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Model Metropolis
"Behind one of the most iconic computer games of all time is a theory of how cities die—one that has proven dangerously influential."



"Forrester’s central claim about complexity wasn’t a new one; it has a long history on the political right. In a 1991 book, Rhetoric of Reaction, the development economist and economic historian Albert O. Hirschman identified this style of argument as an example of what he called the “perversity thesis.” This kind of attack, which Hirschman traced back to Edmund Burke’s writings on the French Revolution, amounts to a kind of concern trolling. Using this rhetorical tactic, the conservative speaker can claim that they share your social goal, but simultaneously argue that the means you are using to achieve it will only make matters worse. When commentators claim “no-platforming will only make more Nazis,” that welfare programs lock recipients into a “cycle of dependency,” or that economic planning will lead a society down a “road to serfdom,” they’re making this kind of perversity argument.

What Forrester did was give the perversity thesis a patina of scientific and computational respectability. Hirschman himself makes specific reference to Urban Dynamics and argues that the “special, sophisticated attire” of Forrester’s models helped reintroduce this kind of argument “into polite company.” In the nearly fifty years since it has come out, Forrester’s “counterintuitive” style of thinking has become the default way of analyzing policy for mainstream wonks. For many, “counterintuitivity” is the new intuition.

Expert knowledge, of course, has an important place in democratic deliberation, but it can also cut people out of the policy process, dampen the urgency of moral claims, and program a sense of powerlessness into our public discourse. Appeals to a social system’s “complexity” and the potential for “perverse outcomes” can be enough to sink transformative social programs that are still on the drawing board. This might not matter in the context of a virtual environment like that of Urban Dynamics or SimCity, but we have decades of real-world evidence that demonstrates the disastrous costs of the “counterintuitive” anti-welfare agenda. Straightforward solutions to poverty and economic misery—redistribution and the provision of public services—have both empirical backing and moral force. Maybe it’s time we start listening to our intuition again."
simcity  libertarianism  history  games  gaming  videogames  cities  simulations  simulation  2019  kevinbaker  urban  urbanism  policy  politics  economics  bias  willwright  urbanpolicy  urbanplanning  complexity  democracy  alberthirschman  edmundburke  danielpatrickmoynihan  jayforrester  paulstarr  urbandynamics  johncollins  dynamo  class  classism  motivation  money  government  governance  poverty  systemsthinking  society 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Nick Kaufmann on Twitter: "Civic tech needs to study history and explore the "usable past". Everyone in #civictech / @codeforamerica network should read Professor Light's upcoming book States of Childhood, ill attempt to summarize her talk below, although
[this is the event:
https://architecture.mit.edu/computation/lecture/playing-city-building ]

[thread contains many images]

"Civic tech needs to study history and explore the "usable past". Everyone in #civictech / @codeforamerica network should read Professor Light's upcoming book States of Childhood, ill attempt to summarize her talk below, although it's only what i could grasp in an hour or so.

https://twitter.com/nickkauf/status/1071162000145817601
At @mitsap tonight tweeting about Jennifer Light's lecture "playing at city building" #urbanism #education #civictech

Light opened the talk with the observation that more disciplines are looking to study history to "look forward by looking backward" #civicfutures #usablepast

In #civictech we know this isnt the first government reform movement with a "techie spin" in the world or us. At the last turn of the century, anxieties about cities birthed the "good government movement" the "googoos" were reformers kinda like #civichackers of today

Like @codeforamerica and also #smartcities boosters, the goo-goos believed scientific models and tech tools were a source of progress. They were worried about "boss rule" and wanted to "rationalize government" compare to cfa's mottos today

After discussing the good govt movement, Lights set the historical context of shifting expectations around young people's behavior. Child labor laws did not stop children from working however, it was just framed as "play" now

In this context early models of vocational education and educational simulations emerged, including William R. George's "model republic" movement. @Erie @pahlkadot model republics were all over the usa, not as franchised like #cfabrigade but more grassroots diffusion of the idea

There were miniature republics run by children in boston(Cottage Row), Cleveland (Progress City) Philadelphia (Playground City), etc, where children worked as real pretend public servants

media coverage of the time hailed these civic simulations as educational opportunity/chance for a "second life" for youth. Some of the tenement kids that George put into his program ended up in ivy league schools, and as lawyers, Pub. Servants and admins of their own model cities

The educational theories at the time of the model republics were very similar to today's trends of "gamification" "experiential learning" etc. Light referenced Stanley Hall (imitation/impersonation) and 'identity play'

Long before Bateson and Goffman were muddling the boundary between seriousness/play, model republics were also using that ambiguity to educate and also cut costs of programs literally built and maintained by children. Imagine 1000 kids and 3 admins

John Dewey's philosophy of learning by doing was also heavily referenced in the talk, as George took great inspiration from him and Dewey was a supporter of the model republics.

Light stressed just how much model republic citizens did in their pretend-real jobs, building housing, policing, data collection, safety inspections, and they did it so well that they often circumvented the adult systems. Why send some1 to adult court when junior court works?

This dynamic reminded me so much of #civichackers today with our pretend jobs and weekly hack night play that quickly turns into real jobs for our cities

Another point Light made was that the model republics were very much about assimilation of immigrants into a certain set of white american middleclass values. But before rise of consumerism those values heavily emphasized DIY/activecitizenship/production.

One reason for the decline of the model republics might have been the rise of consumerism and passive consumption valued over production. But we still have things like model U.N. and vocational programs, vestiges of this time.

Again today we have a perceived need to train people for the "new economy", so what can #civictech #civicinnovation #smartcities learn from looking back to historical examples? For one thing, we learn that youth contribution to civic innovation is important and undervalued

When model republics were introduced into schools the educational outcomes were not the only advantage, they saved schools gobs of money through "user generated" labor. Again think about civictech volunteerism today...

At Emerson School, Light said, kids were even repairing the electrical system. And in some cities kids would stand in for the mayor at real events.

Heres a page describing the establishment of a self-governing body of newsboys in Milwaukee https://www.marquette.edu/cgi-bin/cuap/db.cgi?uid=default&ID=4167&view=Search&mh=1

Light closed the talk by remarking on the "vast story of children's unacknowledged labor in the creation of urban America". slide shows how their labor was hidden behind play. Although they couldnt work in factories,can you call it "play" if it involved *building* the playground?

Although Light's upcoming book focuses on America, she said there were civic simulations like this in many countries including the Phillipines, China, England, France...

Model republics were not however a well connected, branded international civic movement like modern #civictech. Light said that while they were promoted at national educational conferences on education or public housing, George lamented not having control of the brand/vision

The result of George's lack of guidelines and a organizational network of model republic practiciorners was many different, idiosyncratic models run by different ppl in different places. @pahlkadot George really needed a "National Advisory Council" it seems!

For example an Indiana model republic the kids put on their own circuses! George thought some model republics werent following his original values/vision but couldnt do much about it...another theme in #civictech now Fortunately @Open_Maine is allowed to be weirdos too @elburnett

Light emphasized that although the model republics were a tool to assimilate children into a set of values (presumably including colonial, racist, patriarchal, capitalist ones) they were also a site of agency where kids experimented and innovated.

For example, girls in coeducational model republics held public offices and launched voting rights campaigns before the women' suffrage movement gained the rights in the "real" world. Given the power of the republics to do real work this wasnt just a symbolic achievement.

George for his part believed that the kids should figure out model republics for themselves, even if it meant dystopian civics. One model republic kept prisoners in a literal iron cage before eventually abolishing the prison.

Light's talk held huge lessons for the #civictech movement, and the model republic movement is just one of many pieces of history that can be a "usable past" for us. every civic tech brigade should have a "historian" role!

