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Frances Stonor Saunders · Where on Earth are you? · LRB 3 March 2016
"The one border we all cross, so often and with such well-rehearsed reflexes that we barely notice it, is the threshold of our own home. We open the front door, we close the front door: it’s the most basic geographical habit, and yet one lifetime is not enough to recount all our comings and goings across this boundary. What threshold rites do you perform before you leave home? Do you appease household deities, or leave a lamp burning in your tabernacle? Do you quickly pat down pockets or bag to check you have the necessary equipment for the journey? Or take a final check in the hall mirror, ‘to prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet’?

You don’t have a slave to guard your door, as the ancients did, so you set the alarm (or you set the dog, cave canem). Keys? Yes, they’re in your hand. You have ‘the power of the keys’, the right of possession that connects you to thousands of years of legal history, to the rights of sovereigns and states, to the gates of salvation and damnation. You open the door, step through, and turn to close it – through its diminishing arc, the details of your life inside recede. ‘On one side, me and my place,’ Georges Perec wrote:
The private, the domestic (a space overfilled with my possessions: my bed, my carpet, my table, my typewriter, my books, my odd copies of the Nouvelle Revue française); on the other side, other people, the world, the public, politics. You can’t simply let yourself slide from one into the other, can’t pass from one to the other, neither in one direction nor in the other. You have to have the password, have to cross the threshold, have to show your credentials, have to communicate … with the world outside.

You lock the door. You’ve crossed the border. You’ve ignored Pascal’s warning that all humanity’s misery derives from not being able to sit alone in a quiet room. When the Savoyard aristocrat Xavier De Maistre was sentenced to six weeks’ house arrest for duelling in 1790, he turned his detention into a grand imaginary voyage. ‘My room is situated on the 45th degree of latitude,’ he records in A Journey around my Room. ‘It stretches from east to west; it forms a long rectangle, 36 paces in perimeter if you hug the wall.’ And so he sets off, charting a course from his desk towards a painting hung in a corner, and from there he continues obliquely towards the door, but is waylaid by his armchair, which he sits in for a while, poking the fire, daydreaming. Then he bestirs himself again, presses north towards his bed, the place where ‘for one half of our life’ we forget ‘the sorrows of the other half’. And so on, ‘from the expedition of the Argonauts to the Assembly of Notables, from the lowest depths of hell to the last fixed star beyond the Milky Way, to the confines of the universe, to the gates of chaos’. ‘This,’ he declares, ‘is the vast terrain which I wander across in every direction at leisure.’

Whether around your room in forty days, or around the world in eighty days, or around the Circle Line in eighty minutes, whether still or still moving, the self is an act of cartography, and every life a study of borders. The moment of conception is a barrier surpassed, birth a boundary crossed. Günter Grass’s Oskar, the mettlesome hero of The Tin Drum, narrates, in real time, his troubling passage through the birth canal and his desire, once delivered into the world, to reverse the process. The room is cold. A moth beats against the naked light bulb. But it’s too late to turn back, the midwife has cut the cord.

Despite this uncommon ability to report live on his own birth, even Oskar’s power of self-agency is subject to the one inalienable rule: there is only one way into this life, and one way out of it. Everything that happens in between – all the thresholds we cross and recross, all the ‘decisions and revisions that a minute will reverse’ – is bordered by this unbiddable truth. What we hope for is safe passage between these two fixed boundaries, to be able to make something of the experience of being alive before we are required to stop being alive. There’s no negotiating birth or death. What we have is the journey.

On the evening of 3 October 2013, a boat carrying more than five hundred Eritreans and Somalis foundered just off the tiny island of Lampedusa. In the darkness, locals mistook their desperate cries for the sound of seagulls. The boat sank within minutes, but survivors were in the water for five hours, some of them clinging to the bodies of their dead companions as floats. Many of the 368 people who drowned never made it off the capsizing boat. Among the 108 people trapped inside the bow was an Eritrean woman, thought to be about twenty years old, who had given birth as she drowned. Her waters had broken in the water. Rescue divers found the dead infant, still attached by the umbilical cord, in her leggings. The longest journey is also the shortest journey.

Already, in the womb, our brains are laying down neural pathways that will determine how we perceive the world and our place in it. Cognitive mapping is the way we mobilise a definition of who we are, and borders are the way we protect this definition. All borders – the lines and symbols on a map, the fretwork of walls and fences on the ground, and the often complex enmeshments by which we organise our lives – are explanations of identity. We construct borders, literally and figuratively, to fortify our sense of who we are; and we cross them in search of who we might become. They are philosophies of space, credibility contests, latitudes of neurosis, signatures to the social contract, soothing containments, scars.

They’re also death zones, portals to the underworld, where explanations of identity are foreclosed. The boat that sank half a mile from Lampedusa had entered Italian territorial waters, crossing the imaginary line drawn in the sea – the impossible line, if you think about it. It had gained the common European border, only to encounter its own vanishing point, the point at which its human cargo simply dropped off the map. Ne plus ultra, nothing lies beyond.

I have no theory, no grand narrative to explain why so many people are clambering into their own hearses before they are actually dead. I don’t understand the mechanisms by which globalisation, with all its hype of mobility and the collapse of distance and terrain, has instead delivered a world of barricades and partition, in which entire populations seem to be living – and dying – in a different history from mine. All I know is that a woman who believed in the future drowned while giving birth, and we have no idea who she was. And it’s this, her lack of known identity, which places us, who are fat with it, in direct if hopelessly unequal relationship to her.

Everyone reading this has a verified self, an identity, formed through and confirmed by identification, that is attested to be ‘true’. You can’t function in the world without it: you can’t open a bank account, get a credit card or national insurance number, or a driving licence, or access to your email and social media accounts, or a passport or visa, or points on your reward card. You can’t have your tonsils removed without it. You can’t die without it. Whether you’re conscious of it or not, whether you like it or not, the verified self is the governing calculus of your life, the spectrum on which you, as an individual, are plotted from cradle to grave. As Pierre-Joseph Proudhon explained, you must be ‘noted, registered, enumerated, accounted for, stamped, measured, classified, audited, patented, licensed, authorised, endorsed, reprimanded, prevented, reformed, rectified and corrected, in every operation, every transaction, every movement.’"



"All migrants know that the reply to the question ‘Who on earth are you?’ is another question: ‘Where on earth are you?’ And so they want what we’ve got, a verified self that will transport them to our side of history. Thus, the migrant identity becomes a burden to be unloaded. Migrants often make the journey without identity documents, and I mentioned one reason for this, namely that the attempt to obtain them in their country of origin can be very dangerous. Others lose them at the outset when they’re robbed by police or border guards, or by people traffickers en route. Many destroy them deliberately because they fear, not without reason, that our system of verification will be a mechanism for sending them back. In Algeria, they’re called harraga, Arabic for ‘those who burn’. And they don’t only burn their documents: many burn their fingertips on hobs or with lighters or acid, or mutilate them with razors, to avoid biometric capture and the prospect of expulsion. These are the weapons of the weak.

