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robertogreco : robertkrulwich   13

The Chumbawamba Principle: A Commencement Address : Krulwich Wonders... : NPR
"It's time to design a version of yourself that might work. That might make you happy…To Become Somebody ... defined by you…

In high school, in grade school, you didn't have to design yourself. The folks in charge were happy to do it for you. You were marched into a school building at age 3, 4 or 5, placed at a desk or put in a circle, inspected by your teachers. And after that, you did what you were told, what everybody is told to do: Show up and learn stuff…

You can't always name the thing you're going to be. For most people it doesn't work that way. You have to back into it…

My second thought is that — and I'm sorry to tell you this — the designing never ends…

I've had to redesign myself so many times, I can't tell you how many…

Here's the point: When you are trying to create a version of yourself that will one day make you happy, half the battle is know your insides — know your pleasures.

And the other half is to know your outsides — to find allies, partners, mentors."
teaching  cv  adaptability  schools  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  howwelearn  alternative  alternativeeducation  unorthodox  tcsnmy  chumbawambaprinciple  chumbawamba  deschooling  unschooling  schooliness  education  self-knowledge  happiness  work  learning  collegeoftheatlantic  2012  commencementspeeches  robertkrulwich  self-defintion  failure  mistakes  yearoff2  yearoff  change  self-reinvention  reinvention  radiolab  jadabumrad  why  yesbut  whynot  commencementaddresses 
june 2012 by robertogreco
How 'Radiolab' Is Changing the Sound of the Radio - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic
"What's different about Radiolab (&…changing about the web) is that it *is* a production…one of a very new kind. Radiolab is actually post-blog & post-livestream…not aping oratory of old or raggedness of new…a hybrid that takes lessons from the past, recent & deep.

That's where…web journalism is headed…"No one wants to read a 9,000-word treatise online. On the Web, one-sentence links are as legitimate as 1000-word diatribes—in fact, they are often valued more."

While this might have been true at one point, it simply no longer is…at The Atlantic, there is a very strong positive correlation between length of post & readers attracted. The genre conventions of blogging are changing. Few old-style linkblogs exist & a whole culture has developed around the longread. New online publications…look beautiful.

This is the Radiolab effect extended: expect less pretension to authority, greater understanding of one's nodeness, but greater respect for the production culture of the pre-web era."
post-livestream  post-internet  pretension  radiolabeffect  robertkrulwich  twitter  blogging  journalism  storytelling  productionvalues  authority  longformjournalism  longform  theatlantic  online  web  radio  alexismadrigal  jadabumrad  2012  radiolab 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Transom » Radiolab: An Appreciation by Ira Glass
"Artists compete. Not head to head like athletes, but in their souls. Within the appreciation of our fellow artists is the tiny wince, “I wish I’d done that.”

Ira Glass joins us again on Transom, this time for a loving and envious homage to our friends at Radiolab, Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich. A radio master salutes his comrades.

The great thing about Ira’s analysis is that it’s so detailed. He breaks down exactly what’s so good about Radiolab and why. You could almost learn the tricks and do it yourself. Almost. Honestly, though, you’d lose. It’s better sometimes just to appreciate."
art  science  media  storytelling  jadabumrad  iraglass  robertkrulwich  2011  radio  thisamericanlife  radiolab 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Why'd It Take So Long To Invent The Wheel? : Krulwich Wonders... : NPR
"Pop versions of How We Invented The Wheel imagine a single inventor poised over a roundish thing, eyes wide, suddenly seeing what no one else has seen; all around him, people are doubtful, suspicious, then, when the thing starts to actually roll, there's a shout of surprise, then joy, then envy. ("Why didn't I think of that?")

Maybe this happens sometimes, says Jonnie Hughes. But it doesn't happen often. The invention of the wheel, Hughes suggests, probably took:

"... thousands of years and scores of human generations. There may well have been the odd genius involved along the way, conducting his or her own mind experiment ... but in the main, the invention of the wheel was a routinely get-rich-slow affair.""
robertkrulwich  wheels  invention  history  classideas  humans  collective  collectivism  collectiveintelligence  2011 
september 2011 by robertogreco
On The Media: Transcript of "The 'Decline Effect' and Scientific Truth" (May 13, 2011)
[Great story told with Jad Abumrad, Robert Krulwich, and Jonah Lehrer]

"Surprising and exciting scientific findings capture our attention and captivate the press. But what if, at some point after a finding has been soundly established, it starts to disappear? In a special collaboration with Radiolab we look at the 'decline effect' when more data tells us less about scientific truth."

