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robertogreco : sampling   19

Opinion | You Don’t Want a Child Prodigy - The New York Times
"One Thursday in January, I hit “send” on the last round of edits for a new book about how society undervalues generalists — people who cultivate broad interests, zigzag in their careers and delay picking an area of expertise. Later that night, my wife started having intermittent contractions. By Sunday, I was wheeling my son’s bassinet down a hospital hallway toward a volunteer harpist, fantasizing about a music career launched in the maternity ward.

A friend had been teasing me for months about whether, as a parent, I would be able to listen to my own advice, or whether I would be a “do as I write, not as I do” dad, telling everyone else to slow down while I hustle to mold a baby genius. That’s right, I told him, sharing all of this research is part of my plan to sabotage the competition while secretly raising the Tiger Woods of blockchain (or perhaps the harp).

I do find the Tiger Woods story incredibly compelling; there is a reason it may be the most famous tale of development ever. Even if you don’t know the details, you’ve probably absorbed the gist.

Woods was 7 months old when his father gave him a putter, which he dragged around in his circular baby-walker. At 2, he showed off his drive on national television. By 21, he was the best golfer in the world. There were, to be sure, personal and professional bumps along the way, but in April he became the second-oldest player ever to win the Masters. Woods’s tale spawned an early-specialization industry.

And yet, I knew that his path was not the only way to the top.

Consider Roger Federer. Just a year before Woods won this most recent Masters, Federer, at 36, became the oldest tennis player ever to be ranked No. 1 in the world. But as a child, Federer was not solely focused on tennis. He dabbled in skiing, wrestling, swimming, skateboarding and squash. He played basketball, handball, tennis, table tennis and soccer (and badminton over his neighbor’s fence). Federer later credited the variety of sports with developing his athleticism and coordination.

While Tiger’s story is much better known, when sports scientists study top athletes, they find that the Roger pattern is the standard. Athletes who go on to become elite usually have a “sampling period.” They try a variety of sports, gain a breadth of general skills, learn about their own abilities and proclivities, and delay specializing until later than their peers who plateau at lower levels. The way to develop the best 20-year-old athlete, it turns out, is not the same as the way to make the best 10-year-old athlete.

The same general pattern tends to hold true for music, another domain where the annals of young prodigies are filled with tales of eight hours of violin, and only violin, a day. In online forums, well-meaning parents agonize over what instrument to pick for a child, because she is too young to pick for herself and will fall irredeemably behind if she waits. But studies on the development of musicians have found that, like athletes, the most promising often have a period of sampling and lightly structured play before finding the instrument and genre that suits them.

In fact, a cast of little-known generalists helped create some of the most famous music in history. The 18th-century orchestra that powered Vivaldi’s groundbreaking use of virtuoso soloists was composed largely of the orphaned daughters of Venice’s sex industry. The “figlie del coro,” as the musicians were known, became some of the best performers in the world. The most striking aspect of their development was that they learned an extraordinary number of different instruments.

This pattern extends beyond music and sports. Students who have to specialize earlier in their education — picking a pre-med or law track while still in high school — have higher earnings than their generalist peers at first, according to one economist’s research in several countries. But the later-specializing peers soon caught up. In sowing their wild intellectual oats, they got a better idea of what they could do and what they wanted to do. The early specializers, meanwhile, more often quit their career tracks.

I found the Roger pattern — not the Tiger (or Tiger Mother) pattern — in most domains I examined. Professional breadth paid off, from the creation of comic books (a creator’s years of experience did not predict performance, but the number of different genres the creator had worked in did) to technological innovation (the most successful inventors were those who had worked in a large number of the federal Patent and Trademark Office’s different technological classifications).

A study of scientists found that those who were nationally recognized were more likely to have avocations — playing music, woodworking, writing — than typical scientists, and that Nobel laureates were more likely still.

My favorite example of a generalist inventor is Gunpei Yokoi, who designed the Game Boy. Yokoi didn’t do as well on electronics exams as his friends, so he joined Nintendo as a machine maintenance worker when it was still a playing card company before going on to lead the creation of a toy and game operation. His philosophy, “lateral thinking with withered technology,” was predicated on dabbling in many different types of older, well-understood (or “withered”) technology, and combining them in new ways, hence the Game Boy’s thoroughly dated tech specs.

