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robertogreco : robotics   70

A mini, magnetic, all-terrain robot - YouTube
"A tiny robot is making leaps and bounds for small-scale locomotion. This soft robot really can walk the walk, as well as being able to roll, jump and swim. This could help it navigate the surprisingly tough terrain inside a human body."

[See also: https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25443 ]
robots  classideas  locomotion  motion  magnets  2018  movement  robotics 
february 2018 by robertogreco
A Field Guide to 'jobs that don't exist yet' - Long View on Education
"Perhaps most importantly, the Future of Jobs relies on the perspective of CEOs to suggest that Capital has lacked input into the shape and direction of education. Ironically, the first person I found to make the claim about the future of jobs – Devereux C. Josephs – was both Businessman of the Year (1958) and the chair of Eisenhower’s President’s Committee on Education Beyond High School. More tellingly, in his historical context, Josephs was able to imagine a more equitable future where we shared in prosperity rather than competed against the world’s underprivileged on a ‘flat’ field.

The Political Shift that Happened

While the claim is often presented as a new and alarming fact or prediction about the future, Devereux C. Josephs said much the same in 1957 during a Conference on the American High School at the University of Chicago on October 28, less than a month after the Soviets launched Sputnik. If Friedman and his ‘flat’ earth followers were writing then, they would have been up in arms about the technological superiority of the Soviets, just like they now raise the alarm about the rise of India and China. Josephs was a past president of the Carnegie Corporation, and at the time served as Chairman of the Board of the New York Life Insurance Company.

While critics of the American education system erupted after the launch of Sputnik with calls to go back to basics, much as they would again decades later with A Nation at Risk (1983), Josephs was instead a “besieged defender” of education according to Okhee Lee and Michael Salwen. Here’s how Joseph’s talked about the future of work:
“We are too much inclined to think of careers and opportunities as if the oncoming generations were growing up to fill the jobs that are now held by their seniors. This is not true. Our young people will fill many jobs that do not now exist. They will invent products that will need new skills. Old-fashioned mercantilism and the nineteenth-century theory in which one man’s gain was another man’s loss, are being replaced by a dynamism in which the new ideas of a lot of people become the gains for many, many more.”4

Josephs’ claim brims with optimism about a new future, striking a tone which contrasts sharply with the Shift Happens video and its competitive fear of The Other and decline of Empire. We must recognize this shift that happens between then and now as an erasure of politics – a deletion of the opportunity to make a choice about how the abundant wealth created by automation – and perhaps more often by offshoring to cheap labor – would be shared.

The agentless construction in the Shift Happens version – “technologies that haven’t been invented yet” – contrasts with Josephs’ vision where today’s youth invent those technologies. More importantly, Josephs imagines a more equitable socio-technical future, marked not by competition, but where gains are shared. It should go without saying that this has not come to pass. As productivity shot up since the 1950’s, worker compensation has stagnated since around 1973.

In other words, the problem is not that Capital lacks a say in education, but that corporations and the 0.1% are reaping all the rewards and need to explain why. Too often, this explanation comes in the form of the zombie idea of a ‘skills gap’, which persists though it keeps being debunked. What else are CEOs going to say – and the skills gap is almost always based on an opinion survey  – when they are asked to explain stagnating wages?5

Josephs’ essay echoes John Maynard Keynes’ (1930) in his hope that the “average family” by 1977 “may take some of the [economic] gain in the form of leisure”; the dynamism of new ideas should have created gains for ‘many, many more’ people. Instead, the compensation for CEOs soared as the profit was privatized even though most of the risk for innovation was socialized by US government investment through programs such as DARPA.6"



"Audrey Watters has written about how futurists and gurus have figured out that “The best way to invent the future is to issue a press release.” Proponents of the ‘skills agenda’ like the OECD have essentially figured out how to make “the political more pedagogical”, to borrow a phrase from Henry Giroux. In their book, Most Likely to Succeed, Tony Wagner and billionaire Ted Dintersmith warn us that “if you can’t invent (and reinvent) your own job and distinctive competencies, you risk chronic underemployment.” Their movie, of the same title, repeats the hollow claim about ‘jobs that haven’t been invented yet’. Ironically, though Wagner tells us that “knowledge today is a free commodity”, you can only see the film in private screenings.

I don’t want to idealize Josephs, but revisiting his context helps us understand something about the debate about education and the future, not because he was a radical in his times, but because our times are radical.

In an interview at CUNY (2015), Gillian Tett asks Jeffrey Sachs and Paul Krugman what policy initiatives they would propose to deal with globalization, technology, and inequality.9 After Sachs and Krugman propose regulating finance, expanding aid to disadvantaged children, creating a robust social safety net, reforming the tax system to eliminate privilege for the 0.1%, redistributing profits, raising wages, and strengthening the position of labor, Tett recounts a story:
“Back in January I actually moderated quite a similar event in Davos with a group of CEOs and general luminaries very much not just the 1% but probably the 0.1% and I asked them the same question. And what they came back with was education, education, and a bit of digital inclusion.”

Krugman, slightly lost for words, replies: “Arguing that education is the thing is … Gosh… That’s so 1990s… even then it wasn’t really true.”

For CEOs and futurists who say that disruption is the answer to practically everything, arguing that the answer lies in education and skills is actually the least disruptive response to the problems we face. Krugman argues that education emerges as the popular answer because “It’s not intrusive. It doesn’t require that we have higher taxes. It doesn’t require that CEOs have to deal with unions again.” Sachs adds, “Obviously, it’s the easy answer for that group [the 0.1%].”

The kind of complex thinking we deserve about education won’t come in factoids or bullet-point lists of skills of the future. In fact, that kind of complex thinking is already out there, waiting."



"Stay tuned for the tangled history of the claim if you're into that sort of thing..."
benjamindoxtdator  2017  inequality  education  credentialing  productivity  economics  society  statistics  audreywatters  billclinton  democrats  neoliberalism  latecapitalism  capitalism  johndewey  andreasschleicher  kerifacer  lindadarling-hammond  worldeconomicforum  oecd  labor  work  futurism  future  scottmcleod  karlfisch  richardriley  ianjukes  freetrade  competition  andrewold  michaelberman  thomasfriedman  devereuxjosephs  anationatrisk  sputnik  coldwar  okheelee  michaelsalwen  ussr  sovietunion  fear  india  china  russia  johnmaynardkeynes  leisure  robots  robotics  rodneybrooks  doughenwood  jobs  cwrightmills  henrygiroux  paulkrugman  gilliantett  jeffreysachs  policy  politics  globalization  technology  schools  curriculum  teddintersmith  tonywagner  mostlikelytosuccess  success  pedagogy  cathydavidson  jimcarroll  edtech 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Sony’s New toio Wants to Inspire a Future Generation of Robotics Engineers | Spoon & Tamago
"Build, play, inspire. That’s the idea behind Sony’s new toy for kids, designed to inspire a future generation of robotics engineers. Toio is the result of 5 years of research into developing a toy that’s simple enough for kids to use, but also sophisticated enough to create a figurative sandbox where kids can explore the inner-workings of robotics engineering.

Toio, at first glance, is stunningly simple: the core of the toy is just 2 white cubes with wheels. But don’t be fooled by their appearance. The tiny cubes pack a whole lot of tech. They respond to motion, are able to detect the exact location of the other, and can be programmed but also remote controlled.

