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robertogreco : sfpc   18

Ekene Ijeoma
"Ekene Ijeoma works at intersections of life experiences and data studies, poetic acts and analytic insights, and aesthetic quality and social efficacy creating artworks ranging from apps and websites to music/sound performances and interactive installations."
ekeneijeoma  sfpc  art  data  socialjustice  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
5 weeks ago by robertogreco
Taeyoon Choi on drawing, teaching, disability, and the difference between work and project – The Creative Independent
"I think the common mistake of a beginner teacher is giving too much: too much preparation and too much energy, too much love. They end up feeling burned out easily.

I try to limit how much I prepare and leave room for students to fill that. I’ve had good success with that recently. Also, I think teachers are often exhausted even before the class begins simply because of mental anxiety. Before class, I try to sleep well, eat a good meal, and be energetic.

Acknowledging that I’m not an expert always really helped me as well. I don’t have answers for many student questions, especially technical questions. Conceptual questions can be confusing too. Sometimes it’s good to say something like, “I don’t know, I’m sorry. Let’s look at it together.” This relieves a lot of burden from your shoulders.

I learn best when I see a teacher working on a problem. If you have a code problem, you’re stuck, and you have an error, what do you do? You open up Stack Overflow. How do you search it? How do you fix things? Learning how to work through a problem is way more important than doing it the “right way.” I try to teach the emotional roller coaster of coding, which is similar to the experience of working on art and having breakthrough moments.

There are many different kinds of teaching. It depends on context. For SFPC, we select students so that we can collaborate with them. The focus is finding and building a community we are excited about. When I teach elsewhere, sometimes it’s more technical and transactional. I think that’s fine; schools have different goals.

Lately I’m trying to focus on supporting future teachers. I think I’m quite good at helping people teach. I taught a class at NYU called “Teaching as Art” and want to do more of that.

I teach because I want to be a student. I still go to classes a lot. Right now I’m learning American Sign Language, which is completely changing everything. I also do yoga. My yoga teacher is an amazing teacher: very generous and supportive. My teacher also takes other teachers’ classes. I think reciprocity is about always learning and respecting another. That’s the only way you could actually offer something."
taeyoonchoi  teaching  howweteach  learning  interestedness  interestingness  2017  pedagogy  cv  unschooling  deschooling  howwelearn  education  disability  sfpc  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
april 2018 by robertogreco
available in response | sara hendren
"I want to dig into the idea of availability in teaching—in the affective sense, not just the conceptual one. Availability is about being deeply attuned to what’s happening for a group of three, or ten, or twenty-one students, and understanding the differences between those groups so you can calibrate accordingly. It’s broadcasting enough confidence and calm up front that people will trust your intentions, but also the clarity of mind to alter your plans mid-stream and try something else—in response. Plenty of people found it difficult to trust whether Irwin could really pull off something substantive with all of his waiting around, and it takes a tremendous amount of trust for both teachers and students to act together in this way. But availability isn’t disorganization. It’s a quality of attention to the specificities of encounters, this minute, and then this one, and the next.

Steve Seidel, who gave me my first full-time job at Project Zero and first put me onto Irwin, modeled this kind of availability over and over for me. He’d taught in high school classrooms for seventeen years before going into research, and I was lucky to witness, in my early twenties, the ways he welcomed graduate students into his office and his courses, treating their concerns and questions with absolute dignity, like he had all the time in the world for them (and he didn’t!). I saw that there’s a sincere performance aspect to availability: the artificial slowing of time, the listening carefully, and the under-determined nature of exchanges with students, even if you can predict what might be on their minds. I’ve spent the last many years trying to emulate him as much as I can.

The availability thing really came alive, though, when I spent a couple of days at a time down at the School for Poetic Computation in New York. I was there twice as a visiting artist, and both times I gave a talk and then students signed up for half-hour or hour conversations. We walked, or we sat in a garden, or we looked at their work, and we talked. And most of time—these were strangers to me—I tried to get right to the essence with questions and more questions. What’s on your mind? And tell me more. And so on. You have to shore up all your reserves, to marshal all your wits about you when you do this. You have to smile and squelch the urge to fill silences, take a deep breath and pretend like you’ve known each other for some time, in the hopes that this person can get a little space to work longer on what’s in their heads and on paper, or in code, or whatever it is.