The boat carrying more than five hundred Eritreans and Somalis sank off Lampedusa in October 2013, barely three months after the pope’s visit. Whether they had lost their identity papers, or destroyed them, when facing death the people on board wanted to be known. As the boat listed and took on water, and with most of the women and children stuck below deck, those who knew they wouldn’t make it called out their names and the names of their villages, so that survivors might carry ashore news of their deaths.​5 There isn’t really any other way: there’s no formal identification procedure for those who drown. In Lampedusa’s cemetery, the many plaques that read ‘unidentified migrant’ merely tell us that people have been dying in the Mediterranean for at least 25 years – more than twenty thousand of them, according to current estimates.

Everyone must be counted, but only if they count. Dead migrants don’t count. The woman who drowned while giving birth was not a biometric subject, she was a biodegradable one. I don’t want to reconstitute her as a sentimental artefact, an object to be smuggled into the already crowded room of my bad conscience. But … [more]
borders  identity  cartography  francesstonorsaunders  georgesperec  lampedusa  güntergrass  refugees  identification  personhood  geopolitics  legibility  mobility  passports  pierre-josephproudhon  globalization  thresholds  homes  milankundera  socialmedia  digitalexhaust  rfid  data  privacy  smartphones  verification  biometrics  biometricdata  migration  immigration  popefrancis  facialidentification  visas  paulfussell  stefanzweig  xenophobia  naomimitchison  nobility  surveillance  intentionality  gilbertharding  whauden  lronhubbard  paulekman 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Strategies against architecture: interactive media and transformative technology at Cooper Hewitt | MW2015: Museums and the Web 2015
"Cooper Hewitt reopened at the end of 2014 with a transformed museum in a renovated heritage building, Andrew Carnegie's home on the Upper East Side of New York City. New galleries, a collection that was being rapidly digitized, a new brand, and a desire for new audiences drove the museum to rethink and reposition its role as a design museum. At the core of the new museum is a digital platform, built in-house, that connects collection and patron management systems to in-gallery and online experiences. These have allowed the museum to redesign everything from object labels and showcases to the fundamentals of a 'visit experience'. This paper explores in detail the process, the decisions made – and resulting tradeoffs - during each stage of the process. In so doing it reveals the challenges of collaborating with internal and external capacities; operating internationally with online collaboration tools; rapid prototyping; and the distinct differences between software and hardware design and production."



"In early 2012 at the National Art Education Association conference at the Metropolitan Museum of Art a group of junior school children working with Queens Museum of Art got up on stage and presented their view of ‘what technology in a museum should be like’. The kids imagined and designed the sorts of technologies that they felt would make their visit to a museum better. None of their proposed technologies were unfeasible and they imagined a very familiar sounding museum. The best invention proposed was a tracking device that each child would wear, allowing them to roam freely in a geo-fenced museum like home-detention prisoners with ankle-shackles, whilst their teachers sat comfortably in the museum cafe watching them move as dots on a tablet. The children argued that such a device would allow them to roam the museum and see the parts of it they actually wanted to see, and the teachers would get to fulfil their desires of just “hanging out in the cafe chatting”.

Often it feels like museums make decisions about the appropriate use of technology based upon short term internal needs – the need to have something ‘newsworthy’, the need to have something to keep their funders happy, and occasionally to meet the assumed needs of a specific audience coming to a specific exhibition. Rarely is there an opportunity like the one at Cooper Hewitt, to consider the entire museum and purposely reconfigure its relationships with audiences, all in one go. Even rarer is the funding to make such a step change possible.

The D&EM team established a series of unwritten technology principles for the new galleries and experience that were reinforced throughout the concept design stages and then encoded into practice during development. At the heart of these was an commitment to ensure that whatever was designed for the galleries would give visitors a reason to physically visit – and that nothing would be artificially held back, content-wise, from the web. Technology, too, had to help and encourage the visitor against the architectural impositions of the building itself.

Complementing a strategic plan that envisioned the transformation of the museum into a ‘design resource’, and an increasing willingness to provide more open access to the collection, concepts for media and technology in the galleries was to –

1. Give visitors explicit permission to play
Play was seen as an important way of addressing threshold issues and architecture. Entering the Carnegie Mansion, the experience of crossing the threshold provided an opportunity to upend expectations – much like the lobby space of a hotel. Very early on in the design process, then-Director, Bill Moggridge enthused about the idea of concierges greeting visitors at the door, warmly welcoming them into the building and setting them at ease. Technological interventions – even symbolic ones – were expected to support this need to change every visitor’s perception of how they were ‘allowed to behave’ in the mansion.

2. Make interactive experiences social and multi-player and allow people to learn by watching

The Cooper Hewitt, even in its expanded form, is a physically small museum. It has 16,000 sq ft of gallery space which is configured as a series of domestic spaces except for the open plan third floor, which was converted from offices into gallery space as part of the renovation. If interactive experiences were to support a transformed audience profile with more families and social groups visiting together, the museum would need experiences that worked well with multiple users, and provided points of social interaction. Immediately this suggested an ‘app-free’ approach even though Cooper Hewitt had been an early adopter of an iPod Touch media guide (2010) and iPad App (2011) in previous special exhibitions.

3. Ensure a ‘look up’ experience

Again, because of the domestic spaces with narrow doorways, encouraging visitors to be constantly referring to their mobile devices was not desirable. There was a strong consensus amongst the staff and designers that the museum should provide a compelling enough experience for visitors to only need to use their mobile devices to take photos with.

4. Be ubiquitous, a ‘default’ operating mode for the institution

The biggest lesson from MONA was that for a technology experience to have the best chance of transforming how visitors interacted with the museum, and how staff considered it into the future, that technology had to be ubiquitous. An ‘optional guide’, an ‘optional app’, even a ‘suggested mobile website’ might meet the needs of some visitors but it was unlikely to achieve the large scale change we hoped for. Indeed, the experience of prior technologies at Cooper Hewitt had been considered disappointing by the museum with a 9% take up rate (Longo, 2011) for the iPad guide made for the (pre-closure) blockbuster exhibition Set In Style. Similarly, only having interactive experiences in ‘some galleries’ threatened to relegate certain experiences to ‘younger audiences’ – something that is common in science museums.

5. Work in conjunction with the web and offer a “persistence of visit”

We were also insistent from the start that whatever was designed, that it had to acknowledge the web, and that ‘post-visit’ diaries were to be considered. The museum was enamoured with MONA’s post-visit reports from The O, and similar initiatives that followed including MOMA’s Audio+ (2013) and others. This idea grew and the D&EM team began to build out a sizeable infrastructure over 2013, the desire to ensure that everything on exhibition in the museum would also be available online – without exception – became technically feasible. As the museum’s curatorial staff began to finalise object lists for the opening exhibitions, it became clear that beyond the technology layer, a new layer of policy changes would be required to realise this idea. New loan forms and new donor agreements were negotiated and by the time objects began to arrive for installation at the museum in 2014, all but a handful of lenders had agreed to have a metadata and image record of their object’s presence in the museum not only be online during the run of an exhibition, but permanently on the exhibition’s online catalogue."



