recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : signs   43

@debcha en Instagram: “I'm not really a souvenir person, but I did come home with some @transportforlondon swag—I think those are real line status magnets…”
"I'm not really a souvenir person, but I did come home with some @transportforlondon swag—I think those are real line status magnets, together with the ubiquitous hazard sign. The print amused me because I recently learned that the reason why the Tube is so hot in the summer is because a century and a half of dumping waste heat, particularly from braking, has raised the temperature of the clay surrounding the tunnels from a cool 15C to a toasty 25C, which makes it much harder to cool now."
debchachra  2017  london  trains  heat  clay  materials  science  subways  transportation  souvenirs  signs 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Casey Gollan on Twitter: "Will never get over how Robert Bringhurst blockquotes the biggest ever truthbomb right at the beginning of The Elements of Typographic Style https://t.co/vNuRNEqmX6"
"—Everything written symbols can say has already passed by. They are like tracks left by animals. That is why the masters of meditation refuse to accept that writings are final. The aim is to reach true being by means of those tracks, those letters, those signs — but reality itself is not a sign, and it leaves no tracks. It doesn’t come to us by way of letters or words. We can go toward it, by following those words and letters back to what they came from. But so long as we are preoccupied with symbols, theories, and opinions, we fail to reach the principle.

—But when we give up symbols and opinions, aren’t we left in the utter nothingness of being?

—Yes."

- Kimura Kyūho, Kenjutsu Fushigi Hen [On the Mysteries of Swordsmanship], 1768
robertbringhurst  writing  symbols  theories  howewrite  meditation  kimurakyūho  finality  tracks  tracking  signs  reality  letters  words  canon  principles  principle  opinions  nothingness  being 
january 2017 by robertogreco
OSP-foundry» Blog Archive » Crickx
[my favorite display font, the story = delightful, hard to believe I never bookmarked this before]

"OSP-Crickx is a digital reinterpretation of a set of adhesive letters.

The Publi Fluor shop was situated in the northern part of Brussels, Schaerbeek, and founded by the father of Madame Christelle Crickx who was a trained letter painter. In his day he is—it seems—the first to propose fluorescent colors for shopwindow signs. It proves so difficult to paint letters on site with that kind of unstable coating that he develops a technique based on vinyl that he fluo-colors and cuts by hand in the workplace, then sticks at clients shops. Around 1975, his health degrades quickly and his daughter is forced to step into the business.

[image]

Starting to cut letters with the rounded and skilled cardboard templates drawn by her father, Madame Crickx slowly morphs the shapes by analysing how typographic niceties confuse her non-trained clients and leads to bad letters placement. She progressively removes the optical compensation of rounded tops and bottoms, straightens sides, and attaches accents for less floating parts. Those moves add a very specific orientation to this otherwise quite common bold italic sans serif display typeface.

During about fifty years these craft lettres have spread across the windows of shopping streets, more and more, and after the closure of the shop in the early noughties, they seem to still hold their own to the assaults of vector vinyl cutting technology.

[image]

In 1996, Pierre Huyghebaert and Vincent Fortemps have just started to work for the cultural center les Halles de Schaerbeek. For a series of events linked to India, an interest to mix local and distant vernacular takes shape. Those letters spotted on Schaerbeek’s shopwindows years before seem to fit the job ideally. After a few wanderings in the streets nearby, the small lettershop at the bottom of the dull Avenue Rogier, shining with its fluo shapes, is finally spotted as the origin of these typographic waves… And the inside of the shop proves to be even more amazing.

First contacts with Madame Crickx follow, the first poster is typeset letter by letter, then Pierre Huyghebaert pays other visits and it becomes obvious that these letters deserve more than a one-time usage, as Madame Crickx’s work deserves more than simply buying some letters more. For the following Halles assignments, after a quick-and-dirty Fontographer vectorisation, the Crickx font is heavily used. This font is called the Crickx Rush in reference of the time constrains that characterize this kind of operation. When Jan Middendorp, then Editor of the Belgian fontshop magazine Druk, orders an article on the letters, it is the occasion for Pierre to try to investigate and understand better the process described herebefore. (Astonishingly, shortly before the magazine stops, a poll seems to have elected the article as one of the most favoured by the readers…).