At @Open_Maine weve always been looking back to look forward although I didnt have the "usable past" vocabulary until I saw professor Light's talk today. @ajawitz @elburnett and I have consciously explored history in promoting civic tech in Maine.Other brigades are doing this too

For example, early @Open_Maine (code for maine) posters consciously referenced civilian conservation corps aesthetic #usablepast

We also made a 100y link w/ charitable mechanics movement @MaineMechanics makerspace never happened but @semateos became president and aligned org. with modern #makermovement. we host civichackathons there. #mainekidscode class is in same room that held free drawingclass 100y ago

So you can see why Light's talk has my brain totally buzzing. After all, @Open_Maine has been dreaming of #civicisland, an experiential #civictech summer camp! Were currently applying to @MozOpenLeaders to develop open source experiential civictech curricula we could use for it.

Next steps here: I want to write an article about the "usable past" concept for #civictech. So if your brigade is engaged with history I wanna talk to you. @JBStephens1 was it you talking about the rotary club model on slack? @CodeForPhilly didnt you make a history timeline?"
nickkaufmann  urbanism  urban  cities  jenniferlight  children  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  tcsnmy  civics  civictech  technology  history  codeforamerica  smartcities  boston  cleveland  philadelphia  williamgeorge  modelrepublics  simulations  simulation  gregorybateson  play  seriousplay  seriousness  education  johndewey  milaukee  labor  work  colinward  thechildinthecity  housing  governance  policy  activism  participatory  participation  experimentation  experience  experientiallearning  volunteerism  makerspaces  openmaine  maine  learning  howwelearn  ervinggoffman 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Playing at City Building | MIT Architecture
"A century ago, American children regularly played at city building in schools and youth serving institutions. Much of this activity took the form of “junior republics” – miniature cities, states, and nations run by kids. With supervising adults in the background, the young officials made laws, took civil service exams, paid taxes, ran restaurants, printed newspapers, and role played other civic activities. This talk, which draws on my forthcoming book States of Childhood, explores the historical and contemporary significance of these participatory simulations. I'll argue that the history of the republic movement helps to make visible children’s widespread contributions to American city building, and how their varied contributions were rendered invisible through an earlier era’s discourse about simulation and play. I'll also discuss the republic movement's resonances with a range of contemporary techniques and technologies from role playing and gamification to virtual worlds and augmented reality games, and suggest how recent work in the history of computing and information technology is making available new bodies of theoretical and empirical research for scholars and practitioners seeking a “usable past.”

Playing at City Building
A century ago, American children regularly played at city building in schools and youth serving institutions. Much of this activity took the form of “junior republics” – miniature cities, states, and nations run by kids. With supervising adults in the background, the young officials made laws, took civil service exams, paid taxes, ran restaurants, printed newspapers, and role played other civic activities. This talk, which draws on my forthcoming book States of Childhood, explores the historical and contemporary significance of these participatory simulations. I'll argue that the history of the republic movement helps to make visible children’s widespread contributions to American city building, and how their varied contributions were rendered invisible through an earlier era’s discourse about simulation and play. I'll also discuss the republic movement's resonances with a range of contemporary techniques and technologies from role playing and gamification to virtual worlds and augmented reality games, and suggest how recent work in the history of computing and information technology is making available new bodies of theoretical and empirical research for scholars and practitioners seeking a “usable past.”

Jennifer Light

Director of the Program in Science, Technology, and Society; Bern Dibner Professor of the History of Science and Technology; Professor of Urban Studies and Planning
Jen Light’s eclectic interests span the history of science and technology in America over the past 150 years. She is the author of three books as well as articles and essays covering topics from female programming pioneers, to early attempts to organize smart cities, to the racial implications of algorithmic thinking in federal housing policy, to the history of youth political media production, to the uptake of scientific and technical ideas and innovations across other fields. Professor Light is especially fascinated by smart peoples’ bad ideas: efforts by well-intentioned scientists and engineers to apply scientific methods and technological tools to solve social and political problems—and how the history of their failures can inform contemporary scientific and engineering practice.

Light holds degrees from Harvard University and the University of Cambridge. She has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study and the Derek Brewer Visiting Fellow at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge. Her work has been supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and honored with the Catherine Bauer Wurster Prize from the Society for American City and Regional Planning History and an honorary doctorate from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Light serves on the editorial boards IEEE Annals of the History of Computing; Information and Culture; Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences; and Journal of Urban History. Professor Light was previously on the faculty of the School of Communication and the Departments of History and Sociology at Northwestern University."
jenniferlight  2018  children  youth  teens  urban  urbanism  cityplanning  cities  citybuilding  schools  education  civics  modeling  participatory  simulations  participation  government  governance  democracy  politics  computing  technology  society  history  via:nickkaufmann  childhood  play  roleplaying  gamification  virtualworlds  worldbuilding 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Print Simulator - Ink Shift – RISOTTO
"The print simulator is a quick and easy way to experiment with your artwork!

See how your print will look on our variety of papers, switch ink colours at the click of a button and learn the foundations of artwork layering and preparation.

There are 2 modes to play with..."

[via: https://are.na/block/2018171
https://are.na/benjamin-hickethier/riso-1498024805 ]
print  papernet  printing  simulations  risograph 
july 2018 by robertogreco
LOOPY: a tool for thinking in systems
"In a world filled with ever-more-complex technological, sociological, ecological, political & economic systems... a tool to make interactive simulations may not be that much help. But it can certainly try.

play with simulations
It's the ancient, time-honored way of learning: messing around and seeing what happens. Play with simulations to ask "what if" questions, and get an intuition for how the system works!

programming by drawing
Raw code is too inaccessible. Also drag-and-drop is too mainstream. But with LOOPY, you can model systems by simply drawing circles & arrows, like a wee baby

remix others' simulations
Want to build upon your friends' models? Or challenge your enemies' models? LOOPY lets you have a conversation with simulations! You can go from thinking in systems, to talking in systems."



"LOOPY is also open source and public domain, meaning it's free for coders, educators, and just about anybody to re-use and re-mix LOOPY as they see fit."
systems  systemsthinking  software  onlinetoolkit  nickycase  simulations 
july 2018 by robertogreco
LOOPY: a tool for thinking in systems
"In a world filled with ever-more-complex technological, sociological, ecological, political & economic systems... a tool to make interactive simulations may not be that much help. But it can certainly try.

play with simulations
It's the ancient, time-honored way of learning: messing around and seeing what happens. Play with simulations to ask "what if" questions, and get an intuition for how the system works!

programming by drawing
Raw code is too inaccessible. Also drag-and-drop is too mainstream. But with LOOPY, you can model systems by simply drawing circles & arrows, like a wee baby

remix others' simulations
Want to build upon your friends' models? Or challenge your enemies' models? LOOPY lets you have a conversation with simulations! You can go from thinking in systems, to talking in systems.

Like duct tape, you can use LOOPY for all sorts of things:

[image]

However you choose to use LOOPY, hopefully it can give you not just the software tools, but also the mental tools to understand the complex systems of the world around us. It's a hot mess out there.

LOOPY is also open source and public domain, meaning it's free for coders, educators, and just about anybody to re-use and re-mix LOOPY as they see fit. (Get the source code on Github!)