It would seem that the possibilities for toio are endless, which is why the developers teamed up with various creatives and designers to come up with various craft sets that help kids explore what robots can do. You can create your own robotic beast and battle others, you can play board games with them and you can make obstacle courses for them to go through. Sony has even teamed up with Lego for this project, allowing kids to build Lego structures on top of their robots.

But one of the most attractive features is a craft set designed by the folks behind the lovable PythagoraSwitch TV segment. It’s a simple paper set that encourages kids to join the two white cubes using paper. The cubes then interact with each other and come alive, resulting in different movements.

Check out the videos to get a better sense of what toio can do. Sony has released a limited quantity of toio sets that start at 21,557 yen (about $200 USD) and go up to 33,415 (about $300 USD) depending on how many craft sets you want to add on."

[Also here: http://prostheticknowledge.tumblr.com/post/161355896016/toio-programmable-robotics-toy-from-sony-uses ]
via:tealtan  robots  classideas  toys  learning  toio  sony  robotics  engineering  paper  lego 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Letter to the 10-year-old girl who applied to the Paris Summer Innovation Fellowship
"This will make your day, I promise. Eva, a 10-year-old, applied to our summer fellowship program amidst mostly computer science Phds and seasoned urban designers. A summary of her pitch: “The streets of Paris are sad. I want to build a robot that will make them happy again. I’ve already starting learning how to code on Thymio robots, but I have trouble making it work. I want to join the program so the mentors can help me.” Here is my reply to her."



"Dear Eva,

The answer is yes. You have been selected as one of Paris’ first-ever Summer Innovation Fellows among an impressive pool of candidates from all across the world: accomplished urban designers, data scientists and hardware specialists. I love your project and agree that more should be done--through robotics or otherwise--to improve Paris’ streets and make them smile again.

I am writing to you personally because your application inspired me. There was nothing on the website that said the program was open to 10 year olds but--as you must have noticed--nothing that said that it was not. You’ve openly told us that you had trouble making the robot work on your own and needed help. That was a brave thing to admit, and ultimately what convinced us to take on your project. Humility and the willingness to learn in order to go beyond our current limitations are at the heart and soul of innovation.

It is my hope that your work on robotics will encourage more young girls all over the world--not just to code, but to be as brave as you, in asking for help and actively looking for different ways to learn and grow. More good news: I wrote to Thymio, the robotics company whose tech you use and asked if they could designate a specialist to personally help you. They have decided that that person will be their President himself. They will also be providing you their latest robot.

Welcome aboard our spaceship, Eva. We’re very much looking forward to meeting you in person.

All the best from Paris,
Kat Borlongan
Founding Partner, Five by Five
www.fivebyfive.io

PS
Please ask your dad to call me :) "
katborlongan  children  girls  technology  inclusivity  robotics  robots  2016  fivebyfive  stem  engineering  sfsh 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Otherlab!
[previously bookmarked: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:2482ea1338ff ]

"We are mischievous scientists, practical dreamers, working on making the world the way it needs to be. Asking: "Wouldn't it be cool if..." is an excellent place to start:

If you'd like the more in depth version check out the video from our Show and Tell event. We're always on the look out for interesting folks so if this excites you then head over to Jobs to see what's going.

How we work

We have a strong track record of attracting research funding for early and risky ideas in areas such as ‘programmable matter’, robotics, solar energy, wind energy, energy storage, computational and advanced manufacturing, medical devices and more. These non-dilutive investments allows us de-risk the very early exploratory phase of our projects.

We develop enabling new technologies through an emphasis on prototyping coupled to rigorous physics simulation and mathematical models. Our design tools are often made in-house because it's lonely at the frontier and to create new things and ideas, you often have to create the tools to design them.

Core to our model are collaborations with external entities including commercial entities, universities and other research firms. In the past 5 years Otherlab has collaborated with Stanford, MIT, Berkeley, Harvard, NASA, Autodesk, GE, FORD, Google, Motorola, IDEO and a host of others.

What we work on

Our principal domains of expertise are: Renewable and clean energy, Computational Geometry, Computational design tools, Digital Fabrication, Advanced Manufacturing, Robotics and automation & Engineered textiles.

Want a more practical idea? We like you! Head over to Projects for a better sense.

How to reach us

We are @otherlab on twitter and that is a great place to start a conversation. Visual learners may find our YouTube Channel and Instagram feed interesting.

You can email us at info@otherlab.com. We live in the old Schoenstein Organ Factory building in the heart of San Francisco's Mission district:

3101 20th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110"
sanfrancisco  engineering  robots  robotics  solar  wind  energy  manufacturing  otherlab  fabrication  computationalgeometry  saulgriffith  design  make  diy  innovation  tools 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Design Futures in Sub-Saharan Africa: Post-Western Perspectives
"Design Futures in Sub-Saharan Africa: Post-Western Perspectives is a forum for pioneering technologists, curators and scholars from Accra, Nairobi, Cape Town, London and New York to discuss developments in digital design – robotics, gaming and computer imaging - on the African continent.

We tend to think about our world’s future as being discovered in the high-tech laboratories of American scientific research institutes, or debated in elite business and political forums held in the Alps - but less often in the West, do we think about our future as being designed by local tech communities in Sub-Saharan Africa.

In what is being called a transformative Digital Revolution, the African continent now hosts one of the fastest growing tech hubs in the world (the East African ‘Silicon Savannah’), a Pan-African robotics network (AFRON), burgeoning space programmes and a proliferation of digital innovation hubs.

The symposium analyses two major forces shaping the 21st century – innovations in digital technology and the ‘rise of Africa’ – through the lens of material culture and its interpretation. It also marks the official launch of an international network ‘Design Futures in Sub-Saharan Africa’ lead by Cher Potter, developed through a core partnership between London College of Fashion and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Some of the questions that will be examined are:

• What challenges and opportunities do a ‘digital revolution’ combined with unprecedented city and population growth on the African continent present for designers today?

• How is the combination of computer coding and digital fabrication resulting in new typologies of design in Sub-Saharan Africa?

• What composite communities are organising themselves around these new digital models?

• Are gaming environments based on local history and folklore heralding a wider move from European/US-centric worldviews to local ones?

• How might technology open up new ways for reading and categorising objects, both ancient and contemporary?

• How might we describe and test the term ‘postwestern’ in the context of design and curating?

Speakers:

Cher Potter
Cher Potter is V&A/LCF Senior Research Fellow. Her research interests include contemporary design on the African continent, and ‘post western’ models of curating and research. Prior to joining the V&A, she curated the 2013 European Impakt Arts Festival which explored ‘post western’ futures; and lead global cultural research at WGSN, the world’s largest design and fashion trends bureau, coordinating research into design tendencies across 22 countries including 8 African capitals. She was recognized as one of twelve ‘Future Visionaries’ by the 2013 Wellcome Trust Visioneers series.

Jonathan Ledgard
Jonathan Ledgard is Director of the Afrotech Initiative at the Swiss Federal Institute for Technology, Lausanne, established to help pioneer advanced technologies in Africa. He is a leading thinker on risk, nature, and technology in near future Africa and spent the last decade as the Africa correspondent for The Economist, reporting extensively on Africa's mobile phone revolution. A founder of The Economist's Baobab blog, covering politics, economics and culture on the continent of Africa, he continues to contribute to the paper as well as to The New Yorker and other journals.