Roger stories abound. And yet, we (and I include myself) have a collective complex about sampling, zigzagging and swerving from (or simply not having) ironclad long-term plans. We are obsessed with narrow focus, head starts and precocity.

A few years ago, I was invited to speak to a small group of military veterans who had been given scholarships by the Pat Tillman Foundation to aid with new careers. I talked a bit about research on late specializers and was struck by the reception, as if the session had been cathartic.

One attendee emailed me afterward: “We are all transitioning from one career to another. Several of us got together after you had left and discussed how relieved we were to have heard you speak.” He was a former member of the Navy SEALs with an undergrad degree in history and geophysics and was pursuing grad degrees in business and public administration from Dartmouth and Harvard. I couldn’t help but chuckle that he had been made to feel behind.

Oliver Smithies would have made that veteran feel better too, I think. Smithies was a Nobel laureate scientist whom I interviewed in 2016, shortly before he died at 91. Smithies could not resist “picking up anything” to experiment with, a habit his colleagues noticed. Rather than throw out old or damaged equipment, they would leave it for him, with the label “Nbgbokfo”: “No bloody good but O.K. for Oliver.”

He veered across scientific disciplines — in his 50s, he took a sabbatical two floors away from his lab to learn a new discipline, in which he then did his Nobel work; he told me he published his most important paper when he was 60. His breakthroughs, he said, always came during what he called “Saturday morning experiments.” Nobody was around, and he could just play. “On Saturday,” he said, “you don’t have to be completely rational.”

I did have fleeting thoughts of a 1-day-old harp prodigy. I’ll admit it. But I know that what I really want to do is give my son a “Saturday experiment” kind of childhood: opportunities to try many things and help figuring out what he actually likes and is good at. For now, I’m content to help him learn that neither musical instruments nor sports equipment are for eating.

That said, just as I don’t plan to push specialization on him, I also don’t mean to suggest that parents should flip to the other extreme and start force-feeding diversification.

If of his own accord our son chooses to specialize early, fine. Both Mozart and Woods’s fathers began coaching their sons in response to the child’s display of interest and prowess, not the reverse. As Tiger Woods noted in 2000: “To this day, my dad has never asked me to go play golf. I ask him. It’s the child’s desire to play that matters, not the parent’s desire to have the child play.”

On the strength of what I’ve learned, I think I’ll find it easy to stick to my guns as a Roger father."
davidepstein  children  parenting  ports  talent  2019  burnout  generalists  specialization  specialists  prodigies  rogerfederer  tigerwoods  music  performance  gunpeiyokoi  gameboy  nintendo  oliversmithies  genius  science  learning  mozart  sampling  quitting  precocity  headstarts  education  focus 
11 weeks ago by robertogreco
Aloha Miscreant!: The Ultimate Beastie Boys Sample Source Collection
"Many years ago (more than I care to remember), I began a quest to personally track down every record and song that had ever been sampled by the Beastie Boys. I was inspired by the classic Ultimate Breaks & Beats series as it introduced me to songs that I had only heard in sampled form, and needless to say, hearing these tracks in their entirety as opposed to a quick snippet, stab, scratch, or loop opened my mind to a whole new musical experience. While digging in the bins at Uncle Sam's Records back in 1996, I discovered the white-label/bootleg pressing of B-Boy Breaks:12 Original Tunes as Sampled By The Beastie Boys:

[image]

Despite only twelve tracks (one of which was incorrect), it was a great start, but hardly scratched the surface as there were hundreds of other samples that needed to be sourced and tracked down. By 1998, the internet was becoming more robust and though various boards and fan sites, I was able to start compiling a list of all the samples that were used on a per-album basis. By this point, I had only tracked down a handful of records, CDs, and tapes, but it wasn't long before I was trading digital tracks with like minded sample-nerds that I had met online. Then, in 2005, I released the prototype of what would become the Beastie Boys Sample Source Collection. With less than seventy tracks, it definitely needed some serious work, and to make things even worse, the quality of the tracks that I had personally ripped from vinyl or cassette were less than stellar, in most cases, around 128kbps. Likewise, many the digital tracks which I had acquired online were just as bad, if not worse ranging in quality from mediocre to piss poor. From that point forward, I made quality a much higher priority and implemented a more efficient process for ripping vinyl/cassettes (better cartridges, better deck, better software, and interface). I also made it a point to only trade/acquire high quality audio and fully avoid the dreaded web-rips which were usually around 64 to 96kbps. Thanks to Soulseek, Discogs, eBay, and a bunch of really cool cats that I've met over time, the project continued to move forward and it wasn't long before all of the ducks were in a row and it was time to release the beast(ie)! In 2007, I posted the first official version of the compilation, and continued to make updates throughout the next few years as additional samples were sourced and found.