LOOPY is made by Nicky Case"

[via: http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/aug/07/seeing-whole-systems/ ]
dataviz  systems  simulation  simulations  onlinetoolkit  maps  mapping  systemsthinking  drawing  feedbackloops  visualization 
august 2017 by robertogreco
The Ruling Classroom | Jigsaw Productions
"The Ruling Classroom is an in-depth look at teacher George Muldoon’s experiment with his class at California’s Mill Valley Middle School in 1979. The class creates a simulation of American society, only to see it end in corruption at the highest levels of “government,” complete with its own “Kidgate” scandal. As soon as the kids write their own laws, and start their own businesses, the problems arise: white-collar crime emerges, a group of students attempt to monopolize resources, and the gap between the “haves” and “have-nots” grows. The experiment is halted when a child writes an article in the school paper about a teacher slapping a student, and the familiar but make-believe world comes crashing down."
film  1979  documentary  towatch  teaching  education  corruption  government  georgemuldoon  kidgate  simulations 
april 2016 by robertogreco
A Simulation In Emoji
"Howdy! 🌻 This (prototype) is a tool that lets you simulate systems of the world. In emoji.

My hope is that this can help people make more stuff like Parable of the Polygons, interactives that help people understand the complex systems of the world we live in. Also, emoji.

In this simulation, you can edit EVERYTHING. Draw on the grid, modify the rules, even change these very words you're reading! And at the end, you can save and share your creation. That's the cool thing: there is *no* difference between playing & making, between reading & writing.

That's the Forest Fire model to your left. Pretty, isn't it? Scroll down, and you'll find the rules for it, exposed for you to play with. Have fun!"

[See also:
https://github.com/ncase/emoji-prototype
http://ncase.me/emoji-prototype/?remote=-K3ztgWwxXOUb9-QVRGe ]
simulations  classideas  emoji  programming  cellularautomata  simulation  conwaysgameoflife 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Parable of the Polygons - a playable post on the shape of society
"1. Small individual bias → Large collective bias.
When someone says a culture is shapist, they're not saying the individuals in it are shapist. They're not attacking you personally.

2. The past haunts the present.
Your bedroom floor doesn't stop being dirty just coz you stopped dropping food all over the carpet. Creating equality is like staying clean: it takes work. And it's always a work in progress.

3. Demand diversity near you.
If small biases created the mess we're in, small anti-biases might fix it. Look around you. Your friends, your colleagues, that conference you're attending. If you're all triangles, you're missing out on some amazing squares in your life - that's unfair to everyone. Reach out, beyond your immediate neighbors."



"Our cute segregation sim is based off the work of Nobel Prize-winning game theorist, Thomas Schelling. Specifically, his 1971 paper, Dynamic Models of Segregation. We built on top of this, and showed how a small demand for diversity can desegregate a neighborhood. In other words, we gave his model a happy ending.

Schelling's model gets the general gist of it, but of course, real life is more nuanced. You might enjoy looking at real-world data, such as W.A.V. Clark's 1991 paper, A Test of the Schelling Segregation Model.

There are other mathematical models of institutionalized bias out there! Male-Female Differences: A Computer Simulation shows how a small gender bias compounds as you move up the corporate ladder. The Petrie Multiplier shows why an attack on sexism in tech is not an attack on men.

Today's Big Moral Message™ is that demanding a bit of diversity in your spaces makes a huge difference overall. Look at Plz Diversify Your Panel, an initiative where overrepresented speakers pledge not to speak on panels without diverse representation.

Our "playable post" was inspired by Bret Victor's Explorable Explanations and Ian Bogost's procedural rhetoric."
diversity  games  racism  society  visualization  simulation  2014  vihart  nickycase  segregation  integration  bias  individualbias  equality  progress  anti-biases  math  modeling  simulations  videogames 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Michael Wesch at Pasadena City College - YouTube
[Questions that burn in the souls of Wesch's students:
Who am I?
What is the meaning of life?
What am I going to do with my life?
Am I going to make it?]

[See also: http://mediatedcultures.net/presentations/learning-as-soul-making/ ]
education  teaching  michaelwesch  identity  cv  soulmaking  spirituality  why  whyweteach  howweteach  learning  unschooling  deschooling  life  purpose  relationships  anthropology  ethnography  canon  meaning  meaningmaking  schooliness  schools  schooling  achievement  bigpicture  counseling  society  seymourpapert  empathy  perspective  assessment  fakingit  presentationofself  burnout  web  internet  wonder  curiosity  ambiguity  controversy  questions  questioning  askingquestions  questionasking  modeling  quests  risk  risktaking  2014  death  vulnerability  connectedness  sharedvulnerability  cars  technology  telecommunications  boxes  robertputnam  community  lievendecauter  capsules  openness  trust  peterwhite  safety  pubictrust  exploration  helicopterparenting  interestedness  ambition  ericagoldson  structure  institutions  organizations  constructionism  patricksuppes  instructionism  adaptivelearning  khanacademy  play  cocreationtesting  challenge  rules  engagement  novelty  simulation  compassion  digitalethnography  classideas  projectideas  collaboration  lcproject  tcsnmy  op 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Super Planet Crash - Can you feel the gravity?
[About: http://www.stefanom.org/super-planet-crash/ ]

"Super Planet Crash is a little game born out of some of my work on the online version of Systemic. It is a digital orrery, integrating the motion of massive bodies forward in time according to Newtonian gravity. It works on any recent web browser and modern tablets.

The main goal of the game is to make a planetary system of your own creation be stable (i.e. no planet is ejected, or collides with another body). This is of course exceedingly easy when your system comprises of a few Earth-mass planets, but dynamical instability can quickly set in when adding a lot of heavier bodies (from giant planets, all the way to stellar companions).

The challenge is then to fit as many massive bodies as possible inside 2 AUs (twice the distance between the Earth and the Sun), teetering close to instability but lasting at least 500 years. Accordingly, the game rewards a daring player with more points (proportionally to the mass of each body added to the system). A few simple rules are listed under the “Help” button.

The game always starts with an Earth-mass planet in a random location, but you can also have fun overloading known planetary systems! Clicking on the “Template” dropdown brings up a list of planetary systems to use as starting templates, including the compact system Kepler-11 and the super-eccentric planet HD80606 (more systems to come). You can even share your creations with your friends by copying the URL in the “Share” box.

The game is open-source, and still under active development. The entire code will be downloadable from GitHub (as soon as I get a bit of work done!).In the near future, I will be adding integration with Systemic Live, a longer list of template planetary systems and smartphone support. In the meantime, have fun crashing planets!"
astronomy  physics  games  simulations  planets  solarsystems  solarsystem 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Videogames and the Spirit of Capitalism | Molleindustria
"We are only learning to speak of immeasurable qualities through videogames. It’s a slow and collective process of hacking accounting machines into expressive machines. Computer games need to learn from their non-digital counterparts to be loose interfaces between people. A new game aesthetic has to be explored: one that revels in problem-making over problem-solving, that celebrates paradoxes and ruptures, that doesn’t eschew broken and dysfunctional systems because the broken and dysfunctional systems governing our lives need to be unpacked and not idealized.

Strategies are to be discovered: poetic wrenches have to be thrown in the works; gears and valves have to grow hair, start pulsing and breathing; algorithms must learn to tell stories and scream in pain."

[direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/86738382 ]
videogames  gaming  paolopedercini  molleindustria  games  art  design  capitalism  economics  efficiency  control  rationalization  marxism  bureaucracy  consumption  commerce  standardization  socialnetworks  quantification  sybernetics  gamification  goals  society  taylorism  relationships  pokemon  facebook  farmville  zynga  management  power  labor  addiction  addictiveness  badges  behavior  measurement  commodification  rogercaillois  play  idleness  ludism  leisure  leisurearts  artleisure  maxweber  resistance  consciousness  storytelling  notgames  taleoftales  agency  proteus  richardhofmeier  cartlife  simulation  2014  douglaswilson  spaceteam  henrysmith  cooperativegames  collaborativegames  tamatipico  tuboflex  everydaythesamedream  unmanned  systemsthinking  human  humans  oligarchy  negativeexternalities  gamedesign  poetry  johannsebastianjoust  edg  srg  shrequest1  simulations  pokémon 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Links 2013 ["Bret Victor: It’s the end of 2013, and here’s what Bret fell in love with this year"]
"What is the difference between scientific and non-scientific thinking? Thinking within a consistent theory versus thinking haphazardly?