Ayorkor Korsah
Dr Ayorkor Korsah is Head of the Computer Science Department at Ashesi University College and Co-founder of the African Robotics Network, a community of institutions, organisations and individuals engaged in robotics in Africa. She is also a member of the Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute and a TED Global Fellow. Her research interests include design at the intersection of algorithm design, artificial intelligence, and robotics; educating technologists for development in Africa; exploring the potential for participatory design in Africa; information, computing, and communications as keys to sustainable global development.

Kristina Van Dyke
Kristina Van Dyke is an independent scholar and curator. She was Director of the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St. Louis from 2011 to 2015 and Curator for Collections and Research at the Menil Collection in Houston from 2005 to 2011. She curated the exhibition ‘Kota: Digital Excavations in African Art’ currently on display at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, which examines nearly 50 Kota guardian figures using a new digital database created by Belgian computer engineer Frederic Cloth to study and reveal the hidden histories of Kota reliquaries.

Wesley Kirinya
Wesley Kirinya is one of the first games developers in Africa and founder of Leti Arts gaming studio in Nairobi and Accra. As such, he operates within one of the world’s fastest growing tech and design hubs, the East African ‘Silicon Savanah’. He is pioneering the use of local African history in digital gaming environments, and developing a toolbox of African superheroes based on characters from African mythology – heralding a potentially wider move from European/US-centric worldviews to local ones.

Paula Callus
Paula Callus is a Senior Lecturer in Computer Animation at Bournemouth University and is completing her PhD at SOAS on Digital Animation in Sub-Saharan Africa. As an advocate for the role of Sub-Saharan animators within the broader history of ‘moving’ image, she has delivered papers on ‘Reading Animation through the eyes of anthropology’ at the Animation Studies Symposium 2010; ‘Locating Sub-Saharan African Animation within the ‘moving’ image’ at the Film and Television Screen Studies Conference 2013; and curated the Africa in Motion animation programme in Edinburgh.

Mugendi M’Rithaa
Mugendi M’Rithaa is Professor of Industrial Design at Cape Peninsula University of Technology and the President of the International Council of Societies of Industrial Design (Icsid) - the world organisation for Industrial Design. His research interests include Participatory Design which incorporates the needs of end-users/clients; Universal/Inclusive Design; Design for Social Innovation and Sustainability; and design's potential in promoting equity and quality of life in Africa and beyond. He has coordinated workshops on ‘Designing a Prosperous Nation’ (Gaborone, 2004), and ‘Designing for New Realities’ (Helsinki, 2012).

Elvira Ose
Elvira Ose is Lecturer in Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, and curator of the Göteborg International Biennial for Contemporary Art 2015. She was Curator International Art at Tate Modern (2011 – 2014). At Tate, she took a leading role in developing Tate’s holdings of art from Africa and its Diaspora and working closely with the Africa Acquisitions Committee. She was responsible for Across the Board (2012–2014), a two-year interdisciplinary project that took place in London, Accra, Douala and Lagos. She recently co-curated Ibrahim El-Salahi: A Visionary Modernist (2013).

Chairs:

David Pratten
Dr David Pratten is a Professor at the University of Oxford, specialising in the Social Anthropology of Africa. He was Director of the African Studies Centre from 2009-2013, one of the world’s leading centres for African Studies. His research interests include West African issues of youth, democracy and disorder; contemporary models of sociality, and colonial history. He is Co-Editor of ‘AFRICA: Journal of the International African Institute’ Cambridge University Press, which is the premier journal devoted to the study of African societies and culture.

Bill Sherman
Professor Bill Sherman is Head of Research at the Victoria and Albert Museum and Professor of Renaissance Studies at the University of York. He has published widely on the history of books and readers, the interface of word and image, and the relationship between knowledge and power. At the V&A, he is leading the development of the V&A Research Institute (VARI), which is testing new models for collaborative research that draws on history, theory and practice, and new ways of using collections to bring together the museum, the university and the creative industries.

Jane Harris
Dr Jane Harris is Associate Dean of Research at London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London and Professor of Digital Design and Innovation. An advocate for the role that creative and transdisciplinary research in HE can play in the development and advance of design, science and industry, her own practice navigates physical material and technology interfaces. A recipient of the National Endowment for Science Technology and the Arts Fellowship (NESTA) her pioneering CGI work has been internationally exhibited and publications include the co-authored book Digital Visions for Fashion+Textiles: Made In Code. "
designfuturism  speculativedesign  adrica  via:anne  designfiction  africa  2015  cherpotter  jonathanledgard  ayorkorkorash  kristinavandyke  wesleykirinya  paulacallus  mugendim'rithaa  elviraose  davidpratten  billsherman  janeharris  future  speculativefiction  design  robotics  gaming  comuterimaging  digital 
november 2015 by robertogreco
AADRL Spyropoulos Design Lab on Vimeo
"Research from the AADRL Spyropoulos Design Lab exploring an architecture that is self-aware, self-structured and self-assembles. The research explores high population of mobility agents that evolve an architecture that moves beyond the fixed and finite towards a behavioural model of interactive human and machine ecologies."
theodorespyropoulos  2015  architecture  self-assembling  self-aware  robotics  video 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2014 - Leah Buechley on Vimeo
"Thinking About Making – An examination of what we mean by making (MAKEing) these days. What gets made? Who makes? Why does making matter?"



[uninscusive covers of Make Magazine and composition of Google employment]

“Meet the new boss, same as the old boss”

"I'm really tired of setting up structures where we tell young women and young brown and black kids that they should aspire to be like rich white guys."

[RTd these back than, but never watched the video. Thanks, Sara for bringing it back up.

https://twitter.com/arikan/status/477546169329938432
https://twitter.com/arikan/status/477549826498764801 ]

[Talk with some of the same content from Leah Buechley (and a lot of defensive comments from the crowd that Buechleya addresses well):
http://edstream.stanford.edu/Video/Play/883b61dd951d4d3f90abeec65eead2911d
https://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-10-29-make-ing-more-diverse-makers ]
leahbuechley  making  makermovement  critique  equality  gender  race  2014  via:ablerism  privilege  wealth  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  democratization  inequality  makemagazine  money  age  education  electronics  robots  robotics  rockets  technology  compsci  computerscience  computing  computers  canon  language  work  inclusivity  funding  google  intel  macarthurfoundation  opportunity  power  influence  movements  engineering  lowriders  pottery  craft  culture  universality  marketing  inclusion 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Super-strong robot pulls heavy loads - YouTube
"Two robots borrow techniques from both inchworms and geckos to climb up walls while carrying huge loads"

"Full story: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn27413

"Mighty things come in small packages. The little robots in this video can haul things that weigh over 100 times more than themselves.

The super-strong bots – built by mechanical engineers at Stanford University in California – will be presented next month at the International Conference on Robotics and Automation in Seattle, Washington.

The secret is in the adhesives on the robots' feet. Their design is inspired by geckos, which have climbing skills that are legendary in the animal kingdom. The adhesives are covered in minute rubber spikes that grip firmly onto the wall as the robot climbs. When pressure is applied, the spikes bend, increasing their surface area and thus their stickiness. When the robot picks its foot back up, the spikes straighten out again and detach easily.

The bots also move in a style that is borrowed from biology. Like an inchworm, one pad scooches the robot forward while the other stays in place to support the heavy load. This helps the robot avoid falls from missing its step and park without using up precious power.

Heavy lifting

All this adds up to robots with serious power. For example, one 9-gram bot can hoist more than a kilogram as it climbs. In this video it's carrying StickyBot, the Stanford lab's first ever robot gecko, built in 2006.

