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robertogreco : sky   12

video games skies
"the art of depicting skies in video games"

[via: "A tumblr about video game skies by @thibault_lh [Thibault Le Hégarat]"
https://twitter.com/nicolasnova/status/1017284272992989184 ]
videogames  sky  skies  tumblrs  games  gaming  art  pixelart 
july 2018 by robertogreco
The Edgeless & Ever-Shifting Gradient: An Encyclopaedic and Evolving Spectrum of Gradient Knowledge
"A gradient, without restriction, is edgeless and ever-shifting. A gradient moves, transitions, progresses, defies being defined as one thing. It formalizes difference across a distance. It’s a spectrum. It’s a spectral smearing. It’s an optical phenomenon occurring in nature. It can be the gradual process of acquiring knowledge. It can be a concept. It can be a graphic expression. It can be all of the above, but likely it’s somewhere in between.

A gradient, in all of it’s varied forms, becomes a catalyst in it’s ability to seamlessly blend one distinct thing/idea/color, to the next distinct thing/idea/color, to the next, etc.

In this sense, it is the gradient and the way it performs that has become a model and an underlying ethos, naturally, for this online publishing initiative that we call The Gradient.

Similarly, it’s our hope that this post—an attempt to survey gradients of all forms and to expand our own understanding of gradients—will also be edgeless and ever-shifting. This post will evolve and be progressively added to in an effort to create, as the subtitle says, an encyclopaedic and evolving spectrum of gradient knowledge."
gradients  art  2017  ryangeraldnelson  color  blending  spectrums  nature  design  gender  genderfluidity  computers  music  photography  graphics  graphicdesign  thermography  iridescence  brids  animals  insects  snakes  cephlalopods  reptiles  chameleons  rainbows  sky  math  mathematics  taubaauerbach  science  tomássaraceno  vision  brycewilner  alruppersberg  germansermičs  glass  ignazschiffermüller  lizwest  markhagen  ombré  rawcolor  samfall 
july 2017 by robertogreco
The Cloud Appreciation Society | Uniting cloud lovers around the world
"At The Cloud Appreciation Society we love clouds, we’re not ashamed to say it and we’ve had enough of people moaning about them. Read our manifesto and see how we are fighting the banality of ‘blue-sky thinking’. If you agree with what we stand for, then join the society for a minimal one-off postage and administration fee and receive your very own official membership certificate and badge."

[via: "Fighting Blue Sky Thinking" https://vimeo.com/143687714

Gavin Pretor-Pinney is a man on a mission. For the past ten years he has been trying to change the way people think about clouds.

The final episode of season one looks at a group of 40,000 people who are fighting the tyranny of so-called blue sky thinking." ]
clouds  cloudappreciationsociety  sky  gavinpretor-pinney  2015 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Artist James Turrell: I can make the sky any colour you choose | Art and design | The Guardian
"“One of things I’ve always been interested in is the theta state,” says Turrell. “That’s thinking, but not thinking in words.” The alpha state and theta state occur naturally on the path to rest and sleep, he explains, and the light and sound in the cell prompts the brainwave entrainment that makes that happen.

While all this might sound a bit bizarre, Turrell has a wealth of knowledge to back up his ideas, including a degree in perceptual psychology and another in mathematics. But though his art revolves around various scientific concepts, he does not have the same intent as a scientist. “I know that science is very interested in answers, and I’m just happy with a good question,” he says."



"Turrell describes the paintings of Quaker preacher Edward Hicks as a major inspiration because of its message of peace. As a child, Turrell recalls sitting through long, meditative Quaker meetings. “I would just sit there and think about the meeting house, and I would think: wouldn’t it be terrific if it was a convertible?”

This childhood urge to peel the ceiling back birthed Turrell’s famous skyspaces – outdoor viewing chambers that alter viewers’ perceptions of the sky. Meeting was the title of his first public skyspace, which he began in 1978 at the Museum of Modern Art PS1 in New York. Since then, Turrell has made 89 around the world. Within/Without (2010), a permanent work at the National Gallery of Australia, is his 82nd. Currently, he is also working on one for the Museum of Old and New Art (Mona) in Hobart.