I got a little glimpse of this, too, when just a couple of weeks ago I spent time with students in the ID2 program of the Angewandte (university for applied arts) in Vienna. Students were at a halfway point in their course, which had nothing to do with disability. I came and introduced some ideas, and then they prototyped rapidly: a series of ideas-in-things, held in the provisional. There are so many reasons this kind of workshop should ultimately fail. The teacher drops in from outside; there’s no extrinsic motive for them to come along for your invitation. When it succeeds, it’s because of availability in response. With a thousand cues you have to signal: I am here now, holding space for you to do some good work."
availability  listening  sarahendren  robertirwin  teaching  learning  education  art  cv  canon  2017  audiencesofone  seveseidel  projectzero  sfpc  schoolforpoeticcomputation  id2  angewandte  conversation  unschooling  deschooling 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Poetic Computation: Reader
"Greetings. Welcome to the first class of Poetics and Politics of Computation at the School for Poetic Computation(SFPC). I’d like to begin the class by asking “What is poetic computation?” First, there is the poetics of code, which refers to code as a form of poetry. There is something poetic about code itself, the way that syntax works, the way that repetitions work, and the way that instruction becomes execution through abstraction. There is also what I call the poetic effect of code, which is an aesthetic experience realized through code. In other words, when the mechanics of words are in the right place, the language transcends its constraints and rules, and in turn, creates this poetic effect whereby thought is transformed into experience.

Together, the poetics of code and the poetic effect of code form ‘poetic computation.’ The terms code and computation are often used interchangeably, but I should note that code is only one aspect of computation. Code is a series of instruction for computation that requires logical systems and hardware to make the instructions computable. In that sense, computation is a higher level concept than code. For our purposes, however, we can use poetics of code and poetics of computation interchangeably throughout these discussions.

To a non-coder, non-artist friend, or to those just beginning to learn to program, I often say code may look like poetry in an alien language. And to those more experienced with code, writing code sometimes feels like writing poetry because it doesn’t always ‘work.’ I mean two things by ‘work’: first, does it work as an art form? Is it good poetry? On the other hand, I mean ‘work’ in a more utilitarian sense. Does it have practical application?

At SFPC, we like to think that poetic computation is when language meets mathematics, and logic meets electricity. Sometimes, poetic computation is literally writing poems with code. Some of our teachers and students write poetry with algorithms to explore what the language can do. When we started the school, a lot of people asked if the school is for generative poetry or electronic literature. We clarified that while we are definitely interested in the intersection of language and computation, we want to explore a broader definition of the ‘poetic.’ We want to investigate the art of computation as well as the expressive qualities of code, including its aesthetic, visual, aural and material aspects.

While this artistic potential lies at the core of the school’s excitement about code and computation, I’m interested in how this turn towards art may help us explore political possibilities. In this class, I consider computation to be a lens for examining reality and thinking about emergent issues in the world. In other words, computation can be a vehicle for imagining new ways of being in the world. Let’s first step back to look at material precedents of modern computation and computers."
taeyoonchoi  coding  processing  sfpc  poetry  books  toread  ebooks  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
september 2017 by robertogreco
The Art of Teaching
[via: "The slide deck for the workshop is superb. Such a great experience, so grateful to @tchoi8 & the other participants." https://twitter.com/dphiffer/status/879465006449909760

referencing also: "How I learn to build things. Something I created for @tchoi8’s Art of Learning workshop at @eyeofestival."
https://twitter.com/dphiffer/status/879366496354488322 ]

[video: "Absence is Presence with Distance"
https://vimeo.com/234330230

"As an artist, I work with technology and narrative – formal and relational projects. As an activist, I examine personal and political – practice and praxis. As an educator, I create feedback between plastic and elastic – learning and unlearning. My talk is set at the dawn. We are waiting for the sun to rise and we are full of questions. What’s the role of an artist as an activist now? How can we critique oppressive systems that create the sense of ‘others’ based on ability and legal status? What’s kind of pedagogy can we experiment through alternative schools? How can we create a community among those who have nothing in common? By creating art, we can give form to our intentions, contribute to making the world we want to live in.

