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robertogreco : self-publishing   36

Oh God, It's Raining Newsletters — by Craig Mod
"In truth, it’s a newsletter about the design of walking. But more broadly, launching it has given me reason to consider the state of newsletters and email, in 2019: It’s kind of amazing."



"Ownership is the critical point here. Ownership in email in the same way we own a paperback: We recognize that we (largely) control the email subscriber lists, they are portable, they are not governed by unknowable algorithmic timelines.3 And this isn’t ownership yoked to a company or piece of software operating on quarterly horizon, or even multi-year horizon, but rather to a half-century horizon. Email is a (the only?) networked publishing technology with both widespread, near universal adoption,4 and history. It is, as they say, proven."



"A lot of this newsletter writing is happening, probably, because the archives aren’t great. Tenuousness unlocks the mind, loosens tone. But the archival reality might be just the opposite of that common perception: These newsletters are the most backed up pieces of writing in history, copies in millions of inboxes, on millions of hard drives and servers, far more than any blog post. More robust than an Internet Archive container. LOCKSS to the max. These might be the most durable copies yet of ourselves. They’re everywhere but privately so, hidden, piggybacking on the most accessible, oldest networked publishing platform in the world. QWERTYUIOP indeed."
carigmod  newsletters  2019  email  internet  web  online  publishing  walking  substack  buttondown  tinyletter  mailchimp  memberful  naas  instagram  facebook  socialmedia  blogs  blogging  self-publishing  selfpublishing  intimacy  ownership 
february 2019 by robertogreco
The Room of Requirement - This American Life
"Libraries aren't just for books. They're often spaces that transform into what you need them to be: a classroom, a cyber café, a place to find answers, a quiet spot to be alone. It's actually kind of magical. This week, we have stories of people who roam the stacks and find unexpected things that just happen to be exactly what they required."



"Prologue
One Monday earlier this month, we sent five producers to record what happened at library reference desks around the country. (5 1/2 minutes)

Act One
In Praise of Limbo
By Zoe Chace
There is a library that's on the border of Canada and the United States — literally on the border, with part of the library in each country. Producer Zoe Chace interviews journalist Yeganeh Torbati about how lately, it's become a critical space for a surprising set of visitors. (7 minutes)

Act Two
Book Fishing In America
By Sean Cole
In Richard Brautigan's novel "The Abortion," he imagines a library where regular people can come and drop off their own unpublished books. Nothing is turned away. The books live there forever. It’s the kind of place that would never work in real life. But someone decided to try it. Producer Sean Cole has the story. (28 minutes)

You can explore the manuscripts of the Brautigan Library online.
[http://brautiganlibrary.com/index.html ]

Act Three
Growing Shelf-Awareness
By Stephanie Foo
Lydia Sigwarth spent a lot of time in her public library growing up – all day, almost every day, for six months straight. Producer Stephanie Foo returned to that library with her, after years away. (13 1/2 minutes)"
libraries  thisamericanlife  homelessness  homeless  2018  librarians  richardbrautigan  selfpublishing  publishing  borders  canada  us  zoechance  seancole  stephaniefoo  books  self-publishing 
january 2019 by robertogreco
The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
"THE FUTURE BOOK was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.

Prognostications about how technology would affect the form of paper books have been with us for centuries. Each new medium was poised to deform or murder the book: newspapers, photography, radio, movies, television, videogames, the internet.

Some viewed the intersection of books and technology more positively: In 1945, Vannevar Bush wrote in The Atlantic: “Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

Researcher Alan Kay created a cardboard prototype of a tablet-like device in 1968. He called it the "Dynabook," saying, “We created a new kind of medium for boosting human thought, for amplifying human intellectual endeavor. We thought it could be as significant as Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press 500 years ago.”

In the 1990s, Future Bookism hit a kind of beautiful fever pitch. We were so close. Brown University professor Robert Coover, in a 1992 New York Times op-ed titled “The End of Books,” wrote of the future of writing: “Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.” And then, more broadly: “The print medium is a doomed and outdated technology, a mere curiosity of bygone days destined soon to be consigned forever to those dusty unattended museums we now call libraries.”

Normal books? Bo-ring. Future Books? Awesome—indeterminate—and we were almost there! The Voyager Company built its "expanded books" platform on Hypercard, launching with three titles at MacWorld 1992. Microsoft launched Encarta on CD-ROM.

But … by the mid-2000s, there still were no real digital books. The Rocket eBook was too little, too early. Sony launched the eink-based Librie platform in 2004 to little uptake. Interactive CD-ROMs had dropped off the map. We had Wikipedia, blogs, and the internet, but the mythological Future Book—some electric slab that would somehow both be like and not like the quartos of yore—had yet to materialize. Peter Meirs, head of technology at Time, hedged his bets perfectly, proclaiming: “Ultimately, there will be some sort of device!”

And then there was. Several devices, actually. The iPhone launched in June 2007, the Kindle that November. Then, in 2010, the iPad arrived. High-resolution screens were suddenly in everyone’s hands and bags. And for a brief moment during the early 2010s, it seemed like it might finally be here: the glorious Future Book."



"Yet here’s the surprise: We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem."

[sections on self-publishing, crowdfunding, email newsletters, social media, audiobooks and podcasts, etc.]