[image]

When Madame Crickx follows the retirement of her postman husband, the studio Speculoos (where Pierre works) buys the whole stock of letters and dingbats and vinyle for a symbolic prize, stores it in their basement of Saint-Gilles but uses it for some of their funkiest windowshop displays. He ask Madame Crickx to cut lower-cases for her letters as with other accented and diacritics to cover more or less the Latin-1 codepage, by trying to give her just enough sample to distinguish the characters but not much to influence the way to draw them. As answers, she cut a completely new and fantasy set of letters (called the blobby in the pack)… After a discussion, she propose new lower-case, more in sync with the upper cases classical ones, but not sharing exactly the same low contrast. After years of sleeping on hard-drive and archives, in 2010, Ludi Loiseau and Antoine Begon uplift the work to redraw the outlines to produce a more complete and less trashy version (Regular), explore the non-italic more rare one (Droite Rush and Droite) and extend it with lower cases (SharkCut). Finally, the Crickx’s cabinet regains a better place at the new Constant Variable place, Rue Gallait 80, less than a kilometer far from the original shop place…

More :
– Pdf of the article in Dutch (translated by Jan Middendorp and French (original).
– Text by Femke Snelting

We are very happy to receive news from what you do or works you spot that use these fonts!
On est très heureux de recevoir des infos à propos de travaux que vous réalisez ou que vous remarquez qui utilisent ces fontes!"
osp-foundry  crickx  flip-flop  digital  fonts  typography  free  opensource  pierrehuyghebaert  vincentfortemps  christellecrickx  brussels  signs  signage  handmade  ludiloiseau  antoinebegon  janmiddendorp 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Guerrilla Public Service | 99% Invisible
"At some point in your life you’ve probably encountered a problem in the built world where the fix was obvious to you. Maybe a door that opened the wrong way, or poorly painted marker on the road. Mostly, when we see these things, we grumble on the inside, and then do nothing.

But not Richard Ankrom.

In the early morning of August 5, 2001, artist Richard Ankrom and a group of friends assembled on the 4th Street bridge over the 110 freeway in Los Angeles. They had gathered to commit a crime—one Ankrom had plotted for years.

Twenty years earlier, Ankron, then living in Orange County, was driving north on the 110 freeway. As he passed through downtown Los Angeles, he was going to merge onto another freeway, the I-5 North. But he missed the exit and got lost. And for some reason, this stuck with him.

Years later, when Ankrom moved to downtown Los Angeles, he was driving on the same stretch of freeway where he’d gotten lost before. He looked up at the big green rectangular sign suspended above and realized why he missed the exit all those years ago.

The sign was not adequately marked.

The I-5 exit wasn’t indicated on the green overhead sign. It was clear to Ankrom that, the California Department of Transportation (known as Caltrans) had made a mistake.

Ankrom, an artist and sign painter, decided to make the Interstate 5 North shield himself. He also decided that he would take it upon himself to install it above the 110 freeway.

He would call it an act of “guerrilla public service.

Ankrom started by studying L.A. Freeways signs and holding up pantone swatches to perfectly match the paint color. He dangled over bridges to measure the exact dimensions of other signs.

Most importantly, Ankrom consulted the MUTCD, The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, which provides “uniform standards and specifications for all official traffic control devices in California.”

Ankrom wanted his sign to be built to the exact specifications of Caltrans, which were designed to be read by motorists traveling at high speeds. He copied the height and thickness of existing interstate shields, copied their exact typeface, and even sprayed his sign with a thin glaze of overspray of gray house paint so that it wouldn’t look too new.

If he was successful, no one would know that the signs weren’t put up by Caltrans.

As a finishing touch, Ankrom signed his name on the back with a black marker, like a painter signing a canvas.

Then came the next phase of the project: the installation. Ankrom planned it with the precision of a bank heist. He cut his hair, bought some work clothes and a hardhat and an orange vest. He even made a Caltrans contractor-esque decal for his pick-up truck.

He feared he could get arrested, or worse—drop the sign or one of his tools on the cars driving underneath. But he felt it was too late to turn back.

On August 5, 2001, Ankrom parked his truck and went to work. He positioned his ladder over the razor wire and made his way up to the catwalk under the sign, nearly 30 feet above the highway.

The whole installation took less than 30 minutes. As soon as the sign was up, Ankrom packed up his ladder, rushed back to his truck, and blended back into the city.

For about nine months, only a small group of people knew that the Interstate 5 shield hanging above the 110 freeway was a forgery. Then one of Ankrom’s friend leaked the story to a local paper. And that’s how Caltrans found out.

Ankrom had hoped he could get his sign back from Caltrans after they took it down; he figured he would hang it in an art gallery. But Caltrans didn’t take the sign down. His guerrilla sign had passed the Caltrans inspection.