( For a companion posting to this talk visit:

https://medium.com/@tchoi8/absence-is-presence-with-distance-c0712aada56c )]
taeyoonchoi  education  teaching  purpose  routine  ritual  silence  flow  conflict  communication  structure  nurture  authority  kojinkaratani  jean-lucnancy  community  howweteach  pedagogy  learning  howwelearn  eyeo2017  unlearning  curriculum  syllabus  sfpc  schoolforpoeticcomputation  art  craft  beauty  utility  generosity  sfsh  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  classideas  cv  reciprocity  gifts  kant  discretion  instruction  discipline  johndewey  bmc  blackmountaincollege  justice  annialbers  stndardization  weaving  textiles  making  projectbasedlearning  materials  progress  progressive  unschooling  deschooling  control  experimentation  knowledge  fabrication  buckminsterfuller  constructivism  constructionism  georgehein  habit  freedom  democracy  paulofreire  judithbutler  sunaurataylor  walking  christinesunkim  uncertainty  representation  intervention  speculation  simulation  christopheralexander  objectives  outcomes  learningoutcomes  learningobjectives  remembering  creativity  evaluation  application  analysis  understanding  emancipation  allankaprow  judychicago  s 
june 2017 by robertogreco
lessons for students — Medium
"lesson 1: Everything is about curiosity …

lesson 2: The world is Hungry for Ideas …

Lesson 3: Questions are key. Questions lead to conversation, conversation leads to learning.

At the School for Poetic Computation we start the first day always with the same activity — sit quietly by yourself for 20–30 mins and write down every question you have about what we are studying. Then, in smaller groups (and then finally in a larger group) we organize and collate these questions, developing a taxonomy. In some ways this is a contrast to typical school term, where you are presented with a syllabus that kind of lays out the answers.

The reason we do this is that invariably questions lead to discussion and talking and we’re really of the mindset that education is basically structured conversation — that the key to learning is talking, and through talking, we can find better metaphors, better illustrations, better explanations to make harder things simple, or explain how a gets to z.

Lesson 4. Together we know more …

Lesson 5: Simple and honest things win …

Lesson 6: Artistic practice is research, take that obligation seriously.

You are a researcher.

I’ve made the argument for a long time that artistic practice is a form or research, the same way a car company might have an R&D department to think about cars of the future, artists are a kind of R&D department for humanity thinking about different possible futures. It’s important to take the job of research seriously: to study the history, to take notes about process, to publish, etc. In terms of history, I think it’s crucial to know your field, who came before you and to explore the work of the past. We have a tendency to work and think ahistorically (think about how often you hear about “what a revolutionary time we live in”) and it can present profound limitations to creative practice. Note taking is also crucial — I think the more you approach the creative process as a study vs some sort of magical moment of inspiration, the more fruitful your work will be. Finally, publishing is crucial. Scientists write papers, synthasize findings, etc — artists should do the same. In my case, I use open source as a mechanism, but there are plenty of mechanisms for publishing. I think it’s a crucial part of taking R&D seriously.

Lesson 7: Everything operates at a time scale you don’t know.

You are a farmer.

I’ve found (from over a decade working in media art) that things you do take time and work in timescales that you don’t understand. A project you start one year will come back years later, or an idea you have can only be realized at some later point in your life. I think it’s hard as a student to understand timescale. I try to use the metaphor of a farmer, since it feels to me that things you do one year might have impacts years later.

At eyeo festival two years ago I mentioned to the audience during a talk that at the beginning of every class I tell students, “I adopt you.” After the talk, someone came up to me and he said, “10 years ago, I was in a workshop you gave in Brazil where you said, ‘I adopt you’… I didn’t even recognize you here, but when you said that on stage I remembered that moment. Your workshop is why I started doing what I do now.” When I think about that workshop, all I can remember that it was in a hot and stuffy computer lab, I can’t remember anything from that day just that it was, but being face to face with my former student reminded me that the work you at one time can come back many years later. Plant seeds, tend soil, be a farmer.

Lesson 8: Take the time you need.

There’s a tendency in programming education to have these “learn x in y time” type books and approaches. “Learn C++ in 30 days”, “Learn HTML in 24 hours”, etc. It’s important to remind students to take the time they need.

As a side note: at SFPC we are fortunate to have Amit Pitaru as a co-founder and steering committee member, and Amit to me is one of the best advocates for this notion of taking time. I think of him almost as a kind of sherpa for education. check out his talk at eyeo 2013 (https://vimeo.com/69477201) where mid-way through he breaks into a spontaneous discussion of learning.

