recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : slang   25

John McWhorter on his book Talking Back, Talking Black.
"John McWhorter discusses the subject of his new book, Talking Back, Talking Black: Truths About America's Lingua Franca."

[via: "This podcast on Black English by John McWhorter contains an audio clip a freed slave's oral history. Incredible."
https://twitter.com/cmonstah/status/870127827030429697 ]
language  africanamericanvernacular  blackenglish  linguistics  2017  johnmcwhorter  chancetherapper  slang  vernacular 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Anne Curzan: What makes a word "real"? - YouTube
"One could argue that slang words like 'hangry,' 'defriend' and 'adorkable' fill crucial meaning gaps in the English language, even if they don't appear in the dictionary. After all, who actually decides which words make it into those vaulted pages? Language historian Anne Curzan gives a charming look at the humans behind dictionaries, and the choices they make on a constant basis."
annecurzan  language  english  words  classideas  dictionaries  authority  slang  history  2014  via:christaflores  lexicography  lexicographers  dictionary 
november 2015 by robertogreco
What's Your Favorite Slang Word? From Swag to On Fleek, Tweens Explain the Changing English Language - The Atlantic
"This is the first episode in a new series from The Atlantic, where we ask tweens for their thoughts on everything from middle-school jargon to what it's like growing up in the digital age. We interviewed students at Alice Deal Middle School in Washington, D.C., who shared some of their favorite slang words with us: swag, on fleek, and werk (with an "e"). "Sometimes slang words come out of famous videos or Vines," Max, a seventh-grade student, says. "It's social media," says Ricardo, another seventh-grader."

[Also on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvSDh0OQ6Zs ]
kids  language  vine  english  slang  2015  teens  youth  middleschool  tweens 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Conversation in Truro about accent, dialect and attitudes to language. - BBC Voices - Accents and dialects | British Library - Sounds
[via: “Chacking to hear some Cornish dialects?”
http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/sound-and-vision/2015/03/chacking-to-hear-some-cornish-dialects.html ]

[See also:
"The BBC Voices Recordings is an audio archive of group conversations made in 303 locations across the UK by BBC Local and Nations Radio in 2004 and 2005. The recordings involve 1,293 speakers discussing their words for 40 prompt terms (e.g. 'mother', 'tired' and 'to play truant') and exploring the language they use and encounter in their daily lives."
http://www.bl.uk/reshelp/bldept/socsci/research/voicesuk/voices.html ]

"Abstract
[00:00:00] Speakers introduce themselves. Discussion of words used to describe EMOTIONS. Comment that her hairdressing voice is very polite. Mention multiple meanings of hanging and minging. Discussion about speaking differently when talking to different people: friends/clients/parents, use of slang. Description of fathers Cornish accent, swear words he uses. Things that make them jumping (annoyed). Comment that she has picked up the Cornish phrase cheers my lover, used to address boyfriend, since moving to Cornwall.[00:07:38] Discussion of words used to describe ACTIONS. Anecdote about playing truant from school, playing truant from college during second year. Discussion about meaning, use and offensiveness of twatted.[00:11:44] Discussion of words used to describe CLOTHING. Description of clothes they wear when clubbing. Discussion about attitudes towards cheap, trendy clothes, designer labels and fakes; different fashion expectations for boys/girls, their shopping habits. Discussion of words used to mean lacking money/rich. Description of plimsolls, compulsory footwear for physical education when they were at school, comment that her six-year old cousin now wears Nike trainers for physical education at school.[00:17:58] Discussion of words used to describe PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES. Comment that as hairdressers they have to get used to using both right and left hands. Description of person who is hanging/munting/minging meaning extremely unattractive; clothes skaters wear which she thinks look awful. Discussion about subtle differences in meaning between pretty/attractive/stunning/gorgeous used to describe females, examples of women who fit each category. Description of how she reacts to rude customers.[00:28:00] Discussion of words used to describe WEATHER AND SURROUNDINGS. Comment that peoples speech reveals their age. Discussion about words they would/wouldnt use to describe different types of relationships with men, words used to describe promiscuous woman, words used to mean male partner. Discussion about what they would say to each other on seeing a man they really like in a nightclub, euphemisms used when working behind bar in nightclub; words used by men to describe women they like, how they would feel if these words were used to describe them; words used by males/females to describe wanting to have sex with someone, comment that females arent more reserved but they describe it more politely than males who use more boastful language, possibly because male/female sexual activity is judged differently by other people. Mention words used to describe being desperate to go to the toilet.[00:40:55] Discussion of words used to describe PEOPLE AND THINGS. Mention words used to mean father. Use and meaning of Cornish word dreckly.[00:49:25] Discussion about their attitudes towards the way they speak and the words they use, changing speech in different situations/when talking to different people. Attitudes towards regional accents, description of their own accents, attitudes towards Cornish accent, difference between accent of old/young Cornish people, Cornish language, accents that sound educated, how language relates to class. Comment that David Beckhams voice doesnt match his appearance. Discussion about other peoples attitudes towards and assumptions about Cornish accent, changing/losing accent over generations/when moving across country, future of Cornish accent/regional accents, regional accents on television, how accent changes across Cornwall, pride in their accents, pride in being Cornish.

