recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : self-governance   12

What the Arete Project stands for
"1. We offer a higher vision for higher education. Current academic culture values achievement over learning, knowledge over wisdom, research over teaching, and frills over substance. The Arete Project provides an education in the liberal arts and sciences that helps students become thoughtful, responsible, and virtuous human beings. Students are invested with responsibilities that extend far beyond their GPAs; instructors are valued first as teachers and mentors and second as scholars; and education takes place as a communal enterprise in a setting of rustic simplicity.

2. We educate for service and leadership – with real stakes. Many leadership programs are little more than simulations. Many service-work programs are guilty of “voluntourism.” But at the Arete Project, students must create, sustain, and govern their own educational community, as well as work towards the wellbeing of the institution itself. Student self-governance is real. If the cow isn’t milked, she may sicken, leaving the kitchen without dairy products. If recruitment emails aren’t sent, we may have no applicants the next year. Students must take real responsibility for these critical and other functions of the organization.

3. We provide an educational antidote to social fragmentation. It is no secret that our world has fractured deeply along lines of income, identity, and ideology. Our programs require students to step outside of their comfort zones and to build and share an educational space with people from very different backgrounds. The intimacy of the community (including students, staff, and faculty) allows trust and real relationships to flourish; these relationships, in turn, enable the difficult conversations that our society so badly needs to have.

4. We train thoughtful stewards of the natural world. Though we are all ultimately dependent on the ecosystems around us, few of us feel that dependence in our daily lives. The Arete Project asks students to live for extended periods of time in rustic accommodations within rural and wilderness settings, and much work and recreation is out of doors. The labor program in particular – by having students grow their own food and build their own shelter – provides a chance to think deeply about humans' relationship to nature."
education  areteproject  lauramarcus  highered  highereducation  learning  knowledge  wisdom  teching  research  substance  frills  liberalarts  mentoring  responsibility  service  leadership  voluntourism  servicelearning  self-governance  governance  fragmentation  society  inequality  inclusivity  inclusion  lcproject  openstudioproject  relationships  conversation  stewardship  nature  ecosystems  ecology  sustainability  interdependence  labor  work  ideology  criticalthinking  pedagogy  academia  colleges  universities 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Dude Ranch — The California Sunday Magazine
"Even the drive to the college evokes cinematic scenes of frontier outposts: “You come down from the mountains into the valley and see off in the distance a few kinds of trees and a little cluster of buildings in an otherwise empty desert,” says Sam Contis, who has visited the school a dozen times since March 2013. “I wasn’t quite expecting the sense of scale — how small the campus is in relation to the rest of the space around it. It felt like you could blink and it would almost disappear.”"



"The last pillar is self-governance, which is a confluence of a lot of playfulness and a lot of seriousness. We ran our meetings with Robert’s Rules of Order and dealt with some tough decisions. We could have some incredibly tense, incredibly high-octane disagreements. And at the same time, we started most of our meetings with some kind of shared noise. We’d go from howling at the moon to getting into the heart of whether to let someone leave the valley or have a guest for this or that reason.

I experienced a level of comfort, of closeness, of vulnerability, of physical and emotional contact with my classmates, that I think it’s fair to say is pretty uncommon among male peer groups. But to protect that at the expense of allowing women in feels irresponsible, and I don’t think it gives the place enough credit. To imagine that having women at the school would fundamentally alter the relationships between people, that’s naive."



"I had an advantage when it came to the manual labor; I had worked on my dad’s farm and taken care of animals when I was a kid. But I was intimidated by the academics. One of the first classes I took was the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle. That was the first time I took a philosophy class, and I realized that many of my peers had read the book two or three times before. In another class, we talked a lot about the internal politics of the U.S., and they kept saying “the electoral college,” and I was like, “What are they talking about? Is that a college? Where is it?”

Every time I worked alongside my classmates, I’d have long conversations that made me a better student. I remember one particular horseback ride with a friend. We were taking this class about The Varieties of Religious Experience, and we were asking, how is it that when you think about religious experience it always has to be associated with this idea of the divine? Here we were, riding in the valley, in this huge space where there is nothing but us and you can hear everything around you — you can hear the footsteps of the horses, you can hear sand blowing. How is that not given the same form of authority as someone dreaming that they talked to God?"



"There’s this paradox of Deep Springs, because on the one hand, it’s billed as this isolation experiment, but the reality is that it’s the most social experience I’ve ever had. I really started to feel it in my second year — the amount of obligations that piled on throughout the week, everyone being in one dorm."