Another tiny climbing bot weighs just 20 milligrams but can carry 500 milligrams, a load about the size of a small paper clip. Engineer Elliot Hawkes built the bot under a microscope, using tweezers to put the parts together.

The most impressive feat of strength comes from a ground bot nicknamed μTug. Although it weighs just 12 grams, it can drag a weight that's 2000 times heavier – "the same as you pulling around a blue whale", explains David Christensen – who is in the same lab.

In future, the team thinks that machines like these could be useful for hauling heavy things in factories or on construction sites. They could also be useful in emergencies: for example, one might carry a rope ladder up to a person trapped on a high floor in a burning building.

But for tasks like these, the engineers may have to start attaching their adhesives to robots that are even larger – and thus more powerful. "If you leave yourself a little more room, you can do some pretty amazing things," says Christensen."

[via: http://futurescope.co/post/117611592479/microtugs-super-strong-nanobot-pulls-heavy ]
robots  strength  2015  robotics 
april 2015 by robertogreco
The Humane Representation of Thought on Vimeo
"Closing keynote at the UIST and SPLASH conferences, October 2014.
Preface: http://worrydream.com/TheHumaneRepresentationOfThought/note.html

References to baby-steps towards some of the concepts mentioned:

Dynamic reality (physical responsiveness):
- The primary work here is Hiroshi Ishii's "Radical Atoms": http://tangible.media.mit.edu/project/inform/
- but also relevant are the "Soft Robotics" projects at Harvard: http://softroboticstoolkit.com
- and at Otherlab: http://youtube.com/watch?v=gyMowPAJwqo
- and some of the more avant-garde corners of material science and 3D printing

Dynamic conversations and presentations:
- Ken Perlin's "Chalktalk" changes daily; here's a recent demo: http://bit.ly/1x5eCOX

Context-sensitive reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/MagicInk/

"Explore-the-model" reading material:
- http://worrydream.com/ExplorableExplanations/
- http://worrydream.com/LadderOfAbstraction/
- http://ncase.me/polygons/
- http://redblobgames.com/pathfinding/a-star/introduction.html
- http://earthprimer.com/

Evidence-backed models:
- http://worrydream.com/TenBrighterIdeas/

Direct-manipulation dynamic authoring:
- http://worrydream.com/StopDrawingDeadFish/
- http://worrydream.com/DrawingDynamicVisualizationsTalk/
- http://tobyschachman.com/Shadershop/

Modes of understanding:
- Jerome Bruner: http://amazon.com/dp/0674897013
- Howard Gardner: http://amazon.com/dp/0465024335
- Kieran Egan: http://amazon.com/dp/0226190390

Embodied thinking:
- Edwin Hutchins: http://amazon.com/dp/0262581469
- Andy Clark: http://amazon.com/dp/0262531569
- George Lakoff: http://amazon.com/dp/0465037712
- JJ Gibson: http://amazon.com/dp/0898599598
- among others: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embodied_cognition

I don't know what this is all about:
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/
- http://worrydream.com/ABriefRantOnTheFutureOfInteractionDesign/responses.html

---

Abstract:

New representations of thought — written language, mathematical notation, information graphics, etc — have been responsible for some of the most significant leaps in the progress of civilization, by expanding humanity’s collectively-thinkable territory.

But at debilitating cost. These representations, having been invented for static media such as paper, tap into a small subset of human capabilities and neglect the rest. Knowledge work means sitting at a desk, interpreting and manipulating symbols. The human body is reduced to an eye staring at tiny rectangles and fingers on a pen or keyboard.

Like any severely unbalanced way of living, this is crippling to mind and body. But it is also enormously wasteful of the vast human potential. Human beings naturally have many powerful modes of thinking and understanding.

Most are incompatible with static media. In a culture that has contorted itself around the limitations of marks on paper, these modes are undeveloped, unrecognized, or scorned.

We are now seeing the start of a dynamic medium. To a large extent, people today are using this medium merely to emulate and extend static representations from the era of paper, and to further constrain the ways in which the human body can interact with external representations of thought.

But the dynamic medium offers the opportunity to deliberately invent a humane and empowering form of knowledge work. We can design dynamic representations which draw on the entire range of human capabilities — all senses, all forms of movement, all forms of understanding — instead of straining a few and atrophying the rest.

This talk suggests how each of the human activities in which thought is externalized (conversing, presenting, reading, writing, etc) can be redesigned around such representations.

---

Art by David Hellman.
Bret Victor -- http://worrydream.com "

[Some notes from Boris Anthony:

"Those of you who know my "book hack", Bret talks about exactly what motivates my explorations starting at 20:45 in https://vimeo.com/115154289 "
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574339495274876928

"From a different angle, btwn 20:00-29:00 Bret explains how "IoT" is totally changing everything
https://vimeo.com/115154289
@timoreilly @moia"
https://twitter.com/Bopuc/status/574341875836043265 ]
bretvictor  towatch  interactiondesign  davidhellman  hiroshiishii  softrobotics  robots  robotics  kenperlin  jeromebruner  howardgardner  kieranegan  edwinhutchins  andyclark  jjgibson  embodiedcognition  cognition  writing  math  mathematics  infographic  visualization  communication  graphics  graphicdesign  design  representation  humans  understanding  howwelearn  howwethink  media  digital  dynamism  movement  conversation  presentation  reading  howweread  howwewrite  chalktalk  otherlab  3dprinting  3d  materials  physical  tangibility  depth  learning  canon  ui  informationdesign  infographics  maps  mapping  data  thinking  thoughts  numbers  algebra  arithmetic  notation  williamplayfair  cartography  gestures  placevalue  periodictable  michaelfaraday  jamesclerkmaxell  ideas  print  printing  leibniz  humanism  humanerepresentation  icons  visual  aural  kinesthetic  spatial  tactile  symbols  iot  internetofthings  programming  computers  screens  computation  computing  coding  modeling  exploration  via:robertogreco  reasoning  rhetoric  gerrysussman  environments  scale  virtualization 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Transformer Paper Turns Itself Into A Robot. Cool! : NPR
"It's now possible to print electronic circuits on a flat sheet of paper. So if you use some clever folding techniques (based on the ancient art of paper folding called origami), you can fold these sheets into useful structures — maybe a crab-shaped robot that could scuttle across the floor, or a swan-shaped robot that could really fly.

The problem is, it takes a long time for humans to make all the necessary folds in these flat sheets.

"Our goal then," Felton says, "was to try to make them fold themselves in order to save time." So he and his colleagues attached a tiny microprocessor to the paper that tells each hinge when to fold into place.

To actually accomplish the fold, the engineers use a child's toy called Shrinky Dinks. These are sheets made from elastic, shape memory polymers that shrink by about half when you heat them up. You attach the Shrinky Dink to the paper, and when the microprocessor wants to execute a particular fold, it turns on a tiny electronic heater that's printed on the paper, causing the Shrinky Dink to shrink.

"And this, in turn, pulls on the paper," Felton says, "causing the paper to fold."

He's now working on tiny, bug-size folding robots made not with paper and Shrinky Dinks but with aluminum foil and shrink-wrap. He also sees a day when there may be printable spacecraft, sent into space as flat sheets, only to fold up into something useful when they reach their target."
robots  2014  robotics  paper  folding  shrinkydinks  origami 
august 2014 by robertogreco
www.createlab.ri.cmu.edu
"The Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment Lab (CREATE Lab) explores socially meaningful innovation and deployment of robotic technologies. We specifically aim to:

Empower a technologically fluent generation through experiential learning opportunities in and outside of school. We define technology fluency as the confidence to author / creatively configure technology to pursue individual and collective goals.