"It turns out smartphones aren’t the best digital book reading devices (too many seductions, real-time travesties, notifications just behind the words), but they make excellent audiobook players, stowed away in pockets while commuting. Top-tier podcasts like Serial, S-Town, and Homecoming have normalized listening to audio or (nonfiction) booklike productions on smartphones."



"Last August, a box arrived on my doorstep that seemed to embody the apotheosis of contemporary publishing. The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition was published via a crowdfunding campaign. The edition includes a book of images, three records, and a small poster packaged in an exquisite box set with supplementary online material. When I held it, I didn’t think about how futuristic it felt, nor did I lament the lack of digital paper or interactivity. I thought: What a strange miracle to be able to publish an object like this today. Something independently produced, complex and beautiful, with foil stamping and thick pages, full-color, in multiple volumes, made into a box set, with an accompanying record and other shimmering artifacts, for a weirdly niche audience, funded by geeks like me who are turned on by the romance of space.

We have arrived to the once imagined Future Book in piecemeal truths.

Moving images were often espoused to be a core part of our Future Book. While rarely found inside of an iBooks or Kindle book, they are here. If you want to learn the ukulele, you don’t search Amazon for a Kindle how-to book, you go to YouTube and binge on hours of lessons, stopping when you need to, rewinding as necessary, learning at your own pace.

Vannevar Bush's “Memex” essentially described Wikipedia built into a desk.

The "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an iPhone.

In The Book of Sand, Borges wrote of an infinite book: "It was then that the stranger told me: 'Study the page well. You will never see it again.'" Describing in many ways what it feels like to browse the internet or peek at Twitter.

Our Future Book is composed of email, tweets, YouTube videos, mailing lists, crowdfunding campaigns, PDF to .mobi converters, Amazon warehouses, and a surge of hyper-affordable offset printers in places like Hong Kong.

For a “book” is just the endpoint of a latticework of complex infrastructure, made increasingly accessible. Even if the endpoint stays stubbornly the same—either as an unchanging Kindle edition or simple paperback—the universe that produces, breathes life into, and supports books is changing in positive, inclusive ways, year by year. The Future Book is here and continues to evolve. You’re holding it. It’s exciting. It’s boring. It’s more important than it has ever been.

But temper some of those flight-of-fancy expectations. In many ways, it’s still a potato."
craigmod  ebooks  reading  howweread  2018  kindle  eink  print  publishing  selfpublishing  blurb  lulu  amazon  ibooks  apple  digital  bookfuturism  hypertext  hypercard  history  vannevarbush  borges  twitter  animation  video  newsletters  email  pdf  mobi  epub  infrastructure  systems  economics  goldenrecord  voyager  audio  audiobooks  smarthphones  connectivity  ereaders  podcasts  socialmedia  kevinkelly  benthompson  robinsloan  mailchimp  timbuktulabs  elenafavilli  francescacavallo  jackcheng  funding  kickstarter  crowdfunding  blogs  blogging  wikipedia  internet  web  online  writing  howwewrite  self-publishing  youtube 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Of Anarchy and Amateurism: Zine Publication and Print Dissent, by Sheila Liming [.pdf]
[via: https://are.na/block/2959533 ]

"Because they are not usually sold in stores (and because, more often than not, you have to know where to look) you rarely see them. But sines—homemade, mash-up publications suiting a variety of interests, needs, and cadres—exist, constituting a belligerently voiced need for alternative media venues even in our modem age of widespread Internet use and so-called digital democracy. Fag School, Sniffle' Glue, Slug and Lettuce, and Gutter Flowers are the titles of several nines that emerged in the United States between the 1970s and early 1990s. Many of them survive today, viewed as literary appendages of a movement of youth un-rest and social apprehension. While some embrace the opportunities of new media and have "gone digital" (for example, through web-sites like paperrad.com or in e-tines, electronically distributed sines that reach their audiences via e-mail instead of through the Postal Service), still many others maintain a commitment to the ethics of low-tech media production. They continue to be photocopied, hand-drawn, or hand-stitched and circulated according to the old roles: by mail, at zinc conventions, or at shows."
anarchy  anarchism  zines  amateurism  amateurs  publishing  self-publishing  selfpublishing  sheilaliming  lowtech  making  ephemeral  low-tech 
november 2018 by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: How to make a zine
"A guide to ideating, publishing, and distributing a DIY zine, written by Rona Akbari and illustrated by Somnath Bhatt."
zines  howto  classideas  tutorials  somnathbhatt  ronaakbari  publishing  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
november 2018 by robertogreco
The Creative Independent: On exploring how to be online in radical ways [interview with Tara Vancil, co-creator of Beaker Browser]
"Web developer Tara Vancil discusses the peer-to-peer web, the current state of self-publishing, and the future of the internet."


"[Q] I love that Beaker has a built-in editor. There’s this all-in-one feel to it where you can browse and publish websites from the browser. I was curious what self-publishing means for you and why it’s important?