More than eight years after after Ankrom’s sign went up, he got call from a friend who noticed some workers taking it down. It had been replaced with as part of routine maintenance.

When the new sign went up, Caltrans had added the I-5 North shield not only to it, but also to two additional signs up the road.”

[via: https://twitter.com/ablerism/status/566767100556247041 ]
art  publicservice  guerillapublicservice  2015  richardankrom  losangeles  freeways  110  2001  nyc  mta  nycmta  efficientpassengerproject  signs  caltrans 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Pointe-Noire & Its Ironic 'Salon De Coiffure' Beauty [Op-Ed] Okayafrica.
"Robert Nzaou-Kissolo is a Congolese photographer currently based between Cape Town and Pointe-Noire, Republic of the Congo, who recently reached out to us with his ongoing project documenting Pointe-Noire street culture since 2014. In his “Salon de Coiffure” photo series, Nzaou-Kissolo focuses on the prevalence of hair salons in the suburbs of Pointe-Noire (every 100 meters he says), and the standards of beauty their hand-painted boards advertise. “The ‘Salon de Coiffure’ theme explores the beauty of the Congolese people contrasted with what they themselves perceive as beauty,” he said in an email. In the op-ed below, Nzaou-Kissolo elaborates on the irony he sees in Pointe-Noire’s “Salon de Coiffure” culture."
2015  congo  photography  africa  robertnzaou-kissolo  hairsalons  republicofthecongo  streetculture  signs  salons  beautysalons  beauty  culture 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Vital Signs: Revitalizing the Pulse of San Bernardino | San Bernardino | Artbound | KCET
"Not all that glitters is gold under the bright California sun, but there's still something to be said about the ever present, dust-like sparkle embedded within a worn and stained sidewalk.

Poet Juan Delgado and photographer Thomas McGovern explore the vibrant melding of Hispanic and Anglo-American cultures indigenous to San Bernardino County in their collaborative exhibition "Vital Signs", currently on view from April 19th through July 24th, 2014 at the Robert and Francis Fullerton Museum of Art in San Bernardino. A work seven years in the making, "Vital Signs" moves through the duo's stark, yet poignant documentation of the frequently overlooked hand painted signs and murals found within their home region, capturing everything from a barely discernible Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle to the frequently depicted Virgin of Guadalupe. With paintings and text that serve far beyond any base utilitarian need, the union of Delgado and McGovern's work conveys a perceptive understanding of the aesthetic created, and sometimes neglected, by the urban population, continually paying homage to the artistic vigilance indicative of a time before the market became so heavily saturated with ubiquitously low cost forms of advertising."
handlettering  lettering  signs  sanbernardino  photography  2014  juandelgado  thomasmcgovern 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Pixel Track | Berg Blog
"Pixel Track is a new kind of connected display. We prototype products continuously — sometimes to explore the Internet of Things, making sure our platform is up to the task, and often to help businesses find opportunities in connected products. We produced Pixel Track in collaboration with the Future Cities Catapult as part of a research project about data and public signage. We made a film about Pixel Track, and you can watch it here."
berg  berglondon  signs  displays  aesthetics  information  communication  pixeltrack  internetofthings  iot 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Don't worry, California drivers: you won't have to outrun drone strikes on the highway | The Verge
"Despite official-looking warnings, California highway motorists won't have their speed regulated by armed drones. San Francisco's local CBS affiliate KPIX 5 reports that several fake signs have appeared on Bay Area highways, depicting a drone firing a missile along with a "speed enforced by drones" warning. The California Highway Patrol, which has been removing the signs, tells KPIX 5 that it does not, in fact, use drones to hunt down lead-footed drivers. "At CHP we definitely do not have drones," the highway patrol tells KPIX 5. "Along with not having drones we definitely do not have any drones that would fire any type of weaponry."

The CHP tells KPIX 5 that the signs look like the real deal, with professional materials that are "just like the signs that we use on the side of the road for speed limits, and everything else." One of the signs was even reportedly mounted with "tamper-resistant bolts."