Lesson 9: Find your team.

One of the best things you can do as a student is find and surround yourself with people who are supportive, understanding and help you know your own value. I think that is a crucial part of success.

Lesson 10: The past gets made again

I found this amazing book from 1993 called the art of computer designing:

archive.org version of the book [https://archive.org/details/satoArtOfComputerDesigning ]

It’s a pretty amazing book because it’s very fresh even by today’s standards — there’s clever and fun ideas of using shapes and geometry:

but the best part of the book is the afterword, where the author thanks a bunch of people and also members of the Bauhaus. He writes:
I would also like to acknowledge my favorites, Russian Avant-garde, Futurism and Bauhaus, whose brilliant typefaces and designs have in many ways shaped my own mind. If the artists of these movements where alive now to work with computers, I am certain they would discover new artistic possabilities. The work of past ages accumulates, and is remade again.

I love this last sentence of the book,
“the work of past ages accumulates, and is remade again”

It’s a reminder (and license) that the job of every generation is to remake the past.
sfpc  schoolforpoeticcomputation  2015  zachlieberman  teaching  pedagogy  learning  education  curiosity  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  time  scale  purpose  questions  questionasking  art  research  conversation  osamusato  andrewzolli  amitpitaru  mitchgoldstein  ideas  howweteach  howwelearn  schools  arteducation  inquiry  inquirybasedlearning  convesation  askingquestions  björk 
november 2015 by robertogreco
CODE OF CONDUCT - sfpc.hackpad.com
"Purpose:
Better articulate the values of the community and encourage collaboration within the space. We want to create a safe space for all SFPC members. 

For this conversation, we will collaboratively develop a Code of Conduct 
• What do we want to create? 
◦ community, interactive projects, 
◦ respectful communication 
▪ (being empathetic, listening)
▪ room for direct communication; honesty 
▪ Explicit/ Descriptive /   
▪ using constructive criticism - "be tough on ideas, not people"
◦ a shared experience
◦ Relationships of trust
◦ a space that celebrates making
• How do we make this an internationally welcoming environment?
◦ be patient, listen
◦ ask questions; be receptive to questions
◦ be conscious of your language
• Create a space where everyone's opinions are valid, no hesitation in asking questions, welcoming of all skillsets


Our suggestions:
• Work openly
◦ sharing, collaborative documents, transparency
◦ "what's said here stays here and what's learned here leaves here"
• Be generous
• What you put into this you will get out of it; full-time participation
• Speak with respect, assume the most respectful interpretation 
• Step up, step back

Principles of Conversation (via andrew zolli)
• Together we know more
• tough on ideas, gentle on people
• avoid jargon (unfamiliar language)
• threads beat points (making a thread, connect the dots)
• proceed with generosity

Unacceptable Behaviors:
• Violence, threats of violence or violent language directed against another person.
• Sexist, racist, homophobic, transphobic, ableist or otherwise discriminatory jokes and language.
• Posting or displaying sexually explicit or violent material nonconsensually. 2
• Personal insults, particularly those related to gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, or disability.
• Inappropriate physical contact. You should have someone’s consent before touching them.
• Unwelcome sexual attention. This includes, sexualized comments or jokes; inappropriate touching, groping, and unwelcomed sexual advances.
• Deliberate intimidation, stalking or following (online or in person).
• Advocating for, or encouraging, any of the above behavior.

Zach, Taeyoon, Allison, Casey and Tega are available to discuss any sort of unwelcome behavior and will work towards a resolution."
codeofconduct  sfpc  constructivecriticism  allisonburch  behavior  community  generosity  transparency  sharing  andrewzolli  communication  collaboration  honesty  relationships  trust  patience  listening  conversation  jargon  2015  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Radical Computer Science — )
"It was such an honor and pleasure exploring the limits of computation with you all this semester. You are all brilliant, talented, and brave people. Together, we all asked and answered questions that most computer science and art programs avoid for a variety of reasons. That was only possible because of your consistent hard work and presence, and I thank you for that.

Endings are just beginnings. As Zan said on our last day together, we’re still in the cave painting era of programming languages. What little actual magic is inside these tools has been revealed to you, and you’ve wielded it well. All that’s left is to think about people, thought, society, politics, and how all those manifest themselves as code, and how code steers them in return. The important questions are human questions, not technical ones.