After a several year hunt, I finally acquired a vinyl copy of Modern Dynamic Physical Fitness Activities which was sampled in Body Movin', and for all intents and purposes; it was my holy grail and the final addition to the collection. Obviously not every sample or drum break can or ever will be identified, but this is about as close as it's gonna get! With the completion of this eighteen year long ongoing project, I want to personally thank each and every single person out there that has lent insight, shared knowledge, or provided me with any of the tracks that were used to compile this amazing piece of history. It goes without saying that much love, gratitude, and respect is owed to the Beastie Boys for introducing me (and you) to some amazing music via sampling that may otherwise not be heard, let alone acknowledged in this light.

If you've downloaded this collection prior to December 1st, 2014, it should be deleted immediately, and replaced with this version as the quality and content has increased tenfold. As it stands, it's 286 full-length tracks which equates to just over 22 hours worth of amazing music which was sampled by the Beastie Boys from Licensed to Ill up until To The 5 Boroughs. If you're a stickler for quality, you'll be happy to know that all of the tracks are encoded between 256kbps and 320kbps, with a hefty majority being the latter.

At the present time, the files are being hosted via MEGA, Uploadable, and Uploaded, but I will try to add more mirrors as time passes. As is always the case, I strongly suggest grabbing these as quickly as possible because I don't foresee them being available very long. If anybody experiences any difficulty downloading from any of these hosting sites or if the links are dead, please contact me via email and I will directly link you with the files.

Enjoy!"
beastieboys  sampling  remixing  music  history  audio  sound 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Creative License: how the hell did sampling get so screwed up and what the hell do we do about it? - Boing Boing
"Kembrew McLeod and Peter DiCola's Creative License: The Law and Culture of Digital Sampling is a fantastic and deep look at the business, art, culture, ethics, history and future of musical sampling. The authors -- respected academics/writers/filmmakers -- undertook to interview a really amazingly wide spectrum of people involved in music production, and what emerges is a clear picture of how legal rulings, historical accidents, musical history, good intentions, naked greed, and conflicts of all kind came to produce our current, very broken system for musical sampling.
The interview subjects in Creative License include all manner of business people (managers, industry lawyers, execs, lobbyists, producers), musicians who want to sample but can't legally do so, musicians who got away with it before the law caught up with them, musicians who benefit from sampling licenses, musicians who've lost big due to licensing fees and lawsuits, musicians who think that sampling is a legitimate form of creativity, musicians who think it's a lazy way of making art; musicians who think that they should have the power to decide who might sample them and musicians who think that's absurd. They also talk to musicologists, lawyers (academic and commercial), economists, and so on -- producing a remarkable, in-the-round picture of the state of things as they stand.

A few clear truths emerge. When sampling works, it produces works that lots of musicians and fans love -- art that is both critically and commercially successful. The early days of sampling -- when the law wasn't very developed and no one was sure what was and wasn't legal -- yielded extraordinary albums that can't be produced legally today (the authors make a pretty compelling case that an artist would have to be insane to produce a song with more than one or two samples in it). When the market for commercial sample licensing is working -- when it's not being hijacked by lawyers and labels -- it can produce real commercial benefit for poor artists and their descendants, and these are often Black artists who got screwed by their labels when their music was originally recorded. Finally, all music is and always has been derivative, and there's no special creativity or lack thereof inherent to using or not using samples.