"As a sector we have spent a couple of decades making excuses for why “digital” can’t be made core to staffing requirements and the results have ranged from unsatisfying to dismal.

The shift to a ‘post-digital’ museum where “digital [is] being naturalized within museums’ visions and articulations of themselves” (Parry, 2013) will require a significant realignment of priorities and an investment in people. The museum sector is not alone in this – private media organisations and tech companies face exactly the same challenge. Despite ‘digital people’ and ‘engineers’ being in high demand, they should not be considered an ‘overpriced indulgence’ but rather than as an integral part of the already multidisciplinary teams required to run a museum, or any other cultural institution.

The flow of digital talent from private companies to new types of public service organizations such as the Government Digital Service (UK), 18F (inside GSA) and US Digital Service, proves that there are ways, beyond salaries, to attract and retain the specialist staff required to build the types of products and services required to transform museums. In fact, we argue that museums (and other cultural institutions) offer significant intrinsic benefits and social capital that are natural talent attractors that other types of non-profits and public sector agencies lack. The barriers to changing the museum workforce in this way are not primarily financial but internal, structural and kept in place by a strong institutional inertia."
cooper-hewitt  aaronstraupcope  sebastianchan  2015  design  museums  experience  web  internet  ux  api  userexperience  hardware  change  organizationalchange  billmoggridge  mona  theo  davidwalsh  digital  gov.uk  privacy  identity  absence  tomcoates  collections  soa  servicesorientedarchitecture  steveyegge  persistence  longevity  display  nfc  rfid  architecture  applications  online  engagement  play  technology  post-digital  18f 
april 2015 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] did I mention it vibrates? ["history is time breaking up with itself"]
"Lately I've been playing with the idea that history itself is the space left over as any two moments in time tear away from each other. Or as they fade the way a mural in the sun gradually disappears; people both aware of its disappearance and shocked when it finally vanishes.

There are still stand-out events (the clues) and we recognize those in the objects and artifacts we celebrate. More specifically that we celebrate those objects in common. The scarcities of the past meant that the pool of common celebrations from which to choose was pretty limited and so now while it might seem like we're swimming in tailor-made niche rituals I don't actually think the fundamental dynamic has changed.

There is still what Scott McCloud dubbed the magic in the gutter. The "gutter" being the space between any two panels (or frames) in a comic strip. The gutter is the place where the author and the artist let the reader act as the narrative bridge between two events. This is an integral part of comics as a form and I think fundamental to their popularity.

I like to think of the gutter as the space where fan-fiction operates. As a way of creating alternative reasons to explain why any two events are related to one another."



"Monkey Jesus. Let me start by saying: I love Monkey Jesus.

Monkey Jesus is sometimes known as Ecce Homo, a church fresco painted by Elias Garcia Martinez in the 1930s in Northern Spain. Like many churches in Europe it was abandoned and stood waiting to be reclaimed by the elements. In August of 2012 Cecilia Giminez, a nearby resident, decided that she would attempt to restore the painting before it was completely lost.

That last fact is really important: This fresco was the proverbial tree falling in the forest with no one around to hear it. Had another year or another decade passed the painting would have been washed away by the rain or the sun and no one would have known the difference.

What happened instead is that someone posted a picture of Giminez's efforts to the internet and the whole world when completely nuts. This, we were told, was an offense against all culture. Proof that the laity shouldn't be trusted with the arts. That this 90-year woman had single-handedly destroyed everything sacred about the Rennaissance.

Then a funny thing happened: By the end of 2013 forty thousand people had visited the church to see the fresco and Giminez herself was pushing for financial compensation claiming artist's rights for her work.

Monkey Jesus has crossed the event horizon of signifiers and now, I'm willing to bet, we're going to actively preserve the so-called failed restoration over the original fresco precisely because of this history. Because now the work has narrative pedigree. If you think that sounds like crazy-talk consider the exact same painting but done in the hand of Alex Katz or re-created by Cindy Sherman. Look carefully at Monkey Jesus and tell me you can't see the shadow of either artist's work in that painting.

The issue is not whether a different artist would have done Monkey Jesus better but in how we reconstruct the narrative around an event; the reasons we choose to understand why an object is worthy of a narrative at all."



"We did this so that the idea of visitors using a NFC-enabled pen in the galleries stopped being an idea and became something tangible. The problem with conceptual designs is that at a certain point they stop being devices for imagining possibilities and instead become a bucket for everyone's hopes and fears and anxieties. That tipping point is unique to every project but we had reached ours and the most important thing became to root the problem in a practical reality that we could use to make decision about rather than around."



"It turns out the Pen is a pretty good problem-solving interview question. You start with two immutable facts of nature and a warning. Fact number one is that all capacitive styluses have a metal core or metal woven in to the sheathing. (Go back and look at the slide with the vWand cases — that's metallic paint on the tip.) That metal is required in order for the stylus to work. Fact number two is that metal is the enemy of radio frequencies (NFC). The stern warning is that if any point the person answering the question says I saw a thing... on 60 minutes... about a guy in Shenzhen... then the interview is over.

Otherwise you just sit back and listen.

If they get far enough to figure out a design then you ask them how they'd power the thing. You can't really see it in any of the slides I've shown you but there's a button on the back of the Pen. That's the button which activates the NFC antenna because if it were always powered on the Pen would spend all day shouting HELLO? IS ANYONE OUT THERE?? in to the void and quickly exhaust its battery supply."



"It turns out that the Pen is in fact the minimum amount of infrastructure that you need if the goal is to enable some kind of meaningful recall for a museum visit. The point is not to provide users with a Pen experience but to offer them a tool that is quiet and polite and allows them to, literally, touch the objects as a way to remember them. To provide them with something less-shit than taking photos of wall labels. To provide them with a way to come to the museum and have a heads up visit confident that there is a way back after they've left the building."



"We changed the loan agreements to state that the museum reserves the right to display the fact that an object spent time with us and to display the images of those objects on our website and in our galleries. Forever. If you're not a museum person you may be staring at your screen right now wondering what the fuck I am talking about. Like specifically why this is a big deal. That is the correct response.

Pretty much every other loan agreement ever drafted between two museums or a museum and a private individual states that lender retains all image rights to the object being lent. Which is fine, in principle. In practice though it's created an environment where even if a museum enjoys a limited period of use the uncertainty around the licensing of that imagery after the fact means that it's easier to throw up our hands and despair the situation than to look for a viable alternative.

The problem is this: We tell visitors that it is important enough for them to travel to our musuem to see something in person rather than simply looking for it on Google. We tell them it is worth their time and expense and then we pretend as though it never happened.

Which is insane. It's flat out insane. Not to mention wrong. Also stupid.

So we've stopped doing it. We're not going to start making mugs and ties with other people's collections but we are going to assert that their thing was in our building for a while."



'Let's be honest: You are straight up fucked if you then try to search for that thing on a museum website and doubly-fucked if you're trying to do it on your phone. We should all strive to make that experience not suck but for the time being it does. If instead a person can remember that Oh yeah, I was there in October... and there's a way to find the object quickly and easily then two things happen:

1. They can actually find the thing they're talking about and not have it be a proxy object for another of life's annoyances.
2. They can put their phone away.