[A] Well, there’s this myth floating around on the web that the very first web browser, it was called WorldWideWeb, made by Tim Berners-Lee actually had an editor built into it. Now, I’ve never been able to 100% confirm this with him, or anybody, but there’s kind of just the shared history that goes around on the web, so I’m willing to believe it. When I found that out, it was really interesting because we had been building the early prototype of Beaker and it was quite different from what it is now. It did have a button that let you create a website from the browser, so self-publishing was a part of Beaker very early on. But we didn’t fully understand how important facilitating self-publishing would be. It was fairly recently that we decided to put in an editor. We thought it would be too much work to maintain, we thought people wouldn’t care, we thought they’d prefer to use their own editors. And then one day, we just realized like, “You know what? No, a browser really should help people participate in the web.”

So self-publishing, for me, is not necessarily about owning your content. It’s not all about enabling creativity. There are other tools that enable creativity. I think it’s about creating opportunities for the widest swath of people to participate on the web. I think right now, there are so many barriers that can pop up at any given moment when you decide, “I want to make an app, I want to make a game, I want to publish my portfolio, or I want to create an interactive art piece.” With Beaker, self-publishing is about reducing as many of those barriers as possible, so that literally everybody can have some hope of meaningfully participating on the web. Because why not? That’s what the web is. It’s this really strange thing.

I like to call the web humanity’s shared language. We’ve all come together, by some miracle, as a society to define a set of rules and technical standards about how we will communicate, how our computers will communicate with each other, and people all over the world use this. I mean, that’s pretty miraculous that we’ve managed to do that. So why shouldn’t everybody be able to build stuff on it, and share things on it? It seems really sad that right now that’s not the case, and I think it’s also boring.

[Q] There seems to be a general feeling that HTTP doesn’t provide a productive space any longer. Recently there’s been a lot of interest in going offline or just slowing down. I wanted to get your thoughts on the offline first movement and if you align yourself with it?

[A] Offline first is a funny concept to me because it’s rooted in both very corporate ideology and very anti-corporate ideology. So there’s one meaning for offline first, I think it was coined by Google, and this was a way for building applications such that low-power devices in places that have really bad connectivity could cache an application’s or website’s assets so that it can still function well. I think this is an honorable effort to build applications with the expectation that we don’t live in an equitable world, but we have to remember that a corporation like Google is motivated to do that because they want to sell more devices, and they want to further the reach of Gmail and their other tools.

And then there’s the other side of the movement, where offline first means something very different to another group of people. If you’ve heard of Secure Scuttlebutt, it’s a peer-to-peer online friends space. It’s a place for people to post content and share things with their friends without having to connect through something like Twitter or Facebook. And a lot of the folks that participated there in the early days were really interested in finding ways to live a little more independently, to maybe not depend entirely on the electrical grid, or to be able to live on a boat, or to maintain their own garden. I think that reflects an interest in slowing down, and a reaction to the speed of consumption that the web of today demands of us.

So at the end of the day, I think offline first—by both definitions—is rooted in the observation that we don’t live in an equitable world, and modern applications do not serve everybody. They don’t serve every kind of lifestyle. I’m definitely interested in living in a home with electricity and modern amenities but I’m also really interested in doing that responsibly, and I care a lot about my own sanity and other people being able to maintain their sanity in this hyper-connected world. I think a lot of us are perhaps exploring how we do that for the long-term. So I like being online and I want to continue being online, but I think looking to these communities that are exploring how to be online in radical ways, is really important.

[Q] Beaker is a good example of that. In my own exploration of the peer-to-peer web, I’ve needed to either be sent a link directly from somebody, or be in connection with the HTTP web to find websites on the p2p web. I’m curious what the longer-term goals are? Is it sort of like in tandem with the current web, or is the goal to replace HTTP with peer-to-peer protocols?

[A] Yeah, there’s an interesting effect on the peer-to-peer web where you kind of have to bootstrap your experience somehow. You either have to have a chat open with a friend so that you can send links between each other, or you need to have a curated list of websites and projects that you want to visit. And interestingly, I think that’s a problem that the HTTP web suffers from as well. It’s an aggregation problem. If you think back to the early days of the HTTP web, someone—or some company—had to go out there and crawl the web, and collect the links that they found, and then publish them somewhere. That’s just a fact of how networks work. It’s hard to aggregate content independently.

So I think what that means is that if the peer-to-peer web is going to become a part of the web as we know it, then so are search engines and aggregators. And maybe those search engines will use HTTP just because it’s easier for that purpose. Maybe not. I’m not sure that we need to replace HTTP entirely to fix what’s wrong with the web. I think we need to replace HTTP in cases where it encourages centralization of governance over our communities, and it discourages innovation and the ownership of our online experiences. That’s why I think it’s so important that people are able to publish their own websites, for example, because a website can be anything. It can be the place where you post your micro-blogs, like your tweets. It can be a place where you post blog posts, which is pretty obvious. It could be a place where you post photos or art projects, and I feel that the HTTP web makes it so difficult to do that right now. As a result, we’re cornered into the situation where we have to publish on Twitter, and Facebook, and Instagram. And that’s fine, those are pretty cool platforms, but they also constrain us, and I think we’re starting to understand the limits and the consequences of that.

[Q] It might be a positive thing that you can’t search the peer-to-peer web currently, in that it has to be such a personal connection where my friend will send me a link to a website. HTTP is a constant process of following links to other links. On the p2p web it’s more about accessing a page and then reading it to the end, and then maybe going offline after that.