I'm crucially interested in the problem of representing theory such that intuitions are fruitful and theoretically sound, and representations suggest analogies that stay true to the theory. That's not diSessa's problem, but I feel that his viewpoint has some powerful clues."



"Hofstadter says that all thinking runs on analogy-making. Sounds good to me! If he's even partially correct, then it seems to me that a medium for powerful thinking needs to be a medium for seeing powerful analogies. And a medium for powerful communication needs to be designed around inducing the dance he's talking about up there."



Kieran Egan: "Thinking about education during this century has almost entirely involved just three ideas—socialization, Plato's academic idea, and Rousseau's developmental idea. We may see why education is so difficult and contentious if we examine these three ideas and the ways they interact in educational thinking today. The combination of these ideas governs what we do in schools, and what we do to children in the name of education.

Our problems, I will further argue, are due to these three ideas each being fatally flawed and being also incompatible with one other."

Bret Victor: "If you're going to design a system for education, it might help to understand the purpose of education in the first place. Egan points out how modern education is implicitly driven by a cargo-culty mish-mash of three lofty but mutually-incompatible goals. Good luck with that!"



"The cultural importance of the printing press doesn't have much to do with the technology -- the ink and metal type -- but rather how print acted as a medium to amplify human thought in particular ways.

Print was directly responsible for the emergence of a literate and educated society, which (for example) made possible the idea of societal self-governance. The US Constitution could only exist in a literate print culture, where (for example) the Federalist papers and Anti-Federalist papers could be debated in the newspapers.

As you read and watch Alan Kay, try not to think about computational technology, but about a society that is fluent in thinking and debating in the dimensions opened up by the computational medium.
Don't think about “coding” (that's ink and metal type, already obsolete), and don't think about “software developers” (medieval scribes only make sense in an illiterate society).

Think about modeling phenomena, modeling situations, simulating models, gaining a common-sense intuition for nonlinear dynamic processes. Then think about a society in which every educated person does these things, in the computational medium, as easily and naturally as we today read and write complex logical arguments in the written medium.

Reading used to be reserved for the clergy, to hand down unquestionable Revealed Truths to the masses. Today, it's just what everyone does. Think about a society in which science is not reserved for the clergy, to hand down unquestionable Revealed Truths to the masses, but is just what everyone does."



[Reading tips from Bret Victor:]

"Reading Tip #1

It’s tempting to judge what you read: "I agree with these statements, and I disagree with those."

However, a great thinker who has spent decades on an unusual line of thought cannot induce their context into your head in a few pages. It’s almost certainly the case that you don’t fully understand their statements.

Instead, you can say: "I have now learned that there exists a worldview in which all of these statements are consistent."

And if it feels worthwhile, you can make a genuine effort to understand that entire worldview. You don't have to adopt it. Just make it available to yourself, so you can make connections to it when it's needed.

Reading Tip #2

Carver Mead describes a physical theory in which atoms exchange energy by resonating with each other. Before the energy transaction can happen, the two atoms must be phase-matched, oscillating in almost perfect synchrony with each other.

I sometimes think about resonant transactions as a metaphor for getting something out of a piece of writing. Before the material can resonate, before energy can be exchanged between the author and reader, the reader must already have available a mode of vibration at the author's frequency. (This doesn't mean that the reader is already thinking the author's thought; it means the reader is capable of thinking it.)

People often describe written communication in terms of transmission (the author explained the concept well, or poorly) and/or absorption (the reader does or doesn't have the background or skill to understand the concept). But I think of it more like a transaction -- the author and the reader must be matched with each other. The author and reader must share a close-enough worldview, viewpoint, vocabulary, set of mental models, sense of aesthetics, and set of goals. For any particular concept in the material, if not enough of these are sufficiently matched, no resonance will occur and no energy will be exchanged.

Perhaps, as a reader, one way to get more out of more material is to collect and cultivate a diverse set of resonators, to increase the probability of a phase-match.

Reading Tip #3

Misunderstandings can arise when an author is thinking in a broader context than the reader. A reader might be thinking tactically: :How can I do a better job today?" while the author is thinking strategically: "How can we make a better tomorrow?"

The misunderstanding becomes especially acute when real progress requires abandoning today's world and starting over.

We are ants crawling on a tree branch. Most ants are happy to be on the branch, and happy to be moving forward.

[image]

But there are a few special ants that, somehow, are able to see a bigger picture. And they can see that this branch is a dead end.

[image]

They can see that if we really want to move forward, we'll have to backtrack a long ways down.

They usually have a hard time explaining this to the ants that can only see the branch they're on. For them, the path ahead appears to go on forever.

[image]"
bretvictor  brunolatour  andreadisessa  douglashofstadter  place  cognition  science  sherryturkle  kieranegan  terrycavanagh  stewartbrand  longnow  julianjaynes  davidhestenes  carvermead  paulsaffo  tednelson  dougengelbert  alankay  reading  toread  2013  gutenberg  printing  print  modeling  simulation  dynamicprocesses  society  progress  thinking  intuition  analogies  education  systemsthinking  howweread  learning  ideas  concepts  context  readiness  simulations 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Julian Bleecker on ‘Undisciplinarity’ on Vimeo
"‘Undisciplinarity’ is as much a way of doing work as it is a departure from ways of doing work, even questioning what ‘counts’ as work. It is a way of working and an approach to creating and circulating culture that can go its own way, without worrying about working outside of what histories-of-disciplines say is ‘proper’ work. It is ‘undisciplined’. This is important because we need more playful and habitable worlds that the old forms of knowledge production are ill-equipped to produce. It’s an epistemological shift that offers new ways of fixing the problems the old disciplinary and extra-disciplinary practices created in the first place."
julianbleecker  2010  undisciplinarity  glvo  cv  openstudioproject  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  generalists  design  extradisciplinary  knowledgeproduction  learning  culture  making  doing  innovation  scienceofscience  anthropology  science  sciencestudies  historyofconsciousness  sciencefiction  simulation  play  simulations  tinkering  prototyping  exploration  speculation  experimentation 
april 2013 by robertogreco
A Vast Machine
"A Vast Machine is a historical account of climate science as a global knowledge infrastructure. Weather and climate observing systems cover the whole world, making global data. This infrastructure generates information so vast in quantity and so diverse in quality and form that it can be understood only through computer analysis — by making data global. These processes depend on three kinds of computer models: data models, used to combine and adjust measurements from many different sources; simulation models of weather and climate; and reanalysis models, which recreate climate history from historical weather data. A Vast Machine argues that over the years data and models have converged to create a stable, reliable, and trustworthy basis for establishing the reality of global warming."
books  via:robinsloan  climate  simulations  climatescience  science  weather  computing  globalwarming 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Whoa-- Design Renderings Banned on Kickstarter! - Core77
"Well folks, it looks like more than a few Kickstarter backers have been disappointed by their recipients' inability to deliver (which is perhaps why some Core77 readers have been critical of the LIFX, to name one project). Product design is no cakewalk, but it's turning out to be a lot easier to come up with a great idea than it is to have it manufactured and delivered.

To circumvent this, Kickstarter has instituted new rules sure to be a blow to many a would-be designer: Renderings and simulations are banned!"
consumerprotection  productdesign  simulations  renderings  2012  kickstarter 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Making Friends: On Toys and Toymaking — dConstruct Audio Archive
"Toys are not idle knick-knacks: they allow us to explore otherwise impossible terrain; fire the imagination; provide sparks for structured play. They do not just entertain and delight; they stimulate and inspire. And always, they remind us of the value - and values - to be found in abstract play.

