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robertogreco : socialbookmarking   21

Wikity, One Year Later | Hapgood
"I have to admit, I thought early on that there would be larger appetite for Wikity. There may still be. But it has proved harder than thought.

Part of the reason, I think, is that the social bookmarking world that I expected Wikity to expand on is smaller than I thought, and has at least one good solid provider that people can count on (Pinboard, written and maintained by the excellent Maciej Cegłowski). More importantly, people have largely built a set of habits today that revolve around Twitter and Facebook and Slack. The habits of personal bookmarking have been eroded by these platforms which give people instant social gratification. In today’s world, bookmarking, organizing, and summarizing information feels a bit like broccoli compared to re-tweeting something with a “WTF?” tag and watching the likes roll in.

I had a bunch of people try Wikity, and even paid many people to test it. The conclusion was usually that it was easy to use, valuable, cool — and completely non-addictive. One hour into Wikity people were in love with the tool. But the next day they felt no compulsion to go back.

We could structure Wikity around social rewards in the future, and that might happen. But ultimately, for me, that struggle to understand why Wikity was not addictive in the ways that Twitter and Facebook were ended up being the most important part of the project.

I began, very early on, compiling notes in Wikity on issues surrounding the culture of Twitter, Facebook, social media, trolling, and the like. Blurbs about whether empathy was the problem or solution. Notes on issues like Abortion Geofencing, Alarm Fatigue, and the remarkable consistency of ad revenue to GDP over the last century. Was this the battle we needed to have first? Helping people understand the profound negative impact our current closed social media tools are having on our politics and culture?

I exported just my notes and clippings on these issues the other day, from Wikity, as a pdf. It was over 500 pages long. I was in deep.

As the United States primary ramped up, I became more alarmed at the way that platforms like Facebook and Twitter were polarizing opinions, encouraging shallow thought, and promoting the creation and dissemination of conspiracy theories and fake news. I began to understand that the goals of Wikity — and of any social software meant to promote deeper thought — began with increasing awareness of the ways in which our current closed, commercial environments our distorting our reality.

Recently, I have begun working with others on tools and projects that will help hold commercial social media accountable for their effect on civic discourse, and demonstrate and mitigate some of their more pernicious effects. Tools and curriculum that will help people to understand and advocate for the changes we need in these areas: algorithmic transparency, the right to modify our social media environments, the ability to see what the feed is hiding from us, places to collectively fact-check and review the sources of information we are fed.

Wikity will continue to be developed, but the journey that began with a tool ended at a social issue, and I think it’s that social issue — getting people to realize how these commercial systems have impacted political discourse and how open tools might solve the problem — that most demands addressing right now. I don’t think I’ve been this passionate about something in a very long time.

I’ve had some success in getting coverage of this issue in the past few weeks, from Vox, to TechCrunch, to a brief interview on the U.S.’s Today Show this morning.

I think we need broader collaborations, and I think open tools and software will be key to this effort. This is a developing story.

So it’s an interesting end to this project — starting with a tool, and getting sucked into a movement. Wikity is complete and useful, but the main story (for me) has turned out to lead beyond that, and I’m hurtling towards the next chapter.

Was this a successful grant? I don’t know what other people might think, but I think so. Freed from the constrictions of bullet pointed reports and waterfall charts, I just followed it where it led. It led somewhere important, where I’m making a positive difference. Is there more to success than that?

Thanks again to the Shuttleworth Foundation which kicked me off on this ride. I’ll let you all know where it takes me in the future.