[A] Yeah, there’s a certain finiteness to it, which is blissful at times. I’m not sure it’ll stay that way forever. There’s a lesson to be learned about how it feels to use the peer-to-peer web. I’ve found websites where I couldn’t believe I found them. It felt like I’d just stumbled upon a treasure. Like, “Wow, this person is out there and they’ve made this thing. I want to read everything they’ve posted,” and then that’s the end of it. It’s a really satisfying experience.

[Q] It also feels like you have to forget what you thought the web was when you’re approaching the p2p web. I find it pretty difficult to describe what the peer-to-peer web is, and I think maybe that’s not just me. It’s broad, it’s many different things, it’s multi-layered.

What does your ideal web look like?

[A] I want a web that I can build on. I love building on the web so much. To me, websites are my canvas. I grew up in a family that I think looked down on anything that smelled of creativity. I grew up hunting, watching football, and playing sports. There’s no creative exploration in that. I became exposed to the creative process fairly late in my life, and the canvas for me is websites. I love the feeling that I get when I sit down with a blank slate, and I know how to use the tools, I know how to wield HTML and CSS and bend it to my will. I want a web that is conducive to that, and I don’t want to just build standalone websites. I would love to build things that are meaningful to people, that have users, and then I want those users to be able to take what I’ve made and be able to shape it into something new.

On the web today, I feel like I can build something amazing, and I can go out and find people who want to use what I’ve built. But it’s a very rigid process. To build something, I first of all probably have to find investment because launching a service on the web, launching an app that’s actually going to get wide usage, is really, really expensive. So I think I want a web that makes that process cheaper, and distributes the cost of bandwidth and storage across its users. And then beyond that, I want a web that doesn’t try to lock down the experience of … [more]
beakerbrowser  taravancil  2018  publishing  self-publishing  online  internet  time  longevity  ephemeral  ephemerality  collaboration  technology  design  decentralization  radicalism  web  webdev  webdesign  seeding  p2p  peertopeer  http  dat  decentralizedweb  independence  hashbase  p2ppublishing  p2pweb  selfpublishing  distributed  dweb 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Reedsy: Where authors meet the best publishing professionals
[not one woman on the team]

"What if the best publishing professionals were not at publishing houses anymore? Reedsy helps authors collaborate with expert editors and book designers to take their book to another level. We only work with a select group of the best freelancers, the ones who know the publishing landscape better than a writer knows the taste of hot coffee.

They know how to help. Come meet them."
publishing  ebooks  self-publishing  books  epublishing  selfpublishing 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Sawyer Hollenshead | Creating an ebook with Siteleaf
"For this year’s edition of Pocket - A Reading List I wanted to try something different. Last year I made the entire ePub by hand. An ebook is basically just a bunch of HTML files that are “zipped” into a single file, in my case it’s one HTML file per article/chapter. With each article in a separate HTML file, it’s very time consuming to play around with different layouts and styles. If I wanted to make a change to the formatting of the title page, for example, then I’d have to go into each HTML file and change the markup. No fun.

This year I decided to move the management of the ebook content into a content management system. Siteleaf, a product of ours at Oak, turned out to be the perfect content management system for an ebook. Siteleaf is great because it outputs your content as plain HTML files by default. It also has a “wildcard” feature where you can append .liquid to the end of any filename and use templating tags within the file. This wildcarding feature was perfect for creating non-HTML ebook files like the toc.ncx and content.opf files, which are detailed below."
books  ebooks  tools  onlinetoolkit  epub  mobi  howto  selfpublishing  2013  sawyerhollenshead  epubs  self-publishing 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Print-on-demand | Experimental Book
"I know a few of you are thinking about print-on-demand (POD) for the photobook project. POD is fast and cheap and has totally changed the nature of self-publishing. It’s quite good for some things, and not so great for others.

A few reasons to use POD:

— easy, quick mock-up of an idea, even if you plan to produce it in another way;
— cost: some formats allow you to print a book for under $10;
— with very low up-front costs, you can produce a few machine-made, perfect-bound books with a more commercial feel;
— your books can be purchased through a digital storefront;
— if you plan on producing 1–100 books——more than that and it makes sense to look at other formats;
— if you plan to make changes to your book and you’re unsure how many to print;
— to have access to formats that are not typically available outside of a commercial context (newsprint, magazine).

A few reasons not to use POD:

— you give up control of some aspects of the production of your work;
— frequent printing/binding errors (printer will usually offer a credit);
— you’re limited by the specs of the POD printer (size, finish, paper);
— not cost-efficient for producing more than a few books (especially if over 100);
— cost (you’re bound by the printer’s set pricing).

Popular POD printers:

— Blurb.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— special finishes specifically for photobooks (much more $)
— magazine format (including printing on inside front and back covers)—I can show you a sample of this if you’re interested
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Lulu.com
— many soft- and hardcover book formats
— digital storefront
— upload PDF via website

Newspaperclub.com
— various newsprint formats
— free shipping to most places
— scheduled printing 2x per week
— upload PDF via website

Espresso Book Machine (various locations)
— lower quality
— b/w interiors / color covers
— very fast (sometimes on-the-spot)
— physical, walk-in locations only

Magcloud.com
— magazine format from HP

I’ve had mostly good experiences with Blurb, Lulu, Espresso and Newspaperclub, but I’ve never used Magcloud."