Toymaking is not an idle habit. Toys are a fertile ground for creators to work in. They offer a playful space to experiment and explore. They are a safe ground to experiment with new techniques, skills, or ideas. Though they emerge from no particular purpose, they expose purpose and meaning through their making. Toymaking ranges from making realistic simulations of life to producing highly abstract playthings. And everyone who makes things - out of paper, wood, metal, plastic, or code - has something to gain from making them.

Trying to draw a thread through what, it turns out, has been a lifetime first shaped by toymaking, and then spent making toys in idle moments, Tom will take in…"
playthings  making  simulations  meaning  purpose  delight  inspiration  play  srg  edg  glvo  practice  experimenting  prototyping  tinkering  2012  dconstruct2012  dconstruct  toymaking  toys  tomarmitage 
september 2012 by robertogreco
You Can't Fuck the System If You've Never Met One by Casey A. Gollan
"Part of the reason systems are hard to see is because they're an abstraction. They don't really exist until you articulate them.

And any two things don't make a system, even where there are strong correlations. Towns with more trees have lower divorce rates, for example, but you'd be hard-pressed to go anywhere with that.

However, if you can manage to divine the secret connections and interdependencies between things, it's like putting on glasses for the first time. Your headache goes away and you can focus on how you want to change things.

I learned that in systems analysis — if you'd like to change the world — there is a sweet spot between low and high level thinking. In this space you are not dumbfoundedly adjusting variables…nor are you contemplating the void.

In the same way that systems don't exist until you point them out…"

"This is probably a built up series of misunderstandings. I look forward to revising these ideas."

[Now here: http://caseyagollan.com/systems/
http://caseyagollan.com/systems/read/ ]
color  cooperunion  awareness  systemsawareness  binary  processing  alexandergalloway  nilsaallbarricelli  willwright  pets  superpokepets  superpoke  juliandibbell  dna  simulations  trust  hyper-educated  consulting  genetics  power  richarddawkins  generalizations  capitalism  systemsdesign  relationships  ownership  privacy  identity  cities  socialgovernment  government  thesims  sims  google  politics  facebooks  donatellameadows  sherryturkle  emotions  human  patterns  patternrecognition  systemsthinking  systems  2012  caseygollan  donellameadows 
march 2012 by robertogreco
dConstruct2011 videos: The Transformers, Kars Alfrink
"In this talk, Kars Alfrink – founder and principal designer at applied pervasive games studio Hubbub – explores ways we might use games to alleviate some of the problems wilful social self-seperation can lead to. Kars looks at how people sometimes deliberately choose to live apart, even though they share the same living spaces. He discusses the ways new digital tools and the overlapping media landscape have made society more volatile. But rather than to call for a decrease in their use, Kars argues we need more, but different uses of these new tools. More playful uses."

[See also: http://2011.dconstruct.org/conference/kars-alfrink AND http://speakerdeck.com/u/dconstruct/p/the-transformers-by-kars-alfrink ]

"Kars looks at how game culture and play shape the urban fabric, how we might design systems that improve people’s capacity to do so, and how you yourself, through play, can transform the city you call home."
monocultures  rulespace  self-governance  gamification  filterbubble  scale  tinkering  urbanism  urban  simulationfever  animalcrossing  simulation  ludology  proceduralrhetoric  ianbogost  resilience  societalresilience  division  belonging  rioting  looting  socialconventions  situationist  playfulness  rules  civildisobedience  separation  socialseparation  nationality  fiction  dconstruct2011  dconstruct  identity  cities  chinamieville  design  space  place  play  gaming  games  volatility  hubbub  howbuildingslearn  adaptability  adaptivereuse  architecture  transformation  gentrification  society  2011  riots  janejacobs  karsalfrink  simulations 
december 2011 by robertogreco
“Sometimes the stories are the science…” – Blog – BERG
"About a decade ago – I saw Oliver Sacks speak at the Rockerfeller Institute in NYC, talk about his work.

A phrase from his address has always stuck with me since. He said of what he did – his studies and then the writing of books aimed at popular understanding of his studies that ‘…sometimes the stories are the science’.

Sometimes our film work is the design work.

Again this is a commercial act, and we are a commercial design studio.

But it’s also something that we hope unpacks the near-future – or at least the near-microfutures – into a public where we can all talk about them."
oliversacks  learning  deschooling  unschooling  education  berg  berglondon  mattjones  timoarnall  storytelling  design  understanding  newgrammars  conversation  meaning  meaningmaking  glvo  tcsnmy  classideas  art  paulklee  domains  interdisciplinarity  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  perspective  mindset  wbrianarthur  jackschulze  mattwebb  technology  future  dansaffer  rulespace  simulation  believability  materialquality  film  video  invention  creativity  time  adamlisagor  brucesterling  vernacularvideo  victorpapanek  jasonkottke  andybaio  johnsculley  apple  stevejobs  knowledgenavigator  prototypes  prototyping  iteration  process  howwework  howwelearn  communication  simulations 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Second-order simulacra - Wikipedia
"Second-order simulacra, a term coined by Jean Baudrillard, are symbols without referents, that is, symbols with no real object to represent. Simply put, a symbol is itself taken for reality and further layer of symbolism is added. This occurs when the symbol is taken to be more important or authoritative of the original entity, authenticity has been replaced by copy (thus reality is replaced by a substitute).

The consequence of the propagation of second-order simulacra is that, within the affected context, nothing is "real," though those engaged in the illusion are incapable of seeing it. Instead of having experiences, people observe spectacles, via real or metaphorical control screens. Instead of the real, we have simulation and simulacra, the hyperreal.
baudrillard  philosophy  simulation  symbols  simulcra  representation  reality  illusions  illusion  hyperreal  symbolism  simulations 
august 2011 by robertogreco
melaniemcbride.net » Melanie McBride
"Toronto-based early adopter, educator & digital culture specialist who writes, teaches & researches emergent literacies & learning. In 2010, Melanie joined Ryerson University’s Experiential Design & Gaming Environments (EDGE) lab team, where she is currently researching & writing about children’s learning in gaming environments and virtual social spaces. Melanie is also at work on a book about digital literacies and the hidden curriculum of emergent learning & education. Melanie has taught secondary, post-secondary, industry, alternative, at-risk & adult education. When she is not writing and researching she can be found raiding in World of Warcraft or tending her crops in Minecraft."

"Research Interests: Social justice, situated informal learning, gaming/game culture, MMOs and multiplayer games, virtual and persistent worlds, transmedia, remix and maker culture, Open technology, Open education, critical pedagogy, critical theory, hidden and null curriculum, privacy"
games  education  melaniemcbride  toronto  teaching  learning  gaming  play  situationist  situatedlearning  criticalpedagogy  criticaleducation  open  opentechnology  informallearning  transmedia  mmo  wow  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  tcsnmy  situatedinformallearning  socialjustice  criticaltheory  privacy  simulations  digitalliteracy  emergentcurriculum  emergentlearning  hiddencurriculum  minecraft 
may 2011 by robertogreco
From Personalized to Empathetic Technologies | Institute For The Future
"Which brings me to a very different, but increasingly important type of technology for the next decade: Tools that give us the ability to empathize with each other's situations.