How screwed up are things? The best example of this is a back-of-the-envelope calculation of the cost to clear the samples on two of the best-loved, uncleared albums of all times: the Beastie Boys' Paul's Boutique and Public Enemy's Fear of a Black Planet, both of which typify the kind of album that couldn't possibly be made today. By the authors' math, Black Planet would lose $6.8 million in sampling fees on 1.5 million sales; Paul's Boutique would lose an eye-popping $19.8M on its sales of 2.5m. (Kembrew and his publisher were kind enough to supply the chapter in question, along with the notes).

The authors conclude Creative License with a fairly depressing look at solutions -- voluntary, technical, legislative, artistic -- to the sampling deadlock. None of these are very convincing, but practically any of them would be preferable to the status quo.

Books about copyright usually focus on either art or law or business, but it's a rare book that manages to equally weight all three considerations -- Creative License gets it right. It's a fascinating and important read."
sampling  beastieboys  publicenemy  paul'sboutique  fearofablackplanet  copyright  music  corydoctorow  kembrewmcleod  peterdicola  licensing 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Kenneth Goldsmith - Talks | Frieze Projects NY
[Direct link to .mp3: http://friezeprojectsny.org/uploads/files/talks/Kenneth_Goldsmith.mp3 ]

"‘I Look to Theory Only When I Realize That Somebody Has Dedicated Their Entire Life to a Question I Have Only Fleetingly Considered’

A keynote lecture by the poet Kenneth Goldsmith, whose writing has been described as ‘some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry’ (Publishers Weekly). Goldsmith is the author of eleven books of poetry and founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb. In 2013, he was named as the inaugural Poet Laureate of MoMA."
kennethgoldsmith  copying  uncreativewriting  mercecunningham  writing  internet  web  online  remixing  culture  art  poetry  originality  appropriation  quantity  quality  curiosity  harrypotter  poetics  digital  reproduction  translation  displacement  disjunction  corydoctorow  change  howwewrite  pointing  data  metadata  choice  authorship  versioning  misfiling  language  difference  meaning  ethics  morality  literature  twitter  artworld  marshallmcluhan  christianbök  plagiarism  charleseames  rules  notknowing  archiving  improvisation  text  bricolage  assemblage  cv  painting  technology  photography  readerships  thinkerships  thoughtobjects  reassembly  ubuweb  freeculture  moma  outreach  communityoutreach  nyc  copyright  ip  intellectualproperty  ideas  information  sfpc  vitoacconci  audience  accessibility  situationist  museums  markets  criticism  artcriticism  economics  money  browsers  citation  sampling  jonathanfranzen  internetasliterature  getrudestein  internetasfavoritebook  namjunepaik  johncage  misbehaving  andywarhol  bobdylan  barbarakruger  jkrowling  china  creati 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Eclectic Method - A Brief History of Sampling on Vimeo
"eclecticmethod.net

MP3 DOWNLOAD: soundcloud.com/eclecticmethod/a-brief-history-of-sampling

A video remix journey through the history of sampling taking in some of the most noted breaks and riffs of the decades. A chronological journey from the Beatles’ use of the Mellotron in the 60s to the sample dense hiphop and dance music of the 80s and 90s. Each break is represented by a vibrating vinyl soundwave exploding into various tracks that sampled it, each re-use another chapter in the modern narrative."
music  hiphop  sampling  video 
february 2014 by robertogreco
NPR Code Switch | When Our Kids Own America
"It’s much harder now to patrol the ramparts of our cultures, to distinguish between the appreciators and appropriators. Just who gets to play in which cultural sandboxes? Who gets to be the bouncer at the velvet rope?"



"If something is everywhere and everyone trafficks in it, who gets to decide when it’s real or not? What happens when hip-hop stops being black culture and becomes simply youth culture?"



"So once some piece of black American culture slips outside that culture, when does it stop being black and just become this new thing? Where do the borders of one culture end and another begin?"



"When young people inherit the new America, this reconfigured hip-hop will be part of their birthright: the code-switching, style-shifting, and swagger-jacking that’s always been there, mashed up with stories about thrift-shopping, border-crossing and rich South Koreans. Lest anyone get it twisted and think this new America will be some kind of Benetton ad, be forewarned: it’s going to be confusing and it’s going to be messy."



