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robertogreco : satelliteimagery   22

NASA’s new nighttime map of the entire Earth
"For the first time since 2012, NASA has released a new map of the entire Earth at night. Of course, you don’t see the Earth so much as the activity of humans in well-lit cities.
Today they are releasing a new global composite map of night lights as observed in 2016, as well as a revised version of the 2012 map. The NASA group has examined the different ways that light is radiated, scattered and reflected by land, atmospheric and ocean surfaces. The principal challenge in nighttime satellite imaging is accounting for the phases of the moon, which constantly varies the amount of light shining on Earth, though in predictable ways. Likewise, seasonal vegetation, clouds, aerosols, snow and ice cover, and even faint atmospheric emissions (such as airglow and auroras) change the way light is observed in different parts of the world. The new maps were produced with data from all months of each year. The team wrote code that picked the clearest night views each month, ultimately combining moonlight-free and moonlight-corrected data.

Scientists are planning on providing “daily, high-definition views of Earth at night” starting later this year. It’s worth clicking through to play with the interactive India map…it’s astounding to see how much light the country has added in the past 5 years. And see if you can spot North Korea at night:

[image]

Barely…just a tiny dot for Pyongyang. You can play around with a fully zoomable version of the entire map here."
maps  mapping  2017  night  earth  nasa  satelliteimagery  classideas  light  lightpollution  urbanization  urban  urbanism  cities 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Skywatching
"In the Sonoran Desert south of Phoenix, Arizona, there is an array of giant concrete targets whose purpose was secret until about a decade ago. Each target is made of four triangular slabs that form an X about 60 feet wide. If you were to stumble across one of these strange monuments on a desert ramble, you would not see it as part of the larger array, as the targets are spaced a mile apart on a 16×16-mile grid. You might guess that it was meant to be seen from above, like the concrete arrows that guided navigation for U.S. airmail pilots, but in fact these mysterious Xs are conspicuously missing from flight maps.

They are ground-truth markers for calibrating the first spy satellites, under a Cold War program known as Corona. Installed in the mid-1960s by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the targets were left to ruin when the program was decommissioned in 1972. They were forgotten until 2004, when pilot Pez Owen traced the strange symbols she had seen from the air to the Corona program. 1

The declassified 16mm film A Point in Time tells the story of how the CIA and Air Force raced to build a space-based surveillance system after the launch of Sputnik. It must have seemed preposterous at the time: panoramic cameras filled with pounds of physical film were shot into space to take pictures of the Soviet Union and China, and then the records were sent back to Earth for analysis in heat-shielded capsules that fell through the atmosphere, shedding layers and unfurling parachutes caught by planes. After years of failed attempts, the plan actually worked.

With my colleague Damon Sauer, I have been exploring this array of ground-truth markers for the past several years. They are off Interstate 8, near the earthen building ruins of Casa Grande, interspersed among truck stops, quarries, alfalfa fields, and canals. Damon mapped the entire system, using images from Google Earth and historic aerial photographs, and we are visiting the surviving targets on foot. Our project inverts the original relation between the ground and outer space. While the Corona markers were meant to be seen from above, we have turned them into observatories for perceiving the invisible bodies in orbit today.

We plot the location of all publicly known satellites that were overhead at the moment the photograph was taken. Our images are thus documentary records, aesthetic statements, and data maps, all at once. If you look closely, you can read the names of the satellites. Some are evocative, like “Globalstar” and “Cosmos,” while others indicate the purpose or country of origin. We were astonished by the number of satellites present in the sky at any given time (an emerging sustainability issue, as myriad metallic flecks encircle the globe).

“Ground truth” is a term used in remote sensing to describe the correspondence between image data and physical features in the world. We were drawn to the term because it honors embodied or situated knowledge as a special kind of awareness, while also evoking photography’s tenuous relation to truth. Our project examines the relation between human beings and the pervasive information networks in which we are enmeshed. Our satellite tracings resemble star charts as old as civilization — a reminder that humans have always sought to orient themselves to the heavenly unknown."
photography  satellites  space  classideas  satelliteimagery  damonsauer  julieanand  skywatching 
may 2017 by robertogreco
On camera forever | The Outline
"What could you learn if you had a daily snapshot of every location on the planet?"