This blog will live until tumblr shuts down or the current internet stops resolving URLs, whichever comes first. Until then, you have access to the videos, homework, and articles whenever you want. I will continue to post links to this blog as I come across relevant things in my practice, and may use it in the future for a rerun of the same class. This blog is yours forever. Use it.

My final bits of advice will be in the form of a list (lisp hackers amirite):

• You can learn to do anything in this field. I mean this literally. Between online resources, academic papers, and free tools, the only things impeding your ability to code is the amount of time you have available and your drive to keep learning. This is not true of e.g. brain surgery.

• Don’t ever stop asking questions. I also mean this literally. I cannot count the number of times that “accepted wisdom” or “best practices” or “just the way it’s done” has turned out to be horseshit. Question everything. Adopt what makes sense to you, reinvent everything else.

• Don’t ever let anyone tell you your questions are anything but crucially important. Those people are toxic. There are no bad questions, only toxic people.

• Value the process of learning programming as much as (or as more than) the knowledge itself. If you can take joy in the feeling of being bad at something then slowly getting better at it, you will be unstoppable.

• Being really superhumanly good at one particular tool is overrated. It’s great to have something you are fluent in, and it’s a decent goal to have, but certainly not the be-all-and-end-all of programming. See previous point.

• Have fun and be silly. I brought this up in class but it bears repeating. If you are working on something and its not fun, take that as a sign that you should try something else.

• Be kind to one another. The world is a shitty place, and the tech world in particular tends to be racist and sexist, but you can change that just by being yourselves, being kind, and being visible. Often, code speaks louder than words, and code that generates code (compilers!) can be super loud.

• Teach someone what you know. Pass on the torch of knowledge. Its one of the most important ways you can give back, and one of the most gratifying experiences you can have.

That’s all I got.
Change the world, you crazy kids.
R"
ramneynasser  advice  art  life  programming  teaching  learning  howweteach  howwelearn  compsci  computerscience  sfpc  kindness  sharing  coding  time  bestpractices  questioning  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Kenneth Goldsmith - Talks | Frieze Projects NY
[Direct link to .mp3: http://friezeprojectsny.org/uploads/files/talks/Kenneth_Goldsmith.mp3 ]

"‘I Look to Theory Only When I Realize That Somebody Has Dedicated Their Entire Life to a Question I Have Only Fleetingly Considered’

A keynote lecture by the poet Kenneth Goldsmith, whose writing has been described as ‘some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry’ (Publishers Weekly). Goldsmith is the author of eleven books of poetry and founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb. In 2013, he was named as the inaugural Poet Laureate of MoMA."
kennethgoldsmith  copying  uncreativewriting  mercecunningham  writing  internet  web  online  remixing  culture  art  poetry  originality  appropriation  quantity  quality  curiosity  harrypotter  poetics  digital  reproduction  translation  displacement  disjunction  corydoctorow  change  howwewrite  pointing  data  metadata  choice  authorship  versioning  misfiling  language  difference  meaning  ethics  morality  literature  twitter  artworld  marshallmcluhan  christianbök  plagiarism  charleseames  rules  notknowing  archiving  improvisation  text  bricolage  assemblage  cv  painting  technology  photography  readerships  thinkerships  thoughtobjects  reassembly  ubuweb  freeculture  moma  outreach  communityoutreach  nyc  copyright  ip  intellectualproperty  ideas  information  sfpc  vitoacconci  audience  accessibility  situationist  museums  markets  criticism  artcriticism  economics  money  browsers  citation  sampling  jonathanfranzen  internetasliterature  getrudestein  internetasfavoritebook  namjunepaik  johncage  misbehaving  andywarhol  bobdylan  barbarakruger  jkrowling  china  creati 
august 2014 by robertogreco
An Administrator's Lament — Casey's Notes and Links
"A businessman approached with the idea of a sporadic institution might be see it as something on the brink of collapse or failure. That’s because the ephemeral institution’s default state is not growing, profitable, comfortable, boring, tense inertia…but: potential energy. A resting network of individuals, resources, and ideas awaiting the charter of its next constellation.

There’s a weight to having resources and a freedom in forcing yourself to shut down and start over early and often. You can tell you’re thinking in terms of Return On Investment if that sounds backwards to you.