Probably the most well-known example of this sort of empathetic technology comes from MIT's Age Lab, which helps people experience the future effects of aging. AGNES, or the Age Gain Now Sympathy System, is a full-body suit that physically strains the body of the wearer to give that person the brief physical experience of being decades older."
empathy  technology  iftf  simulation  aging  physical  simulations 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Vanished
"An environmental disaster has taken place on Planet Earth and we need your help.<br />
Smithsonian Institution & MIT Education Arcade invite all scientists-in-training ages 10½-14 to log onto VANISHED & help decipher clues that unravel one of the world’s biggest mysteries. An online/offline interactive event, VANISHED is an 8-week episodic quest that will transform you into principal scientific investigators who must collaborate to find the answers. You will race against time as you solve games, puzzles, & other online challenges; visit real museums; collect samples from in & around your homes; and even partner w/ some of the Smithsonian’s world renowned scientists & investigators, to help unlock the true secrets of this catastrophe—before it’s too late."
games  learning  vanished  smithsonian  mit  miteducationarcade  simulations  arg  museums  puzzles  mysteries  collaboration  tcsnmy  classideas  interactive 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Pursuit of Perfection | Mssv
"The reason why the new American Dream is so chilling is because imposes practically unachievable goals and ultimately destructive desires upon us all (I’m including the entire rich world here). It distracts us from examining our own lives and deciding what we want ourselves in favour of buying more and more stuff.

Gamification holds out the promise of achieving those goals. It tells us that if you play the right games with enough enthusiasm and persistence, then you can have a perfect life and make a perfect world – at least, according to the game, if not necessarily in reality.

I’m sure that many games that seek to improve our lives and the world will work, to an extent. But many will not, whether through poor design or badly-constructed goals. We all need to be careful about games that promise to change our lives. Just as the unexamined life is not worth living, the unexamined game is not worth playing."
simulations  games  gaming  arg  janemcgonigal  adrianhon  2011  consumerism  gamification  criticism  life  play  meaning  value  unexaminedlife  reflection  goals  motivation  reality 
april 2011 by robertogreco
World Peace...and other 4th-grade achievements - About the Film and the Game
"World Peace...and other 4th-grade achievements interweaves the story of John Hunter, a teacher in Charlottesville, Virginia, with his students' participation in an exercise called the World Peace Game. The game triggers an eight-week transformation of the children from students of a neighborhood public school to citizens of the world. The film reveals how a wise, loving teacher can unleash students' full potential."

"The World Peace Game is a hands-on political simulation that gives players the opportunity to explore the connectedness of the global community through the lens of the economic, social, and environmental crises and the imminent threat of war. The goal of the game is to extricate each country from dangerous circumstances and achieve global prosperity with the least amount of military intervention. As "nation teams," students will gain greater understanding of the critical impact of information and how it is used."

[See also: http://www.darden.virginia.edu/web/Media/Darden-News-Articles/2010/Founder-of-World-Peace-Game-Named-Fellow-of-Dardens-Center-for-Global-Initiatives/ ]
film  johnhunter  worldpeace  fourthgrade  education  teaching  simulations  classideas  economics  society  politics  tcsnmy  ted  global  perspective  projectbasedlearning  via:cervus  pbl 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Gamasutra - Features - The Era Of Behaving Playfully
"Playing is behaving. From childhood experimentation & role-play to the competitive simulations of adults, it's impossible to separate even the most abstract forms of play from human expression. Yet video game design is dominated by the perceived need for win conditions.

If an interaction can't be parsed into passing or failing it can't be counted as fun. Without the threat of failure there is no fun. Yet, it's not victory that drives the invented play of kids on a playground, nor friends laughing over an inside joke.

Video games built around behavior aren't often given the same attention more competitively oriented games are, but they're no less important a part of the industry.

Games like The Sims 3, Heavy Rain, Nintendogs, Façade, Animal Crossing, & Harvest Moon are all made for the pleasures of expression. These are games played for their creative experiences more than their victory conditions."

[See also the Comment from Bart Stewart.]
videogames  gaming  play  gamedesign  roleplaying  simulations  invention  inventiveplay  animalcrossing  thesims  harvestmoon  nintendogs  creativity  games 
january 2011 by robertogreco
learningscience.org
"learningscience.org is an organization dedicated to sharing the newer and emerging "learning tools" of science education. Tools such as real-time data collection, simulations, inquiry based lessons, interactive web lessons, micro-worlds, and imaging, among others, can help make teaching science an exciting and engaging endeavor. These tools can help connect students with science, in ways that were impossible just a few years ago. Take a look at a few different types of "learning tools" at this link, Tool Examples. At this point in our project we are highlighting some of the best web resources for science concepts. Although our main emphasis is on students, teachers, and parents, really anyone interested in science education will find the site useful and informative."
science  education  resources  interactive  simulations  chemistry  biology  astronomy  activities  inquiry  teaching  visualization  physics  free 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Artificial Intelligence Brings Musicians Back From the Dead, Allowing All-Stars of All Time to Jam | Popular Science
"New software, developed by North Carolina-based Zenph Sound Innovations, is something like a Pandora for live musical style; sophisticated software analyzes musicians based on how they sound on old, archaic recordings. The software can then reconstruct songs as they would have sounded if those musicians had recorded in a modern studio and on superior media.