[via: "What satellites can’t see yet and which companies are working to change that & blacken the skies."
https://twitter.com/doingitwrong/status/805792725014605824 ]
satellites  satelliteimagery  surveillance  matthewbraga  2016  earth 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Josh Begley on Vimeo
"Setting Tangents Around A Circle –

"If you set enough tangents around a circle, you begin to recreate the shape of the circle itself." —Teju Cole

In this talk Josh Begley considers human data -- what lies at the bottom of the ledger -- and tangential approaches to representing historical archives. Paying particular attention to landscape, geography, carcerality, and surveillance, he examines ways of seeing some of the violence behind the way we live."
eyeo  eyeo2016  2016  joshbegley  socialmedia  drones  violence  race  racism  ronimorrison  tejucole  data  datavisualization  geography  prisionindustrialcomplex  redlining  policy  maps  mapping  militaryindustrialcomplex  military  archives  history  landscape  trevorpaglen  satelliteimagery  imagery  aerialimagery 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Charlie Loyd on Vimeo
"Far and Smooth – “Popadantsy” is what Russian fandom calls accidental travelers in time and space. On the internet, we’re all popadantsy, and one of the wormholes is satellite imagery – a way of seeing that’s gone from top secret to our phones in a generation. Charlie Loyd has been working with satellite images, and this talk is partly a report on how weird they are. From there he cruises around themes of distance and familiarity, continuity and resolution, and obviously frogs."
charlieloyd  2016  eyeo  chrishatfield  photography  imagery  seeing  frogs  familiarity  overvieweffect  popadantsy  websurfing  earth  aerialimagery  space  satelliteimagery  humanism  humanity  poetry  art  canon  eyeo2016  classideas 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Open California - Planet Labs
"We're releasing our growing California archive under an open, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA). Join our community of image analysts, scientists, developers, and researchers to experiment with novel new satellite imagery applications. Perform in-depth data analysis, develop exciting new applications and tools, and power products with the Planet Labs, RapidEye satellite, and Landsat imagery archives. Experience an openly licensed preview of our commercial, global dataset. With California's data right at your fingertips, what will you build?

We're just getting started; and we're excited to have you join us as we develop our platform, increase data frequency and expand our coverage. As we work towards a daily image of the entire planet, we invite you to access our California data published two weeks after acquisition.

Open California is Planet's initial open data release. We’re evaluating new limited regional datasets to release in the future... stay tuned!"

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEGgWmAODQ8 ]
california  creativecommons  imagery  data  satelliteimagery  landsat  planetlabs  maps  mapping  geography  classideas 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Welcome to your planet - Planet Labs - Planet Labs
[See also: https://www.planet.com/gallery/ ]

"Founded in 2010 by a team of ex-NASA scientists, Planet Labs is driven by a mission to image the entire Earth every day, and make global change visible, accessible, and actionable.

We started as a small team of physicists, aerospace and mechanical engineers in a garage, using the cubesat form-factor to inform the first designs of our Dove satellite. Just two years after our first satellite entered space, Planet now operates the largest constellation of Earth-imaging satellites...ever.

Our satellites are collecting a radical new data set with endless, real-world applications. Whether you’re measuring agricultural yields, monitoring natural resources, or aiding first responders after natural disasters, our data is here to lend businesses and humanitarian organizations a helping hand. Planet believes timely, global imagery will empower informed, deliberate and meaningful stewardship of our planet.

Our Approach

At Planet we have redefined every part of the Earth-imaging pipeline to quickly deliver actionable insights. We’ve built our entire platform - from satellites to APIs - using the latest components of the consumer electronics industry and open source software. We’ve innovated at every step, bringing it all together in a complete Imaging-as-a-Service platform."