[via this thread: https://twitter.com/rogre/status/405790451791175680

@soulellis What do you use for digital printing on demand? Lulu? Blurb? Other?

@rogre all of the above plus @newspaperclub. but for 530 [http://soulellis.com/projects/530-2/ ] I found a digital printer in Reykjavík, who was able to print 50 books only.

@soulellis @newspaperclub Thank you.

@soulellis Any preference or noticeable differences between Lulu and Blurb?

@rogre Blurb good for magazine format and photobooks, Lulu good for thick text-based pubs. Also --> http://experimentalbook.wordpress.com/2013/10/17/print-on-demand/

@soulellis Perfect. Thanks so much. ]
books  publishing  paulsoulellis  printondemand  lulu  magcloud  espressobookmachine  newspaperclub  blurb  printondemnad  printing  selfpublishing  ondemand  self-publishing  epublishing  digitalpublishing 
november 2013 by robertogreco
The LBM Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers « Little Brown Mushroom
[via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/julianbleecker/sets/72157634559501046/ ]

"Established in 2008 by Alec Soth, Little Brown Mushroom (LBM) is committed to exploring the narrative potential of the photo book. Having worked closely with photographers, writers and designers, we’re now eager to exchange ideas with students and emerging artists.

Visual storytelling tends to be a lonely business. As such, it attracts more than its share of wallflowers. Here at LBM (home to more than a couple introverts), we thought it would be worthwhile to bring creative loners together to see what we can learn from each other. We’re envisioning a gathering that is more summer camp than classroom. After various daytime outings, we’ll sit around the digital projector and tell each other stories. From there we’ll discuss the ways in which visual stories can be translated into book form.

When: July 9-13, 2013

Where: After gathering each morning at the Little Brown Mushroom headquarters in St. Paul, we’ll have regular outings around the Twin Cities. Participants should have their own transportation. Housing is not provided.

Who: The gathering will be led by LBM team: Alec Soth, Carrie Thompson, Galen Fletcher, Ethan Jones, Brad Zellar and Jason Polan. We are inviting photographers, writers, illustrators, designers or anyone interested in visual storytelling to apply. While social awkwardness isn’t mandatory, it is encouraged.

Cost: Free

How to apply: 

Create a single PDF (no bigger than 5mb) with the following:

• Your name and contact information
• A concise and informal biography (age, where do you live, what do you do, etc). We’d also love to see a picture of you.
• Examples of your work (this can be photography, writing, illustration, graphic design or anything else you can get into a PDF).
• A link to your website or other work you have online
• Important: we can not accept PDF files larger than 5mb

Email the PDF to camp@littlebrownmushroom.com

Deadline: April 15th. We will notify applicants about our selection by April 30th.

view this info as a printable PDF"

----

"Established in 2008 by Alec Soth, Little Brown Mushroom (LBM) is a small publishing house located in St. Paul, Minnesota. Working closely with photographers, writers and designers, LBM is committed to experimenting with new ways of creating and distributing visual stories."
littlebrownmushroom  classideas  photobooks  ncmideas  openstudioproject  alecsoth  carriethompson  galenfletcher  ethanjones  bradzellar  jasonpollan  storytelling  projectideas  minnesota  stpaul  photography  publishing  selfpublishing  lcproject  summerinwintercamp  campforsociallyawkwardstorytellers  self-publishing 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Lacuna Books
"Lacuna Books is the best way to write and publish a book.

Lacuna Books is an application designed specially for writing books, research papers, and technical documentation. It helps you manage content more effectively and produces beautiful digital books."
books  publishing  software  tools  writing  selfpublishing  ebooks  self-publishing 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Publication Studio
"We print and bind books on demand, creating original work with artists and writers we admire. We use any means possible to help writers and artists reach a public: physical books; a digital commons (where anyone can read and annotate our books for free); eBooks; and unique social events with our writers and artists in many cities. We attend to the social life of the book. Publication Studio is a laboratory for publication in its fullest sense—not just the production of books, but the production of a public. This public, which is more than a market, is created through physical production, digital circulation, and social gathering. Together these construct a space of conversation, a public space, which beckons a public into being.

Currently there are eight Publication Studios, in Portland (run by Patricia No and Antonia Pinter), the San Francisco Bay Area, CA (run by Ian Dolton-Thornton, with sage advice from Colter Jacobsen), Vancouver, BC, Canada (run by Keith Higgins and Kathy Slade), Toronto, Ontario, Canada (run by Derek McCormack, Alana Wilcox, and Michael Maranda), Boston (run by Sam Gould), Portland, Maine (run by Daniel Fuller and the Institute for Contemporary Art), Philadelphia (run by Robert Blackson and the Tyler School of Art), Los Angeles (run by Sergio Pastor, Matthew Schum, and Lizzie Fitch), and Malmö, Sweden, run by Ola Stahl. To contact one of the Publication Studios, click on its name on the home-page of this site."
art  artists  books  diy  publishing  portland  oregon  bayarea  sanfrancisco  vancouver  britishcolumbia  toronto  boston  maine  philadelphia  losangeles  publicationstudios  selfpublishing  ebooks  publication  self-publishing  publishers  bc 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Scan/flip/spread | Soulellis
"How we author, design and publish language-based communications is undergoing a radical shape-shift. The acceleration of the book (as commodity, technological device, art object) has entered a new stage of evolution in our trajectory towards constant presence and the post-human, and reading—the eye-brain processing of written culture—has much to lose, and gain, in the transformation.