Empower everyday citizens and scientists with affordable environmental sensing and documentation instruments, and powerful visualization platforms for sense-making and sharing of gathered scientific data - to promote evidence based decision making, public discourse and action."



"The CREATE Lab is both a technology breeding ground and a community partner. It is this unique combination that enables a new form of local change: one that empowers the citizens to chart their technology future and, most important of all, their community's prospects for quality of life."
carnegiemellon  robotics  technology  education  experientiallearning  learning  sensemaking  data  classideas 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Seeing Spaces on Vimeo
"What if we designed a new kind of "maker space" -- a space that isn't just for putting pieces together, but also for seeing and understanding a project's behavior in powerful ways? - seeing inside - seeing across time - seeing across possibilities "I think people need to work in a space that moves them away from the kinds of non-scientific thinking that you do when you can't see what you're doing -- moves them away from blindly following recipes, from superstitions and rules of thumb -- and moves them towards deeply understanding what they're doing, inventing new things, discovering new things, contributing back to the global pool of human knowledge." Presented at the EG conference on May 2, 2014. Art by David Hellman. Bret Victor -- http://worrydream.com "



"I think people need to work in a space that moves them away from the kinds of non-scientific thinking that you do when you can't see what you're doing -- moves them away from blindly following recipes, from superstitions and rules of thumb -- and moves them towards deeply understanding what they're doing, inventing new things, discovering new things, contributing back to the global pool of human knowledge."
bretvictor  makerspaces  seeing  understanding  making  invention  behavior  howwework  2014  howwelearn  design  robotics  robots  software  engineering  seeingspaces  time  possibilities  displays 
june 2014 by robertogreco
18. Webstock 2014 Talk Notes and References - postarchitectural
[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/91957759 ]
[See also: http://www.webstock.org.nz/talks/the-future-happens-so-much/ ]

"I was honored to be invited to Webstock 2014 to speak, and decided to use it as an opportunity to talk about startups and growth in general.

I prepared for this talk by collecting links, notes, and references in a flat text file, like I did for Eyeo and Visualized. These references are vaguely sorted into the structure of the talk. Roughly, I tried to talk about the future happening all around us, the startup ecosystem and the pressures for growth that got us there, and the dangerous sides of it both at an individual and a corporate level. I ended by talking about ways for us as a community to intervene in these systems of growth.

The framework of finding places to intervene comes from Leverage Points by Donella Meadows, and I was trying to apply the idea of 'monstrous thoughts' from Just Asking by David Foster Wallace. And though what I was trying to get across is much better said and felt through books like Seeing like a State, Debt, or Arctic Dreams, here's what was in my head."
shahwang  2014  webstock  donellameadows  jamescscott  seeinglikeastate  davidgraeber  debt  economics  barrylopez  trevorpaglen  google  technology  prism  robotics  robots  surveillance  systemsthinking  growth  finance  venturecapital  maciejceglowski  millsbaker  mandybrown  danhon  advertising  meritocracy  democracy  snapchat  capitalism  infrastructure  internet  web  future  irrationalexuberance  github  geopffmanaugh  corproratism  shareholders  oligopoly  oligarchy  fredscharmen  kenmcleod  ianbanks  eleanorsaitta  quinnorton  adamgreenfield  marshallbrain  politics  edwardsnowden  davidsimon  georgepacker  nicolefenton  power  responsibility  davidfosterwallace  christinaxu  money  adamcurtis  dmytrikleiner  charlieloyd  wealth  risk  sarahkendxior  markjacobson  anildash  rebeccasolnit  russellbrand  louisck  caseygollan  alexpayne  judsontrue  jamesdarling  jenlowe  wilsonminer  kierkegaard  readinglist  startups  kiev  systems  control  data  resistance  obligation  care  cynicism  snark  change  changetheory  neoliberalism  intervention  leveragepoints  engagement  nonprofit  changemaki 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Humans will befriend a stick — as long as it moves properly - Boing Boing
"Human emotions and social interaction have a lot to do with body language — how our faces express what we're thinking and feeling, how our gestures are read by other people, and how we invade (or retreat from) each other's personal space. In fact, those movements and behaviors are so important that, if you map them onto an otherwise completely non-human, non-animal form, we'll start interpreting it as engaging with us — even if that form is nothing more than a moving stick.

This video, clips from a study that was published in 2011 by computer scientists at the University of Calgary, shows what test subjects did and said when they were left alone in a room with a stick-like robot, and asked to just think out loud and interact with the robot in whatever ways felt natural. Some people made friends. Others tried to fight it. And a few tried to talk it out of wanting to fight them."

[Direct link to video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqPDenb6ByM ]
robots  psychology  behavior  johnharris  ehudsharlin  robotics  language  communication  friendship  social  socialinteraction  movement 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Hogwarts for Hackers: Inside the Science and Tech School of Tomorrow | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com
"“I had to learn what the programming language was, learn what a compiler was,” he remembers. “I found books on it and talked to upperclassmen. But basically had to learn it on my own.”

The IMSA Wednesdays are like Google’s “20 percent time” — only better. “At Google, 20 percent time is actually tacked on to the rest of your job. ” says Daniel Kador, another former IMSA student. “At IMSA, it really is built into your schedule.” And though Kador and other students admit that they spent more than a few Wednesdays just goofing off — as high school students so often do — they say the environment at IMSA ends up pushing many of them towards truly creative work. And it pays off."



"That’s IMSA in a nutshell. IMSA students help each other learn, and they continue to help each other, even after they graduate. Alums are invited back to teach mini-courses during the first week of the winter semester, and this has become of one of the highlights of the year — for everyone involved. “As a student, it was the most fun thing,” says Wild, “and as an alum, it’s even more fun.”"
imsa  illinois  education  schooldesign  schools  learning  google20%  technology  robotics  stem  collaboration  projectbasedlearning  cv  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  openstudioproject  lcproject  pbl 
june 2013 by robertogreco
‘Phones, Drones and Genomes’: Top Sectors Where SD Makes a Mark | Voice of San Diego
"In the post-World War II era, San Diego made a big investment in companies working in atomic energy, medical research and aerospace – realms where San Diego had made a wartime name for itself. That investment helped set the stage for many of the region’s subsequent discoveries. And it helped grow clusters of companies.

Now, half a century later, the landscape has evolved. What are the places, niches, realms where San Diego’s making a mark nationally and internationally? Part of our reporting quest to discover and outline potential barriers to innovation in San Diego is defining what innovation is and where San Diego fits in the larger conversation.

Here’s a tentative list we’ve put together, with the help of some great suggestions, of the areas where San Diego is making a big impact. What did we miss? Let us know below.

Drones
Stem Cells
Genomics
Wireless communications
Software and software analytics
Clean tech and Blue tech
Cybersecurity
craft brewing"
sandiego  economics  economy  kellybennett  drones  stemcells  craigventer  genomics  illumina  generalatomics  northropgrumman  qualcomm  software  cleantech  bluetech  oceans  robotics  cybersecurity  beer 
june 2013 by robertogreco
upclose | connecting informal learning to the learning sciences
"We are an academic home for informal learning. We explore what it means to learn science, technology, and art in out-of-school settings. We conduct basic research on learning. We produce innovative designs to support informal learning. We uncover how museums and community organizations learn and change. We prototype with partners ways for learning experiences to be more connected across place and time. Through the Learning Sciences and Policy, Ph.D program, we train the next generation of informal learning researchers. And, finally, we also bring research and practice together through collaborations and national field-building initiatives."

