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robertogreco : slowjournalism   2

Gandhi’s Printing Press — Isabel Hofmeyr | Harvard University Press
"At the same time that Gandhi, as a young lawyer in South Africa, began fashioning the tenets of his political philosophy, he was absorbed by a seemingly unrelated enterprise: creating a newspaper. Gandhi’s Printing Press is an account of how this project, an apparent footnote to a titanic career, shaped the man who would become the world-changing Mahatma. Pioneering publisher, experimental editor, ethical anthologist—these roles reveal a Gandhi developing the qualities and talents that would later define him.

Isabel Hofmeyr presents a detailed study of Gandhi’s work in South Africa (1893–1914), when he was the some-time proprietor of a printing press and launched the periodical Indian Opinion. The skills Gandhi honed as a newspaperman—distilling stories from numerous sources, circumventing shortages of type—influenced his spare prose style. Operating out of the colonized Indian Ocean world, Gandhi saw firsthand how a global empire depended on the rapid transmission of information over vast distances. He sensed that communication in an industrialized age was becoming calibrated to technological tempos.

But he responded by slowing the pace, experimenting with modes of reading and writing focused on bodily, not mechanical, rhythms. Favoring the use of hand-operated presses, he produced a newspaper to contemplate rather than scan, one more likely to excerpt Thoreau than feature easily glossed headlines. Gandhi’s Printing Press illuminates how the concentration and self-discipline inculcated by slow reading, imbuing the self with knowledge and ethical values, evolved into satyagraha, truth-force, the cornerstone of Gandhi’s revolutionary idea of nonviolent resistance."

[via: https://twitter.com/complexfields/status/568156442240229376 ]
gandhi  printing  press  media  history  books  toread  2013  isabelhofmeyr  nonviolence  resistance  ethics  satyagraha  truth  truth-force  reading  writing  slow  newspapers  contemplation  reflection  projectideas  lcproject  openstudioproject  thoreau  self-discipline  information  slowjournalism  journalism  publishing  zines  howweread  howwrite 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Narratively: Local stories, courageously told.
"Narratively is a platform devoted to original, true and in-depth stories. We launched in New York in September 2012 and began our expansion to additional cities in February 2013.

Narratively slows down the news cycle. We don’t care about the breaking news or the next big headline; we’re devoted exclusively to sharing a city’s untold stories—the rich, intricate narratives that get at the heart of what a place is all about.

Each week, we explore a different theme and publish a series of stories—just one a day—told in the most appropriate medium for each piece. We might feature a longform article on a Monday, followed by an animated documentary on Tuesday, then a photo essay, an audio piece or a short documentary film. Every story gets the space and time it needs to have an impact—an approach we like to call “slow storytelling” or “slow journalism.”

We also have a platform for shorter content, fittingly called Narratively Shorts. There, you’ll find original short stories and series, essays written by you and others in our community, and you’ll get behind the scenes through interviews with our contributors and subjects. Additionally, we’ll post observations and reflections on the state of media and storytelling.

Our writers, editors, photographers, artists, designers and filmmakers have worked regularly for top media outlets like the New York Times, New York magazine, CNN, NPR, MediaStorm, the New Yorker and the BBC, among other innovative and experimental publications. And we’ve subsequently gotten press from leading outlets like Forbes, PBS, Yahoo! Finance and others."
culture  journalism  nyc  storytelling  narratively  local  photojournalism  photoessays  documentary  slowjournalism  slow  slowstorytelling  news 
march 2013 by robertogreco

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