Imagine if you could take a museum for granted that way. Not in a creepy or selfish way but in a way that allowed you to think about it as a resource, with the patience to always be present. Imagine what it would mean for a museum to have the infinite space of everything to the right of a permalink's URL at its disposal.

It's not a permalink of the object (they already have their own permalinks) but a permalink of your having collected that object during that visit and these are the places where visitors and the museum together might actually explore what it means to better share an understanding of an object beyond a 75-word wall label. There is a fantastic amount of learning and writing that has produced about the objects in our collections over the years but almost no one, outside the hula-hoop of professional disciplines, ever sees it.

These, we hope, are the places where we might start to change that. These are the places where someone might finally read the 10,000 word essay about an exhibition in the comfort of their living room or even just on the subway ride home after their visit. These are the places where we might start to find a way to make the curatorial files I mentioned earlier an active participant in the collection."



"In the end I think the hardest part of this project for the museum will be being patient and in measuring success over the long-term. Some people will see and immediate and personal value in what we're trying to do but it would be unfair, and unrealistic, to demand the same of everyone else. People have busy, complicated lives and it sometimes takes people a while to warm up to an idea. Our disposition, our super-power, as cultural heritage institutions is that we have time on our side. We should learn to share it with those who don't."
2015  aaronstraupcope  cooper-hewitt  museums  history  memory  objects  interaction  monkeyjesus  fanfiction  scottmccloud  sebchan  billmoggridge  aaronkeefer  alisoufan  selfawareroomba  roomba  design  waronterror  narrative  storytelling  culture  smithsonian  internet  web  online  collections  socialmedia  rfid  nfc 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Hacked dog, a car that snoops on you and a fridge full of adverts: the perils of the internet of things | Technology | The Guardian
"In the not so distant future, every object in your life will be online and talking to one another. It’ll transform the way we live and work - but will the benefits outweigh the dangers?"



"For all the untold benefits of the IoT, its potential downsides are colossal. Adding 50bn new objects to the global information grid by 2020 means that each of these devices, for good or ill, will be able to potentially interact with the other 50bn connected objects on earth. The result will be 2.5 sextillion potential networked object-to-object interactions – a network so vast and complex it can scarcely be understood or modelled. The IoT will be a global network of unintended consequences and black swan events, ones that will do things nobody ever planned. In this world, it is impossible to know the consequences of connecting your home’s networked blender to the same information grid as an ambulance in Tokyo, a bridge in Sydney, or a Detroit auto manufacturer’s production line.

The vast levels of cyber crime we currently face make it abundantly clear we cannot even adequately protect the standard desktops and laptops we presently have online, let alone the hundreds of millions of mobile phones and tablets we are adding annually. In what vision of the future, then, is it conceivable that we will be able to protect the next 50bn things, from pets to pacemakers to self-driving cars? The obvious reality is that we cannot.

Our technological threat surface area is growing exponentially and we have no idea how to defend it effectively. The internet of things will become nothing more than the Internet of things to be hacked."
via:anne  iot  internetofthings  2015  connectivity  marcgoodman  security  susceptibility  advertising  surveillance  rfid 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Smithsonian's design museum just got some high-tech upgrades | The Verge
"But the most impressive addition to the museum is what's simply called the Pen. It's a smartly designed rubberized wand with a pen-shaped tip at one end and an NFC antenna at the other. Not only does it work as a capacitive stylus on all of the tables, but it can be used around the museum: each item on display at the museum that now has an NFC tag next to it. When you find something you like, or want to read more about later, just tap the back of the pen to the tag. Lights on the Pen illuminate and a slight vibration confirms that the item's been recognized. You're essentially building your own personal collection as you browse the museum, and you're given a URL when you leave that lets you access that collection (or add to it when you return).

This isn't a terribly new idea; a few museums have been using NFC technology for a number of years now. But instead of relying on visitors to have NFC-enabled phones, the Pen makes for a much more cohesive experience, and it's something that the museum's directors believe any visitor can pick up and understand. It also plays extremely well with the interactive tables. Not only can it be used as a stylus, but you can tap the NFC tag to the table and watch the collection you've built spill out onto the table.

It may sound like a small change, but even during our brief after-hours demo back in December, it was easy to see how powerful a paradigm shift this could be. A simple stylus combined with a deep database of the museum's collection means that the museum is no longer just a few hundred objects inside four walls. It's an experience that can follow you anywhere."
art  design  2015  aaronstraupcope  cooper-hewitt  collections  digital  museums  exhibitions  rfid  nfc 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Why (Not) Wearables
"Students are watched. They are monitored. They are assessed. They are quantified.

Calls for a “quantified student” are connected in part to the “quantified self” movement, whose proponents use various technologies – apps, sensors, and wearables – to monitor aspects of their daily life (most commonly related to health and wellness, tracking things like caloric intake, sleep quality, and physical activity). The notion of the “quantified self” isn’t new – there are merely new devices for tracking, new ways to count “what counts.” “What counts” remains largely the same.

So even if a student gets to track for herself her own data there’s still, again, a very limited sense of “what counts,” based in part on the education system’s existing data demands and measurements. (This is one of the great ironies of disrupting “seat time”: we’re turning to other similarly flawed metrics.)"

"And so education technology opts to track more data. Rarely do we stop to ask to whom all this is being revealed or to what end. If both education and education technology view students as objects – objects to be tracked and monitored and shaped and surveilled – what role can we expect wearables to play?"
surveillance  audreywatters  2015  horizonreport  hype  policy  rfid  wearables  quantification  data  recording  video  googleglass  gps  students  schools  tracking  control  fitbit  edtech  technology  education  altschool 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Making Visible – Timo Arnall
"My PhD thesis called ‘Making Visible’ was submitted in December 2013 and successfully defended on 12 June 2014. The thesis reflects upon the design material exploration research from the Touch and Yourban projects. It uses these explorations to situate design research with technology as a cultural, material and mediational practice:"
darkmatter  design  interactiondesign  rfid  timoarnall  2014  visibility  immaterials  visualization 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Critical Making Lab
"The critical making laboratory is a shared space for opening up the practice of experimentation with embedded and material digital technology to students and faculty in the Faculty of Information. The lab provides tools, materials, and training for building devices such as wearable computers, RFID systems, ubiquitous computing networks, and other physical computing technologies. However, while the critical making lab organizes its efforts around the making of material objects, devices themselves are not the ultimate goal. Instead, through the sharing of results and an ongoing critical analysis of materials, designs, and outcomes, the lab participants together perform a practice-based engagement with the pragmatic and theoretical issues around information and information technology. Physical computational objects are increasingly part of libraries, museums, and information environments more generally. The lab serves as a novel space for conceptualizing and investigating the critical social, cultural, and political issues that surround and influence the movement of information processing capability into the physical environment."
toronto  canada  design  criticaldesign  theory  internetofthings  ubiquitouscomputing  computing  making  makers  physicalcomputing  rfid  openstudioproject  iot 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Curiosity Cabinet - Commonplace Studio
"Curiosity Cabinet #1 is the first cabinet in a series that appropriates the structure of historical curiosity cabinets of the sixteenth century in a contemporary context. Throughout the Renaissance, objects representative of god (naturalia) and man (artificialia) were displayed in cabinets as an index of their proprietors’ world view. Since today we are no longer concerned with the dichotomy of nature and art, but with the duality of the material and the virtual, these cabinets brings together both physical and digital space in one archival system.