"When I got there, my first memory was settling into the room where I was staying, and there were two students curled up together on the bed reading Emily Dickinson. Then I poked my head into another room at night where the student body was having what they call a “boojie.” There were 15 guys dancing to Kesha and Taylor Swift and Katy Perry. At that point, I just had no idea how I could possibly stay in that space. But by the end of my time, I learned to dance at Deep Springs in a very real way."
deepspringscollege  2017  photography  isolation  self-governance  sfsh  democratic  education  learning  colleges  universities  social  samcontis  ericbenson  cohabitation 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Outer Coast College
[See also:
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/12/11/outer-coast-college-seeks-replicate-deep-springs-success
http://the-toast.net/2015/11/19/theyre-building-a-deep-springs-for-women-in-alaska-and-i-need-a-minute/
http://www.adn.com/article/20151217/lawmaker-plans-new-unusual-private-college-sitka
http://www.newsminer.com/news/alaska_news/group-targets-sheldon-jackson-campus-for-new-college/article_0c863fa0-a772-11e5-a518-277bec2027c3.html
http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/dec/20/group-targets-sj-campus-for-new-college/?page=all ]

"What if we could start over with higher education?

We love our colleges and universities. After all, college is where we solidify our deepest beliefs and forge our dearest friendships. It’s where many of us proudly take responsibility for our lives for the first time. Long after graduation, we recall our college years with fondness.

But many of us know that these rosy feelings mask the truth about higher education in the United States—that it’s showing its wear. Crises loom:

1) Quality: At many colleges and universities students simply aren't learning...
2) Cost: ...while the price of a college education continues to skyrocket.

Films have been shot, articles have been written, bills have been passed. But these problems persist, to the point where they can seem intractable.

We think otherwise. We think a college education can be affordable and transformative, intellectually and personally. To prove it, we’re building a college of our own.

Three Pillars

Outer Coast College is a nascent two-year institution of higher education in Sitka, Alaska. Our curriculum is one for the whole person, built upon the three pillars of Academics, Service & Labor, and Self-governance.

We draw our inspiration from Deep Springs College, a small and remarkable postsecondary institution nestled in a quiet valley just east of the Sierra Nevada. Although a remarkably successful and admired educational institution, nearly a century after its founding Deep Springs remains the only college of its kind.

Self-governance
As at Deep Springs, Outer Coast College students self-govern. Students hire faculty, determine curriculum and course offerings, serve on the Board of Trustees, legislate academic and student life policies, and serve as the admissions committee to select incoming classes.

Academics
Outer Coast College provides a rigorous liberal arts environment, in which a sincere appreciation for learning and intellectual inquiry is encouraged. Excellence in pedagogy and student scholarship are hallmarks of the college.

Service & Labor
We believe in the value of labor as soulcraft and the power of service as a moral education that can instill a lifelong obligation of service to society. Students assume a labor responsibility to sustain the college’s day-to-day operations: running the kitchen and dining hall; growing and harvesting food (vegetables from the garden, salmon from the ocean, etc.); a “work crew,” guided by a foreman-carpenter, that assists with the historic restoration and rehabilitation of Sheldon Jackson Campus’s 100-year-old buildings; and the important work of dishwashing and custodial upkeep. Similarly, students rotate through service positions and apprenticeships with organizations in the community, contributing to Sitka and its vibrant culture.

Today’s universities function more as sprawling conglomerates than as schools: they manage multi-million-dollar athletic programs, police departments, hospitals, science research facilities, massive food and residential services operations, and sprawling real estate portfolios. Meanwhile, the academic job market often discourages great teaching by providing incentives for faculty to focus primarily on research.

Outer Coast is a relentlessly student-focused institution. Excellence in scholarship is different from excellence in teaching. Outer Coast College faculty’s foremost obligation is to create a dazzling, neuron-bending pedagogic and intellectual experience for students, and to treat teaching as a craft in its own right. At Outer Coast College, excellence in teaching is the expectation.

After two years Outer Coast students transfer to four-year institutions, where they can take advantage of the resources of a larger institution. This model aspires to be the “best of the both worlds”: students can complete a robust two-year liberal arts education without crippling debt, then transition into two years of a traditional undergraduate education with a far clearer sense of themselves."



