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robertogreco : risalavizzo-mourey   1

The Health Threats Mark Zuckerberg’s Gift Doesn’t Address | Risa Lavizzo-Mourey | Pulse | LinkedIn
"But health is not merely, or even mostly, determined by our DNA. Poverty, inequity, violence, poor housing, lack of a good education, lack of jobs, lack of access to healthy food or safe places to play – all have a dramatic impact on health. These social determinants of health are responsible for an estimated 80 percent of all illnesses; only 20 percent can be chalked up to biological causes alone.

The power of social determinants to drive health is illustrated by a series of maps (see below), produced by the Center for Society and Health at Virginia Commonwealth University, which lay out projected lifespans based on where a person lives. In Atlanta, a baby born in Buckhead, a high-end shopping mecca, can expect to live 84 years, while five miles away in Bankhead, a neighborhood in transition, residents face a life expectancy a full 13 years shorter. Babies born on opposite sides of downtown Denver have an 11-year difference in life expectancy; in Richmond, Virginia the longevity gap between wealthy and underserved neighborhoods is a yawning 20 years. As the maps demonstrate, your zip code can be a greater determinant of life expectancy than your genetic code.

Narrowing the longevity gaps found in communities across the United States requires far more than money alone. These are the "wicked problems" facing America – problems that are huge and complex, with solutions that are neither clear nor stable. Even the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s $10 billion endowment — the fourth largest of any U.S. foundation — is not enough to cure these challenges to health.

What is needed is diverse thinking, lots of collaboration, and solutions designed by, and specific to, the communities they target. These solutions are already emerging, in communities across the nation, and need to be encouraged and amplified. For example, RWJF and the Reinvestment Fund recently launched Invest Health to bring together leaders from mid-sized U.S. cities that are applying innovative solutions to entrenched poverty, poor health, and a lack of investment. In January Invest Health awarded $3 million to 50 cities in support of programs that are creating affordable housing, safe places to play and exercise, and quality jobs. Teams from the selected cities have access to faculty advisors and coaches, and share what they've learned.

Zuckerberg and Chan will also require that researchers share their work, which is likely to speed up the search for causes and treatments for disease. In the same way, we all need to share ideas about how to address the systems and structures that perpetuate the glaring inequities that cause illness. We must develop cross-sector solutions that can address a multitude of problems. And we must learn from each other – both our successes and our mistakes."
markzuckerberg  health  healthcare  society  policy  politics  us  via:anne  2016  risalavizzo-mourey 
october 2016 by robertogreco

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