This cabinet intersperses sixteen drawers for physical objects, and sixteen boxes with embedded memory and RFID tags for saving and presenting digital information. To view the digital content, one must simply place a digital box near the computer."

[Other project of note by Jon Stam:
Cabinet of the (Material& Virtual) World: http://commonplace.nl/CABINET-OF-THE-MATERIAL-VIRTUAL-WORLD
An Imaginary Museum: http://commonplace.nl/AN-IMAGINARY-MUSEUM
Bioscope: http://commonplace.nl/Bioscope
Save as Mine: http://commonplace.nl/Save-As-Mine ]
furniture  jonstam  cabinets  cabinetofcuriosities  curiosities  digital  virtual  rfid  design  art  digitalphysical  photography  video  cameras  memory  memories  archives  storage 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Worklog
"My name is Jordi Parra and this Tumblr is a personal worklog to keep track of the process of my degree project: a device to listen to Spotify at home."
spotify  arduino  electronics  rfid  music  design  radio  jordiparra 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Visualized: A School Day as Data | Wired Science | Wired.com
"By putting RFIDs on children and monitoring their interactions over a single day, researchers have produced one of the most detailed analyses ever of the roiling, boiling social free-for-all that is school.<br />
<br />
The findings, published August 16 in Public Library of Science One, document the minute-by-minute interactions and locations of 232 children aged 6 to 12 and 10 teachers.<br />
<br />
Reconfigured as pulsing network maps and flows of color are the universal experiences of middle school: the between-class rush, playground cliques, snatched hallway conversation and the fifth-graders who are too cool for everyone else."
networks  schools  children  relationships  rfid  social  maps  mapping  visualization  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - Timo Arnall - The design of networked products
"Timo Arnall take us on a a very visual path where he talks about how we can use rich interaction with the world around us to create more meaningful experiences. Timo shares the most important learnings from the research work he's done in the past years."
timoarnall  momo17  physicalcomputing  mobile  phones  interactiondesign  ux  experiencedesign  2010  networkedproducts  digitalservices  rfid  nfc 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Gray Area Foundation – Culture Debate’s Review of City Centered
"The City Centered Festival of Locative Media & Urban Community brought together a broad range of practices from artists, researchers, urban planners, community organisers, educators & computer programmers...
gaffta  stamen  bencerveny  sanfrancisco  preemptivemedia  brookesinger  senseablecities  cities  mit  urbancomputing  ubicomp  planning  urban  urbanism  mobile  phones  data  rfid  gps  locativemedia  location  maps  mapping  emmawhittakercitycenteredfestival 
august 2010 by robertogreco
The overarching vision « Adam Greenfield's Speedbird
"In 2010, anyway, this is my own personal vision of informatic technology at the service of the full range of human desire and complexity. Not a word of it is intended as a “solution” to what are inevitably and correctly local social or political challenges…but it is intended to give people everywhere better tools with which to join such struggles. I hope you find it useful, and invite you to subject its claims and assumptions to the same skepticism I’ve applied to other visions of ubiquitous technology."
ubicomp  ubiquitous  urban  urbanism  rfid  cities  adamgreenfield  momcomp  complexity  informatics 
july 2010 by robertogreco
How Barcodes and Smartphones Will Rearchitect Information - The Conversation - Harvard Business Review
"These are just three possible implications. One can imagine many, many more. The reason it's so powerful is that any time we create a new tagging architecture that is decentralized and out "at the ends" of the network, we have the ability to unleash the power of self-organization. Given how localized and voluminous information is, any solution for integrating marketplace and marketspace information must be decentralized and self-organizing.
mobile  phones  smartphones  tagging  bargodes  rfid  gps  dna  qrcodes  iphone  ubicomp  spimes 
july 2010 by robertogreco
On Immaterials « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"And here we get to the crux of the issue: in both Hong Kong and Tokyo, the consequences of decisions made by engineers about the properties of a technical system cascaded upward not merely to the level at which they could afford or constrain individual behavior, but that at which they affected the macro-level performance of the entire subway system…and maybe even the community’s long-term well-being."
rfid  design  adamgreenfield  urbanism  sensors  ubicomp  touch  risk 
october 2009 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sensing the immaterial-material city
"I've created a public group at Flickr called Sensing the City, so if you have similar photos, do add them there. I'd be interested to see what turns up.