It's not clear yet who's behind the prank, but it's not the first time fake drone signs have popped up in the US; in 2011, street artist Essam Attia plastered fake Big Brother-style advertisements throughout Manhattan that depicted NYPD drones launching strikes on fleeing citizens. The NYPD didn't take the situation lightly, and arrested Attia — who now faces 56 counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument and grand larceny possession of stolen property."
drones  droneproject  california  2013  pranks  signs 
july 2013 by robertogreco
We Will Be Close | Photos by Jesse Ragan
"Words and letters catch my eye pretty much everywhere I go. Some are ugly, some are beautiful, and some are simply bizarre. All are working hard to communicate something, but sometimes they communicate more than they mean to: humor, irony, poetry, or even something mysteriously poignant. That’s when I take out my camera.
We will be close... staring from now into forever."
vernaculartypography  quickfixes  hand-paintedsigns  hand-letteredsigns  brooklyn  handmade  via:litherland  irony  humor  words  letters  photography  nyc  signs  typography  jesseragan 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Writing Live Fieldnotes: Towards a More Open Ethnography | Ethnography Matters
"I just returned from fieldwork in China. I’m excited to share a new way I’ve been writing ethnographic fieldnotes, called live fieldnoting…

At one point in time, all ethnographers wrote their notes down with a physical pen and paper. But with mobiles, laptops, iPads, and digital pens, not all ethnographers write their fieldnotes. Some type their fieldnotes. Or some do both. With all these options, I have struggled to come up with the perfect fieldnote system…

…the problem with a digital pen, notebook, and laptop is that they are all extra things that have to be carried with you or they add extra steps to the process…

I still haven’t found the perfect fieldnote system, but I wanted to experiment with a new process that I call, “live fieldnoting.” …

…updates everyday from the field. … compilation on Instagram, flickr, facebook, tumblr, and foursquare. I made my research transparent and accessible with daily fieldnotes. Anyone who wanted to follow along in my adventure could see…"
mobile  signs  research  flashbacks  moments  rituals  customs  location  travel  participatoryfieldnoting  socialfieldnoting  johnvanmaanen  ethnographymatters  rachelleannenchino  jennaburrell  heatherford  jorisluyendijk  gabriellacoleman  janchipchase  lindashaw  rachelfretz  robertemerson  photography  iphone  china  noticing  observation  transparency  2012  foursquare  tumblr  facebook  flickr  instagram  triciawang  howwework  process  wcydwt  notetaking  designresearch  fieldnoting  fieldnotes  ethnography  ritual 
august 2012 by robertogreco
ROBERT MONTGOMERY
"ROBERT MONTGOMERY WORKS IN A POETIC AND MELANCHOLIC POST-SITUATIONIST TRADITION

HE MAKES BILLBOARD PIECES

RECYCLED SUNLIGHT PIECES

AND DRAWINGS"
writing  advertising  photography  artists  activism  poetry  text  signs  billboards  situationist  post-situationist  typography  robertmontgomery  art 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Walk [Your City]™
"What? An online pedestrian empowerment tool for any citizen to become an engaged stakeholder in their community. The W[YC] platform will allow anyone to auto-magically create their own guerrilla wayfinding sign to export, print and install.

Why? Walk Raleigh, our initial guerrilla (unsanctioned & self initiated) wayfinding project, has resonated with so many people, both home and away (even the BBC came to town!), we had to make it accessible for more people to use. Walk Raleigh has even been adopted as a pilot educational program in Raleigh, N.C. Wait, whats guerrilla or tactical urbanism anyways?

How? By using existing digital resources and the newly released “google maps” walk tool, we will develop a simple point and click sign-making experience for even the most novice of computer-user. Anyone will be able to auto-magically download their own sign."
walkability  googlemaps  signs  guerillawayfinding  wayfinding  mapping  maps  signalization  transportation  urbanism  urban  walking  pedestrians  empowerment  cities 
july 2012 by robertogreco
The Untitled Project / Siber Art
"The Untitled Project is rooted in an underlying interest in the nature of power. With the removal of all traces of text from the photographs, the project explores the manifestation of power between large groups of people in the form of public and semi-public language. The absence of the printed word not only draws attention to the role text plays in the modern landscape but also simultaneously emphasizes alternative forms of communication such as symbols, colors, architecture and corporate branding. In doing this, it serves to point out the growing number of ways in which public voices communicate without using traditional forms of written language.

The reintroduction of the text takes written language out of the context of its intended viewing environment. The composition of the layouts remain true to the composition of their corresponding photographs in order to draw attention to relative size, location and orientation…"
2010  2002  visual  communication  aworldwithouttext  textless  ads  language  text  advertising  photography  art  mattsiber  words  signs  streets  cities 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Miracle Mile, Los Angeles - Wikipedia
"Ross ordered that all building facades along Wilshire be engineered so as to be best seen through a windshield. This meant larger, bolder, simpler signage; longer buildings in a larger scale, oriented towards the boulevard; and architectural ornament and massing perceptible at 30 MPH instead of at walking speed. These simplified building forms were driven by practical requirements, but contributed to the stylistic language of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne."