What legacy of the book do we wish to bequeath to the future?

What is the futurestory of the book?

Several attributes of reading that are about to be lost, perhaps only temporarily (patina, olfactory, nostalgic), have opened up deep space for others (gestural, social, access, speed). And even more are on the way, as we prepare for the near-future absorption of the screen into the body (Google Glasses)…

…I propose a series of printed book experiments on the occasion of MutaMorphosis: Tribute to Uncertainty. These are actions of resistance—strategies for countering our growing need to read in haste. Three concepts will direct us to a poetic, if analog, investigation of book/time and the fast/slow speed of reading: scan, flip and spread. Working with found texts, public domain works, bot-generated ephemera and other digital artifacts, a printed book or short series of books that encourages and/or discourages slow reading will be produced as a limited print-on-demand edition for the MutaMorphosis conference (via Espresso Book Machine or other inexpensive digital-to-paper solution). The books will be distributed to all conference participants for discussion (panel, artist’s presentation or otherwise, TBD).

Scan/Flip/Spread puts forward the idea of the fast(er) book (print-on-demand) and braises it with the slow read. The investigation will explore the interface of the printed book—page-to-language ratio, typographic depth and density, page-turn-time, frame, weight, read rhythm, chance, flip speed and other formal aspects of the page; as well as content—questions of narrative, sense, curation and image/word play. Our goal, as a group, will be to create a space to embrace and counter the technologies of automation that are transforming language, visual culture, the page and reading—through the printed book object."
paulvirilio  design  longform  automation  dromosphere  printondemand  mutamorphosis  uncertainty  spread  flip  scan  future  ebooks  bookfuturism  googleglass  speed  access  socialreading  gestures  nostalgia  smell  patina  reading  publishing  books  2012  paulsoulellis  slowreading  slow  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
september 2012 by robertogreco
From indie writers & publishers to adventurous readers | Bkclb
"Bkclb: almost certainly the best way to discover & publish ebooks.
Bkclb is a platform enabling writers and publishers to sell their work just the way they'd like. For the nitty-gritty, check out our FAQ."
reading  writing  indiewriters  self-publishing  selfpublishing  marketplace  publishing  ebooks  books  bkclb 
september 2012 by robertogreco
China Miéville: the future of the novel | Books | guardian.co.uk
"With the internet has come proof that there are audiences way beyond the obvious."

"In fact what's becoming obvious - an intriguing counterpoint to the growth in experiment - is the tenacity of relatively traditional narrative-arc-shaped fiction. But you don't radically restructure how the novel's distributed and not have an impact on its form. Not only do we approach an era when absolutely no one who really doesn't want to pay for a book will have to, but one in which the digital availability of the text alters the relationship between reader, writer, and book. The text won't be closed."

"A collection of artists and activists advocating the neoliberalisation of children's minds. That is scandalous and stupid. The text is open. This should – could – be our chance to remember that it was never just us who made it, and it was never just ours."

"We piss and moan about the terrible quality of self-published books, as if slews of god-awful crap weren't professionally expensively published every year."

"There's a contingent relationship between book sales and literary merit, so we should totally break the pretence at a connection, because of our amplifying connection to everyone else, and orient future-ward with a demand.

What if novelists and poets were to get a salary, the wage of a skilled worker?"

"This would only be an exaggeration of the national stipends already offered by some countries for some writers. For the great majority of people who write, it would mean an improvement in their situation, an ability to write full-time. For a few it would mean an income cut, but you know what? It was a good run. And surely it's easily worth it to undermine the marketisation of literature for some kind of collectivity.

But who decides who qualifies as a writer? Does it take one sonnet? Of what quality? Ten novels? 50,000 readers? Ten, but the right readers? God knows we shouldn't trust the state to make that kind of decision. So we should democratise that boisterous debate, as widely and vigorously as possible. It needn't be the mere caprice of taste. Which changes. And people are perfectly capable of judging as relevant and important literature for which they don't personally care. Mistakes will be made, sure, but will they really be worse than the philistine thuggery of the market?

We couldn't bypass the state with this plan, though. So for the sake of literature, apart from any- and everything else, we'll have to take control of it, invert its priorities, democratise its structures, replace it with a system worth having.