While it's a very different sensibility and approach to the aforementioned explorations of radio frequencies - it's often a very material city, rather than immaterial; just hidden - in the context of discussions around instrumenting the fabric of our cities via urban informatics it's interesting to consider how much of this already occurs on our streets. And despite being marked by traffic cones and fluorescent work jackets it's become an invisible activity, somewhat ironically, for passers-by. These people are sensors."
danhill  design  urbanism  materiality  visualisation  cities  urban  visualization  ubicomp  space  flickr  rfid  mobile  nearfield  wireless  networkedcities 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Immaterials: the ghost in the field
"we hope that this work goes some way towards building better spatial and gestural models of RFID, as material for designers to build better products and to take full advantage of the various ways in which spatial proximity can be used. And with this better understanding we hope to be able to discuss and design for privacy and the ‘leakage’ of data in a more rigorous way."
berg  berglondon  timoarnall  jackschulze  visualization  rfid  sensors  visualisation  touch  nfc  nearfield  video  aesthetics  design  data  blindness 
october 2009 by robertogreco
The ghost in the field – Blog – BERG
"There is a power to be found in understanding everything from systems, to APIs, to components, to data, through to their enveloping materials (such as plastics and metals) as substrates to interfere with, bend and test...Having produced these visualisations, I now find myself mapping imaginary shapes to the radio enabled objects around me. I see the yellow Oyster readers with plumes of LED fluoro-green fungal blossoms hanging over them – and my Oyster card jumping between them, like a digital bee cross-pollenating with data as I travel the city....Matt Jones described what we do as ‘Post Industrial Design.’ Perfect! Where once industrial design was concerned with radii, form, and finish, we now deal in behaviours, experience, shifting context, and time."
berg  berglondon  rfid  visualization  interaction  nfc  nearfield 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Anne Galloway | Towards Rural Computing and the Internet of Companion Species
"As I've said many times, who and what get excluded from design visions are just as interesting and important as what and who are included. Western philosophers have long held that a society can be judged by how it treats its weakest or least fortunate members (in other words, who we ignore or abandon) and contemporary notions of cultural citizenship rely precisely on how well we interact with people who are different from us."
annegalloway  russelldavies  ubicomp  ruricomp  design  technology  internet  internetofthings  planning  rural  rfid  spimes  iot 
september 2009 by robertogreco
iPhone RFID: object-based media [via: http://vimeo.com/4147129]
"This is a prototype of an iPhone media player that uses physical objects to control media playback. It is based on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) that triggers various iPhone interactions when in the range of a wireless tag embedded inside a physical object. ... RFID is becoming more common in mobile phones (under the term Near Field Communication or NFC) from manufacturers such as Nokia. By looking at Apple’s patents we know that the technology is being considered for the iPhone. With the iPhone SDK 3.0 external hardware accessories can be accessed by iPhone software, so third party RFID or NFC readers are also possible. ... Compared to other mobile handsets the iPhone is a particularly media-friendly device, with a large, bright screen and high quality audiovisual playback. What if this screen could act as a ‘lens’ to content that resides in the world?"
nfc  via:timo  iphone  ubicomp  rfid  mobile  augmentedreality  concepts  touch  ar 
april 2009 by robertogreco
How I built an RFID device without hurting myself | Geek Gestalt - CNET News
"I'm here at ETech, the Emerging Technology conference, and I'm sitting in on a session called "Hands-on RFID for Makers." Led by Tom Igoe, a professor at New York University's Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP), and Brian Jepson, from O'Reilly Media, the workshop is designed as a primer for people interesting in building RFID readers for use in a wide variety of situations. I thought it would be fun to sit in on the session and see how the systems work."
rfid  make  tomigoe  classideas 
march 2009 by robertogreco
inspiring touch-related interaction design | re/touch: an encyclopædia of touch and culture
"re/touch brings together hundreds of cross-cultural examples of social norms and values involving touch—all categorised according to actions related to touching.
design  ethnography  rfid  database  interactiondesign  ixd  gestures  haptic  quotes  touch  senses  interface  resources  reference  research  culture  theory 
february 2009 by robertogreco
5 Companies Building the "Internet of Things" - ReadWriteWeb
"The "internet of things" is a concept that describes a wireless network between objects. In a way, it parallels the current network of addressable web pages (aka the "world wide web"), except "the internet of things" would include addressable inanimate objects that could be anything from your home's refrigerator to the shoes on your feet. Although this world of web-connected things has been much discussed for years, we've seen little movement pushing the concept forward. At least, until now."
internetofthings  tikitag  arduino  microcontrollers  mir:ror  blogjects  rfid  nearfield  wifi  internet  future  web  twitchboard  objects  things  programming  hardware  webdesign  trends  innovation  nabaztag  pachube  zerog  spimes  iot  webdev 
february 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: from product to project
"So I've been thinking about how I can continue to projectise this product. And how this bag can have a 10-year + story. So I'm trying to add spimeiness to it and to use internet stuff as a memory aid for this thing. So, I've created a unique URL for it at thinglink, in the spirit of the skuwiki idea. And I've built a tumblblog for it at HMDbag.tumblr.com. That tumblr extracts things from flickr and delicious that I've tagged appropriately, so it's sort of self-generating. I imagine telling the story of the life of the bag that way, keeping it as a project not a product.

But what would be really nice would be if it could tell its own story more. Generate its own data. I could attach an RFID tag, but I'm not quite sure what would ever read it. I guess ideally it would have it's own GPS logging stick sewn in. Or something. The good thing though, about a 10-year + project is that you don't have to have it all sorted at the begining."
brucesterling  design  sustainability  russelldavies  manufacturing  howies  bags  rfid  spimes  brands  products  stories  gps  physical  things  unproduct  beausage  plannedobsolescence  plannedlongevity  glvo  wabi-sabi 
january 2009 by robertogreco
russell davies: meet the new schtick
"1. Screens are getting boring. ... 2. There are a lot of people around now who have thoroughly integrated 'digitalness' into their lives. To the extent that it makes as much sense to define them as digital as it does to define them as air-breathing. ie it's true but not useful or interesting. ... 3. The stuff that digital technologies have catalysed online and on screens is starting to migrate into the real world of objects. Ideas and possibilities to do with community, conversation, collaboration and creativity are turning out real things, real events, real places, real objects. I'm not saying that this means that these things are therefore inately better, or that the internet has 'come of age' or any of that nonsense. I just mean that there are new, interesting things going on IRL and that they have some advantages (and penalties) that don't apply online."

[part 2: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2009/01/meet-the-new-schtick-2.html ]
russelldavies  RFID  things  futurism  planning  advertising  marketing  computing  digital  culture  future  technology  ubicomp  design  spimes  post-digital 
january 2009 by robertogreco
HAND-ME-DOWN
[Wayback: http://web.archive.org/web/20091223032056/http://hmd.howies.co.uk/

"These products have been made to last. So that one day you can hand them down to someone else. And they can carry on their little journeys."
sustainability  howies  reuse  manufacturing  bags  vintage  glvo  apparel  clothing  environment  spimes  rfid  fashion  organic  shopping  plannedobsolescence  plannedlongevity  beausage  wabi-sabi 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Michael Wesch on how WE learn
"How do WE learn in the age of the web? Michael Wesch, known for his YouTube videos “A Vision of Students Today” and “The Machine is Us/ing Us“, talks about anti-teaching and harnessing collective intelligence in his class." Somewhew around the 8:20 mark, Wesch imagines a campus-wide learning environment that utilizes mobile phones, RFID and barcodes."
michaelwesch  via:preoccupations  assessment  teaching  interenet  wikis  collaboration  education  leadership  edtech  learning  psychology  pedagogy  anti-teaching  elearning  social  tcsnmy  gamechanging  mobile  mobilelearning  mobiled  rfid  community  connectivism  barcodes  qrcodes 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The web in the world
"In same way as the web is quickly extending onto mobile platform, we are starting to see web moving further into physical world. Many emerging technologies are beginning to offer physical-world inputs & outputs; multi-touch iPhones, gestural Wii controllers, RFID-driven museum interfaces, QR-coded magazines, GPS-enabled mobile phones. These technologies have been used to create very useful services that interact with web such as Plazes, Nokia Sports Tracker, Wattson, Tikitag, Nike+. But the technologies themselves often overshadow the user-experience and so far designers haven’t had language or patterns to express new ideas for these interfaces. This talk will focus on a number of design directions for new physical interfaces...various ideas around presence, location, context awareness, peripheral interaction...haptics & tangible interfaces. How do these interactions work with the web? What are the potentials and problems, and what kinds of design approaches are needed?"
timoarnall  design  RFID  interactiondesign  touch  nearfield  nfc  personalinformatics  interface  haptics  context  spimes  web  interaction  wattson  wiimote  iphone 
october 2008 by robertogreco
Make a Faraday Cage Wallet - Wired How-To Wiki
"You already have your tin foil hat, and you're pretty sure no one can find you on the Google. However, there's one detail you may not have thought of, and that's those pesky RFID chips. RFID tags identifying who and -- gasp! —- where you are can be found in passports, ATM cards, credit cards and some state-issued ID cards. The same technology will possibly even be used in paper money in the near future. With the right equipment, these chips can be read from afar by data snoops or your friendly government official. A Faraday cage is sufficient for blocking such eavesdropping. Here's how to hide yourself from both the baddies and The Man."
RFID  security  technology  tinfoilhat  wallets  passports  creditcards  identity 
october 2008 by robertogreco
tikitag
"Tikitag is an Alcatel-Lucent Venture based in Antwerp, Belgium which provides a service to link the real world with the online world for consumer and business usage. We are currently in alpha, and we welcome any suggestions or feedback on suggestions@tikitag.com. The beta launch is planned for launch on October 1st, with the availability of tikitag starter packages and tag packages via e-commerce."
tikitag  rfid  technology  applications  glvo  arduino  nfc  diy  make 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Hypertext - The wide world of the web | Chicago Tribune | Blog
"We have the capacity to surveil and control adolescents ion a way we’ve never done before. We chase them indoors and then we tell them that all the virtual places they might gather, we need to surveil them because of the ever-present threat of pedophiles and because of the ever-present need to market to them. We've really hemmed in adolescence in a way we never have before."
corydoctorow  littlebrother  surveillance  privacy  children  adolescence  youth  freedom  childhood  society  parenting  interviews  books  opensource  security  boingboing  sciencefiction  design  obsolescence  apple  technology  creativecommons  blogging  writing  copyright  piracy  law  generations  optimism  rss  rfid  making  hacking  diy  internet 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Protecting against Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, RFID data attacks | News - Security - CNET News
"Using a laptop, cell phone headset, building access badge, credit cards, or even a passport can make you a walking target for data thieves and other criminals, a security expert warned at the Last HOPE hacker conference here late Friday."
rfid  security  privacy  wifi  data  passports  mobile  phones 
july 2008 by robertogreco
zengestrom.com: Reboot 10 talk on Nodal Points
"In my talk I discussed how activity streams are turning social services into a flow of updates, filtered through people, and tried to show how the concepts of social objects and social peripheral vision can be applied to make sense of this shift."