[From the "Data Show": http://www.onthemedia.org/episodes/2011/05/13 See also "The Personal Data Revolution" http://www.onthemedia.org/transcripts/2011/05/13/01 AND "Data Journalism" http://www.onthemedia.org/transcripts/2011/05/13/02 AND "Two Cautionary Data Tales" http://www.onthemedia.org/transcripts/2011/05/13/03 ]

[See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_effect ]
declineeffect  2011  radiolab  jonahlehrer  jadabumrad  robertkrulwich  psychology  observation  science  research  statistics  data  reality  truth  perception  placebos  observereffect 
may 2011 by robertogreco
“There are some people who don’t wait.” Robert Krulwich on the future of journalism | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine
"So for this age, for your time, I want you to just think about this: Think about NOT waiting your turn.

Instead, think about getting together with friends that you admire, or envy. Think about entrepeneuring. Think about NOT waiting for a company to call you up. Think about not giving your heart to a bunch of adults you don’t know. Think about horizontal loyalty. Think about turning to people you already know, who are your friends, or friends of their friends and making something that makes sense to you together, that is as beautiful or as true as you can make it.

And when it comes to security, to protection, your friends may take better care of you than CBS took care of Charles Kuralt in the end. In every career, your job is to make and tell stories, of course. You will build a body of work, but you will also build a body of affection, with the people you’ve helped who’ve helped you back.

And maybe that’s your way into Troy."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/2011/6850 ]
education  technology  teaching  future  journalism  science  passion  doing  waiting  fear  risk  risktaking  entrepreneurship  robertkrulwich  making  notwaiting  unschooling  change  gamechanging  friendship  community  support  horizontal  horizontalloyalty  counterculture  hierarchy  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
“There are some people who don’t wait.” Robert Krulwich on the future of journalism | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discover Magazine
"So for this age, for your time, I want you to just think about this: Think about NOT waiting your turn.

Instead, think about getting together with friends that you admire, or envy. Think about entrepeneuring. Think about NOT waiting for a company to call you up. Think about not giving your heart to a bunch of adults you don’t know. Think about horizontal loyalty. Think about turning to people you already know, who are your friends, or friends of their friends and making something that makes sense to you together, that is as beautiful or as true as you can make it.

And when it comes to security, to protection, your friends may take better care of you than CBS took care of Charles Kuralt in the end. In every career, your job is to make and tell stories, of course. You will build a body of work, but you will also build a body of affection, with the people you’ve helped who’ve helped you back.

And maybe that’s your way into Troy."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/2011/6850 ]
education  technology  teaching  future  journalism  science  passion  doing  waiting  fear  risk  risktaking  entrepreneurship  robertkrulwich  making  notwaiting  unschooling  change  gamechanging  friendship  community  support  horizontal  horizontalloyalty  counterculture  hierarchy  2011 
may 2011 by robertogreco
How 'Radiolab' Is Transforming the Airwaves - NYTimes.com
"they seem to share is a blend of curiosity & skepticism, willingness to be convinced—& delight in convincing."

“Normally reporter goes out & learns something, writes it down & speaks from knowledge…Jokes & glitches puncture illusion of all-knowing authority, who no longer commands much respect these days anyway. It’s more honest to “let audience hear & know that you are manufacturing a version of events…

“It’s consciously letting people see outside frame…those moments are really powerful. What it’s saying to listener is: ‘Look, we all know what’s happening here. I’m telling you a story, I’m trying to sort of dupe you in some cosmic way.’ We all know it’s happening—& in a sense we all want it to happen.”

This is how “Radiolab” addresses tension btwn authenticity & artifice: capturing raw, off-the-cuff moments…& editing them in gripping pastiche…hope…is to preserve sense of excitement & discovery that often drains away in authoritative accounts of traditional journalism."
via:lukeneff  radiolab  radio  npr  robertkrulwich  jadabumrad  2011  storytelling  science  journalism  classideas  authority  authenticity  humility  humor  fun  artifice  attention  engagement  curiosity  skepticism  convincing  knowledge  honesty  uncertainty  perspective  teaching  knowing  understanding  transparency 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » What Innovation
"best part of book is last sentence…

"Go for a walk; cultivate hunches; write everything down, but keep your folders messy; embrace serendipity; make generative mistakes; take on multiple hobbies; frequent coffeehouses & other liquid networks; follow the links; let others build on your ideas; borrow, recycle, reinvent. Build a tangled bank."