So an unresentful sense of writers as people among people, and a fidelity to literature, require political and economic transformation. For futures for novels – and everything else. In the context of which futures, who knows what politics, what styles and which contents, what relationships to what reconceived communities, which struggles to express what inexpressibles, what stories and anti-stories we will all strive and honourably fail to write, and maybe even one day succeed?"
writers  writing  publishers  democratization  democracy  futures  politics  selfpublishing  self-publishing  neoliberalism  copyright  hypertextnovels  fiction  literature  weirdfictionreview  ubuweb  lyricalrealism  zadiesmith  jamesjoyce  poulocoelho  oulipo  modernism  brunoschulz  lawrencedurrell  borges  ebooks  hypertext  hypertextfiction  text  cv  economics  publishing  leisurearts  bookfuturism  futureofbooks  2012  chinamieville  collectivity  money  artleisure 
august 2012 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Sketchbook: Print-on-demand work-in-progress
"The fact that things could be emailed, which is a prerequisite, also meant they were too easy to ignore. By making something easy to disseminate via email, you were also placing it in a fast-flowing stream of other objects… 

We wanted to exploit the fertile middle ground of “work in progress” with something that was a little more engaging, that would pull focus onto the discussions at hand, yet not so over-produced that the thing couldn’t iterate or evolve. Something that could be thrown around in a workshop—literally!—accessed in linear or non-linear fashion, carry visual and textual information, carried on the person, or remain guiltily within sight on someone’s desk. Something physical and digital' which might have an allure over simply digital, at least at the form of artifacts.

In other words, a small book. So a simple InDesign template later, and a not-quite-so-simple PDF upload a little later, a bunch of A5 books emerged via Lulu’s print-on-demand (POD) service."

[See also: http://www.helsinkidesignlab.org/blog/helsinki-street-eats-and-hacking-lulu ]
workinprogress  communication  email  oma  documentation  process  craigmod  printondemand  low2no  amazon  layout  jamesgoggiin  magcloud  dearlulu  helsinkidesignlab  sitra  newspaperclub  blurb  lulu  projectideas  glvo  books  indesign  pdf  printing  2012  selfpublishing  self-publishing  cityofsound  danhill  unbook 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Speak Up Archive: Dear Lulu, The New Standards
"My plan for the workshop is to investigate the visible & tangible parameters of graphic design — type specimens, halftone screens and, in particular, colour tests & calibration charts — & make a book of our own self-produced tests which we will send to print on Friday afternoon using the online print-on-demand system Lulu. The book project will therefore act as a colour/type/pattern test of the very system with which it is produced. “Print-on-demand” is an increasingly important production system which can serve to make us designers rethink the impact our profession has on the environment and to question the often wasteful print volumes and production methods requested of us by our clients. Graphic designers, and especially students, have a chance to use and subvert these relatively new (and fairly cheap) technological systems to our advantage."

"The result… a fantastic & imaginative resource…"

[via: http://www.cityofsound.com/blog/2012/08/print-on-demand-work-in-progress.html ]

[Book link is broken, now see:
http://www.lulu.com/shop/hochschule-darmstadt-fachbereich-gestaltung/dear-lulu/paperback/product-5643235.html
http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/1197693 ]

[Another interview about the project: http://www.printmag.com/design_articles/supply_on_demand/tabid/449/Default.aspx ]

[James Groggin's website: http://www.practise.co.uk/ ]
printondemand  digital  digitalprinting  patterns  photography  selfpublishing  self-publishing  frankphilippin  howto  projectideas  glvo  diy  design  books  typography  printing  publishing  lulu  jamesgoggin 
august 2012 by robertogreco
How I got a big advance from a big publisher and self-published anyway | Penelope Trunk
"Book sales are about community. If you have a community of people who listen to you via blog posts, then you have a community of people who will be interested to know how you put a bigger idea together in a book."
publishing  rants  via:jbushnell  penelopetrunk  community  self-publishing  books  blogging  selfpublishing 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Aerbook Cloud Publishing
"Create, share, and sell graphical eBooks and apps made in your browser without writing any code.

It's the easiest, most inexpensive way to make tablet-worthy titles for all major formats and devices."
selfpublishing  applications  publishing  ebooks  ebook  aerbook  self-publishing 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Paperweight
"Paperweight is an online project dedicated to furthering a dialogue on independent publishing. Paperweight also publishes offline articles expanded from the website and organizes public discussions.

Paperweight began in the Winter of 2009 and was accidentally destroyed during the SOPA (Stop Online Privacy Act) protests during the Winter of 2012.

The independent publishing community is one that has seen a rapid growth within the past several years. This community requires a space that can facilitate a cultural dialogue, both in historical and contemporary contexts, as well as provide resources that others have found helpful in their own production.

Paperweight’s online presence operates through Arena, itself an experiment in independent publishing and research."
self-publishing  selfpublishing  are.na  research  independentpublishing  sopa  paperweight  maxfenton  publishing  books 
july 2012 by robertogreco
no2self.net » dyslexia, eBooks and typography
"So, if you’re an app developer and you fancy looking at this more, maybe we should have a chat? Better yet, if you actually know something about dyslexia and can put my armchair/googled understanding straight that would also be much appreciated.

In the meantime, there are things that can be done to test this further and craft something at home. In an hour or so over the weekend I’d managed to create Josh another book with a similar layout approach using Proboscis’ self-publishing system bookleteer.com, some text from Project Gutenberg, a font made from my own handwriting (made using Fontifier a few years ago) and some help from a certain Mr Kipling.

We can view the online version with an iPad or on a laptop, and after some quick folding I’ll be giving him the paper copy later today (PDF link – A3 format).