Starting something is hard enough, so it’s scary to consider building a framework in which you intentionally shut yourself down like clockwork to rehustle as if you’re just starting out. Self-sabotage?! Self-inflicted trauma!? (The warnings of smart and kind but still capitalists.)

Again, this sounds crazy, but: if you’re liked well enough, you won’t be able to run fast enough to outpace support. The gradual decline into comfortable, boring, tense, rich, ignorant, trapped — at some point forever imposed on you.

The-most-fucked-up-thing-of-all: time accrues. No matter how small you try to stay fiscally, bureaucratically — time grows you up. Simply by virtue of having existed for consecutive minutes, months, years you’re expected to legitimize (as if you didn’t start off running from its logical conclusion): a storage unit, taxes, insurance, payroll, audits, correspondence. Whole industries around not letting experiments stay young forever.

Maybe in a year there’ll be a staff of 25 and franchises from Shanghai to Dubai. I can only see that kind of future when I squint beyond the horizon of some twisted alternate universe. But I’ve lived it before, so when I meet with our accountant it literally hurts to think I’ll live it again."
caseygollan  2014  ephemeral  ephemeralinstitutions  pop-ups  inertia  potential  sfpc  schools  openstudioproject  lcproject  time  bureaucracy  capitalism  nonprofits  freedom  returnoninvestment  roi  ephemerality  nonprofit  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
april 2014 by robertogreco
STET | Clearing space
"There is a mechanical horse rescued from Coney Island. Imagine hitting its butt; imagine that makes it gallop. Imagine the grinding, the squeals of its metal skeleton forcing wood to life. If it worked, that’s how it would ride.

There is a 20-foot-high totem made from the legs of tables and chairs.

There was to be a sauna on the roof but it was Against Code.

We are starting a school from air."



"Strangers left notes on my Willy Wonka windshield. They wrote “Thanks!" and “I was having a bad day until I saw this.” I painted the car because I was half-crazy broken under other people’s expectations and I wanted to talk to strangers, to send them a message I couldn’t quite believe myself. I drove that message around until the axle broke in the middle of the road and the tow truck driver gave me a ride home and everyone knew it was beyond time to put the car down and my wheeled poetry was over."



"When I needed to escape the martyrdom that is teaching high school math, I went to grad school. A Los Alamos recruiter invited me to intern for the summer for more money than my mother ever made in a year (and we were not poor). I told him three times politely — and one time impolitely — that I wasn’t interested. For the next few years, I listened to my grad school friends insist that they weren’t working on defense problems at their classified summer internships at National Labs — they were only working on problems of fluids moving over a solid.

Numbers don’t lie, exactly. They tell a lot of different truths, surely. They’re like us that way.

Numbers from The Internet: one quarter of US mathematicians work in defense-related jobs. The NSA is the world’s single largest employer of mathematicians. Eighty-one percent of mathematicians employed by the federal government work for the Department of Defense.

We have a complicated relationship with computation.

Experiments with computation are restricted by marketing demands, by defense support, by the pressures of grant funding. AT&T killed Bell Labs one laid-off researcher at a time. What is the new Bell Labs? Where are the spaces for open-ended creative computational experiments?

There is very little support now for creating what one imagines. There never was much, but now there is less. You have to clear the space yourself. Paint the car at night for no good reason. Create an open community biolab. Start a school. Ignore everyone’s expectations but your own."



"Questions: How can we measure time with space? How can we get the machines to see each other? How do I make the world more loving? How do I know the machine understands me?

Discussions: What the hell is poetic computation, anyway? Are we being poetic enough? How do we decide what to make? What is the final show? Should we schedule workshops or should we schedule making? Should we find solitude or stick with the group? The theme recurs: now that we’ve cleared the space, how do we fill it?"



"Starting a school from air goes like this: First, clear a space. A floor of a building. Ten weeks of your time. Fill the space with people. Don’t let the flies get the best of you. Ask all the questions. Build some answers. There you have it."
jenlowe  sfpc  2013  poetry  math  mathematics  canon  openstudioproject  education  learning  priorities  creativity  beauty  life  living  resistance  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Taeyoon Choi | Research + Collaboration
"Hello! My name is Taeyoon and I make art projects, teach, write and curate about technology, cities and political possibilities. I live in New York and Seoul."