[Projects:
The Science Learning Activation Lab
Center for Lifelong Science Learning
Gigapixel Imaging for Participatory Science Learning
The City as Learning Lab: Spreading Technological Fluency Through Creative Robotics
CAISE: The Center for the Advancement of Informal Science Education
MakeShop
ENERGY-NET (Energy, Environment and Society Learning Network):
Enhancing opportunities for learning using an Earth systems science framework]

[See also: http://remakelearning.org/organization/pitt/upclose/ ]
informallearning  education  unschooling  deschooling  teaching  lisabrahms  makeshop  research  science  learning  openstudioproject  museums  cities  robotics  kevincrowley  karenknutson  martilouw  lynettejacobs-priebe  mayannsteiner  kaleentisonpovis  glvo  laurenallen  pittsburgh  caise  upclose 
may 2013 by robertogreco
IsoBots
"Welcome to my robotics site, first a little about myself, I am a product designer and educator. As a product designer I have had the opportunity to work on a variety of projects including concept automobiles, electric vehicles, medical equipment, exhibit design, wearable computers and toys. Although I am a certifiable car nut and lover of cutting edge technology, my favorite projects are toys. I love creating toys that might become a child's treasured object, I look back on my favorite toys that I had as a kid and can clearly see how they allowed me to develop my imagination. My goal is to give today's kids the opportunity to learn how things work and make working robots! My partner Anne Mayoral and I developed the ArtBots to implement this goal. Many times it is the first time the girl or boy has actually constructed something that actually works! The pride on the young makers face is priceless and the successful completion of the working bot instills confidence which is needed to encourage further engagement. I feel that this encouragement is missing in so many of today's toys and games. We have created several generations of kids that can turn on and off toys, have excellent hand eye coordination but lack in the knowledge and even the curiosity of how stuff works.

I reside in San Francisco and spend my free time tinkering with British cars, old motorcycles, RC gliders and building various robotic creatures. I teach at the Academy of Art University in the Industrial Design Department. I also run an after school robotics class for seven to nine year olds called ArtBots."

[via: http://make.berkeley.edu/ ]
robotics  robots  youth  kids  education  bayarea  sanfrancisco  making  chrismeyer  criticalmaking  makers  design  learning  toys  toydesign  toymaking  glvo  edg  srg  isobots  berkeley 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Romotive
"By combining smartphones with a mobile base, we create robots that do awesome things (telepresence, autonomous navigation, machine vision). Because software for Romo is distributed through the Apple App Store, our users download new behaviors and personalities for their robots at the click of a button. Anyone can build and distribute new apps for Romo using the Romotive SDK."

[See also: http://romotive.com/meet-romo ]
romo  android  iphone  robots  robotics  api 
february 2013 by robertogreco
DIY Drones
"This is the home for everything about amateur Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Use the tabs and drop-down menus above to navigate the site. (About us/Site rules)
This community created the Arduino-based ArduPilot, the world's first universal autopilot (planes, multicopters of all sorts and ground rovers). The APM 2.5 autopilot hardware runs a variety of powerful free UAV software systems, including:

• ArduPlane, a pro-level UAV system for planes of all types.
• ArduCopter, a fully-autonomous multicopter and heli UAV system."
diy  electronics  opensource  robotics  uav  drones  edg  srg  glvo  howto 
february 2013 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] signs of life [These quotes are only from the beginning. I recommend reading the whole thing.]
"I've been thinking a lot about motive & intent for the last few years. How we recognize motive &… how we measure its consequence.

This is hardly uncharted territory. You can argue easily enough that it remains the core issue that all religion, philosophy & politics struggle with. Motive or trust within a community of individuals.

…Bruce Schneier…writes:

"In today's complex society, we often trust systems more than people. It's not so much that I trusted the plumber at my door as that I trusted the systems that produced him & protect me."

I often find myself thinking about motive & consequence in the form of a very specific question: Who is allowed to speak on behalf of an organization?

To whom do we give not simply the latitude of interpretation, but the luxury of association, with the thing they are talking about …

Institutionalizing or formalizing consequence is often a way to guarantee an investment but that often plows head-first in to the subtlies of real-life."

[Video here: https://vimeo.com/51515289 ]
dunbartribes  schrodinger'sbox  scale  francisfukuyama  capitalism  industrialrevolution  technology  rules  control  algorithms  creepiness  siri  drones  robots  cameras  sensors  robotreadableworld  humans  patterns  patternrecognition  patternmatching  gerhardrichter  robotics  johnpowers  dia:beacon  jonathanwallace  portugal  lisbon  brandjacking  branding  culturalheritage  culture  joannemcneil  jamesbridle  future  politics  philosophy  religion  image  collections  interpretation  representation  complexity  consequences  cooper-hewitt  photography  filters  instagram  flickr  museums  systemsthinking  systems  newaesthetic  voice  risk  bruceschneier  2012  aaronstraupcope  aaron  intent  motive  storiesfromthenewaesthetic  canon 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Procrastineering - Project blog for Johnny Chung Lee: Robots: Cute and Less Cute
"When it comes to robotics, I typically jump to the technical aspect of planning, kinematics, & tracking. It can get nitty gritty really fast. But, it's great to see what just a little bit of artistic creativity can do when applied to even the most modest of robots. I hardly ever see anything quite this "cute" come out of the robotics research community:

[video]

Okay well, there's KeepOn by Hideki Kozima & Marek Michalowski which is pretty good.

At the complete other end of the "cute" spectrum is this recent video from Boston Dynamics…

Boston Dynamics continues to push hydraulic actuators farther than I think anybody thought they could. But, why does it have run like some kind of giant insect rather than an actual cheetah? Surely, staggering the foot falls would provide mechanical advantages I am not knowledgeable enough to articulate. Developing a robot capable of matching the maneuvering performance & speed of a cheetah would be quite remarkable."
marekmichalowski  propulsion  movement  animals  cheetahs  bostondynamics  2012  uncannyvalley  hidekikozima  kawai  cuteness  cute  design  johnnychunglee  robotics  robots 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Backyard Brains » Insane in the Chromatophores
"During experiments on the giant axons of the Longfin Inshore Squid (loligo pealei) at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA; we were fascinated by the fast color-changing nature of the squid’s skin. Squids (like many other cephalopods) can quickly control pigmented cells called chromatophores to reflect light. The Longfin Inshore has 3 different chromatophore colors: Brown, Red, and Yellow. Each chromatophore has tiny muscles along the circumference of the cell that can contract to reveal the pigment underneath.

We tested our cockroach leg stimulus protocol on the squid’s chromatophores. We used a suction electrode to attach to the squid’s fin nerve, then connected the electrode to an iPod nano as our stimulator. The results were both interesting and beautiful. The video below is a view through an 8x microscope zoomed in on the dorsal side of the fin."