[See also:
"A New 50-Trillion-Pixel Image of Earth, Every Day: Thanks to a small group of Silicon Valley’s satellite startups, we may never look at our planet again the same way."
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/03/terra-bella-planet-labs/472734/

"Silicon Valley's New Spy Satellites: Three startups are launching services—and orbiters—to provide real-time, better-than-Google imagery of the Earth."
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/01/silicon-valleys-new-spy-satellites/282580/ ] ]

[Updates 2017:
"Planet Labs on ISRO record launch of 104 satellites"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuXlsJXidyU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0jGyLI_7m4

"Google Remakes the Satellite Business, by Leaving It: A startup says a 50-trillion-pixel image of Earth, refreshed daily, is coming later this year."
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/02/google-gets-out-of-the-satellite-business/515841/ ]
maps  mapping  space  earth  imagery  satelliteimagery  sanfrancisco  classideas  planetlabs 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Timelapse – Google Earth Engine
"Timelapse

The global timelapse video shows changes to our planet visible from Landsat satellite imagery.

The video has one frame per year. Each frame is a 1.7-terapixel snapshot of the entire Earth, generated from 30-meter resolution Landsat images. Landsat collects new imagery over each location in the world about once every two weeks. Using Earth Engine’s analysis platform, each year’s worth of images was combined into a single cloud-free, per-pixel composite for that year.

Timelapse is an example that illustrates the power of Earth Engine’s cloud-computing model. The platform can be used for other types of analysis as well.

To embed a timelapse viewer on your site, use the “Share or embed” button above. You can also create a timelapse tour that moves from one destination to another over time using the Timelapse Tour Editor."
via:meetar  timelapse  satelliteimagery  landsat  earth 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Windows on Earth
"Windows on Earth is an educational project that features photographs taken by astronauts on the International Space Station. Astronauts take hundreds of photos each day, for science research, education and public outreach. The photos are often dramatic, and help us all appreciate home planet Earth.

This web site provides free public access to virtually all of these photos, updated at least weekly. The site is operated by TERC, an educational non-profit, in collaboration with the Association of Space Explorers (the professional association of flown astronauts and cosmonauts).

CASIS (Center for Advancement of Science in Space) provided funds to develop and operate the site.

Windows on Earth also operates software on the International Space Station, as a window-side aide to help astronauts identify priority targets for photography.

All images are in the public domain, credit NASA."
satelliteimagery  earth  photography  astronauts  space  via:tealtan  night  imagery  nasa 
march 2016 by robertogreco
San Francisco, Super Bowl Sunday | Mapbox
"We don’t often see pictures like this one. The problem is haze: as a camera in space looks toward the horizon, it sees more water vapor, smog, and other stuff in the atmosphere that obscures the Earth. But our friends at DigitalGlobe built WorldView-3 with a sensor suite called CAVIS, which lets it quantify and subtract haze – making atmospheric effects virtually invisible. Only WorldView-3 can see so clearly at this angle.

The satellite is about 17° above the horizon from San Francisco, and it is looking about 60° away from the point directly under it. At first I thought there was a typo, because 17° off horizontal should be 73° off vertical, not 61°. But while sketching it out, I realized I was assuming the ground is flat. WorldView-3 is way out over the Pacific – more than 1300 km or 800 miles to the west, and over that distance the Earth curves by about 12°!"
charlieloyd  mapbox  sanfrancisco  digitalglobe  aerialimagery  satelliteimagery  photography  satellites  2016 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Google Earth Fractals
"The following is a "photographic" gallery of fractal patterns found while exploring the planet with Google Earth. Each is provided with a KMZ file so the reader can explore the region for themselves. Readers are encouraged to submit their own discoveries for inclusion, credits will be included. Besides being examples of self similar fractals, they are often very beautiful structures ... not an uncommon characteristic of fractal geometry."