"Mission Statement
Outer Coast College seeks to teach and inspire promising young people to create virtuous change in the world and in their own lives. It aims to accomplish this mission by providing a rigorous and challenging academic curriculum marked by exceptional pedagogy and faculty engagement; by imparting the value of labor and service to a diverse student body entrusted with broad powers of self-governance; by cultivating love for community and respect for nature within the setting of Sitka, Alaska; by fostering creativity, curiosity, honesty, generosity, resilience, self-reliance, and good humor; and by accompanying students in their search for self-understanding and moral worth.

Who We Serve
The student body of Outer Coast College will be national and international in breadth, and diverse in many ways, including race, gender, and socioeconomic status. The college will make a special effort to recruit students from Alaska, particularly Alaska Natives and rural Alaskans, as well as high-achieving students from underserved backgrounds.

Brief History of the Project
Founded in 1878, Sheldon Jackson College was the oldest institution of higher learning in Alaska until its closure in 2007. At that time, title to the deteriorating campus was transferred to the nationally recognized Sitka Fine Arts Camp.

In the ensuing years, led by the inspiring vision of the Fine Arts Camp, the community of Sitka rallied to restore the campus in perhaps the largest volunteer effort in the history of Alaska.

Today the Sitka Fine Arts Camp runs its summer programs on the Sheldon Jackson Campus to national acclaim, filling Sitka with tremendous creative energy.

In summer 2014 Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins and Roger Schmidt began discussing the possibility of founding a new college on the campus in partnership with the Fine Arts Camp.

In January 2015 Jonathan visited Deep Springs College to explore adapting its model to Sitka. While there, Jonathan met Will Hunt, a second year student who subsequently committed to move to Sitka in the fall to join the effort to create a Deep Springs-inspired college on Sheldon Jackson Campus.

Full-time work to create the college began September 2015. A four-person principal team of Jonathan, Will, Stephanie Gilardi, and Javier Botero coalesced through the fall. In mid-November, the team organized a two-day convening on the campus, bringing together collaborators from Sitka, Alaska, and the Lower 48 to contribute to the vision of Outer Coast College.

Through the fall and winter Jonathan, Will, Stephanie, and Javier created seven working committees, collectively charged with advancing the disparate work of creating a college, from accreditation to pedagogy to fundraising to admissions and recruitment. All aspects of the Outer Coast College project are actively progressing through present (April 2016)."
alaska  srg  colleges  universities  deepspringscollege  outercoastcollege  servicelearning  labor  self-governance 
april 2016 by robertogreco
the arete project | towards new programs on the Deep Springs model
[via: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/07/16/women-only-summer-program-hopes-replicate-deep-springs-experience-women
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/12/11/outer-coast-college-seeks-replicate-deep-springs-success ]

"The Arete Project offers innovative, affordable educational programs designed to prepare young people for lives of thoughtful leadership and service to humanity.

The Arete Seminar
The Arete Seminar is an eight-week long program for college-aged women held between June and August of each year. The 2016 program will run from June 20 - August 13, 2016.

Modeled on the educational philosophy of L.L. Nunn, the Arete Project features a small student body size, a rural, isolated community, and the three pillars of academics, labor and self-governance. Seminar participants also take on additional self-governance and service projects throughout the course of the year."



"The mission of the Arete Project is education towards its highest ends: the cultivation of wisdom, the living of a good life in thought and action, and selfless devotion to world and humanity.

Arete builds this education around three central pillars: rigorous engagement with the liberal arts, physical labor undertaken in service of the land and community, and student self-governance over each other and the organization as a whole.

Arete conducts its programs in a human context and on a human scale: in small, close-knit communities and rural, isolated settings; through meaningful relationships between students, faculty, and staff; and through demanding intellectual and physical work on which the community depends.

Arete regards its students as beneficiaries, rather than consumers, of their educations: tuition and administrative expenses are kept to a minimum, and no student is turned away for inability to pay.

Our purpose is to expand upon the educational models pioneered by L.L. Nunn in the early 1900s. Nunn’s organizations were designed to prepare servant leaders, and he structured his programs around three pillars: academics, labor, and self-governance. For the past two summers, the Arete Project has given college-aged women the unique opportunity to intensively engage in these areas during an 8-week summer program, which was held on an organic farm in Sebastopol, CA in 2014, and then, in 2015, on the campus of the Arthur Morgan School near Burnsville, NC. We are excited to announce that Arete will continue to call the Arthur Morgan School home for summer 2016.

