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robertogreco : songs   40

R.L. Burnside: See My Jumper Hanging On the Line (1978) - YouTube
"R.L. Burnside at home in Independence, Mississippi, shot by Alan Lomax, Worth Long, and John Bishop in August, 1978. For more information about the American Patchwork filmwork, Alan Lomax, and his collections, visit http://culturalequity.org. [02.11.07]"
rlburnside  music  blues  1978  songs  classideas 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Little Boxes - Tribute to Daly City, CA on Vimeo
"The song "Little Boxes" by Peter Seeger mocks Daly City, the large-tract suburb of San Francisco. This video shows what Seeger missed -- a look inside one of those little boxes."
dalycity  sanfrancisco  bayarea  california  peteseeger  music  songs  video  classideas  malvina  reynolds  henrydoelger  suburbia  conformism  middleclass  us  capitalism  nancyreynolds  westlake 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Little Boxes - Wikipedia
""Little Boxes" is a song written and composed by Malvina Reynolds in 1962, which became a hit for her friend Pete Seeger in 1963, when he released his cover version.

The song is a political satire about the development of suburbia, and associated conformist middle-class attitudes. It mocks suburban tract housing as "little boxes" of different colors "all made out of ticky-tacky", and which "all look just the same." "Ticky-tacky" is a reference to the shoddy material used in the construction of the houses.

Reynolds was a folk singer-songwriter and political activist in the 1960s and 1970s. Nancy Reynolds, her daughter, explained that her mother wrote the song after seeing the housing developments around Daly City, California, built in the post-war era by Henry Doelger, particularly the neighborhood of Westlake.
My mother and father were driving South from San Francisco through Daly City when my mom got the idea for the song. She asked my dad to take the wheel, and she wrote it on the way to the gathering in La Honda where she was going to sing for the Friends Committee on Legislation. When Time magazine (I think, maybe Newsweek) wanted a photo of her pointing to the very place, she couldn’t find those houses because so many more had been built around them that the hillsides were totally covered.
"

[See also:
http://www.roomonethousand.com/little-boxes-high-tech-and-the-silicon-valley/
http://telstarlogistics.typepad.com/telstarlogistics/2006/11/americas_most_p.html
http://www.willemsplanet.com/2014/10/09/thursday-the-little-boxes-of-daly-city/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/telstar/sets/72157594414534853/
https://vimeo.com/224844379 ]
dalycity  malvina  reynolds  peteseeger  sanfrancisco  classideas  songs  music  henrydoelger  bayarea  california  suburbia  conformism  middleclass  us  capitalism  nancyreynolds  westlake 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Joe Vasconcellos – La joya del pacifico - YouTube
"Eres un arco iris de múltiples colores
tu Valparaíso puerto principal
tus mujeres son blancas margaritas
todas ellas arrancadas de tu mar
Al mirarte de Playa Ancha lindo puerto
allí se ven las naves al salir y al entrar
el marino te canta esta canción
yo sin ti no vivo puerto de mi amor
Del Cerro Los Placeres yo me pase al Barón
me vine al cordillera en busca de tu amor
te fuiste al Cerro Alegre y yo siempre detrás
porteña buena moza no me hagas sufrir mas
la plaza de la victoria es un centro social
o Avenida Pedro Montt como tú no hay otra igual
mas yo quisiera cantarte con todito el corazón
torpedera de mi ensueño Valparaíso de mi amor
En mis primeros años yo quise descubrir
la historia de tus cerros jugando al volantín
como las mariposas que vuelan entre las rosas
yo recorrí tus cerros hasta el ultimo confín
Yo me aleje de ti puerto querido
y al retornar de nuevo te vuelvo a contemplar
la Joya del Pacifico te llaman los marinos
y yo te llamo encanto como Viña del Mar
Del Cerro Los Placeres... (repite coro)
Con todo mi corazón...hasta el ultimo confín
con todo mi corazón...yo te vengo a contemplar
con todo mi corazón...Valparaíso de mi amor
con todo mi corazón...como tu no hay otra igual
con todo mi corazón...Valparaíso de mi amor,
con todo mi corazón...Valparaíso de mi amor!"

[See also: https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_joya_del_Pac%C3%ADfico
http://www.estrellavalpo.cl/prontus4_noticias/site/artic/20070428/pags/20070428004816.html

used here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E90NWsTLrh8

other versions:
Tito Fernández https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttZH1_RmZF8
Lucho Barrios (2007) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVE-Gi7bGFY
Lucho Barrios (1998) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zhycjo1E1s
Jorge Farias https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HV4OM01Fufw
Palmenia Pizarro https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=99w74v8j7e8
Joe Vasconcellos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqf2pqIpThw ]
music  songs  valparaíso  viñadelmar  joevasconcelos  víctoracosta  lázarosalgado  chile  titofernández  luchobarrios  jogefarias  palmeniapizarro 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Gorillas make up ‘little food songs’ while they eat: Listen to them here | Dangerous Minds
"According to an article by Brian Owens in New Scientist, a German scientist working in the Congo has discovered a fun new fact about gorillas, that they hum and even sing during mealtimes. Food-related calls had been documented in chimpanzees and bonobos, but never in gorillas.

But far from just vocalizing, gorillas appear to generate two different types of sound while eating. One of them was “a steady low-frequency tone” that sounds rather like a sigh of contentment, or a hum: [sound]

The other was “a series of short, differently pitched notes” which resembles “a random melody”: [sound]

And it’s not like they “sing the same song over and over,” commented Luef. “It seems like they are composing their little food songs.”