Description
All three interviewees are hairdressers who are also keen clubbers and very good friends. BBC warning: this interview contains strong or offensive language. Recording made for BBC Voices project of a conversation guided by a BBC interviewer. The conversation follows a loose structure based on eliciting opinions about accents, dialects, the words we use and people's attitude to language."
truro  language  accents  dialects  english  cornish  2004  linguistics  slang  words  uk  cornwall  voices 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Internet slang meets American Sign Language — Hopes&Fears — flow "Internet"
"How do you sign "new" words? The Deaf community works as a network, collectively brainstorming new sign language terms over the web, until dominant signs emerge."
language  signlanguage  signing  asl  2015  slang  words  deaf  mikesheffield  change 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Bring chaos theory to English language teaching | Education | Guardian Weekly
"By relying on grammar rules in class, learners are in danger of becoming detached from the dynamism of spoken language"
language  english  grammar  teaching  writing  classideas  deschooling  unschooling  languagearts  via:rushtheiceberg  rules  rulebreaking  slang  change  dynamic 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Nonce - Wikipedia
"Nonce may refer to:
*Nonce, time being: the present occasion; "for the nonce"
*Nonce word, a word used to meet a need that is not expected to recur
*Cryptographic nonce, a number or bit string used only once, in security engineering
*The Nonce, American rap duo
*Nonce (slang), a sex offender
*Nonce orders, an architectural term"
words  computers  cryptography  slang  time  language  temporary  temporality  nonce 
june 2011 by robertogreco
On Language - Creeper! Rando! Sketchball! - NYTimes.com
"Rando is one of a surprisingly large number of words that U.N.C. students use to refer to unfamiliar, suspicious or anxiety-producing outsiders. Skimming the lists that Eble has collected from recent classes, I kept spotting a familiar pattern: along with rando, there are nouns like creeper, sketcher and sketchball and adjectives like dubious, grimy, sketchy, sketch and skeazy. Sketchy and sketch have, in fact, been among the most frequently attested words culled from Eble’s students for the past several semesters."
language  online  slang  privacy  safety  facebook  words  tcsnmy  toshare  classideas 
november 2010 by robertogreco
‘So’ Pushes to the Head of the Line « Anand Giridharadas
"So, it is widely believed that the recent ascen­dancy of “so” began in Sil­i­con Val­ley. The jour­nal­ist Michael Lewis picked it up when research­ing his 1999 book “The New New Thing”: “When a com­puter pro­gram­mer answers a ques­tion,” he wrote, “he often begins with the word ‘so.”’ Microsoft employ­ees have long argued that the “so” boom began with them.

In the soft­ware world, it was a tic that made sense. In immigrant-filled tech­nol­ogy firms, it democ­ra­tized talk by replac­ing a world of pos­si­ble tran­si­tions with a catchall.
And “so” sug­gested a kind of think­ing that appealed to problem-solving types: con­ver­sa­tion as a log­i­cal, uni­di­rec­tional process, pro­ceed­ing much in the way of soft­ware code — if this, then that.