Had Johnson followed the walks of those innovators he was curious about, followed them along their mistakes & noted the ways they borrowed, recycled, reinvented he could have done away with the silly biology analogies. It’s all right there in the hands-on work that’s going on — there’s no need for a big, grand, one-size-fits-all theory about how ideas come to be and how they circulate, or don’t circulate and how they inflect and influence and change the way we understand and act and behave in the world. That’s the “innovation” story — or the way that *change-in-the-way-we-understand-the-world* comes about story."

[Now here: http://nearfuturelaboratory.com/2010/12/23/what-innovation/ ]
stevenjohnson  julianbleecker  innovation  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  serendipity  learning  wheregoodideascomefrom  books  criticism  biology  walking  thinking  cv  analogies  analogy  adjacentpossible  stuartkauffman  science  robertkrulwich  kevinkelly  radiolab 
december 2010 by robertogreco
How Much Does A Hurricane Weigh? : Krulwich Wonders… : NPR
"In our radio broadcast on Morning Edition, Andy Heymsfield of the National Center for Atmospheric Research used elephant–sized units of water to measure hurricanes, storm clouds and little white puffies. Years ago, in a story I did on ABC, another cloud measurer used elephant units, too. But for our new cartoon, Odd Todd and I switched to blue whales. Blue whales are bigger, which we thought would make the lesson more impressive. Either way, though, hurricanes are humongous."

[Entertainment, but there is a part of me that just wants the amount of water involved to compared to a well-know body of water.]
robertkrulwich  elephants  clouds  hurricanes  water  weight  measurement  moisture 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Twisted History: The Wily Mississippi Cuts New Paths : Krulwich Wonders… : NPR
"OK, let's you and I take a trip down the Mississippi, if we can find it. It's the white channel you see on this braid of ghostly Mississippis from years past. Just scroll for a bit. It's a long river. [BEAUTIFUL, LONG, MUST-SEE IMAGE OF SEVERAL MAPS STICHED TOGETHER] The Mississippi, like all great rivers, is constantly rearranging itself, filling in where it used to be, cutting new watery paths through fields, creating islands. Back in 1944 a cartographer named Harold Fisk decided to draw a map of the Mississippi as it flowed in his day (click on this little map, so you get the full effect) The white channel is the 1944 river and working backwards from geological maps, he also drew the river as it had been in earlier decades (all those other colored ribbons) and produced a lovely fugue of multiple ghostly Mississippis for the Army Corps of Engineers — all of which allows me to tell you this story."
robertkrulwich  mississippiriver  mississippi  maps  mapping  rivers  cartography  history  time  us  geography 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Frank Chimero - Robert Krulwich on Wondering
"Noticing is tough, yet rewarding work, & it begs to be documented. We’ve more tools than ever to do so. I’ve done some documenting of my own. I walk everywhere with a phone camera in my pocket, & I suspect you do too, so documenting visuals is easy. I can type on my phone, so I can capture text or overheard conversations. I can record video if necessary. And then? I can dump it to a Twitter account or a Tumblr blog to catalog everything. And then, if it is good? Maybe if the noticing started to arrange into larger patterns or there got to be a lot of documentation, I could maybe even print up a book of all the things I had noticed. …

As a person constantly in a position to produce words or designs or ideas, or whatever it may be, it feels good to give myself permission to kick back and inquisitively absorb things as they come. Part of noticing isn’t seeking, it’s highly reliant on serendipity and unexpected relevancy."
frankchimero  noticing  photography  sound  recording  audio  robertkrulwich  serendipity  patterns  patternrecognition 
september 2010 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Postopolis!: Robert Krulwich
"Much of his talk concerned 'framing', and the way the media handles inclusion and exclusion, and how it creates spaces of framing."
media  politics  journalism  architecture  space  framing  cityofsound  postopolis  robertkrulwich  perception  vision  staging 
may 2007 by robertogreco

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