What is arete?
The term arete designates the highest human potential, the “best that we can be.” The concept of arete dates back to ancient Greece, and is found throughout the writings of Homer, Plato, Aristotle, and their intellectual descendants. It is often translated as “virtue” or “excellence,” but encompasses much more—in various times and in various places, the term has been associated with bravery, cooperation, justice, loyalty, intelligence, compassion, diligence – while ultimately transcending them all. The Arete Project takes an expansive view of human excellence, balancing together the uniqueness of each student’s potential and the flourishing of the community in which they live.

The Arete Project provides an educational program for college-aged women that emphasizes democratic participation and leadership, sustainability, personal and communal responsibility, and intellectual excellence. It combines a top-tier liberal arts academic programming with a practical education in stewardship and citizenship, supported by the three pillars of academics, labor, and self-governance. All participants will be held to the ground rules: (a) isolation on campus, encouraging introspective and intensive engagement with the community and (b) a strict policy forbidding the use of drugs, tobacco, and alcohol. Apart from these foundational regulations – along with required engagement with the three pillars – the task of self-governance will see all participants active together in creating and maintaining their own polity."
srg  colleges  universities  deepspringscollege  llnunn  areteproject  small  liberalrts  land  community  rural  work  labor  physicallabor  self-governance 
april 2016 by robertogreco
We 'Choose' for Poor Children Every Day - Bridging Differences - Education Week
"You challenge me: "What gives you confidence that we get to choose?" You insist that "I don't pretend for a second that I get to choose. At least not for other people's children."

But in fact you/we are choosing, every day. In acts small and big, from deciding small classes don't matter, to deciding to gentrify Manhattan. The people of Harlem didn't have a choice. It's some other "we" who are moving other people and their children to locations not specified. What/who is it that didn't "adapt"? It wasn't the working people of Detroit or New Orleans or Manhattan who failed to "adapt"—it was the industries they counted on, the expertise of those well-educated people who did have the power to make some choices and failed to do so.

It was my dear old mother who warned me about people who cry "crisis" too often. I should beware of them, she said. Tell me what years there hasn't been a "crisis" that was blamed on our public schools? (Read Richard Rothstein's The Way Things Were—it's truly a fun read.) Yes, in some ways, I'm more "conservative" than you: I know who gets hurt first when we "disrupt" regardless ....

Yes, there is a lot of money spent on education, and any good entrepreneur seeks his or her opportunities where the money is. And then looks for ways to make more. That's not a plot or a conspiracy. Just good straight thinking. But not all entrepreneurs are equal when it comes to pushing for their self-interest.

So we agree on tests? If we do, then it wasn't test scores that revealed the rot in Detroit's schools for the poor. If you walked into them, without any data, you'd know immediately that you wouldn't CHOOSE to send your children there. Although for many parents it was a "home" of a sort, better than having none.

You wouldn't CHOOSE to live where these children do either. So whites moved out—by choice—and left Detroit what it is today. Whether the kinds of solutions that those who remained are exploring are utopian or not, I'm on their side. They're trying to reconstruct a city built on a different set of assumptions—that a community can be rebuilt out of the ashes. I wish them all the best, and offer any help I can.

It's too easy, from perches of comfort and adaptability, to say that factories come and go, as do oceans and rivers and mountains, and species. But the triumph of the human species, up to now, rests on its use of its brains. We're not exempt from some "laws" of nature. Adaptation isn't accomplished overnight. If we don't use our brains better (and more empathetically) we, too, will become extinct—although I can't adapt to that idea yet!

You and I—or some other somebodies—are deciding the future of "other people's children" unless we provide ways for "them" to have a voice, a vote, and the resources to decide their own future. We need to restore a better balance between local communal life (with its power to effect some immediate changes like we did at the small self-governing schools I love) and distant, "objective" moneyed power. It's our democracy that rests on our rebuilding strength at the bottom. If we don't, we induce a passivity that surely cannot be in the self-interest of the least powerful, but might (just might) be in the self-interest of others. And then we blame them for being passive?