[via: http://www.cesarharada.com/squid-hop/ via http://www.flickr.com/photos/worldworldworld/7887219272/ ]
science  greggage  animals  cockroaches  2012  color  membranes  robotics  muscles  music  biology  squid  chromatophores 
august 2012 by robertogreco
OPENROV
"OpenROV is a DIY community centered around underwater robots for exploration & adventure. We're a group of amateur and professional ROV builders and operators from over 50 countries who have a passion for exploring the deep."
robot  robots  openrov  underwater  rov  hardware  opensource  diy  robotics  drones  oceanography  droneproject 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Artificial Empathy – Blog – BERG
"Artificial Empathy is at the core of B.A.S.A.A.P. – it’s what powers Kacie Kinzer’s Tweenbots, and it’s what Byron and Nass were describing in The Media Equation to some extent, which of course brings us back to Clippy.

Clippy was referenced by Alex in her talk, and has been resurrected again as an auto-critique to current efforts to design and build agents and ‘things with behaviour’

One thing I recalled which I don’t think I’ve mentioned in previous discussions was that back in 1997, when Clippy was at the height of his powers – I did something that we’re told (quite rightly to some extent) no-one ever does – I changed the defaults.

You might not know, but there were several skins you could place on top of Clippy from his default paperclip avatar – a little cartoon Einstein, an ersatz Shakespeare… and a number of others."
ai  robotics  emotion  design  artificialempathy  empathy  bigdog  robots  mattjones  berg  berglondon  machines  dogs  behavior  adaptivepotentiation  play  seriousplay  toys  culture  human  basaap  emotionalrobots  emoticons  alexdeschamps-sonsino  reallyinterestinggroup  2011  animals 
february 2011 by robertogreco
The Do Lectures | Matt Webb
"Matt Webb is MD of the design studio BERG, which invents products and designs new media. Projects include Popular Science+ for the Apple iPad, solid metal phone prototypes for Nokia, a bendy map of Manhattan called Here & There, and an electronic puppet that brings you closer to your friends.

Matt speaks on design and technology, is co-author of Mind Hacks - cognitive psychology for a general audience - and if you were to sum up his design interests in one word, it would be “politeness.” He lives in London in a flat with a wonky floor."
mattwebb  design  designfiction  computing  ai  scifi  sciencefiction  berg  berglondon  future  futurism  retrofuture  space  speculativedesign  2010  dolectures  books  film  thinkingnebula  nebulas  history  automation  toys  productdesign  iphone  schooloscope  redlaser  mechanicalturk  magic  virtualpets  commoditization  robotics  anyshouse  twitter  internetofthings  ubicomp  anybots  faces  pareidolia  fractionalai  fractionalhorsepower  andyshouse  weliveinamazingtimes  spacetravel  spaceexploration  spimes  iot 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Students, Meet Your New Teacher, Mr. Robot - NYTimes.com
"Standing on a polka-dot carpet at a preschool on the campus of the University of California, San Diego, a robot named RUBI is teaching Finnish to a 3-year-old boy.

RUBI looks like a desktop computer come to life: its screen-torso, mounted on a pair of shoes, sprouts mechanical arms and a lunchbox-size head, fitted with video cameras, a microphone and voice capability. RUBI wears a bandanna around its neck and a fixed happy-face smile, below a pair of large, plastic eyes.

It picks up a white sneaker and says kenka, the Finnish word for shoe, before returning it to the floor. “Feel it; I’m a kenka.”

In a video of this exchange, the boy picks up the sneaker, says “kenka, kenka” — and holds up the shoe for the robot to see.