[via: http://log.scifihifi.com/post/7532494235/ross-ordered-that-all-building-facades-along ]
losangeles  miraclemile  wilshire  carculture  cars  architecture  design  artdeco  streamlined  streamlinemoderne  signs  signage  perspective  history 
july 2011 by robertogreco
eye | feature : All you need is love: pictures, words and worship [Great piece on Sister Corita Kent]
"Corita’s cultural contribution spanned several decades. Although she described herself as an artist rather than a design professional, her 1960s work spanned both fields. Graphic strategies such as lettering and layout were central to her artistic voice. At the same time, she had no qualms about accepting commissions for magazine covers, book jackets, album sleeves, ads and posters, although even here she should be seen less as a jobbing designer than as an artist with a distinctive and easily recognisable graphic sensibility. As Harvey Cox said, “The world of signs and sales slogans and plastic containers was not, for her, an empty wasteland. It was the dough out of which she baked the bread of life.” 12 At its best, her work proposed a symbolic template that blurred the boundaries between art, design and communication, between a life of worship and the everyday life of her time."
sistercorita  art  vernacular  life  everyday  glvo  design  communication  graphicdesign  graphics  typography  advertising  signs  symbols  via:britta  teaching  printmaking  serigraphs  accessibility  urban  urbanism  decontextualization  photography  noticing  seeing  seeingtheworld  fieldtrips  unschooling  deschooling  education  immaculateheartcollege  eames  viewfinders  process  julieault  2000  1960s  martinbeck  society  perspective  activism  coritakent 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Secrets of the Happiest Places on Earth - NatGeo News Watch
"San Luis Obispo has the best emotional health in country & highest level of well-being…because they have a dozen or so things going for them that were put in place in late 1970s.

They made decision as a city, rather than making the city optimal for commerce, to make it optimal for quality of life. It used to be a forest of signs. Signs beget more signs. They instead limited the size of signs & put the resources into aesthetics. They outlawed fast-food drive-throughs so you don't have idling cars polluting the air, it's harder for people to eat fast food. They were the first place in the world to outlaw smoking in bars & restaurants, so as a result you have about the lowest rate of smoking in the country.