(And to my Wikity fans and users — don’t worry: Wikity is not going away. As long as I can’t live without it, it’s going to continue to be developed, just a bit more slowly)."
mikecaulfield  wikity  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  software  pinboard  wikis  2016  socialmedia  titter  facebook  slack  socialgratification  tagging  compulsion 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Shiori - Pinboard and Delicious OS X client
"Shiori is a Pinboard and Delicious OS X client that allows you to find and add bookmarks."
shiori  pinboard  del.icio.us  boomarking  socialbookmarking  applications  mac  osx  via:tealtan 
august 2013 by robertogreco
The Little Mystical - Notes on “The Structure of Collaborative Tagging System”
"I stumbled across a 2005 research paper on Delicious tagging, which studied tag usage across users and time. Here are some highlights:"

[Allen's commentary between highlighted screenshots:]

"This is perhaps the single greatest challenge with archival (personal or institutional) and systems for returning – your sensibilities in how to divide and categorize things change and throws off all your previous taxonomic efforts. These two articles on channel drift and decay theory may be worth revisiting."

"I wrote an overview of my Pinboard tagging structure [http://tanmade.com/writing/2012/05/05/tagging-structures.html ] back in 2012, which hasn’t changed very much – and is remarkably similar to this."
allentan  2013  pinboard  tagging  folgsonomy  tags  taxonomy  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  retrieval  social  socialbookmarks 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Tagging Structures – Allen Tan is…writing
"Tags have cascading levels of specificity: publishing > journalism > reading > narrative, for example, letting me jump in at whatever scale that I can remember. A useful rule-of-thumb is to name these tags what I’m likely to search for later, which sometimes feels like future sight."



"As fallback, I have 10 tags at the top level: technology, education, life, publishing, political, society, design, history, art, and food. Some of these things overlap, and that’s ok: they reflect the way I mentally sort what I find and read. Everything should be tagged at least one of these lead tags, and they are the starting points when I remember almost nothing about what I’m looking for.

This gives me a naming framework at the moment of tagging, too: I start with the lead tag and then describe the bookmark with broad categories, gradually getting more specific (the same way one would carve at sculpture), and then I skim through the article and my highlights again to add any individual triggers: names and highly specific concepts tend to be dropped in here. Specific uses (say, shopping) or projects also come at the end.



"This is a continuously evolving system: my bookmarks from even half a year ago looks different from my bookmarks now. This sometimes gives me trouble when I get confused by things tagged out of order, or by outdated naming conventions (I try to tag all people names as firstname-lastname now). So, careful and diligent pruning is necessary to keep this system coherent."

[See also: http://tealtan.tumblr.com/post/54105931916/notes-on-the-structure-of-collaborative-tagging that references http://www.citeulike.org/user/zelig/article/305755 + http://arxiv.org/pdf/cs.DL/0508082.pdf ]
allentan  2012  tagging  folksonomy  pinboard  del.icio.us  granularity  tags  bookmarks  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  socialbookmarks  taxonomy 
june 2013 by robertogreco
i miss delicious.com
" Delicious is the Rome, Jerusalem, and Paris of my existence as an academic these days. It's where I make my friends, how I get the news, and where I go to trade. All this from a little server that does nothing but share bookmarks in public.
...For two years I've been using Delicious as an information organizer. It's produced an impressive encyclopedia of the most interesting information, images, articles, citations, books, and subjects on the internet to which I might want to refer. Consider my dissertation tag, under which are a wide variety of online images and Google books that I'll be using for my research. Not only can I come back to them, but I can also find related subjects—dissertation material related to walking—and navigate seamlessly from one to another. As an improvement on the index card system—or on my own terrifying piles of articles, even now ornamenting my bookshelf, or even on the folders within folders within folders of word documents—this represents a definite improvement."

"There is nothing like Delicious out there in terms of an community for finding grass-roots curators and beholding their careful, discerning brilliance over time.  Not twitter, where we all snark meaninglessly; not tumblr, which buries precious information beneath a flood; not Zotero, where it's nearly impossible to browse strangers or follow them from afar.  

In the end, I don't care that the people were more reliable than Yahoo, or that corporate America destroyed my intellectual commons.  I miss you, Delicious.  Give me my library back."