"My generation started writing our chapters on race during the Crack Era — the time of of Rodney King, The Cosby Show, and Menace II Society. But that was 20-something years ago, and we’re still applying the templates that we created in 1992 and 1963 to the chapters that are being scripted now. Those old stories reflect a starkly different demographic reality than the one we now inhabit. It’s not that those stories are wrong, it’s that they’re incomplete. And so we find ourselves having to assimilate into these places we thought we knew and that we thought were ours.

The Afropunk skater in Philly, the Korean b-boy graffiti artist in Los Angeles, the bluegrass-loving Latino hipster in Austin — they’re all inheriting an America in which they’ll have access to even more hyphens in their self-definitions. That’s undoubtedly a good thing. But it’s important that those stories be complete as well. If you’re in Maricopa County, Ariz., and brown, the sheriff’s deputies won’t care whether you’re bumping Little Dragon in your ride when they pull you over. The way each of us experiences culture each day may be increasingly unmoored from genre, from geography, and yes, even from race, but America will not be easily untethered from the anchor of its history. We may be more equal, but mostly in our iPods.

How the country fares in the next century will depend in part on how it deals with these dissonances. It will be determined by whether we grapple with the complications of some basic assumptions about our spaces — who gets to play and work and live in them and how they get to do that.

And so, the “Harlem Shake” kerfuffle isn’t just about some hip-hop dance, but about these anxieties of ownership of the past and future, about generational tensions around acknowledgement, respect and reverence, about the understandable if futile impulse to want culture to retain something like purity, about disparities in power both real and perceived, about land and property, about realness and authenticity and race and history.

For good or ill, the country our kids are creating will work by new, confounding rules.

It’s the rest of us, those of us who’ve been here for awhile and who still find comfort with these old modes of viewing the world, who will start to face the discomfort of assimilating. A Minnesota suburb that looks more like a Brooklyn ‘hood. A “Harlem Shake” that looks nothing like Harlem."
codeswitch  codeswitching  2013  culture  appropriation  us  appreciation  gentrification  diversity  race  ethnicity  harlemshake  genedemby  rafaelcastillo  laurenrock  npr  harlem  nyc  oakland  brooklynpark  minnesota  discrimination  sterotypes  popularculture  hiphop  marginalization  teens  youth  youthculture  ebonics  ceciliacutler  civilrightsmovement  blackpanthers  joshkun  signaling  separateness  hsamyalim  language  communication  english  wealth  power  access  borders  repurposing  shereenmarisolmeraji  chantalgarcia  music  remixing  sampling  dumbfounded  jonathanpark  losangeles  biboying  breakdancing  messiness  stevesaldivar  hansilowang  karengrigsbybates  assimilation  generation  demographics  evolution  change  canon  remixculture  blackpantherparty 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Plagiarism: Maybe It's Not So Bad - On The Media
"Artists often draw inspiration from other sources. Musicians sample songs. Painters recreate existing masterpieces. Kenneth Goldsmith believes writers should catch-up with other mediums and embrace plagiarism in their work. Brooke talks with Goldsmith, MoMA’s new Poet Laureate, about how he plagiarizes in his own poetry and asks if appropriation is something best left in the art world."

[Full show here: http://www.onthemedia.org/2013/mar/08/ ]

"A special hour on our changing understanding of ownership and how it is affected by the law. An author and professor who encourages creative writing through plagiarism, 3D printing, fan fiction & fair use, and the strange tale of who owns "The Happy Birthday Song""
plagiarism  poetry  poems  2013  kennethgoldsmith  moma  appropriation  creativity  originality  writing  creativewriting  3dprinting  fanfiction  happybirthday  songs  music  drm  copyright  fairuse  ownership  possessions  property  law  legal  ip  intellectualproperty  campervan  beethoven  robertbrauneis  jamesboyle  history  rebeccatushnet  chrisanderson  michaelweinberg  public  publicknowledge  campervanbeethoven  davidlowey  johncage  representation  copying  sampling  photography  painting  art  economics  content  aesthetics  jamesjoyce  patchwriting  ulysses 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Hip Hop Genius: Remixing High School Education on Vimeo
"this video illustrates (literally!) the concept of Hip Hop Genius. these ideas are explored more fully in my book, Hip Hop Genius: Remixing High School Education (hiphopgenius.org)