"Making Lab at APAP2013 is a proposition for city of Anyang for a Hackerspace. Situated in Anyang Pavilion of Anyang Public Art Park, Making Lab will host series of workshops and provide facility for local community to engage in art and technology. The space will be operate from February to December of 2013 as a pilot program. After initial period, the Lab will search for a self sustainable model for community participation."



"This is what my portable lab looks like. I make art projects using technology, teach workshops and collaborate with others."
taeyoonchoi  art  artists  glvo  nyc  seoul  sfpc  anyangpublicartpark  makinglab  makerspaces  openstudioproject  lcproject  workshops  technology  collaboration  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
june 2013 by robertogreco
school for poetic computation blog: Poetry and computation?
"Noise is undesirable in engineering, but artists find glitch to be beautiful and revealing inner workings of the system. Poetic computation may value expressive nature of code and computers more so than efficiency. This might an answer to questions like “Why Less Demos and more Poems?” Demonstrations are driven by end goal. It values practicality and functionality, while poems desire aesthetic and emotional impact. Hopefully what we make at School for poetic computation is for people, not computers. "
sfpc  taeyoonchoi  noise  inefficiency  poetry  coding  emotion  impact  aesthetics  2013  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
june 2013 by robertogreco
SFPC
"school for poetic computation is an artist run school launching this fall in New York. A small group of students and faculty will work closely to explore the intersections of code, design, hardware and theory -- focusing especially on artistic intervention. It's a 10 week program, a hybrid of residency and research group, that will happen multiple times per year to be a powerboost for creativity. Our motto is: more poems less demos."

[From the Mission]

"The school for poetic computation is a school organized around exploring together the creative and expressive nature of computational approaches to art and design. The school’s focus is on writing code like creative writing — focusing on the mechanics of programming as well as demystifying as much as possible the tools, techniques and strategies for making art via code.

We are interested in how to program things that leave the screen and move into physical space, interacting with people through material-tactile expression. In this way, the school will focus on hardware, experimental interaction design, and computational ways of sensing movement, touch and gesture.

We are interested in craft, and the idea that every writer needs space and time to hone their trade. Our school aims to provide a safe haven – so you could get acquainted with the craft at your own pace, make it your own, find that part between your true creative process and the craft. This takes time, encouragement, the right push at the right time, conversations with colleagues, and more time.

This is a school for teaching. Every student who comes here will be asked to also teach, both to their classmates, but also in the form of workshops and outreach. We want to spread the things we care about as far and as wide as we can.

The goal of the school is to promote completely strange, impractical and magical work. We value aesthetics and poetics over efficiency and usefulness. It may not be the sort of things that are about building a portfolio for finding a job, but the sort of things that will surprise and delight people and enable you to be creative without the structure of school or job. However, we like to think employers will appreciate this kind of work as well.

This is not a program to get a degree, there are large programs for that. This is not a program to go for vocational skills, there are programs for that. This is a program for self initiated learners who want to explore new possibilities. This is a program for thinkers in search of a community to realize greater dreams."

[from the FAQ]

"Does the School issue certificate for graduation?
The school does not accredit any formal degrees but the group of alumni will grow into a lively community that will collaborate in the future. We hope students experience at the school and skill will be a validation for them to pursue a creative career."

"What are the core principles the school stands for?
Hacking, exploration, open source, publish everything and often, tools for building, deep understanding through hands on experience and so on…

What kind of students are you looking for?
We want to work with students who are creative at heart and dedicated to learning and teaching code and technology in general. We like students who are kind to help one another.
Where did this idea come from?

We have been teaching and organizing workshops at schools and festivals around the world. We want to create a safe haven for others to develop ideas into reality. We want to bring all of our experience and knowledge to make a sustainable system for learning and teaching code, electronics, installation, performance, user experience, data visualization and etc.



What is the teaching philosophy?
We celebrate failure and collaboration. Our classes are going to be a mix of lecture, demo and lab hours. We respect our students and support them as artist and educator. We hope our students will have the experience to create projects on their own and to teach after the program.



Why do you teach?
Teaching inspires to continue to learn. We love meeting new people and we often make our best work in collaboration with others."
hackerspaces  education  art  computing  programming  coding  altgdp  openstudioproject  lcproject  residencies  jenlowe  amitpitaru  zachliberman  taeyoonchoi  schoolforpoeticcomputation  time  slow  process  certification  accreditation  conversation  sharing  collaboration  teaching  learning  sfpc 
april 2013 by robertogreco

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