[More: https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308703279855058944 and https://twitter.com/joguldi/status/308679134744293376 and others]
joguldi  research  del.icio.us  socialbookmarking  community  twitter  zotero  intellectualcommons  2013  libraries  yahoo  data  privacy  connectivism  collectivism  folksonomy  tags  tagging  learning 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Open Bookmarks
"More and more people are reading books electronically, on computers, on mobile phones, and on dedicated ereading devices.

Ereading allows people to make bookmarks, write notes in the margins, select extracts, and measure their progress through the book. This is the reading experience, and for the first time it's possible to save and share this experience directly. (Find out more about social reading...)

Open Bookmarks wants to make sure that this experience belongs to readers: that they can save it for the future in ways that are useful to them, and share their progress and annotations in the way that they want, however and wherever they read."
books  social  community  culture  reading  jamesbridle  bookmarks  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  socialboomarks  persistence  socialreading  sharing  marginalia  ebooks 
june 2011 by robertogreco
A Whole Lotta Nothing: Quick thoughts on Pinboard
Comparing my own Delicious feed to my own Pinboard feed I see this theme repeated: my Pinboard feed is personally useful, but socially uninteresting.

& therein lies the rub: Pinboard extends the functionality of Delicious to any links you drop in Twitter, sites you choose at Instapaper, & interesting things at Google Reader, but like Instapaper, that works best as a personal archiving appliance that you use personally to dig up a story about raising kids you read 6 months ago at NYTimes. But when you combine extensive personal archiving w/ a public view mixed into a network of shared links from dozens of friends, you get a mish-mash of bookmarks, jokes from twitter, & wacky sites someone liked in Google Reader. As a personal archive tool, it's pretty impressive, as a shared space to find interesting bookmarks, it's problematic.

In the end, I'll likely continue using Delicious to track bookmarks w/ Pinboard as a backup/archive…[and] continue to hit my Delicious network page…"
bookmarking  social  pinboard  twitter  2010  matthaughey  del.icio.us  socialbookmarking  cv  socialboomarks  reading  discovery 
december 2010 by robertogreco
notes.husk.org. Sticking With Delicious.
"I still find its pared-down interface slightly too minimal, & the ability to pull in feeds from Twitter and Instapaper has led to some people falling foul of link pollution. [Huge point.]

Frankly, despite the burst of migrations, my delicious network is still more full of good links, although it’s been starved of some of the most interesting posters…

(As a side note, I think this also proves beyond all doubt how important the social aspect of any service is. For all that individuals can download their links, the value I get out of the site is not my 3,500 bookmarks, but the 345,681 in my network. The continued utility of that is what’s most at risk.)

Anyway, since Pinboard can mirror from Delicious but not vice versa, I’m going to keep using the latter as my primary service. Pinboard can carry on being what it’s been for the last eighteen months: a hot spare, but not the service I really want to be using."
del.icio.us  pinboard  paulmison  discovery  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  bookmarking  aggregation  twitter  linkpollution  social  networks  internet  2010  research  socialnetworking 
december 2010 by robertogreco
notes.husk.org. The Post-Delicious World.
""what does the delicious network do that I can’t also do with an RSS reader and independent linklogs?"

… main issues are UI &, more seriously, discoverability.