Each skyspace is site-specific, and Turrell visits those sites multiple times before making them. “I respond to what the sky is: you have maritime skies, desert skies, and you have high desert skies. I’m doing some also in the Alps – and there you have the really crisp blue that can happen in the winter, which is almost like a blue you can cut into cubes.”"
jamesturrell  science  art  2014  askingquestions  questions  questionasking  inquiry  answers  sky  light 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Jed Carter — Eyes on The Sky
"I made a book. It documents my major self-initiated project this year: a process-based investigation into generative design and the weather. It’s a record of the sky, of the colours that change so slowly it’s almost impossible to see. A bit like a visual almanac.

I linked 64 public-access web cameras across Europe, recording the colour of the sky, at each point, at regular intervals. Together, the cameras paint the weather, once every hour. The book collects a week of paintings."
weather  books  jedcarter  webcams  sky  visualization  datavisualization  glvo  patterns  color  colors 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Dung Beetles, Dancing to the Milky Way : The New Yorker
"The cosmos is nothing if not egalitarian; we are all equally small. It seems fair that Earth’s sanitation workers should benefit from the Milky Way, as the rest of us do. And dung beetles likely aren’t alone; crickets, moths, nocturnal bees, and other insects probably share their ability to navigate by the Milky Way and by polarized moonlight. “I’d be surprised if they were the only insect,” Warrant said."

"We suppose that we are superior to dung beetles, but are we really? At least dung beetles recycle. We scavenge, hoard, consume…what? Crap, mostly. It piles up around us; increasingly we live on a ball of it. Even light we waste; designed to illuminate, it now obscures. As our celestial guides recede, we risk losing our bearings and will have ever less to consider but ourselves."
milkyway  astronomy  navigation  skies  sky  dungbeetles  insects  2013  nature  animals  via:anne  cosmos  egalitarianism  science  biology  sight  vision  light  sun 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Explosions in the sky « Snarkmarket
"Robin: Isn’t the span­gling of stars in the sky just basi­cally ran­dom noise onto which we’ve pro­jected pat­terns and then sto­ries? And if that’s been successful—and it toootally has—doesn’t it imply that you could do the same with just about any kind of ran­dom noise? What sort of weird wacky stuff could you spread across your desk to tell sto­ries with? Tim: After the Coper­ni­can rev­o­lu­tion, a con­stel­la­tion isn’t even a con­stel­la­tion. Instead, it’s a two-dimensional flat­ten­ing of a three-dimensional real­ity. Actu­ally, we should prob­a­bly say a FOUR-dimensional real­ity. The light from stars at vary­ing dis­tances, leav­ing their sources at var­i­ous times in the dis­tant past, gets mis­taken, from our earth­bound point-of-view, as a simul­ta­ne­ous two-dimensional pattern. John Mayer (via Robin): I’m try­ing to fold over time, to see it as a random-access hard disk where I can move to any point in time and change the way I see today."

[See also: http://snarkmarket.com/2010/5883 ]
time  space  thingtothinkabout  constellationalthinking  snarkmarket  robinsloan  timcarmody  johnmayer  astronomy  light  perspective  history  physics  life  whoah  constellations  sky 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Michel de Broin - Nuit Blanche
"Mirror ball, 1000 mirrors, 7.5 meters in diameter.
art  paris  sculpture  light  sky  stars  astronomy  installation 
march 2010 by robertogreco
sky movies (tecznotes)
"What ties these together is the visible relative motion of the stars. The earthbound video shows the entire dome of the sky turning slowly, while the airplane video shows the stars eerily standing still as the landscape moves below them." ... "if there's a broad class of subjective experience I find most addictive, it's the perspective shift connected to a sudden adjustment in point of view"
video  perspective  timelapse  stars  sky  motion  michalmigurski 
january 2010 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Sky.doc
"there is an obvious (and rather uninteresting) reaction to all this – i.e. please save us from yet another form of corporate advertising – but there are also artistic, and even literary, implications here that go beyond mere outrage."
art  ephemera  graffiti  clouds  sky  typography  make  design  architecture  bldgblog  writing  blogging  text 
april 2008 by robertogreco

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