But it doesn't end there. Zenph is working on a means to not only recreate old performances, but to dissect a style to the point that it can manifest an artist's personal touch into pieces he or she never performed in life. Meaning the software could potentially lift Jimmy Page out of Black Dog and replace him with, say, Jimi Hendrix, just so see how it sounds."
music  annabelscheme  podcast  simulation  ai  simulations 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Game Based Learning .:: Video Games, Social Media & Learning ::. - Public Pedagogy through Video Games:
"So our argument so far: today’s complex popular culture involves a characteristic form of teaching and constitutes a public pedagogy. That form of teaching involves good design (which makes meaning situated and language lucidly functional), resources, and affinity spaces. In fact, we see much popular culture today as a form of competition for schools and schooling. Much popular culture teaches 21st-century skills, like collaboration, producing and not just consuming knowledge, technology skills, innovation, design and system thinking, and so forth, while school often does not. And, further, we see no reason (other than institutional forces) why teaching in school ought not to be primarily about good design, resourcing learners, and creating efficacious affinity spaces."
education  learning  informallearning  jamespaulgee  simulations  videogames  games  gaming  schools  schooling  formal  stevenjohnson  television  tv  criticalthinking  yu-gi-oh  ageofmythology  thesims  unschooling  deschooling  collaboration  tcsnmy  edg  srg  glvo  consumption  production  content  technology  21stcenturyskills  popculture  innovation  design  systemsthinking  complexity  pedagogy 
october 2009 by robertogreco
We run videogames in our heads - Preoccupations
"At the heart of both talks, besides his zest for life, learning and a passionate engagement with his subject, is the critically important idea of situated meanings and their role in learning: ‘Comprehension is grounded in perceptual simulations [of experience] that prepare agents for situated action’ — Barsalou (1999). ... summarise here James’s six headline slides from his Handheld Learning talk about what characterises videogames: an experience of being simultaneously inside and outside a system; situated meanings; action orientated tasks; lucidly functional language; modding; passionate affinity groups ... Good games makes you feel smarter than you are. Play first, learn later (situated meanings). Where school fails is when it’s like a bunch of manuals without the games — and that’s also a very good way to make the poor look stupid."
davidsmith  jamespaulgee  games  gaming  videogames  schools  teaching  learning  simulations  education  stevenjohnson  perception  immersive  systems  affinitygroups  situatedmeanings 
october 2009 by robertogreco
…My heart’s in Accra » Fun and games with human misery
"For me, either the suspiciously accurate novel or the eminently readable comic go a long way in turning a distant – though critical – concern into a real, tangible problem. It makes me wish that more journalists and activists would look for creative ways to tell these stories and make them more real to readers."
education  learning  comics  games  gaming  simulations  science  politics  piracy  africa  ethanzuckerman  tcsnmy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Serious Fun § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM - "Microsoft Research is slated to release Kodu for Xbox 360."
"Using terrain-drawing tools and an intuitive graphical programming language, players can design, play, and share a wide variety of 3D games. With no adrenaline-soaked violence, no plot, narrative, or even defined goals, Kodu challenges expectations of what a game entails. But it also embodies a form of communication that reflects some of the fundamental aspects of human cognition and learning. As such, Kodu may epitomize how games are uniquely capable of marrying traditional storytelling with the complexities of the real world. The growing “serious games” movement seeks to show off this potential, but selling “serious” in a medium synonymous with “fun” is no easy task. Sitting down with a heavy-handed, good-for-you-game is like getting a plate of broccoli when you ordered the chocolate cake. While advocacy groups might support them as communication or outreach tools, “broccoli” games are not exactly ready to become a part of the mainstream industry’s business plans."
education  games  programming  gaming  kids  simulations  learning  seriousgames  videogames  xbox360  kodu  coding  children 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Clark Aldrich On Simulations and Serious Games: Four Intellectual Traps for Understanding Learning
"1. School is not a useful model for learning. But learning to ride a bike or a foreign language is. Schools are only good for teaching people how to be students, and maybe teachers.
schools  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  learning  schooliness  gaming  games  play  leadership  innovation  sports  simulations 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Rossignol » Thrilling Wonder Stories
"The rocketship wonder of earlier decades is gone, and our children write dystopias by default: a fascinating, terrifying realisation. He seemed rather earthy and upbeat, and talked of how problems mean invention, and creativity, but I couldn’t help think about a generation of kids for whom there is no bright imagined future: only Bladerunner, eco-death, the Drowned World, apocalypse. MacLeod talked about the problems for idealistic sci-fi now, and I wonder if there was something about the hip nihilism of modern fantasy, combined with relentless terror-cancer newsmedia shit, that really will stop future generations bothering to climb out of their doomed shrug." ... "The whole thing was stamped, perhaps imperceptibly to everyone else, with a motto I come back to - paraphrasing Richard Rorty - which is: “anything can be redescribed”. Sometimes, a new description is all you need."
design  archigram  architecture  fiction  simulation  speculation  jgballard  pessimism  sciencefiction  scifi  optimism  narrative  representation  writing  futurism  future  tcsnmy  dystopia  utopia  jimrossignol  wonder  children  simulations 
may 2009 by robertogreco
More Geo-Games: Ship Simulator on Google Earth - O'Reilly Radar
"Frank Taylor of the Google Earth Blog just posted about Ships, a new ship simulation plugin that uses the API ( Frank's movie review). It's one of the Plugins he's going to dissect in his Google Earth workshop at Where 2.0 tomorrow (use whr09rdr for 20% off that last-minute registration)." See also: http://ships.planetinaction.com/
games  googlemaps  simulation  geolocation  googleearth  ships  navigation  maps  mapping  simulations 
may 2009 by robertogreco
Handheld Learning 2008 - Steven Johnson, Author
Steven Johnson talks about Everything Bad Is Good for You adding references to technologies, games, and media that have appeared since publication of the book.
via:preoccupations  videogames  stevenjohnson  gaming  learning  culture  society  tv  television  systems  patterns  simulations  simcity  games  2008  lost  thewire  entertainment  tcsnmy  spore  attention  patience  schools  schooling  brianeno 
january 2009 by robertogreco
When college students reinvent the world | csmonitor.com
"Kansas State University professor Michael Wesch’s ‘World Sim’ course – aka Anthropology 204 – helps students create new ‘cultures’ to get beyond the multiple choices to understanding the ‘why’ of global affairs."
michaelwesch  anthropology  pedagogy  teaching  learning  colleges  universities  education  reading  simulation  simulations 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Darwinia
"The world of Darwinia is a virtual themepark, running entirely inside a computer network and populated by a sentient evolving life form called the Darwinians. Unfortunately Darwinia has been overrun by a computer virus which has multiplied out of control. Your task is to destroy the Viral Infection and save the Darwinians from extinction."
games  evolution  gaming  simulation  introversion  tcsnmy  classideas  intorverts  simulations 
november 2008 by robertogreco
After Shock: What Happens Next Is Up to You...
"After Shock is the world's first massively collaborative disaster simulation, about a major earthquake affecting much of Southern California. Starting Nov 13, 2008, you'll experience the earthquake as if it's really occurring, and what happens next? How do we survive? Can our region recover and rebuild? - will be up to you."
iftf  earthquakes  simulation  disasters  tcsnmy  socal  classideas  simulations 
october 2008 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: SimCity: Not for Educational Use
"Simulation games like SimCity are valuable because they give a peek at the complex relationships between cause and effect in big systems such as cities. They're a chance to play at the edges of complexity, to see "what happens if I do this?" in both an iterated and replicable fashion. They can be wonderfully seductive digital sirens leading to unexpectedly staying up to 3:30 AM. But to be good educational tools, the models have to be transparent and changeable. We should be able to play with the system itself, not just the system's effects."
simcity  simulations  games  learning  education  transparency  worldchanging  2004  jamaiscascio 
september 2008 by robertogreco
Phun - 2D physics sandbox
"Phun is a free game like 2D physics sandbox where you can play with physics like never before. Children, students, engineers, artists, university professors, and many others, use Phun for telling stories, learning, constructing amazing machines, creating games - or just for the plain fun of it."
physics  simulations  edg  srg  play  mechanics  science  freeware  software 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Dimension M - Where there's power in numbers
"DimensionM™is an immersive video game world that engages students in the instruction and learning of mathematics. Pre-algebra and algebra objectives are covered through a series of missions that bring math into a world that today's students understand. Students become so captivated in solving problems that they forget they're learning but they don't forget what they've learned."
seriousgames  simulations  games  gaming  math  algebra  prealgebra  classideas  tcsnmy  learning  education  edtech  videogames  play  interactive 
august 2008 by robertogreco
mediatedcultures.net @ kansas state university - World Simulation Project
"The World Simulation is a radical experiment in learning that is the centerpiece of the Introduction to Cultural Anthropology course at Kansas State University, created in a fit of frustration with the large lecture hall format which seems inevitable in a classroom of 200-400 students. Of utmost concern to me, was the nature of questions I was hearing from students, which tended to be administrative and procedural rather than penetrative, critical, and insightful. My least favorite question was also the most common: "What do we need to know for this test?" Something had to be done, so I set to work creating the World Simulation."
michaelwesch  education  anthropology  pedagogy  learning  culture  teaching  ethnography  globalawareness  classideas  online  twitter  jott  mobile  phones  understanding  projectbasedlearning  simulations  pbl 
august 2008 by robertogreco
» Tiltfactor is…
"first academic center to focus on social activist games. Our mission is to research and develop software and art that creates rewarding, compelling, and socially-responsible interactions, with a focus on inventive game design for social change."
activism  virtualworlds  games  gaming  gamedesign  social  art  programming  simulations  interaction  collective  via:hrheingold 
july 2008 by robertogreco
climateTimeMachine - Tracking Changes in Global Conditions over Time
"This series of visualizations show how some of the key indicators of climate change, such as temperature, sea ice extent and carbon dioxide concentrations, have changed in Earth's recent history."
climate  nasa  science  environment  globalwarming  visualization  climatechange  arctic  datavisualization  simulations 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Superstruct! Play the game, invent the future. | The Institute For The Future [FAQ: http://www.iftf.org/node/2096 Also: http://www.openthefuture.com/2008/07/superstruct_play_the_game_inve.html]
"This fall, IftF invites you to play Superstruct, world’s 1st massively multiplayer forecasting game...not just about envisioning future...about inventing it. Everyone is welcome...Watch for opening volley of threats & survival stories, September 2008."
janemcgonigal  mmog  arg  future  predictions  play  games  gaming  iftf  classideas  2008  simulations  futurology  superstruct  multiplayer 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Budget Hero | Marketplace from American Public Media
"if you ever wanted to control where your tax dollars go, here's your chance to decide.
politics  economics  government  education  budget  us  simulations  seriousgames  gaming  games  money  socialstudies 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Read at Work
"Read At Work turns your desktop into a full screen, realistic PC looking desktop with folders, start button, recycle bin, the works. The kicker is the all the folders contain writings of famous authors and New Zealand locals."
reading  books  literature  subversion  desktop  ebooks  fiction  classics  applications  humor  simulations  satire  powerpoint  parody 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Games Without Frontiers: 'Grand Theft Auto IV' Delivers Deft Satire of Street Life
"I may never finish the game. In a city this vibrant, it's hard to stop getting distracted. At one point, I finished a mission on top floor of decrepit apartment...started to head back downstairs to my car, then wondered: "Hey, what's up on the roof?"
immersion  games  gaming  gta  clivethompson  nyc  detail  exploration  gamedesign  reviews  simulations  openplay  open-endedplay  grandtheftauto 
may 2008 by robertogreco
26 Learning Games to Change the World | Mission to Learn
"Fair warning, you could easily eat up a big chunk of your day following the links in this post! Buy hey, you’ll be helping out the world a bit in the process. Here’s what I found"
games  learning  play  gaming  videogames  simulations  activism  freeware  interactive  online 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Digital Ethnography » Teaching with Twitter
"The World Simulation was an amazing success this year, thanks in part to the use of Twitter and Jott, which allowed students to send live updates of major events through their mobile phones."