[More: http://sprxmobile.wordpress.com/2008/08/02/learning-from-the-future-jyri-engstrom-nodal-points/ AND http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=SiWjAVcWK4g AND http://www.zengestrom.com/blog/2008/08/nodal-points-vi.html ]
jyriengestrom  socialobjects  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  mobile  social  jaiku  flickr  del.icio.us  twitter  rfid  discovery  identity 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Video: Tiny hands-on with Swinxs - Engadget
"Bottom Line: The €150 / $235 Swinxs does what the Disney or Nintendo babysitter can't: it gets kids moving, really moving... and that's a good thing too, chubby."
swinxs  games  rfid  gadgets  children  play  physical 
july 2008 by robertogreco
ButtUgly: Main_blogentry_300608_2 - Ubicomp, and why I think it's broken
"People want to feel smarter, and in control. When you are overwhelmed with choice, you feel stupid. When you have five options, you can weigh them in your mind, and make a choice which you feel happy about - you feel both smart and in control."
ubicomp  behavior  everyware  via:blackbeltjones  technology  mobile  phones  rfid  spimes  identity  human  choices  intelligence  psychology 
june 2008 by robertogreco
realsnailmail - "snails equipped with miniaturised electronic circuit & antenna enables them to be assigned messages from hardware located within their enclosure."
"moment you click ‘send’ your message will travel at speed of light to our snail server...associated with tiny electronic chip on snails shell...carried around until snail chances by drop off point...forwards it to its final destination."
humor  rfid  newmedia  communication  art  snailmail  email  technology  dawdlr 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Providence in the FAIL of a Sparrow « Adam Greenfield’s Speedbird
"Nevertheless, sooner or later it’s all but inevitable that someone’s going to pull this concept off. I think that someone should be careful what it is that they’re asking for, because they - and we - just might get it."
adamgreenfield  interactiondesign  experience  motorola  shopping  rfid  retail  payment  mobile  design 
june 2008 by robertogreco
chris woebken I selected projects - a new relationship to e-money
"I designed devices for different spending behaviors, imagining new parasitical services sitting on top of bank accounts that create feedback mechanisms and a new relationship to our bank-account as an extension of ourselves. I am interested in exploring
currency  via:adamgreenfield  money  transit  transport  urbancomputing  design  rfid  datamining  economics  ecosystems  future  payment 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Mediamatic.net - Mediamatic.net: New Media, Art, Society
"Mediamatic is a cultural organization in Amsterdam. We do exhibitions, presentations, workshops and much more. This site combines an overview with news and theory. It's edited automatically with anyMeta, matching the topical with heritage in a sometimes
culture  activism  media  design  newmedia  theory  art  technology  rfid  semiotics  processing  workshops  wearable  interaction  interface  prototyping  electronics  wearables 
april 2008 by robertogreco
How to block/kill RFID chips - Instructables - DIY, How To, tech, life
"In this Instructable I will describe different ways to block or kill RFID tags. RFID stands for Radio Frequency Identification. If you do not know about this technology yet, you should definitely start familiarizing yourself with it, because the number o
howto  rfid  security  surveillance  privacy  tutorials 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Team Ladybugs | Project Ladybag
"It's a conceptual gadget purse that scans its contents for your arphids and then reports if you've got all your tagged valuables by "smiling" or "frowning.""
rfid  technology  fashion  gadgets  projects  electronics  bags  digital 
april 2008 by robertogreco
OpenSpime - project of WideTag Inc, technology infrastructure company providing hardware & software solutions for open Internet of Things
"Our technology enables individuals and corporations to better understand their environment, through the use of a series of GPS-enabled sensors. We provide a set of open APIs and communication protocols to manage the data collected."
geolocation  gps  spimes  rfid  sensors  climatechange  internet  network  hardware  brucesterling  ambient  location  locative  location-based  monitoring  everyware  future  ubicomp  ubiquitous  visualization  mobile  carbon  via:timo 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Technologies of Kindness and Cruelty
"made from often complex social-political-ideological-financial assemblages of the human kind...Don’t ever fool yourself into thinking that technology is not synonymous and deeply, inextricably imbricated with the social practice."
technology  society  julianbleecker  art  design  ethics  social  rfid 
march 2008 by robertogreco
New Brave World workshop at iMAL: RFID and art - we make money not art
"my presentation about RFID and art at the RFID workshop that iMAL organizes this week in Brussels as part of its series of New Brave World events."
art  rfid  nfc  wmmna  technology  media  design  ubiquitous  ubicomp  everyware  newmedia  electronics  opensource  urbancomputing 
march 2008 by robertogreco
So long Mifare RFID system
"Absolutely fascinating stuff the impact of which could be pretty big when the next unbreakable technology is widely adopted, implemented and cracked! Oh that was Microsoft’s Windows Media DRM, no wait or was it Apple’s FairPlay, no wait it was… Goo
encryption  hacking  rfid  via:timo  urbancomputing  NFC  security  ubicomp  electronics  transit 
march 2008 by robertogreco
LA Weekly - News - Stanton Kaye: Father of Reinvention - Steven Mikulan
"Could tracking technology save the Hollywood dreams of a former golden boy?"
ubicomp  spimes  rfid  tracking  film  hollywood  stantonkaye 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Fun, New SWINXS Encourages Fitness, Robotic Subservience -- Daddy Types
"RFID-enabled, programmable gaming platforms that purports to encourage physically active play while secretly conditioning children to the idea of taking orders from a computer that monitors their every move"
children  rfid  games  play  gaming  arg 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Ford truck with RFID tool tracker - Boing Boing
"Developed with DeWalt & ThingMagic, Tool Link system comes with bunch of wireless RFID tags you attach to gear...in-dash display shows what's in your truck so you can tell right away if someone snagged your hammer, or, hopefully, you just left it at the
rfid  everyware  ubicomp  possessions  ford  ownership  cars  tools 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Nokia's Eco Sensor concept gets right with the greens - Engadget
"consists of two parts: a wearable mobile phone (duh, it's Nokia) with giant display and a remote sensing unit which keeps tabs on your health and external environment"
environment  Linux  mobile  nokia  sensors  sustainability  health  nfc  rfid  phones 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Space & Culture » Blog Archive » Ubiquitous space and culture
"technology developed in U.S. labs, but fewer social and regulatory obstacles to implementing them in Korea. There is an historical expectation of less privacy. Korea is willing to put off the hard questions to take the early lead and set standards.” Su
rfid  korea  us  experiments  ubicomp  ubiquitous  space  culture  songdocity  future  privacy  observation 
january 2008 by robertogreco
phy5ics » Blog Archive » Arithmetik Garden
"the technology is completely transparent...card on a string...around one’s neck...leaves participant to focus on the math operations required & the freedom to enjoy experience of walking through an interface rather than passively interacting with it."
rfid  art  tokyo  via:blackbeltjones  interface 
january 2008 by robertogreco
wrapping up 2007 (28 December 2007, Interconnected)
"Stafford Beer in his book Platform for Change. Beer talks about social institutions such as 'schooling,'... These are self-organising and self-regulating systems. As their environment changes, how do they not collapse? How are they not sensitive to shock?