If he thinks there’s any discernible difference I think it’ll be worth pursuing further…"
typography  ebooks  self-publishing  typeface  learning  robannable  2012  reading  fonts  dyslexia  selfpublishing 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Create your Tweetbook with Bookapp
"Archive your Twitter feed into a beautifully printed and bound book or keep it in PDF form."
papernet  printondemand  twitter  books  printing  tweetbook  bookapp  selfpublishing  self-publishing 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Very Rich Indie Writer – Novelr - Making People Read
"Amanda Hocking is 27 years old. She has 9 self-published books to her name, and sells 100,000+ copies of those ebooks per month. She has never been traditionally published. This is her blog. And it’s no stretch to say – at $9 per book/70% per sale for the Kindle store – that she makes a lot of money from her monthly book sales. (Perhaps more importantly: a publisher on the private Reading2.0 mailing list has said, to effect: there is no traditional publisher in the world right now that can offer Amanda Hocking terms that are better than what she’s currently getting, right now on the Kindle store, all on her own.)

And that is stunning news."
books  ebooks  selfpublishing  indie  writing  publishing  kindle  amazon  self-publishing 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Blurb: Make your own book. Make it great.
"With Blurb, you’ll find all the tools you need to make your own photo book, whether you’re making a personalized wedding album, cookbook, baby book, travel photo book, or fundraising book. Count on bookstore-quality printing and binding, and a range of choices from Hardcover photobooks to Softcover paperbacks in an array of trim sizes. Use any of our free online bookmaking tools. Learn how to publish a book and much more with our free how-to tips and tutorials or watch our two-minute BookSmart video and see how easy it is to make a coffee table photo book. Be sure to register and subscribe to Blurb emails to get the news first on Blurb events and promo code coupon offers."

[Related: http://www.magcloud.com and http://www.lulu.com ]
publishing  self-publishing  blurb  books  howto  print  portfolio  photography  flickr  printing  writing  classideas  selfpublishing 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Kickstartup — Successful fundraising with Kickstarter & the (re)making of Art Space Tokyo — Craig Mod
"I want to share with you a story about books, publishing, fundraising and seed capital. It's a story that I hope will change how you think about all of these topics. And it's a story that I hope will serve as a template. In April 2010, Ashley Rawlings and I used community fundraising to raise nearly $24,000[1] to breathe new life into our book, Art Space Tokyo. My goal here is to outline what we did and why we did it, with the hope of inspiring anyone with an itch, gumption and a good narrative, to do the same. To bring beautiful, well-considered things into the world."
books  kickstarter  crowdfunding  entrepreneurship  publishing  craigmod  marketing  print  self-publishing  tokyo  fundraising  funding  design  printing  typography  selfpublishing 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Connect, Write, Self-Publish and Promote Your Book - all in one place. - FastPencil
"FastPencil is book publishing without the pain. The traditional book publishing process can take many months of effort and more money than most writers anticipate. It’s no wonder authors get discouraged.
fastpencil  writing  books  online  collaboration  printing  publishing  free  selfpublishing  tools  ebooks  self-publishing 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Do projects.
"Do projects is Nurri Kim and Adam Greenfield, accompanied by a loose network of friends and collaborators. Some of our ambitions are to: - develop words and images that make the people who encounter them re-see themselves and the world around them; - find the most appropriate containers for our ideas; - craft the kind of books that please their readers in the details of their conception, design and construction as much as in the things they say; - and figure out what “do-it-yourself” might mean in an age when new production technologies, informational and logistical networks give the independent amateur producer unprecedented power to reach out and make things happen. And even though we have absolutely no formal training or background in any of the skills we’d need to make good on these ambitions, one thing we definitely believe in is learning by doing. This site is a record of everything we learn along the way. We hope you enjoy both it and the things we make."
books  publishing  art  photography  design  urban  adamgreenfield  diy  selfpublishing  howto  self-publishing 
december 2009 by robertogreco
MagCloud
"MagCloud enables you to publish your own magazines. All you have to do is upload a PDF and we'll take care of the rest: printing, mailing, subscription management, and more."

[more info: http://powazek.com/posts/984 ]
magazines  publishing  diy  make  printing  pdf  catalog  selfpublishing  onlinetoolkit  zines  via:preoccupations  classideas  self-publishing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
HobbyPrincess: Draft Craft Manifesto
"I’ve been trying to pin down what is driving the increasing popularity of crafting for a while now. This is what I’ve got so far"
activism  crafts  craft  diy  manifestos  making  make  sustainability  society  skills  selfpublishing  hobbies  hacks  hacking  community  gadgets  fun  gamechanging  trends  interaction  opensource  longtail  glvo  build  design  culture  creativity  create  howto  self-publishing 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Scribd
"Scribd is a Silicon Valley startup creating technology that makes it easy to share documents online. You can think of Scribd as a big online library where everyone can publish original content, including you!"
print  publishing  online  selfpublishing  diy  documents  sharing  pdf  internet  web  manuals  literature  filesharing  onlinetoolkit  documentation  converter  self-publishing 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Blurb | Self publish with free BookSmart software for Windows or Mac
"So we put our minds together, and developed a creative publishing service simple and smart enough to make anyone an author – every blogger, cook, photographer, parent, traveler, poet, pet owner, marketer, everyone. (This means you.)"
books  publishing  selfpublishing  glvo  printing  design  writing  portfolio  photography  zines  printer  self-publishing 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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