[Now at: http://mediatedcultures.net/projects/world-simulation/teaching-with-twitter/ ]
blogging  education  socialmedia  teaching  twitter  videos  michaelwesch  anthropology  culture  simulations  jott  technology  online  microblogging  via:hrheingold  sociology  ethnography  classideas 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Clark Aldrich's Style Guide for Serious Games and Simulations: If books liberated us from kings, can sims liberate us from CEOs?
"Books and their ability to let people "learn to know" had their role in creating the modern concepts of freedom and democracy. What will sims and "learning to do" next bring?"
games  gaming  simulations  society  tranformation  economics  gamechanging  books  history  future 
april 2008 by robertogreco
SENSEable City
"increasing deployment of sensors & hand-held electronics...allowing new approach to study of built environment...way we describe & understand cities is being radically transformed - alongside the tools we use to design them & impact on physical structure
mit  architecture  urban  design  technology  visualization  research  megacities  ubicomp  ubiquitous  programming  sensing  semanticweb  urbancomputing  surveillance  simulations  psychogeography  globalization  location-aware  location  locative  mapping  maps  geography  geolocation  datavisualization  data  culture  space  environment  interaction  interactive  interface  landscape  mobile  demographics 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Michael Wesch: Anti-Teaching (pdf)
[Linkrot, so go here: http://www.cea-ace.ca/sites/cea-ace.ca/files/EdCan-2008-v48-n2-Wesch.pdf ]

"I have toyed with the idea of calling what I do “anti-teaching", as I have come to the conclusion that "teaching" can actually be a hindrance to learning.""

[See also: http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/?p=168]
michaelwesch  teaching  learning  deschooling  unschooling  education  gamechanging  colearning  socialmedia  contentcreation  neilpostman  marshallmcluhan  simulations  methods  pedagogy  students  schools  schooling  filetype:pdf  media:document 
april 2008 by robertogreco
.CSV » group think
"Now, new equations describing “crowd dynamics” are about to change our lives. And not always for the better. This is one of the most significant technology trends I have seen in years; it may also be one of the most pernicious."
behavior  personalinformatics  surveillance  systems  technology  psychology  simulations  social  society  government  crowds  perception  predictions  politics  culture  sociology  collaboration  software  modeling  socialsoftware 
april 2008 by robertogreco
I have seen the future of online education and it is PMOG at EdTechPost
"What’s new is that all of this context (and all of the people) can be brought back to the very thing being described, in place, enriching the experience, and in the example of PMOG, tied together with a narrative thrust."
pmog  elearning  education  learning  online  internet  mmog  simulations  play  games  gaming  web2.0  hypertext  browser  lifeasgame  arg  browsers 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Technology Review: TR10: Modeling Surprise
"Combining massive quantities of data, insights into human psychology, and machine learning can help manage surprising events, says Eric Horvitz."
microsoft  predictions  simulations  traffic  transportation  urban  blackswans  context-awareness  nassimtaleb 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Attention Economy: The Game
"I have my students play a game I developed to let them explore the dynamics of building a reputation online by giving and capturing attention. It’s also a fun way for students to get to know each other. I’m posting the game instructions and materials
attention  blogging  blogs  games  education  learning  socialnetworking  socialmedia  simulations  online 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Galaxy Dynamics | Gravitas: Portraits of a Universe in Motion
"visual and musical celebration of the beauty in a dynamic universe driven by gravity. Animations from supercomputer simulations of forming galaxies, star clusters, galaxy clusters, and galaxy interactions are presented as moving portraits of cosmic evolu
animation  astronomy  free  dvd  physics  science  simulations  space  download 
february 2008 by robertogreco
MyMiniCity
"No need to sign up, nothing to download! Follow its evolution from your web browser."
collaboration  community  simulator  simulations  visualization  virtual  generator  socialsoftware  games  cities  webapp  videogames  gaming 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Zombie Infection Simulation - The Original
"Zombies are grey, move very slowly and change direction randomly and frequently unless they can see something moving in front of them, in which case they start walking towards it. After a while they get bored and wander randomly again."
simulator  processing  code  chaos  zombies  simulations  programming  behavior  visualization 
february 2008 by robertogreco
simcity on the olpc (29 January, 2008, Interconnected)
"Satellites are very tall towers used for telecommunications. Are there any other profitable uses of space, or is that it?"..."We used to chase horses off cliffs for food. Then we carried spears. A portable cliff!"
mattwebb  olpc  simcity  cities  simulations  sugar  2008 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Deyemon - MyMiniCity
"To improve Deyemon, you only have to give the following links to your friends or post them in your blog. Each different click will improve Deyemon!"
cities  web  online  simulations  viral 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Passage: a Gamma256 video game by Jason Rohrer
SPOILER: "Please play the game before you read this"..."presents an entire life, from young adulthood through old age & death, in the span of 5 minutes. Of course, it's a game, not a painting or a film, so the choices that you make as the player are cruci
games  gaming  death  life  philosophy  art  culture  simulations  contemplation  via:kottke 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Carnegie Mellon Libraries:Library Arcade
"The Library Arcade features games designed to help students develop research skills through entertaining and easy-to-repeat activities. At this stage, we are testing each game to work through any technical glitches and prepare the games for a final versi
e-learning  learning  librarians  libraries  online  simulations  gaming  games  tutorials  books  classification  catalog 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Free Gamer - open source games: Flightgear 1.0.0 Released
"Distributed under the GPL, Flightgear is one of the first major Free Software games and has become a flight simulator that rivals it's commercial counterparts. It is a stellar example of enthusiasts coming together to create something for the community."
freeware  games  gaming  opensource  flight  simulations  simulator  free  mac  windows  Linux 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Travian - Browser Game - Romans, Gauls, & Teutons
"Travian is a browser game with a world full of thousands of users who all begin as the leaders of small villages."
strategy  games  gaming  simulations  MMO 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Sherry Turkle (World Question Center 2006 - What is your dangerous idea?)
"After several generations of living in the computer culture, simulation will become fully naturalized. Authenticity in the traditional sense loses its value, a vestige of another time."
simulations  technology  virtual  identity  authenticity  robots  culture  darwin  ethics  future  sherryturkle  charlesdarwin 
november 2007 by robertogreco
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