The experiment in democracy may or may not survive this round, but I'm not giving up on it. "Self-governance"—of, for, and by the people, Robert, is what's at stake. Do we agree that it's an essential aspiration, another way of describing what we mean by freedom within community, or communities of free citizens? If so, what would it look like in schools given, as you remind me, the realities we must all "accept"—for the moment. Until we create new realities."
deborahmeier  2014  edreform  reform  education  democracy  choice  passivity  robertpondiscio  entrepreneurship  gentrification  adaptability  opportunity  community  schools  publischools  policy  self-governance  citizenship  civics  acceptance 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Deep Springs College and the Liberal Arts Ideal
"In order to understand what “is suited to the education of a free person,” we need to first know what freedom amounts to. At the core of Nunn’s conception of freedom is self-governance, for he views freedom and self-government in obedience to law as one and the same. He recognizes that on the face of it this doesn’t make sense. How can obedience be synonymous with freedom?

To understand this it will help to contrast the fee person with the slave. The free person lives in free society with others. Free societies can be small and large, ranging from, for example, the small association of students at Deep Springs, to the state government of Pennsylvania or the government of the United States of America. When people live in society with one another they choose to establish laws governing the conduct of their members, for the maintenance and flourishing of the society as a whole, and they curtail their own rights, for the benefit of the common good.

Slavery, like freedom, requires society. Unlike freedom, which is participation in society, however, slavery is subjugation to it. The slave does not choose to enter into society with others, but is coerced into obeying orders out of fear. Both the slave and the free person recognize and respect the law, but they do so in extremely different ways. The free person wills the law, takes responsibility for it, and has her part in determining it. The slave submits to it and is bound by it in servitude.

At the individual level, Nunn thinks that we find a situation analogous to that of the free person and the slave at the social level. He thinks there are laws governing our right conduct, laws of morality that we can all be aware of through our good common sense. We can rebel against these and instead follow our personal inclinations, desiring our own pleasure and our own gain, at the expense of others. Such intemperance, according to Nunn is the mark of poor self-governance. When we follow our good judgment, will our action in accord with it, and take responsibility for this action, however, then he thinks we govern ourselves well individually.

Now in a free society, the authority of the body politic derives from each individual’s choice to enter into that society. Accordingly, the authority of the society is in part vested in it from each of its members, and in respecting its authority the members are indirectly respecting their own authority over themselves. In this way, when a free person respects the laws of their free society, they are engaged in a further form of self-government."



"The main difference between my years at Deep Springs and those spent elsewhere perhaps is just this: life there was simpler. It was simpler because it was preparatory. It was about surveying the space of possibilities, laying foundations, and getting one’s bearings. This was mostly an internal process. It was about getting one’s heart in order. And while this process couldn’t happen alone, in isolation, it could happen in a relatively simple, small community of fifty or so people, largely cut off from the mad complexity of life in the real world and of what our future lives in that world would be. The tremendous privilege that Deep Springs students receive is, then, just two years in this simple space in which they can orient themselves and prepare for the complexities of life to come."
deepspringscollege  time  simplicity  education  lcproject  tcsnmy  tcsnmy8  learning  liberalarts  llnunn  life  well-being  self-governance  democracy  democraticschools  democratic  alternative  service  servicelearning  selflessness  community  labor  freedom  liberty  society  slavery  authority 
march 2013 by robertogreco
a brief history of participation
"These activities were not always congenial to the program of government reform towards democratization. Many of them used participatory methods instead to net poor peoples into networks of debt and reliance on hierarchical authorities.

The reasons for the failures of participatory technology are actually quite specific.

Participation was appropriated during the 1970s as a means of cheap development without commitment of resources from above. The theme of participatory ownership of the city, pioneered in discussions about urban planning in the West, remained strong in the context of the developing world, and even grew in a context of spiraling urbanization. In India, the Philippines, and much of Africa and Latin America, postwar economies pushed peasants off of the land into cities, where the poor availability of housing required the poor to squat on land and build their own homes out of cheap building materials. At first, the governments of these towns collaborated with the World Bank to take out loans to provide expensive, high-rise public housing units. But increasingly, the World Bank drew upon the advice of western advocates of squatter settlements, who saw in western squats the potential benefits of self-governance without interference from the state. In the hands of the World Bank, this theory of self-directed, self-built, self-governed housing projects became a justification for defunding public housing. From 1972 forward, World Bank reports commended squatters for their ingenuity and resourcefulness and recommended giving squatters titles to their properties, which would allow them to raise credit and participate in the economy as consumers and borrowers.

Participatory mechanisms installed by the Indian government to deal with water tanks after nationalization depend on principles of accountability at the local level that were invented under colonial rule. They install the duty of the locality to take care of people without necessarily providing the means with which to do so.

