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robertogreco : risograph   9

Kelli Anderson - Folding Folder
"Folding Folder
…a folder of pre-scored auxetic folding patterns

This folder contains 8 risographed posters (2 of each design) featuring auxetic folding patterns for maximum folding joy.

These origamic patterns give paper an unusual spring-like behavior: if stretched L/R, they also expand up/down.

Besides offering a pleasingly-stretchy experience, these patterns offer an alternative means by to produce mechanical movements. (For example, in contexts where actual mechanics are impractical because of the scale—like in tiny stints.) The front of each poster includes instructions, as well as information on the functional applications of each fold. The prints are tucked into a custom folder made by Talas book binding supply.

Includes: The Miura-ori fold, Ron Resch's Square Twist, a modified version of the classic Waterbomb pattern, and an experimental Sequent fold"
kellianderson  miuraori  folding  risograph  paper  miurafold  miura  miura-ori 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Print Simulator - Ink Shift – RISOTTO
"The print simulator is a quick and easy way to experiment with your artwork!

See how your print will look on our variety of papers, switch ink colours at the click of a button and learn the foundations of artwork layering and preparation.

There are 2 modes to play with..."

[via: https://are.na/block/2018171
https://are.na/benjamin-hickethier/riso-1498024805 ]
print  papernet  printing  simulations  risograph 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Uses This / Jenny Odell
"I'm Jenny Odell, and I used to call myself a digital artist, but I think I might actually be a conceptual artist. I'm based in Oakland and I teach art at Stanford."



"At Facebook, I've been using a risograph machine, sort of like a cross between a photocopying and screen printing, since you can only do one color at a time. Someone told me the other day that it's so named because "Riso" means "ideal" in Japanese, but that seems hard to believe after wrangling with the printer's mysterious needs and requests. Lastly, I want to give a shout out to my very satisfying Alvin Draf-Tec 0.5mm mechanical pencil, which I use with a regular black spiral bound notebook."



"My friend and fellow artist Liat Berdugo recently observed that screens "ask the body to be fixed in space"; my teaching mentor Camille Utterback has also noted that digital interfaces aren't very generous or forgiving to the human body. Basically, my dream setup exists in the far (or maybe not so far?) future, where I don't have to sit crouched in a vise-like position, poking and clicking at things all day. Is there a way to make digital art by running around outside and doing cartwheels? I really hope so."
jennyodell  risograph  tools  2017  usesthis  art  artists  thesetup 
october 2017 by robertogreco
The Dramatic Ways Having Kids Can Change Your Design PracticeEye on Design | Eye on Design
"When the founders of Pupilpeople became parents two years ago, the graphic designers struggled to find quality toys for their baby boy. Disappointed with gimmicky, plasticky gadgets, unsafe and overly-instructive playthings, Sean Kelvin Khoo and Nicole Ong designed their own toys for little Elias instead.

This gave birth to OddBlocks, a set of eight cubes that each unpack into three curious objects. An off-kilter semi-circle, an asymmetrical rectangle and a trapezoid with a chewed-off top are just some of the 24 odd-shaped toys created to help children build from their imagination and discover new shapes and forms.

“A toy is meant to be played with, but a lot of times what we saw in the market was that the product became an educational tool,” explains Khoo. “It’s very Singaporean; everything must [be used to] train my child to be a genius… to be good at maths, good at physics…”

While agreeing that children learnt best through play, the young parents wanted to be less prescriptive in their designs. What started as an open-ended graphic puzzle turned into a three-dimensional product when their studio designer Kong Wen Da roped in industrial designer Jamie Yeo to help. The quartet came up with a sleek plastic prototype in less than half a year, but after testing it with Elias they realized its weight and sharp corners were inappropriate for children. Unlike the “cold” plastic, cork proved a lighter and more environmentally sustainable alternative. The designers were also delighted to discover this made the blocks ideal for printmaking.

Printmaking is just one of several functions that Pupilpeople have found for OddBlocks, and used workshops they conduct under their new initiative Why, O, Why! (w, o, w!), a design school for kids where the eight-year-old studio is developing more products and experiences to nurture creativity in children. For Ong, this is a baby step towards her dream of running a childcare center to address the lack of play and joy in learning among children in Singapore. Growing up, Ong hardly recalls playing, and was creatively stumped the first time she played Lego with Elias. “I was like, ‘Build what? What can I do with it?’” Watching her son have fun building whatever he imagined helped Ong learn that play could establish a sense of discovery. “Is it the children’s fault for not enjoying [what they do] or is it our fault for not exposing themselves enough to find what they love?” she asks.

This also explains Pupilpeople’s recent shift from client work to design education. Khoo discovered a love for teaching when he signed up to lecture part-time 2011. Three years later, the arrival of a Risograph printer in the studio enabled him to experiment with teaching outside of design school. Inspired by overseas initiatives such as the ad-hoc Parallel School, which focuses on art and design as a process, Khoo, Ong and their designer, Kong, founded Areas of Interest to conduct workshops based on the philosophy of “making as a way of thinking”. In one early class, they challenged participants to design and produce printed matter within the limitations of Risograph technology.

“We wanted to create a platform where people could do things that were not typically what we see as design output, and we were trying to challenge what design is,” he explains.

From this year onwards, Khoo will be conducting his experiments on a large scale as a full-time lecturer at Singapore’s pioneering design college, Temasek Design School. While excited by the possibilities that lie ahead, Khoo refuses to tie himself down to a desired outcome and stresses how discovery will continue to be at the heart of both practising and teaching design.

“Design is a form of play,” he says. “Rather than a didactic way of teaching… trying to make clones of myself, I’m trying to discover each individual student’s unique disposition, their own individuality.”"
design  singapore  2016  pupilpeople  sfsh  toys  graphicdesign  seankelvinkhoo  nicoleong  oddblocks  teaching  printmaking  classideas  wood  cork  risograph  proces  thinking  making  howweteach  howwelearn  education  learning  schools  children  process 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Article: Rise of the Risograph, Part One / Features / Nothing Major
"Once marketed to schools as a cheap copier, the Risograph has become a fave of graphic designers, artists, zine publishers, and arts institutions. Part one: Rise of the Machine."

[Parts two and three:

"So, now that we know what a Risograph is, who's using it, and how?"
http://nothingmajor.com/features/18-rise-of-the-risograph-part-two/

"This week, we're checking in with art institutions to see how they use Risographs."
http://nothingmajor.com/features/24-rise-of-the-risograph-part-three/ ]
risograph  print  printing  mattputrino  via:robinsloan  design  openstudioproject  lcproject  classideas  zines  glvo  srg 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Risograph - Wikipedia
"Risograph is a high-speed digital printing system manufactured by the Riso Kagaku Corporation and designed mainly for high-volume photocopying and printing. Increasingly, Risograph machines have been commonly referred to as a RISO Printer-Duplicator, due to their common usage as a network printer as well as a stand-alone duplicator. When printing or copying multiple quantities (generally more than 20) of the same original, it is typically far less expensive per page than a conventional photocopier, laser printer, or inkjet printer. Printing historian Rick O'Connor has debated that the original, and thus correct, name for the device is RISSO and not RISO. This debate spawns from the notion that an extra 'S' is added because the inventor's wife found it more pleasing to the ears."

[via http://www.designworklife.com/2013/08/09/risograph-radness/ via Allen]
risograph  risso  riso  printing  publishing  speed  digital  photocopying 
august 2013 by robertogreco

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