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robertogreco : servers   10

GitHub - jkriss/altcloud: A web server with extra powers. Run your own stuff.
"Altcloud is a web server with some niceties build in so that you can create real applications without any backend code or external services.

The idea is to set up an altcloud server on something like a Digital Ocean instance or a C.H.I.P. and run multiple sites off of that single server.

Altcloud is powered by simple configuration files and uses the local filesystem for storage. It doesn't scale, and that's just fine.

This implementation of the altcloud server is written in node.js, but the specification is platform and language agnostic.

DISCLAIMER: this is beta software. Please don't trust it just yet."
jessekriss  altcloud  cloud  diy  web  webdev  servers  software  applications  webdesign 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Are You Being Served? → Summit_afterlife.md
"A few months after “Are You Being Served?“ some of us met up in the Feminist Server Summit at Art Meets Radical Openness (AMRO <http://radical-openness.org>), ESC in Graz. The theme of this edition, Autonomy (im)possible sparked discussions on relationality, dependency and what that would mean for an (imaginary) Feminist Server. The following embryonic manifesto was written in response to these discussions.
A feminist server…

* Is a situated technology. She has a sense of context and considers herself to be part of an ecology of practices
* Is run for and by a community that cares enough for her in order to make her exist
* Builds on the materiality of software, hardware and the bodies gathered around it
* Opens herself to expose processes, tools, sources, habits, patterns
* Does not strive for seamlessness. Talk of transparency too often signals that something is being made invisible
* Avoids efficiency, ease-of-use, scalability and immediacy because they can be traps
* Knows that networking is actually an awkward, promiscuous and parasitic practice
* Is autonomous in the sense that she decides for her own dependencies
* Radically questions the conditions for serving and service; experiments with changing client-server relations where she can
* Treats network technology as part of a social reality
* Wants networks to be mutable and read-write accessible
* Does not confuse safety with security
* Takes the risk of exposing her insecurity
* Tries hard not to apologize when she is sometimes not available


Another version will be developed and presented at The Ministry of Hacking (ESC, Graz) <http://esc.mur.at/de/projekt/ministry-hacking>. You are welcome to contribute to this text through comments, rewriting, additions or erasure: <http://note.pad.constantvzw.org/public_pad/feministserver>."
via:caseygollan  feminism  servers  technology  ecology  community  software  hardware  materiality  efficiency  scalability  slow  small  immediacy  networking  autonomy  security  safety  readwrite  service  manifestos  context  sfsh  care  caring  transparency  open  openness 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Sandstorm
"Sandstorm is an open source operating system for personal and private clouds."

"What can I do with it?

Create
Create Google-Docs-like spreadsheets, documents, forms, etc. with EtherCalc, Etherpad, Sandforms, Draw.io, and more.

Collaborate
Share documents, diagrams, and other files with your colleagues and friends, and collaborate in real-time.

Communicate
Sync up with your colleagues securely with great chat applications like Rocket.Chat.

How is it different?

Usability | Designed for Humans
Sandstorm is the easiest way there has ever been to run a server.

Sandstorm requires no technical expertise to use.

Installing apps on Sandstorm is as easy as installing apps on your phone. No need to read documentation and edit config files – and no need to wait for IT to do it for you.

Sandstorm emphasizes users over apps.

You log into Sandstorm, not into each app separately.

All of your data across all apps (documents, chat rooms, whatever) can be found and searched in one place, rather than logging into each one separately.

You can share and collaborate on anything – or keep it private.

Security | Secure by Default
Sandstorm is ridiculously secure.

The biggest challenge to securing any server is buggy apps. Some app developers are good at security, but some are not, and it's usually impossible to know who is whom without doing a costly security audit.

Sandstorm, therefore, takes a different approach: break data down into "grains" (for example, individual documents, or chat rooms) and isolate each one in a secure sandbox from which it cannot talk to the world without your express permission. With this approach, no matter how buggy your document editor might be, each document can only possibly be accessed by the people you shared it with. No matter how buggy your chat room, only the people you permitted will ever see the logs.

Skeptical? Check out our security docs and list of security non-events to learn more.

Because Sandstorm manages access control on every document, it can tell you who has accessed your data and allow you to revoke that access at any time. Prove that your sensitive data is secure by reviewing all the systems it is connected to."
cloud  opensource  privacy  security  servers  sandstorm  onlinetoolkit  ethercalc  etherpad  sandforms  draw.io 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Ingrid Burrington - Crash Course in Digital Literacy - Video Archive - The Conference by Media Evolution
"In our session ”Crash Course in Digital Literacy” Ingrid will give an overview of the physical infrastructure of the internet, share some of her own experiences trying to visit and map these infrastructures, and explain why it’s useful to think about the internet as a physical, tangible landscape.

Ingrid Burrington lives and works on an island off the coast of America, where she writes, makes maps, and tells jokes about places, politics, and the weird feelings people have about both.

Most recently, her work has appeared in Creative Time Reports. She is currently a fellow at the Data and Society Research Institute and an artist in residence at Eyebeam, an art and technology center in New York."
ingridburrington  internet  networks  web  online  datacenters  servers  infrastructure  2014  digitalliteracy  julianoliver  drones  code 
august 2014 by robertogreco
HowTo: EC2 for Poets
"Most people think they can't run a server, but servers aren't any more complicated than a laptop. The main difference is that a server is always on and always connected to the Internet.

EC2 for Poets is a tutorial that shows you how to set up a server in Amazon's "cloud." All you need is a net connection, credit card, and a basic understanding of how to use computers."
servers  s3  cloud  server  hosting  setup  howto  amazon  ec2 
july 2012 by robertogreco
A Cloud of My Own (Pinboard Blog)
"I have no idea what I'm doing. I do it, I write it up, and then wisdom pours down from the Internet."
tinkering  servers  hardware  twitter  crowdsourcing  web  internet  2012  learningbydoing  experimentation  learning  doing  maciejceglowski  pinboard  maciejcegłowski 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Anatomy of a Crushing (Pinboard Blog)
"A number of people asked about the technical aspects of the great Delicious exodus of 2010, and I've finally had some time to write it up."
pinboard  scaling  performance  infrastructure  servers  del.icio.us  migration  yahoo  2010  2011  maciejceglowski  bookmarks  bookmarking  maciejcegłowski 
march 2011 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Servers at Sea
"I have to assume, then, that we're moving ever closer to true deep-water city-states – only they won't be libertarian ocean-going homesteads, after all, they'll be distributed networks of supercomputing villages afloat on, and drawing power from, the tides."
google  energy  sea  infrastructure  design  computing  architecture  archigram  servers  power 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Annotation (Harper's Magazine): Keyword: Evil: Google's addiction to cheap energy
Annotated blueprint of Google's The Dalles, Oregon data center and discussion of the concessions, handouts received, influence wielded, energy consumption, etc.
cloud  cloudcomputing  google  datacenters  oregon  energy  environment  power  servers  sustainability  green  technology  infrastructure  trends  internet  information  data  politics  electricity  networks  web  capitalism  influence  government 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: Look, ma, no servers
"Think of how much more efficiently computing assets are used in this model - and, equally important, the way it renders IT essentially invisible to the users."
cloud  servers  internet  web  business  computing  entrepreneurship  nicholascarr 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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