The Delicious network page is built for links. It shows notes nicely, & also displays tags & who posted something in a compact fashion. (Pinboard network page does same, to be fair.) By contrast, generic RSS readers are, well, generic. In dealing w/ everything from links to photos to long form text to podcasts, they have to make compromises, but for browsing links, it makes them a poor interface.<br />
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The more pressing problem…is discovery…1stly, below every link, both Pinboard & Delicious allow you to see who else bookmarked it, which can be useful for finding people with a similar set of interests. 2ndly, both provide a central place where you can enter someone’s nick & see if they exist. 3rdly, Delicious allows you to browse the network of another user, which is another route to finding people you may want to follow."
del.icio.us  pinboard  social  discovery  research  paulmison  2010  networks  socialnetworking  socialbookmarking  socialboomarks 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Delicious → Pinboard username mapper
"Add your usernames for others to find. Find your Delicious network on Pinboard."
pinboard  del.icio.us  boomarks  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  socialnetworking  migration 
december 2010 by robertogreco
10 Alternatives To Delicious.com Bookmarking
"There are several alternatives available and, if you’re like me, you’re going to have to test some of them out until you find the one that best fits how you like to save bookmarks and later search for them. You’ll also want to export your existing delicious.com bookmarks and, if possible, import them into the new service you choose. Instructions on that are below, but first, here’s a list of options for your post-Delicious.com bookmarking."
bookmarking  bookmarks  internet  onlinetoolkit  evernote  diigo  instapaper  blinklist  connotea  2010  socialbookmarking  del.icio.us 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Delicious's Data Policy is Like Setting a Museum on Fire
"Yahoo! is going to shutter its social bookmarking service Delicious, the web learned today, and with it will sink an incredibly valuable source of collectively curated knowledge. You can easily export your own bookmarks (no verdict yet where we should all meet up to import them to) but what if you want to export other peoples'? That's at least half the value of the service, socially curated discovery."
del.icio.us  yahoo  data  history  curation  curating  tags  tagging  bookmarking  socialbookmarking  2010  archives  loc  web2.0 
december 2010 by robertogreco
R.I.P. Delicious: You Were So Beautiful to Me
"It was beautiful. And now it's gone.<br />
<br />
The Library of Congress should have bought it, similar to the way it has now archived every Tweet ever tweeted.<br />
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So much value. So unappreciated. So tragically lost. Where will we all gather next, where our bookmarks can be centralized for maximum network effect? Perhaps this story demonstrates that's not the right question to ask."
del.icio.us  social  yahoo  2010  readwriteweb  tags  tagging  value  cv  socialbookmarking  bookmarks  bookmarking 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Daily Clique
"Every weekday, I use this space to share the best links from a select group of 21 people in my network on delicious.com. The membership of this select group (listed in the right-hand column above) is subject to change. That's where you come in."
del.icio.us  bookmarks  socialbookmarking  aggregator  socialmedia  lists  links  curation 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Ethan Hein’s metablog » Social bookmarking is delicious
"The most practically useful thing on the whole entire social web is Delicious. Its original point was to store your web browser bookmarks online. That’s reason enough to use it. But the real value of Delicious is how it connects the thoughts in your head to the thoughts in the heads of innumerable internet strangers. Even more useful is the way it stores, reorganizes and reflects your own thoughts back to you. Delicious feels less like a web site I look at and more like a new module of my brain. It’s also like a slow-paced but highly absorbing text-based computer game, a loosely organized internet scavenger hunt." ... "Flickr is the second most useful site on the social web. It shares many of Delicious’ best qualities, like tagging and the rich inspiration of other users. Here are my Flickr items tagged with Delicious. After looking at my Turing tag on Delicious, my next move would be to take a look at my Turing tag on Flickr."
del.icio.us  flickr  folksonomy  tagging  tags  socialbookmarking  blogging  memes  learning  recursion  via:preoccupations 
november 2008 by robertogreco
the Awesome Highlighter - be nice, highlight
"The Awesome Highlighter lets you highlight text on web pages and then gives you a link to the highlighted page."
highlighter  web2.0  sharing  collaboration  web  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  bookmarking  browser  blogging  services  webservice  socialbookmarking  annotation  browsers 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Howard Rheingold's Vlog: Introduction to Social Bookmarking
"The third in a series of videos documenting my use of social media in my personal and professional life. This installment introduces social bookmarking. My del.icio.us account is hrheingold."
socialbookmarking  tagging  howardrheingold  education  del.icio.us  bookmarking  bookmarks  socialmedia  socialsoftware 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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