In person they are not remotely humanlike, most of today’s social robots. Some speak well, others not at all. Some move on two legs, others on wheels. Many look like escapees from the Island of Misfit Toys."
robots  robotics  education  autism  ai  schools  teaching  ucsd 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Nomadic Plants - we make money not art
"Gilberto Esparza first appeared in the radar of bloggers a couple of years ago when he started colonizing Mexico City with Urban Parasites. Made of recycled consumer goods, the small robotic creatures explore the urban space in search of any source of energy they can feed on. Under its quirky, amusing side, the project also had the objective of providing a basis for a critical exploration of the role that technology plays in cities."
nomadicplants  plants  gilbertoesparza  mexico  art  artists  robotics  pollution  cities  biotech  urban 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Moravec's paradox - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"We should expect the difficulty of reverse engineering any human skill to be roughly proportional to amount of time that skill has been evolving in animals. The oldest human skills are largely unconscious and so appear to us to be effortless. Therefore, we should expect skills that appear effortless to be difficult to reverse engineer, but skills that require effort may not necessarily be difficult to engineer at all.
science  media  perception  transhumanism  computers  human  intelligence  futurism  robotics  cognitive  mind  cognition  philosophy  difficulty  moravecsparadox 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Lowtech Sensors and Actuators
"This report describes the results of a collaborative research project to develop a suite of low-tech sensors and actuators that might be useful for artists and architects working with interactive environments. With this project we hoped to consolidate a number of different approaches we had found ourselves taking in our own work and develop both a "kit-of-parts" and a more conceptual framework for producing such works."
edg  make  art  howto  diy  electronics  toys  hardware  tutorial  robotics  sensors  hacking  arduino  physicalcomputing  computing  hacks  technology  opensource  programming  interface  lowtech  usmanhaque  low-tech 
may 2009 by robertogreco
TechShop is the SF Bay Area's Only Open-Access Public Workshop
"TechShop is a 15,000 square-foot membership-based workshop that provides members with access to tools and equipment, instruction, and a creative and supportive community of like-minded people so you can build the things you have always wanted to make.
sanfrancisco  lcproject  fabrication  robotics  electronics  workshop  bayarea  techshop  machineproject  diy  projects  community  technology  education  howto  make  classes 
january 2009 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: Holiday Gift Guide: Robots!
"For our MAKE Robot Gift Guide, we've put together a sampling of robot-related offerings from the Maker Shed, as well as some other robots we fancy. If you give or get any of these bots for the holidays, or especially if you or your recipients, hack them, we'd love to hear about it."
robots  robotics  edg  gifts  make  electronics  diy 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Arduino Controlled Servo Robot (SERB) - kit
"A great kit that includes everything you need to begin experimenting with robots, Arduino micro-controllers and open source hardware. All carefully packaged and nicely presented."
arduino  robots  robotics  edg  make  electronics  microcontrollers  via:reas 
november 2008 by robertogreco
DIY Drones
"This is a site for all things about amateur Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs): How-to's, videos, discussion and more."
drones  diy  electronics  arduino  hardware  hacks  robots  aviation  airplanes  robotics  opensource  aircraft 
october 2008 by robertogreco
YouTube - robot generates a conception of itself
"it looks like a four-armed starfish, but so far it's unaware of its own shape. After flailing its arms for a while, however, the robot gets a sense of its design and begins to walk. The real feat comes when engineers remove a part of its leg: The robot senses a change in its structure and begins walking in a different way to compensate. The demonstration is the first proof that a robot can generate a conception of itself and then adapt to damage, a handy skill to have in unpredictable environments."
via:adamgreenfield  robots  intelligence  robotics  ai  consciousness 
october 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future: Natalie Jeremijenko: The WorldChanging Interview
"EG: It's very much in the history of science in the western world, where you have these kooky Englishmen with too much time on their hands wandering off, studying botany and chemical reactions, inventing photography. And then in the last century, you have men in their basements with their little engineering projects. They didn't think of them as engineering projects, but they were essentially conducting science.
2004  nataliejeremijenko  worldchanging  interviews  surveillance  robotics  science  art  robots  activism  biology  biotechnology  technology  inventions  politics  design  hacktivism  environment  community 
september 2008 by robertogreco
7 Cool Robots for Geek Kids and Dads | Geekdad from Wired.com
"So here's my first look into the world of low cost robots. I should disclose that while I have purchased from some of these companies, I have not yet purchased or assembled any of these kits. I do plan to soon."
tcsnmy  robots  electronics  robotics  make 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Heart Robot
"Heart is a puppet as well as a simple robot. As the puppeteer moves Heart, Heart gets more excited! There are three contributors to the unfolding event when Heart meets the public; the audience, the puppeteer, and Heart himself!"
robotics  robots  edg  interface  human  emotion  love  interactiondesign  technology  art 
august 2008 by robertogreco
WeDo: LEGO's new robotics system for elementary schools - Boing Boing Gadgets
"LEGO has announced a low-end, tethered robotics system called "WeDO" designed to be used in classrooms of elementary-aged children. It won't replace Mindstorms, but instead serve as an intermediate step between the more fully featured robotics platform a
lego  wedo  robots  robotics  programming  children  make  edg  coding  teaching 
july 2008 by robertogreco
matt kirkland > designer for hire > stupid projects > in vestimentis ursum
"Surely the robot hiding in the bear's clothing, vestimentis ursum, is impressive. So: armed with my childish curiousity and the spurious excuse of 'product design research,' I set out to discover what, exactly, these creatures are hiding."
via:kottke  plush  toys  robots  dolls  glvo  robotics  photography 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Reconsidering the Lego Robotics... [Bill Kerr makes a great point about class time in the comments.]
"robotics programs in primary and secondary schools...many have been successes, but limited successes...relative expansion of Lego robotics in schools has coincided with a virtual collapse of computer science US K-12 schools in general."
robots  robotics  computers  compsci  schools  education  learning  children  lego 
may 2008 by robertogreco
MAKE: Blog: Shape-Shifting Robots
"The University of Pennsylvania created these modular robots that are able to recognize each other and assemble themselves into 1 larger robot. Once assembled, the larger robot is able to walk...theoretically. I just like the part where the guy kicks it!"
robots  robotics  reassembly 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Evolution Robotics: Robotics - ViPR - Visual Pattern Recognition is a Vision Solution for Cell Phone Cameras and Loss Prevention
"Evolution Robotics ViPR (visual pattern recognition) technology provides a reliable and robust vision solution that truly gives electronic devices the ability to detect and recognize complex visual patterns - in effect, to see."
robotics  vision  recognition  search  sensing  software  images  mobile  visual 
april 2008 by robertogreco
roBlocks is a robot construction kit.
"By combining sensor, logic and actuator blocks, young kids can create simple reconfigurable robots that exhibit surprisingly complex behavior. roBlocks are self-describing, so they can provide helpful feedback to the user, and automatically adjust their
arduino  construction  robots  children  learning  electronics  via:russelldavies  gadgets  robotics  toys  education  hardware  diy  make  programming  elearning  coding  teaching 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Flexible robotic fin does away with drag - tech - 29 February 2008 - New Scientist Tech
"A robotic fin that mimics the energy-efficient manoeuvres of an agile fish's pectoral fins has been developed by US researchers. Working out how to use multiple versions in conjunction could allow robot submarines to hover and turn on a dime as natural s
robots  propulsion  fish  biology  biomimicry  robotics  biomimetics 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Wired News - AP News: Study Finds Dogs, Robots Cheer Elderly
"Robotic competition is nipping at [dogs'] heels in the man's-best-friend department...study by Saint Louis U found lovable pooch named Sparky & robotic dog AIBO, were about equally effective at relieving loneliness of nursing home residents"
robots  dogs  animals  loneliness  elderly  technology  society  robotics  health  comfort 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Robot 'plays back' dreams - we make money not art
"Using recorded brainwave activity and eye movements during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep to determine robot behaviors and head positions, "Sleep Waking" acts as a way to "play-back" dreams."
robots  sleep  robotics  installation  art  dreams  brain 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Dark Roasted Blend: The Machine-Animals of Nantes
"French city of Nantes recently became host to extremely strange and fascinating sculptural display: "Les Machines de l'Ile Nantes", designed by François Delarozière and Pierre Orefice."
animals  robotics  robots  squid  sculptures  exhibitions  machines  sculpture  puppets  steampunk 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Bug Labs
"BUG is a new kind of device, one that's designed by you, not us. BUG is an open source, modular consumer electronics platform that makes building hardware just as easy as writing software or Web applications"
appliances  coding  components  crowdsourcing  design  devices  electronics  embedded  gadgets  future  hacking  hacks  microcontrollers  innovation  interaction  prototyping  robotics  sensors  opensource  modular  hardware  programming 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Technology Review: The Interoperation
"Architecture had given way to software management. So he turned buildings into construction programs."
brucesterling  scifi  sciencefiction  robotics  manufacturing  fiction  design  construction  architecture 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Google Phone - New York Times
"Andy Rubin...oversees a secretive Google software project that the company hopes will transform the smartphone market."
google  googlephone  mobile  phones  innovation  sidekick  mobility  internet  web  online  apple  engineering  webtv  andyrubin  robotics  robots 
november 2007 by robertogreco
'Great Robot Exhibition' Showcases Centuries of Japanese Bots
"Thematically divided into karakuri (clockwork dolls), imagination (anime, manga and toys) and real machines, the show depicts robot development in Japan as a grand procession from medieval automatons to sci-fi fantasies to actual mechatronic men."
culture  futurism  robots  robotics  japan  history 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Keepon & the BeatBots
"This video was produced by WIRED, directed by Jeff Nichols, and made with the generous participation of Spoon and the RT robot store. Watch a high-resolution version at blip.tv, and see our other videos of Keepon on YouTube, particularly the one that sta
japan  video  keepon  robots  robotics  music  dance  people  tokyo 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Beyond the Beyond - Wired Blogs - Big Dog's Even More Horrible Little Robot Sister
"*That horrid little mutilated frog... don't let children under 12 watch this, as they may wake screaming, staring under their beds..."
robots  military  dogs  animals  robotics 
september 2007 by robertogreco
BEST Robotics, Inc. :: Middle and High School Robotics Competition
"BEST is a non-profit, volunteer organization whose mission is to inspire students to pursue careers in engineering, science, and technology through participation in a sports-like, science- and engineering-based robotics competition."
robotics  electronics  education  competition  science  schools  technology  contests  challenge  robots 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Seed: Rise of Roboethics
"Grappling with the implications of an artificially intelligent culture."
ai  consciousness  brain  robots  robotics  singularity  ethics  future  law  mind  philosophy  technology  culture  japan 
august 2007 by robertogreco
The blade runner generation - Times Online
"Soon, we will transfer information by thought, run faster and further without tiring...What started as a quest to help the disabled will revolutionise the lives of the able-bodied...robotics is the next giant leap for mankind"
singularity  robots  robotics  technology  future 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Urban Tapestries | Social Tapestries: Robotic Feral Public Authoring in London Fields [see also: http://socialtapestries.net/feralrobots/index.html]
"A group from Proboscis (Giles Lane, Sarah Thelwall, Orlagh Woods and Camilla Brueton) and Birkbeck College Computer Science dept (George Roussos and Dima Diall) braved the freezing weather to test the robot out in the field."
robots  gps  electronics  art  robotics 
april 2006 by robertogreco

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