We need developers who can learn from the history of futility, and historians who have the courage to constructively encourage a more informed kind of development. "
peertopeer  web2.0  joguldi  2013  conviviality  participation  participatory  government  centralization  centralizedgovernment  self-rule  history  1960s  democracy  democratization  reform  networks  mutualaid  peterkropotkin  politics  activism  banks  banking  patrickgeddes  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  planning  self-governance  worldbank  dudleyseers  gandhi  robertchambers  neelamukherjee  india  thailand  philippines  gis  geography  latinamerica  1970s  squatters  economics  development  africa  cities  resources  mapmaking  cartography  maps  mapping  googlemaps  openstreetmap  osm  ushahidi  crowdsourcing  infrastructure 
march 2013 by robertogreco
David Graeber, On Bureaucratic Technologies & the Future as Dream-Time [at SVA]
"The twentieth century produced a very clear sense of what the future was to be, but we now seem unable to imagine any sort of redemptive future. Anthropologist and writer David Graeber asks, "How did this happen?" One reason is the replacement of what might be called poetic technologies with bureaucratic ones. Another is the terminal perturbations of capitalism, which is increasingly unable to envision any future at all. Presented by the MFA Art Criticism and Writing Department."
occupywallstreet  ows  anarchism  davidgraeber  alvintoffler  timothyleary  futurism  situationist  capitalism  collapse  economics  anthropology  robots  robotfactories  future  labor  efficiency  sva  self-governance  paperwork  decentralization  scifi  sciencefiction  humanrights  corruption  politics  policy  organization  2012  startrek  automation  technology 
february 2012 by robertogreco
dConstruct2011 videos: The Transformers, Kars Alfrink
"In this talk, Kars Alfrink – founder and principal designer at applied pervasive games studio Hubbub – explores ways we might use games to alleviate some of the problems wilful social self-seperation can lead to. Kars looks at how people sometimes deliberately choose to live apart, even though they share the same living spaces. He discusses the ways new digital tools and the overlapping media landscape have made society more volatile. But rather than to call for a decrease in their use, Kars argues we need more, but different uses of these new tools. More playful uses."

[See also: http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kars-alfrink AND http://speakerdeck.com/u/dconstruct/p/the-transformers-by-kars-alfrink ]

"Kars looks at how game culture and play shape the urban fabric, how we might design systems that improve people’s capacity to do so, and how you yourself, through play, can transform the city you call home."
monocultures  rulespace  self-governance  gamification  filterbubble  scale  tinkering  urbanism  urban  simulationfever  animalcrossing  simulation  ludology  proceduralrhetoric  ianbogost  resilience  societalresilience  division  belonging  rioting  looting  socialconventions  situationist  playfulness  rules  civildisobedience  separation  socialseparation  nationality  fiction  dconstruct2011  dconstruct  identity  cities  chinamieville  design  space  place  play  gaming  games  volatility  hubbub  howbuildingslearn  adaptability  adaptivereuse  architecture  transformation  gentrification  society  2011  riots  janejacobs  karsalfrink  simulations 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Bridging the Values Gap | Blog | design mind
"Clearly, the bond between society and business is broken, and the legitimacy of companies is at a new low point. Movements such as Occupy Wall Street express a growing indignation over the disconnect between the perks for a few and the rights of many. When Harvard undergraduate students stage a walkout of an Economics 101 class in sympathy with the Occupy movement to protest the ‘corporatization’ of education, it might indeed indicate the beginning of a “New Progressive Movement.” It is not just the redistribution of wealth that’s being scrutinized, however. What citizens, in the U.S. and elsewhere, demand are new, more collaborative and inclusive models of value creation that produce meaning as much as profits…

reality in many companies today is that there appears to be a gap between the articulation of lofty principles and their application, despite all the talk about purpose, social power, emotional engagement, and community-building"
hierarchy  2011  society  business  communities  collaboration  leadership  organizations  values  self-governance  ows  occupywallstreet  inclusion  inclusiveness  inclusivity  inlcusivity 
december 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - Deep Roots; An Ideal Preserved
"Short documentary on Deep Springs College in Inyo Valley, CA. An Academy of Integrated Media project that embodies the American character."

[Also at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v01LKW1EshU ]
deepspringscollege  education  colleges  universities  self-governance  omnicompetence  learning  failure  schools  empowerment  tcsnmy  california  alternative  alternativeeducation  purpose  urgency  transformation 
september 2010 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read