You already know that asking friends is the best way to find restaurants, dentists, hairstylists, and anything local. Yelp makes it fast and easy b
consumer  ratings  reviews  search  restaurants  community  local  social  shopping  advice  business  comparison  recommendations  reputation  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  stores  tourism  travel  trust 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Rapleaf: Reputation Lookup and Email Search
"Look someone up by their email address to view their reputation related information, profile stats, and social networks. Leave feedback on others and they will be encouraged to rate you back. Use Rapleaf to build, promote, and manage your online reputati
reputation  ratings  online  networking  networks  email  blogging  branding  business  collaboration  community  consumer  marketing  people  profile  socialsoftware  social  shopping  services  tools 
july 2007 by robertogreco
socialmeter
"Social meter scans the major social websites to analyze a webpage's social popularity. Currently we scan Bloglines, Del.icio.us, Digg, Google, Rojo, Shadows,Technorati and Yahoo My Web."
socialnetworks  socialsoftware  traffic  trends  statistics  tracking  reputation  popular  del.icio.us  digg  bookmarks 
february 2007 by robertogreco
Wired News: Delete Your Bad Web Rep
"A new startup, ReputationDefender, will act on your behalf by contacting data hosting services and requesting the removal of any materials that threaten your good social standing."
culture  photo  life  reputation  socialnetworks  society  online  internet  web  work 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Wize. People Know.
"When it comes to shopping, we believe that everyone is smarter than any one. That's why we are constantly gathering user reviews, expert reviews, and buzz from all over the web."
aggregator  shopping  search  reviews  information  products  ratings  reference  reputation  gadgets  hardware  research  consumer  tips  money  capitalism 
october 2006 by robertogreco
Dave Chiu :: Portfolio :: Applied Dreams 2.2
"RentAThing is a Reputation Management Service which enables negotiation for access by addressing risk. I worked on this two-week Applied Dreams project with Didier Hilhorst. We developed several transaction mechanisms and interactions which leverage trus
attention  collaboration  democracy  future  interaction  ideas  interface  internet  management  software  social  socialsoftware  sharing  risk  research  networks  reputation 
september 2006 by robertogreco

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