You can stand any place in SLO, a city of about .25 million people, & look around & see green. They have zoned it such that there's no building beyond a certain point, so everybody has access to green space, which we know lowers stress levels, & has access to recreation."
happiness  singapore  urbanism  geography  planning  urban  sanluisobispo  california  traffic  bike  biking  signs  greenery  denmark  nuevoleón  mexico  well-being 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Bad Signs
"I’d love to see a research study that counted the number of motivational posters (along with other self-help, positive-thinking materials and activities) in a school and then assessed certain other features of that school. My hypothesis: the popularity of inspirational slogans will be correlated with a lower probability that students are invited to play a meaningful role in decision-making, as well as less evidence of an emphasis on critical thinking threaded through the curriculum and a less welcoming attitude toward questioning authority. I’d also predict that the schools decorated with these posters are more likely to be run by administrators who brag about the school’s success by conventional indicators and are less inclined to call those criteria into question or challenge troubling mandates handed down from above (such as zero-tolerance discipline policies or pressures to raise test scores)."
alfiekohn  signs  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  education  learning  schools  administration  students  teaching  lcproject  tcsnmy  unschooling  deschooling  authority  whatmatters 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Arroba - Wikipedia
"The word arroba has its origin in Arabic ar-rubʿ (الربع), the fourth part (of a quintal). Arroba was a Spanish and Portuguese unit of weight, mass or volume. Its symbol is @. In weight it is equal to about 25 pounds in Spain, and 32 pounds in Portugal. An Italian academic claims to have traced the @ symbol to the Italian Renaissance, in a Venetian mercantile document signed by Francesco Lapi on May 4, sent from Seville to Rome, describing the goods and treasures arriving on a ship from the Americas to Spain 1537. The Aragonese historian Jorge Romance located the appearance of the @ symbol at the "taula de Ariza" registry from 1448, to denote a wheat shipment from Castile to the Kingdom of Aragon. The unit is still used in Portugal by cork merchants, and in Brazil by cattle traders, defined as 15 kg. In the Spanish language and Portuguese language, the term arroba has now become synonymous with the symbol due to its use in e-mail addresses."
arroba  signs  symbols  email  spanish  portuguese  español  renaissance  italian  arabic  measure  volume 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Tuttle SVC: Readers and Writers vs. Information Processors
"English teachers do not and should not believe that people "access and use information." That is not the way we think about the world, and it is not how the world works.
information  english  reading  writing  teaching  learning  signs  signifiers  texts  culture 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Distracting Miss Daisy: Why stop signs and speed limits endanger Americans
"The more you look for signs, for police, and at your speedometer, the less attentive you will be to traffic conditions. The limits on attention are much more severe than most people imagine. And it takes only a momentary lapse, at the wrong time, to caus
culture  government  psychology  traffic  us  uk  flow  attention  driving  unintendedconsequences  cars  travel  signs  signage  safety 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Borrowing an idea from Los Angeles, 2091 - International Herald Tribune
"That is the world of "Blade Runner"...an obsession of real estate developer, Sonny Astani, who hopes to evoke those atmospherics by affixing rows of light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, to the facades of his two newest condominium towers in the city's center.
losangeles  led  architecture  design  bladerunner  lighting  signs  displays  film  space 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Younghee Jung » Blog Archive » surveillance techniques
"How would people drop out of, or at least minimize their digital traces and minimize contributing to create others’?"
design  signage  signs  surveillance  technology  ubicomp  youngheejung  everyware  helsinki  london  tokyo 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Sliding Friction: The Harmonious Jungle of Contemporary Cities
"Through 15 topics & 4 themes...focus lenses on sparkles generated by many frictions between ideas, practices & infrastructures that populate cities...hope to provide raw food for thoughts to consider city of future. Do we want to mitigate, or eliminate t
cities  future  julianbleecker  nicolasnova  brucesterling  space  insfrastructure  gamechanging  urban  urbanism  photography  semiotics  interface  interaction  fabiengirardin  pareidolia  signs  street  devices  computing  cloud  technology 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Let's fill this town with scientists on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"Enough namby-pamby 'creative economy' rubbish. Science! Engineering! NOW!"
engineering  science  humor  signs 
october 2007 by robertogreco
PingMag - The Tokyo-based magazine about “Design and Making Things” » Archive » Gaffer Tape Art in Tokyo’s Train Stations
"train guard Shuetsu Sato took matters in his own hands and started taping signage in huge Japanese characters with masking tape in clever ways, just so passangers could find their way around. His transient tape art became so popular that film artist coll
graphics  japanese  typography  tokyo  japan  infographics  design  tape  visualization  signs  signage  pingmag 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Symbol Signs: Society & Environment: AIGA
"The complete set of 50 passenger/pedestrian symbols developed by AIGA is now available on the web, free of charge. Signs are available in EPS and GIF formats."
aiga  infodesign  symbols  signs  signage  graphics  icons  images  visualization  wayfinding  travel  cartography  information  international  design 
august 2007 by robertogreco
The Road to Clarity - New York Times
"Looking at a sign in Clearview after reading one in Highway Gothic is like putting on a new pair of reading glasses: there’s a sudden lightness, a noticeable crispness to the letters."
design  fonts  typography  typeface  signs  signage  transportation  information  infodesign 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Symbols.com - Home
"Symbols.com contains more than 1,600 articles about 2,500 Western signs, arranged into 54 groups according to their graphic characteristics."
archaeology  art  communication  definitions  encyclopedia  graphic  graphics  iconography  icons  infographics  images  ideas  language  linguistics  logos  meaning  symbols  signs  typography  visual  visualization  shapes  semiotics  religion 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Klein Dytham Architecture - Billboard Building
"Being nearly all front, we let it be what it so obviously wanted to be – an inhabitable billboard."
architecture  signs  billboards  design  projections  plants  light 
may 2007 by robertogreco
russell davies: people under instruction
"Give us a break, we all make mistakes when we're learning."
learning  risk  education  work  instruction  signs 
april 2007 by robertogreco
The Future of Things (TFOT)
"NeonClick are individual, colored neon letters, numbers, symbols, and punctuations, which reside within transparent, fire-resistant, plastic casings that snap together like Lego blocks to create a word or a phrase of your choosing."
signs  information  electronics  neon  light  typography 
december 2006 by robertogreco
Signs of change at Gallaudet | csmonitor.com
"At the only US liberal arts university for the deaf, protesters' calls for reform highlight concerns of the deaf community."
universities  colleges  politics  deaf  culture  education  us  language  signs  gallaudet 
november 2006 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read