recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : screenprinting   9

BELLACANVAS.COM | BELLA + CANVAS
"Every day, since 1992, we’ve lived by the words BE DIFFERENT. Founders Danny Harris and Marco DeGeorge push BELLA + CANVAS and the team in Los Angeles to challenge the status quo in every way.

Sustainability. No sweatshops. Solar power. Designed and made in L.A. Paper-free warehouse. Yoga classes. Electric car chargers. Laughing. A lot.

BELLA + CANVAS lives to make the best fashion-forward knit tees and fleece in men's, unisex, women’s, youth and baby sizes. 140 styles and 132 colors from the best basics to what’s new and on-trend. Great fits and super-soft fabrics like triblend, flowy, and marble—and introducing NEW acid wash, slub, speckled and mineral wash fabrications for 2015. BELLA + CANVAS is one of the only companies to use 100% combed and ring-spun cotton and fine-gage threads for the softest wear and smoother, flatter high-def printing. It isn’t the cheapest way to make a tee, but it’s the best."

[via: https://cottonbureau.com/products/space-age ]
tshirts  clothing  screenprinting  lcproject  materials  glvo  openstudioproject  t-shirts 
january 2015 by robertogreco
highly prized | A Walker in LA
"When I first moved to Los Angeles I would take long runs high into the hills around my Hollywood house to learn the lay and splay of the land—to clear my head from the unsettling visual cacophony of this strange city, where beauty existed uncomfortably close with ugliness.

Almost every day I ran by the Immaculate Heart College, oblivious to its significance, until one day I noticed a tiny sign on the gate written in what looked like hastily-dashed script: Corita.

For 20 years during the ‘60s and ‘70s a Catholic nun named Sister Mary Corita Kent ran a tiny printmaking studio here that became an internationally-recognized art institution, one visited by Buckminster Fuller, Saul Bass, Charles Eames. Her messages of peace and love were tempered with a raw, visual urgency, ushering in a new language of democratized design which would influence an era of protest banners and pop art. In the spring her students organized a massive public art show on the school’s lawn for Mary’s Day, unfurling banners out the windows and stacking silkscreened cardboard boxes into towers, as they whirled between them in a pastel blur of sundresses and hats sewn from daisies.

Kent took her cues from what she called “marvelously unfinished Los Angeles,” gathering imagery from field trips to car washes and supermarkets. The serigraph highly prized was ripped quite literally from the streets of L.A., slathered in traffic-cone orange paint, and transformed into an appropriately-messy, hand-scrawled celebration of urbanity, freedom and hope. All this, I marveled, happened right up the street from where I lived.

Years later I attended a Mary’s Day celebration. Wearing floral dress and carrying a screenprinted sign, I walked onto that same grassy hill poised at the edge of the endless gray grid and gazed out over the city I which I now so proudly called my home. It was Corita Kent’s radical work that taught me how to truly embrace Los Angeles, for all its freeways and freakishness, all its ugliness and unfinishedness. This serigraph now hangs in my living room."
alissawalker  2011  sistercorita  coritakent  losangeles  seeing  unfinished  screenprinting 
december 2014 by robertogreco
The Brandon - an album on Flickr
"Exhibition of Machine Project Documentation at The Brandon, Houston, 2014"

[See also: http://thebrandoncontemporary.com/machine-project ]

"The Brandon is pleased to present the first retrospective of the screen prints and performance documentation of Los Angeles art collective Machine Project. Bringing together over 50 posters and 25 videos made between 2003 and 2013, topics covered in this show include:

Indoor shipwrecks

Fire starting with sticks

Dog Operas (by and for dogs)

Vacations for plants

Converting cacti into musical instruments

Kimchee

Pizza

Psychics

Music for parking garages

Three disturbed big box store employees

Simultaneous aerobics and butter making

A drag tableaux-vivant reenactment of scenes from the Marlene Dietrich western Destry Rides Again

A workshop on how to escape from the trunk of a car "so that the next time you're kidnapped it doesn't have to ruin the rest of your day."

Described in the LA Weekly as "Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of 'The Anarchist Cookbook", Machine Project is a non-profit performance and installation space investigating art, technology, natural history, science, music, and literature in an informal storefront in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Machine Project also operates as a loose collective of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under the direction of founder Mark Allen, Machine has produced over 1500 events, workshops and installations.

Mark Allen is the founder and executive director of Machine Project, a non-profit performance and installation space investigating art, technology, natural history, science, music, literature, and food in a disheveled storefront in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Beyond their storefront space, Machine Project operates as an informal group of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under his direction Machine has produced over 1000 events, workshops and installations. Mark received his MFA from the California Institute of the Arts, following a residency with the Core Fellowship of the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.

Opening reception: Friday, April 18, 6pm-9pm.

Additionally we will be screening select videos from the Machine Project archives every Wednesday from April 23-May 21.

Gallery talk: Saturday, April 19, 3pm. Please join us for an artist discussion with Machine Project founder Mark Allen and Houston-based designer and typographer Sibylle Hagmann.

Sibylle Hagmann started her career in Switzerland after earning a B.F.A. from the Basel School of Design in 1989. She explored her passion for type design and typography while completing her M.F.A. at the California Institute of the Arts. Over the years she developed award winning typeface families, such as Cholla and Odile. Cholla was originally commissioned by Art Center College of Design in 1999 and released by the type foundry Emigre in the same year. The typeface family Odile, published in 2006 was awarded the Swiss Federal Design Award. Her work has been featured in numerous publications and recognized by the Type Directors Club of New York and Japan, among others. Her typeface collections are available from Kontour.com, a type foundry launched in 2012.

Machine Project Website
http://machineproject.com/

Kontour
http://www.kontour.com/ "
machineproject  exhibits  thebrandon  houston  losangeles  2014  graphicdesign  design  graphics  print  screenprinting  kontour  sibyllehagmann  typography 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Squeegee Prints | Professional apparel printing
"Squeegee Prints is a professional print studio based in San Diego, CA.
We specialize in printing custom apparel, headwear, and promotional products.
Please take a moment to read through our art requirements before submitting a quote."
sandiego  makers  screenprinting  printing 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Levi's® Workshops: Sister Corita on Vimeo
"Directed by Peter Rhoads

Sister Corita was a remarkable, fire-breathing Catholic nun who, during the course of her neverending fight for social justice, gave artistic legitimacy to screenprinting. Filmmaker Aaron Rose, along with the Corita Foundation's Sasha Carrera, set out to show that–even though she's gone–this beloved teacher-printer's message and medium resonate today more than ever."

[Posted here: http://tcsnmy7.tumblr.com/post/3643305776/i-recommend-watching-this-short-video-about-sister ]
sistercorita  aaronrose  peterrhoads  screenprinting  coritakent 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Photo-emulsion Screen Printing
"This Instructable covers the standard photo-emulsion screen printing process, which is great for printing text or images with fine detail...and at the end, you have your own personally-designed entirely unique prints on fabric, clothing, paper, or whatever else you can get under your screen." video here: http://www.boingboing.net/2008/08/13/bbtv-howto-guerrilla-1.html
make  screenprinting  littlebrother  tutorials  howto  tshirtsclassideas  glvo  printing  instructables 
august 2008 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read