the drawings were done by Mike McCarthy, a student at College Unbound (collegeunbound.org), a school that exemplifies many of the values espoused in the film. the entire video was shot in College Unbound's seminar space, where Mike has built a studio for his company Drawn Along (drawnalong.com)."
education  learning  politics  economics  creativity  hiphop  meaning  meaningmaking  dialogue  pedagogy  classideas  conversation  commonality  engagement  culture  love  identity  meaningfulness  ingenuity  instinct  confidence  remixculture  art  music  streetart  graffiti  resourcefulness  genius  sampling  individualization  projectbasedlearning  collegeunbound  change  gamechanging  flux  flow  freshness  emergentcurriculum  contentcreation  schools  unschooling  deschooling  mindset  dialog  pbl  remixing 
may 2011 by robertogreco
How To Raise A Superstar [If true, this is huge endorsement of small, progressive schools where the emphasis is not on competition, but on exposure, experience, and unstructured time, where all students are given the chance to participate.]
"smaller cities offer more opportunities for unstructured play…to hone general coordination, power, & athletic skills. These longer hours of play also allow kids to experience successes (& failures) in different settings…likely toughens their attitudes in general…important advantage of small towns…actually less competitive…allowing kids to sample & explore many different sports. (I grew up in big city,…sports career basically ended at 13. I could no longer compete w/ other kids my age.) While conventional wisdom assumes it’s best to focus on single sport ASAP, & compete in most rigorous arena…probably a mistake, both for psychological & physical reasons…While deliberate practice remains absolutely crucial, it’s important to remember that most important skills we develop at early age are not domain specific…real importance of early childhood has to do w/ development of general cognitive & non-cognitive traits, such as self-control, patience, grit, & willingness to practice"
jonahlehrer  children  childhood  biology  learning  cognition  education  sports  psychology  practice  tigerwoods  performance  competition  urban  rural  tcsnmy  confidence  persistence  self-control  patience  grit  self-confidence  athletics  athletes  variety  toshare  topost  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  sampling  malcolmgladwell  burnout  specialization  generalists  coordination  success  failure  play  unstructuredtime  specialists 
august 2010 by robertogreco
DJ Bitman | PRI's The World
"Making this album from the start, I started with samples, and the record company told me man you can't use samples, any samples, so I started a process to replace every sample with live recordings, live musicians."
djbitman  chile  music  sampling 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Obey Plagiarist Shepard Fairey
"Fairey has carefully nurtured reputation as heroic guerilla street artist waging one man campaign against corporate powers-that-be. Infantile posturing aside, Fairey’s art is problematic for another, more troubling reason - that of plagiarism."
artist  obey  plagiarism  sampling  design  critique  copyright  opinion  shepardfairey 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Sound Effects, Production Music, Royalty Free Music, MP3 AIF WAV Sound Effects
"It was the world's first online commercial sound effects and production music library long before the Apple iTunes music store. We pride ourselves on having a vast, easily accessible sound library for immediate download (in .aiff, .wav., .mp3, .wma., and
free  sound  mp3  music  soundeffects  audio  archive  recording  sampling 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Wu-Tang Clan's RZA Breaks Down His Kung Fu Samples By Film and Song
"RZA gave WIRED the dope on Wu-Tang's cinematic source material and sounded off on a selection of rare movie clips."
music  hiphop  rap  sampling  rza  film  culture  kungfu 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Internet Archive: Details: Can I Get An Amen?
"Can I Get An Amen? is an audio installation that unfolds a critical perspective of perhaps the most sampled drums beat in the history of recorded music, the Amen Break."
art  audio  copyright  culture  documentary  film  hiphop  history  music  sampling  breakbeat  technology  video  reference 
march 2007 by robertogreco
monome
"the monome 40h is a reconfigurable grid of sixty-four backlit buttons. see the demonstration video."
interface  input  sampling  design  gadgets  electronics  opensource  light  music  devices  sound  video  hardware 
april 2006 by robertogreco
Nate Harrison
"Can I Get An Amen? is an audio installation that unfolds a critical perspective of perhaps the most sampled drum beat in the history of recorded music, the Amen Break. It begins with the pop track Amen Brother by 60's soul band The Winstons, and traces t
art  audio  music  projects  video  history  installation  documentary  copyright  culture  sampling 
february 2006 by robertogreco

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