[via: http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-natural-fractals-of-google-earth ]
googleearth  paulbourke  photography  nature  earth  fractals  satelliteimagery 
january 2016 by robertogreco
The GoPro That Fell to Earth - Video - NYTimes.com
"In June 2013, members of the Grand Canyon Stratospheric Balloon Team and vedphoto.com launched a balloon with a camera into the stratosphere, where it burst. It was found by a hiker two years later."
via:austinkleon  gopro  cameras  space  earth  satelliteimagery  aerialimagery  2013  2015 
september 2015 by robertogreco
Japan’s New Satellite Captures an Image of Earth Every 10 Minutes - The New York Times
"A sense of perspective is unavoidable from 22,000 miles out. Looking down at Earth from that distance — almost three times farther than the diameter of the planet itself — allows a view of the globe as a massive organic system, pulsing with continuous movement. Below, images from the Himawari-8 weather satellite's first official day paint a living portrait of the western Pacific, with Typhoons Chan-hom and Nangka spinning slowly westward.

Locked into a stationary orbit above New Guinea, the satellite takes 144 photographs of the entire planet a day, three times as many as its predecessor. The images show how weather systems evolve and help forecasters develop more nuanced models of Earth’s atmosphere.

The satellite can see features down to about a third of a mile in size — twice the resolution of similar weather satellites that watch other parts of the globe.

NOAA and NASA aim to launch a similar advanced weather satellite, GOES-R, next March. The satellite will hover over either the eastern Pacific or the Caribbean and will track weather systems moving toward the United States."
space  weather  earth  satelliteimagery  derekwatkins  2015  satellites 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Watch: Satellite time lapse reveals humanity's global footprint - Vox
"[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNQ9z_Eb-Jc ]

In the 1970s, some forward-thinking NASA scientists put an Earth-observing satellite into orbit. At an altitude of 570 miles, it photographed the entire planet every 18 days, circling Earth 14 times a day and sending the data back to ground stations.

Forty years later, this satellite and its successors have created the longest continuous record of our planet's surface. By stringing the images together, NASA and the US Geological Survey have shown how rapidly and how profoundly humans are changing the face of Earth.

[gif]

In this time lapse showing the massive growth of Las Vegas, vegetation appears red because the images were partially gathered through infrared sensors. Golf courses and lawns jump out, foretelling the city's water scarcity problems. Off of Lake Mead an artificial lake appears in the 1990s, and developments form alongside it. This is Lake Las Vegas, where Celine Dion lives.

Check out the video above to see what 40 years of satellite imagery reveal about humanity's global footprint.

Read more: 15 before-and-after images that show how we're transforming the planet"
satelliteimagery  via:vruba  anthropocene  nasa  geology  geography  2015  energy  defoestation  envionment  earth  urbansprawl  wateruse  aralsea  lasvegas  brazil  brasil  climatechange  wyoming 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Slow Factory
"Slow Factory™ is a design boutique that creates limited edition silk scarves by merging high-resolution digital prints of scientific images from NASA with the highest quality, centuries-old artisanal textile finishing in Como, Italy. Each collection weaves a strong partnership with an internationally-recognized NGO working in the Environmental or Human Rights sectors."
via:bopuc  textiles  silk  clothing  design  fashion  celinesemaanvernon  glvo  satelliteimagery  earth  nasa  scarves 
april 2015 by robertogreco
First Photo of U.S. by NASA Satellite : NASA : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive
"A giant photo map of the contiguous 48 states of the United States, the first ever assembled from satellite images, completed for NASA by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service Cartographic Division. The map is 10 by 16 feet, is composed of 595 cloud-free black-and-white images returned from NASA's first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1). The images were all taken at the same altitude (912 kilometers: 560 miles) and the same lighting angle. The images were produced by the spacecraft's Multi-spectral Scanner System (MSS) in Band 5, or the red portion of the visible spectrum, during the period July 25 to October 31, 1972. A similar mosaic has been made using Band 7, the near infrared, of the MSS. The mosaic is produced at scale of 1:1,000,000 (one inch on the mosaic equals a million inches on the ground). Enlargements of segments of the mosaic can be made up to a scale of 1:500,000. ERTS images are used for many other purposes besides cartography, including geology, hydrology, environmental and land use studies, agriculture studies, and various other areas."