Beer says that an ultrastable social institution will do one of three things in response to change:

1. It will change internally and still survive (I guess this is like scouting or soccer, both institutions that have changed minimally).

2. The institution's internal form will change, but its relationships to other institutions will remain. Perhaps this is like prisons, which have the same relationship to the population, police, courts and government... but operate internally very differently.

3. Dramatic change occurs. This makes me think of the Church: it has changed enormously internally and in its external relations over the last millennium, yet it's still the Church."
semanticweb  socialsoftware  markets  structures  mattwebb  lcproject  marketing  gamechanging  social  web2.0  trends  thinking  theory  technology  groups  future  organizations  simplicity  coding  science  computers  systems  collapse  institutions  society  change  reform  deschooling  staffordbeer  complexity  environment  evolution  flocking  cars  transportation  rfid  gps  physics  astronomy  astrophysics  nanotechnology  ultrastablesystems  progress  phenotropics  search  microformats  patterns  drugs  advertising  browser  web  internet  thermodynamics  freemarkets  capitalism  behavior  economics  modeling  identity  reputation  sharing  networks  networking  socialnetworks  socialnetworking  self  human  memory  forgetting  play  flickr  webdev  development  webdesign  experience  ux  flow  iphoto  interaction  design  radio  typologies  words  motivation  risk  abstraction  schooling  schools  2007  browsers 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Shifd.com - Hack Day London 2007 Winner
"Shifd between your computer and MOBILE seamlessly (and back again)"
mobile  phones  rfid  rss  mobility  hacking  hacks  hardware  nytimes  ux  interface  interaction  software  applications  shifd  iphone  maps  arduino  nfc  ios 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Making things talk · Touch
"Tom Igoe’s new book Making things talk arrived today, full of lovely projects and code examples."
books  rfid  nfc  make  glvo  coding  howto  tutorials 
november 2007 by robertogreco
/// Blink ///
"Blink design large-scale mobile phone projects...Working with SMS, Bluetooth or RFID Blink always aim to be subversive in the way we exploit familiar and accessible technologies to the widest possible audience."
agency  interactive  arg  mobile  phones  play  games  sms  messaging  rfid 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Snitchtown - Forbes.com
"universal surveillance is seen as the universal solution to all urban ills. But the truth is that ubiquitous cameras only serve to violate the social contract that makes cities work."
surveillance  sou  sousveillance  security  rfid  privacy  politics  panopticon  urbanism  urban  future  design  cities  cctv  corydoctorow  london  us  history  public  citizenship  space  uk 
june 2007 by robertogreco
fredshouse.net: prada epicenter revisited
"Ubicomp is hard, understanding people, context, and the world is hard, getting computers to handle everyday situations is hard, and expectations are set way too high. I used to say ubicomp was a ten-year problem; now I'm starting to think that it's reall
ubicomp  prada  rfid  exploratorium  oma  remkoolhaas  technology  society  people  ubiquitous  shopping 
may 2007 by robertogreco
Hitachi develops RFID powder ::: Pink Tentacle
"RFID keeps getting smaller. On February 13, Hitachi unveiled a tiny, new “powder” type RFID chip measuring 0.05 x 0.05 mm — the smallest yet — which they aim to begin marketing in 2 to 3 years."
RFID  security  privacy  future  surveillance  technology  wireless  tagging 
february 2007 by robertogreco
The land where oranges are fireballs and office chairs are racing cars
"ET is a wearable computing system that uses RFID tags to transform any common object into a toy. When the user touches an object, the ET armband reads its RFID tag. ET makes a sound according to the user's actions. For example, an umbrella becom
play  games  rfid  interaction  fun  art  sound  technology  objects 
january 2007 by robertogreco
Wired 15.01: Biblio Tech
"The new library at Chicago State University has one ironclad rule: No students allowed in these stacks – only robots."
books  libraries  robots  technology  universities  RFID 
december 2006 by robertogreco
Wired News: Nike+ IPod = Surveillance
"If you enhance your workout with the new Nike+ iPod Sport Kit, you may be making yourself a surveillance target."
apple  privacy  security  surveillance  RFID 
december 2006 by robertogreco
Touch
"Touch is a research project looking at the intersections between the digital and the physical. Its aim is to explore and develop new uses for RFID, NFC and mobile technology in areas such as retail, public services, social and personal communication."
interactive  interaction  innovation  ideas  design  touch  internet  research  RFID  social  technology  ubicomp  blogs  mobile  phones  tangible  nfc  nearfield  ubiquitous  ui  user  wireless  gps  gui  haptic  everyware  payment  pervasive  infodesign  bluetooth  mobility  locative  tracking 
september 2006 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Bruce Sterling: A Hardy Polemic
"Spime move us away from ubiquitous computation and toward electronically enhanced tags embedded in architectural environments. His book is a mainifesto of a world that contains objects that aren't smart, but that generate histories and stories embedded i
internet  online  web  society  technology  future  geography  life  RFID  information  spimes  computers  communication  interface  julianbleecker 
november 2005 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Technology | UN predicts 'internet of things'
""It would seem that science fiction is slowly turning into science fact in an 'Internet of Things' based on ubiquitous network connectivity," said the report."
internet  online  web  society  technology  future  geography  life  RFID  information  spimes  computers  communication  interface 
november 2005 by robertogreco

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