This log­i­cal tinge to “so” has fol­lowed it out of soft­ware. Start­ing a sen­tence with “so” uses the whiff of logic to relay author­ity. Where “well” vac­il­lates, “so” declaims."

[via: http://www.clusterflock.org/2010/06/meet-the-flockers-luke-neff.html ]
so  via:lukeneff  culture  english  semantics  slang  language  psychology  meaning  linguistics  journalism  writing  words  speech  anandgiridharadas 
june 2010 by robertogreco
A Common Nomenclature for Lego Families by Giles Turnbull - The Morning News
"Thousands of different Lego exist, yet when your seven-year-old asks for “a clippy bit,” you know exactly what to hand him. GILES TURNBULL surveys a caucus of children and determines a common nomenclature."

[New URL: http://www.themorningnews.org/article/a-common-nomenclature-for-lego-families ]
culture  children  play  folksonomy  names  linguistics  words  taxonomy  language  writing  nomenclature  lego  slang  toys  glvo  edg  srg  naming 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Fun little article by Grant Barrett about people saying words wrong on purpose (kottke.org)
"I use several of these mispronunciations regularly...Nucular, saxamaphone, muscles with Popeye's hard c, computor, robit for robot, etc. Those of you who speak other languages...is this a common behavior outside of English?" + comments
english  language  linguistics  wordplay  slang  pronunciation  kottke  fun  spelling 
april 2008 by robertogreco
tuBabel.com (beta) - español confuso. contagioso. divertido.
"Es el diccionario social de regionalismos latinos más completo del mundo. Llegará a ser el más completo porque nunca se termina de definir... cada persona puede agregar nuevas palabras, definiciones adicionales en palabras existentes o comentarios...
spanish  español  language  latinos  reference  slang  dictionary  jerga  culture  regional  dictionaries 
april 2008 by robertogreco
textually.org: Textonyms: Sophisticated pig latin
"Key words are replaced by first alternative that comes up on using predictive text ...replacement words, technically paragrams, but commonly known as extonyms, adaptonyms or cellodromes, are becoming part of regular teen banter."
language  mobile  phones  youth  teens  communication  trends  slang  texting  sms 
february 2008 by robertogreco
France's immigrant slang (3:00) | PRI's The World
"The language spoken in France's immigrant neighborhoods doesn't sound much like French -- especially that spoken by young people. But the kids do want to be understood. So they've created a slang dictionary to help others in France understand them."
language  linguistics  france  immigration  communication  slang 
october 2007 by robertogreco
T9onym - Wikipedia
"A T9onym is a word that shows up on mobile phones that have T9 text entry that is equivalent through T9 to other words. "
language  technology  mobile  phones  slang  textonyms  t9  texting  keyboards  keypads  sms  jargon  text  messaging  english  writing 
january 2007 by robertogreco
Teenangels
Teenangels is a group of 13-18 year-old volunteers that have been specially trained by the local law enforcement, and many other leading safety experts in all aspects of online safety, privacy, and security.
online  internet  web  children  teens  youth  parenting  language  resources  society  slang  words  chat  im  text  safety  security 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Acronyms
"At this page you find an overview of the most common used acronyms. These acronyms are used in regeluar e-mail, messenger programs, SMS, MMS and other ways of communication."
online  safety  security  internet  web  children  teens  youth  parenting  language  resources  society  slang  words  chat  im  text 
november 2006 by robertogreco
About No Slang dot com
"No Slang.com is a translator similiar to those offered by Google or AltaVista with one major difference: We don't translate language, we translate slang and acronyms."
online  safety  security  internet  web  children  teens  youth  parenting  language  resources  society  slang  words  chat  im  text 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Cracking the code of teens' IM slang | CNET News.com
"For parents of teens, three-letter acronyms like PAW, MOS and CD9 might be more disturbing than the old four-letter words."
online  safety  security  internet  web  children  teens  youth  parenting  language  resources  society  slang  words  chat  im  text 
november 2006 by robertogreco
BOOKFORUM | Sept/Oct/Nov 2006
"One of the many benefits of owning the two-volume New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English ... s that you can dip in just about anywhere and enjoy the exuberant, endless display of human inventiveness with language."
language  english  slang  books  reference 
october 2006 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read