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robertogreco : slowtechnology   3

Machines of Laughter and Forgetting - NYTimes.com
"The hidden truth about many attempts to “bury” technology is that they embody an amoral and unsustainable vision. Pick any electrical appliance in your kitchen. The odds are that you have no idea how much electricity it consumes, let alone how it compares to other appliances and households. This ignorance is neither natural nor inevitable; it stems from a conscious decision by the designer of that kitchen appliance to free up your “cognitive resources” so that you can unleash your inner Oscar Wilde on “contemplating” other things. Multiply such ignorance by a few billion, and global warming no longer looks like a mystery."

"Imagine being told that “you visited 592 Web sites this week. That’s .5 times the number of Web pages on the whole Internet in 1994!”

The goal here is not to hit us with a piece of statistics — sheer numbers rarely lead to complex narratives — but to tell a story that can get us thinking about things we’d rather not be thinking about. So let us not give in to technophobia just yet: we should not go back to doing everything by hand just because it can lead to more thinking.

Rather, we must distribute the thinking process equally. Instead of having the designer think through all the moral and political implications of technology use before it reaches users — an impossible task — we must find a way to get users to do some of that thinking themselves."

"While devices-as-problem-solvers seek to avoid friction, devices-as-troublemakers seek to create an “aesthetic of friction” that engages users in new ways. Will such extra seconds of thought — nay, contemplation — slow down civilization? They well might. But who said that stopping to catch a breath on our way to the abyss is not a sensible strategy?"
design  friction  frictionlessness  seams  scars  ambient  evgenymorozov  canon  civilization  thinking  2013  slow  slowtechnology  transparency  problemsolving  problemshowing  contemplation  via:anne  cognitiveresources  technology  globalwaming  mindfulness  narrative  forgetting  memory  seamlessness 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Inuit Genealogy « fevered imaginings
"Currently working on a research project related to Canadian and Greenland Inuit with R0gMedia in Berlin. The diagram above is a genealogical diagram made in the mid 1950s by anthropologist Jean Malaurie, the first of its kind. It’s a hand made radial drawing, Malaurie has a whole series of them in his apartment in Paris, along with his extensive personal archive of research materials including photos, films, notebooks, drawings. While the broader aims of the project are to find an institution willing to host the collection, I’m trying to make an digital artefact out of this diagram that could bring the information alive and demonstrate how historical anthropological materials can be made relevant and contextualised for present and future generations. DIS2012 published a paper on this project for a workshop about slow technology. Slow technology DIS2012 [http://johnfass.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/slow-technology-dis2012.pdf ]"
interfacedesign  interactiondesign  datavis  datavisualization  jeanmalaurie  johnfass  hci  via:charlieloyd  slowtechnology  technology  genealogy  inuit 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Designing for Slow Technology: Intent and Interaction [.pdf]
"I argue in this paper for the value of adopting some specific design approaches when creating slow technology, how to create long lasting relationships with technology, and how to design reflective or slow digital interactions. The problem I have addressed is how to design for long lasting technologies with changing users. My approach is informed by activity theory, which provides a theoretical and methodological perspective while design principles inform ideas of process, structure and interaction. The contribution to HCI is in the view of slow technology as demanding a unique set of design skills.

Slow technology is concerned with time and with speed, primarily with relation to how humans interact with technological artefacts. Slow technology is a way of thinking about human artefacts that emphasises speed of operation, pace of consumption and the length of time taken to obtain results. As a knowledge domain, slow technology has engaged with many different areas of technology…"

[via: http://johnfass.wordpress.com/2012/07/15/inuit-genealogy/ ]
interaction  attitude  intent  modularity  interactiondesign  2012  johnfass  slow  technology  slowtechnology 
september 2012 by robertogreco

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