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robertogreco : russellquinn   4

The Pickle: A Conversation About Making Digital Books — Medium
"But I also wonder if there’s a factor beyond straight economics — a way in which the currently ascendant Startup Narrative can get applied where it doesn’t quite belong. Robin, you brought up the question of platforms vs one-off, artisanal apps. I think the answer has got to be somewhere in between — an assortment of platforms, plus an accrual of code libraries and lessons learned. But I also think that question itself can be inhibiting to the creative process — this drive to anticipate the future, to guess correctly, to fit optimally within larger trends. To me, maybe that’s the true reality-distortion field — the blurring of “worthwhile” and “scalable,” the idea that valuation will tell us whether something’s a good idea. That standard might work well for, say, grocery-delivery startups, but is it how we want to think about our novels, our stories, our art-whatevers? Publishing has grappled with these tensions for centuries, but they might be less familiar in the tech world.

Sorry to sound like an elderly hippie! I guess what I’m trying to say is this: If every novel is an implicit declaration of a definitive Future of Publishing, we’ll miss out on a lot of great novels — and, what’s more, we might miss out on some great futures of publishing too. I don’t know if these answers can really be found without rolling up our sleeves and just Making Stuff — seeing what works, what doesn’t, what’s annoying, what’s fun, how many dumb pickle jokes are too many, etc. Having a strange idea and then bringing it into reality, regardless of efficiency or scalability.

This comes back to Russell’s description of the process — meandering, playful, with lots of back-and-forth between the two of us and between the various demands of the project. What he describes is typical of many creative endeavors, but it might be a bit unusual for a traditional programming job. Pickle could never have resulted from me handing Russell a finished text and a list of specs — I mean, we thought we had a decent idea about what we were making two years ago, but we were very wrong. The project had to find itself, and that required actual collaboration, not just outsourcing — fluidity and looseness, experimentation and fun.

As for whether “eight years of ebooks” is a blink or an eternity, I have no idea. But I do know that there’s no guarantee that we’ll end up in a place that serves us as individuals, as readers and writers. I mean, look at television — finally flowering after, what, sixty years? And not as a result of any fundamental change to the medium, but just a bunch of smaller evolutions that opened the door to new creators and new audiences. I’m hoping we won’t have to wait til 2068 for ebooks to do the same (though I’m sure Russell is itching to whip up a multiplatform rendering of 91-year-old Eli’s epic poem, Incontinence on Mars)."
elihorowitz  2015  books  creativity  publishing  economics  tv  television  playfulness  play  making  experimentation  future  thepickleindex  storytelling  scalability  scale  platforms  suddenoak  russellquinn  fluidity  looseness  glvo  srg 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The Pickle: A Conversation About Making Digital Books — The Message — Medium
"1: Opening Salvo

Okay, Craig, I know you’re critical of the arrested state of ebooks today. For my part, I’m more… curious. It’s clear to me that, for all their commercial success, we don’t know what books on screens are supposed to look like; not yet. But that shouldn’t be surprising; the first Kindle came out a mere eight years ago, and most people have been reading books on screens for a few years at most.

It’s only now that we’re starting to see the really interesting work emerge.

I believe you’ve read The Pickle Index, and I think we can agree that it represents something interesting and new. The novel’s digital edition is much more than words on a screen; instead, it masquerades as a recipe app, complete with menus and lists and a wonderful little map. It’s quite slick; if it was a real recipe app, it would be a pretty solid one! Its creators, Eli Horowitz and Russell Quinn, use the idiom of the app to pull you more deeply into the story, to make you, as a reader, feel somehow like an accomplice.

It’s fabulous.

But the Pickle Index app (for reasons I don’t want to give away to people who haven’t read it yet) can only tell the Pickle Index story; the way it works is bound up with the tale it tells. Eli and Russell can’t reuse this machine for, say, The Istanbul Protocol or The Dragon Wizard. Those stories wouldn’t fit.

So, with your earlier criticism in mind: What do you think? Is this matching of content to container the road forward, or is it a lovely cul-de-sac? Is the non-naive, non-repackaged future of ebooks more of these unique apps, or is it some new, reusable “master format” that we have yet to invent?

Note to readers: This is (going to be) a long, loopy conversation. The Pickle Index is crisp and compact. Consider sampling its tangy delights."

[Craig's first response: https://medium.com/message/the-pickle-a-conversation-about-making-digital-books-1e8464b469e4#.xjy0jenpm

Collection here: https://medium.com/tag/the-pickle-index/latest ]
2015  robinsloan  ebooks  books  publishing  elihorowitz  russellquinn  thepickleindex  bookfuturism  craigmod  epublishing  applications  suddenoak 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Russell Quinn — The World's Most Wired Storyteller | Wired Design | Wired.com
"Now after a string of behind-the-scenes successes, Quinn may be about to transform the art of storytelling itself. This summer he will launch The Silent History, a sprawling electronic novel that plays with the mechanics of how stories are told, taking full advantage of the tablet’s GPS and touchscreen, along with platform features like in-app purchasing.

It will be the first release from Ying Horowitz & Quinn, the San Francisco publishing house Quinn co-founded in January. Judging by samples shared with Wired, The Silent History is part book, part multiplayer game, part Google map, and entirely revolutionary.

“I love the printed book,” Quinn says. “But I’m not romantic about the book, either.”

…One key difference in how this e-book works is that the narrative is serialized… The serial is broken into six parts, each one spanning several years in fictional time…

Then there are Field Reports."
children  books  serialfiction  serial  mapping  maps  gaming  games  2012  elihorowitz  chrisying  yinghorowitz&quinn  ebooks  reading  location  gps  literature  fiction  interactivefiction  ipad  ios  application  iphone  mcsweeneys  russellquinn  thesilenthistory  if  suddenoak 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Ying Horowitz & Quinn
"We develop projects that organically integrate storytelling, design, and technology. Our projects are a mix of self-initiated experimentation and progressive client-based proposals that bridge the gap between old and new media. We see new digital formats not as an end in themselves, but rather as an opportunity to explore new possibilities in narrative."

[Via: http://www.wired.com/design/2012/07/russell-quinn-the-worlds-most-wired-storyteller ]

[Now see Sudden Oak too: http://www.suddenoak.com/ ]
digitalstorytelling  digital  applications  iphone  ios  ivanramen  thesilenthistory  mcsweeneys  luckypeach  elihorowitz  russellquinn  chrisying  narrative  storytelling  suddenoak 
july 2012 by robertogreco

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