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Dispelling myths about California’s homeless | PolitiFact California
"Myth #1: California’s homeless are from somewhere else -- and moved here for the mild weather and social services.

Reality: Experts say this is one of the most common and inaccurate assumptions about homeless Californians.



Myth #2: They’re homeless because they’re drug addicts or mentally ill.

Reality: Martin said it’s often the stress and trauma of living without a home that leads to addiction and disease, or makes it worse.



Myth #3: Homelessness is a choice.

Reality: This is another frequent misconception, said Veronica Beaty, policy director at the Sacramento Housing Alliance, which advocates for supportive housing for the homeless."

[via a thrEad doing the same: https://twitter.com/adamconover/status/1135037776309604354

related, on Seattle, from a response to the same thread:
"Homelessness may be down, but more people in King County are living in tents
A fuller report on the annual count shows sizable decreases in the number of young people and military veterans struggling with homelessness."
https://crosscut.com/2019/05/homelessness-may-be-down-more-people-king-county-are-living-tents ]
homeless  homelessness  california  sanfrancisco  losangeles  sandiego  sanjose  sacramento  2018 
june 2019 by robertogreco
California Trip • Dennis Stock • Magnum Photos
"Dennis Stock’s remarkable 99 black-and-white photographs are the result of the author’s travels through the unique state of California during the1960s. Traversing the state from Sacramento to San Diego, Stock says of this collection, “Even though I found the sun and fog, sand and Sierras which conveyed a firm image of stark reality, the mother vision of life, the state seemed unreal. The people were conducting layers and dimensions of life that unsettled me. Surrealism was everywhere, the juxtapositions of relative levels of reality projected chaos. For the young man with traditional concerns for a spiritual and aesthetic order, California seemed too unreal. I ran.”

This classic photo essay on California captures the contrasts of the state and its people, from the mountains of the Sierras to the sands of the coast, from the people on a spiritual quest to those doing research at the cutting-edge of technology, all during time of intense political, cultural and social exploration in America’s history."
california  1968  photography  dennisstock  sacramento  sandiego  losangeles  venicebeach  novato  santamonica  coronadelmar  monterey 
january 2017 by robertogreco
These Public Libraries Are for Snowshoes and Ukuleles - The New York Times
"SACRAMENTO — Libraries aren’t just for books, or even e-books, anymore. They are for checking out cake pans (North Haven, Conn.), snowshoes (Biddeford, Me.), telescopes and microscopes (Ann Arbor, Mich.), American Girl dolls (Lewiston, Me.), fishing rods (Grand Rapids, Minn.), Frisbees and Wiffle balls (Mesa, Ariz.) and mobile hot spot devices (New York and Chicago).

Here in Sacramento, where people can check out sewing machines, ukuleles, GoPro cameras and board games, the new service is called the Library of Things.

“The move toward electronic content has given us an opportunity to re-evaluate our physical spaces and enhance our role as a community hub,” said Larry Neal, the president of the Public Library Association, a division of the American Library Association, which represents 9,000 public libraries. “The web is swell,” he added, “but it can feel impersonal.”

Libraries, arguably the original sharing economy, have long circulated art prints, music and movies, and more recently have added tools. But services like the Library of Things and the “Stuff-brary” in Mesa, outside Phoenix, are part of a broad cultural shift in which libraries increasingly view themselves as hands-on creative hubs, places where people can learn new crafts and experiment with technology like 3-D printers.

The Sacramento Public Library is one of a few dozen libraries in the country to embrace the “maker movement,” in which people use technology, like robotics and 3-D printing, to create handicrafts and other objects. Sacramento has set up what it calls the Design Spot at a library branch in a mixed-income neighborhood, with space designated for 3-D printers, vinyl and laser cutters, and other tools.

“It’s an experimental place to do free cool stuff,” said Jessica Zaker, 34, Sacramento’s central branch manager."
libraries  sacramento  musicalinstruments  2015 
july 2016 by robertogreco

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