[via: https://twitter.com/spacearcheology/status/552238507037450240 ]
landsat  1974  imagery  satelliteimagery 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Earth View from Google Maps - Chrome Web Store
"Earth View displays a beautiful and unique Satellite image from Google Maps every time you open a new tab.

Click the Globe icon in the lower right corner to launch the current view in Google Maps."
chrome  extensions  googleearth  satelliteimagery  earth  via:jenlowe  canon 
october 2014 by robertogreco
6, 4: Block quotes
"So! In some of NASA’s actions you can detect a flavor of institutional hypervigilance against controversy. For example, most of what I’m in contact with is EO (Earth Observation, under what to my great pleasure was once called MTPE, Mission to Planet Earth), and for them climate change is a big, big deal. But they have to bend over backwards not to say anything that could be interpreted as even a little partisan, which is a tough move when simple, contextualized facts are very partisan. Likewise, two different people have politely reminded me that their communications are subject to FOIA, giving me the impression that they feel they have to avoid volunteering opinions outside narrow technical topics, even when they’re squeaky clean of any bias that could possibly affect the quality and independence of their work.

The impression that one sometimes gets is of a sticky note on the monitor frame reading “Don’t say anything you wouldn’t want to hear read out in Congress by someone who intends to defund your program”.

It’s a shame. You add friction to people’s work when you make them second-guess themselves and not express even well-supported, carefully framed, intellectually honest, professionally relevant opinions.

I wish the squint-inducing sunlight were felt in agencies whose failures cause secret murders, foolish wars, and the creation of surveillance states more than in an agency whose most salient failures so far – seventeen suited astronaut deaths – were caused by institutional lock-up more than by anything else. It should scare us how much Columbia was a repeat of Challenger: in both cases, a good understanding of the problem and solution was diffused within NASA, but it never converged on the point where it was needed. Too little jidoka. It’s not that transparency causes Crew Module Catastrophic Events, but there’s a chain from “we need to make sure the taxpayers are getting their money’s worth” through “let’s make sure we have solid procedures for everything” to “no, don’t just say ‘STOP! I see a problem that could kill the crew.’ to your boss; write up a nice report in rock-solid formal language” that has to be broken somewhere.

Astronaut deaths are the most salient failure, but to my mind the much bigger one is the failure to go further, which is the fault of the Executive and Legislative branches. One illustration of the problem is the Landsat program. As a series of satellites, you might assume it would be NASA’s responsibility to manage the space side of things. Nope. Obama reached over with scissors and glue to move Landsat to its own authority within the Geological Survey, because we was rightly counseled that Congress (and the presidency) cannot be trusted to fund NASA consistently enough to let it run Landsat. The consequence is very good: USGS’s Landsat operation is one of my stock examples when folks ask about doing open data right. But it bodes bogus of our handling of our primary space program when we have to take satellites away from it because we can’t trust ourselves to let it run them.

And so I see the hypervigilance as another face of the imposed institutional conservatism that has made NASA an anxious genius of an agency, never sure whether it will have the funding to do anything ambitious even after it’s been promised, tired of being scolded for not finishing what it doesn’t have the mandate to start, trying to get through a few short-sighted decades while doing justice to its domain. It’s amazing it’s as sure-handed as it is.

This, then, I think, is why we don’t see even more radical innovation from NASA: because Congress hates funding costly failures, even ones that are small and necessary parts of hugely worthwhile successes. And that’s why I doubt we’re anywhere close to the fail-hard/win-big r strategy program that Maly envisions. NSF grants are one good back door. Universal healthcare and a better social net in general is another: read Bill Gates’s “half” story and go ask a single mother who can’t afford daycare how she thinks the US economy is doing at letting her best ideas compete. I bet we’ll get there, but what happens between now and then still counts. America is waiting.

One of many causes for hope is that, even as its funding for outreach is cut, it’s NASA’s figured out how to put on a show on the web."
charlieloyd  2014  nasa  bureaucracy  universalhealthcare  healthcare  research  government  failure  science  hypervigilance  observation  imagery  congress  funding  landsat  usgs  remotesensing  earth  satellites  satelliteimagery 
march 2014 by robertogreco

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