According to Ali Vella-Irving of the Toronto Zoo, “Each gorilla has its own voice: you can really tell who’s singing. And if it’s their favorite food, they sing louder.”

The behaviors, however, differ according to whether the primates are in captivity or not. In zoos every individual sings during meals, but Luef found that in the wild “it was generally only dominant silverback males that sang and hummed while eating.”

She speculated that vocalizing might be the silverback’s method of informing the group that the meal is not yet concluded and that the time to move on has not yet arrived. “He’s the one making the collective decisions for the group,” Luef says. “We think he uses this vocalization to inform the others ‘OK, now we’re eating.’”

Because there is so much variation in calls both between individuals and species, food calls provide a good way to study the origin of language, says Zanna Clay, a psychologist at the University of Birmingham: “It gives a good insight into the origin of meaning in animal signals, and also the social pressures that might drive the flexibility we see in language.”"
animals  gorillas  music  songs  2017  multispecies  brianowens  zannaclay 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Interview with Sjón | The White Review
"Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — Where are you from? And how did you come to write?

A: SJÓN — I was born in Reykjavík in 1962. From the beginning I read everything, from children’s books to newspapers – whatever printed material came into the house. At the age of 8 I discovered Icelandic folk stories, which is when I truly started waking up to literature. A year later, I discovered poetry. In school we were given a big collection of poetry, which was to last us throughout our school years, and I started reading this book for pleasure at home. I was reading detective novels, Icelandic folk stories, and Icelandic romantic poetry from very early on. Early reading teaches you the different possibilities of text.

When I came into my teenage years I became a huge David Bowie fan. To be a David Bowie fan in Iceland you more or less had to teach yourself English – to translate the lyrics, to be able to read the interviews in NME. My infatuation with Bowie prepared me for my discovery of modernist poetry, first in translation. At the age of 15 I found a book of Icelandic modernists from the end of the Second World War. That’s when modernism came to Iceland – and they were very much influenced by the surrealists. Somehow, I was bitten by the bug. It simply fascinated me that you were allowed to use the Icelandic language in this way, to create these incredible images and metaphors, and to present such ideas with the Icelandic language. I felt like I should be a part of it. So I started writing poetry and in a few months time I had written enough poetry for a book. I published my first book of poetry the summer I turned 16.

Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — You speak of an early interest in the various kinds of text, and your own writing is not easily assimilated into any single textual mode. As a writer, lyricist and poet, you move in and out of these different formats. What do you classify yourself as first and foremost, if anything? How might this resistance to categorisation link in to your interest in surrealism?

A: SJÓN — I’m a novelist who occasionally writes poetry. I write librettos, lyrics and children’s books but these are all collaborations that I do in between working on novels and poetry. One of the wonders of the novel is how easily it absorbs diverse texts. Everything that is written, whether it is non-fiction, old archives, newspaper articles, lullabies – somehow it can always find its place in the novel, and for that reason the novel became more important to me than the poem.

The novel is encyclopaedic: all of the different manners of expressing oneself in words can find their place there. In the Eighties my friends and I formed a group of surrealist poets called Medusa. Surrealism brings so much with it and one of the first things I realised when I became excited by surrealism was its link with folk stories. Surrealism is always non-academic, always looking for the source of human activity, looking into the back alleys and the darkest clearing in the forest for excitement. Somehow it was always very natural for me to bring all these different things together in what I was doing.

Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — Your novels are hybrids – a crossbreed of narrative fiction, historical fact, myth, music…

A: SJÓN — I like my novels to be made up of different parts, realities, states of consciousness. I now see my work as realist because everything I write is grounded in at least the experience of the character, here, in earthly life. The strange things that happen in the books are what happens in people’s minds, what they experience as truth. That of course creates a hybrid, when your standard is something normalised and accepted as the only way to experience reality.

Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — Music is a great part of this assortment – you’ve mentioned Bowie as an influence, and you have collaborated with musicians such as Björk. Do you think that words can achieve the condition of music, which has a much greater immediacy and is far less freighted with multiple meanings?

A: SJÓN — I think it’s very important to be open to influence from diverse artistic forms and forms of expression. I have been very much influenced by music and one of the routes I took to literature was through the music of David Bowie. I have worked with musicians in all fields – contemporary composers, pop artists – and I’ve worked with very diverse styles of music. But there is a huge difference between words being sung, spoken or read. The emotion that the singing voice brings to the world when sung out loud is something you cannot recreate on paper. I don’t think you should even try.

Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — You have spoken of realising that ‘you could take the classical string quartet as a model for the composition of THE BLUE FOX’. How did you achieve this?

A: SJÓN — I think the fact that I can take the form of the string quartet and use it as the basis of a novel is another proof of how dynamic the novel is. I’m sure that a composer writing a string quartet can learn something from a movie or the structure of film. It was music that gave me the idea of constantly breaking up the narrative. THE BLUE FOX would be a completely different novel if it were chronological. In it, there are constant cliff-hangers and repeated refrains – I’m playing with the element of two melodies that come together but never fully, only in the end finding a solution. It was very interesting that the first people who commented on the book were composers. They said it was very clear to them that I was always playing with volume of information versus text, which is the same thing they do – volume of tones versus time. You can take a melody and stretch it over five minutes, or compress it down to three seconds. They were very much aware of how I was playing with text versus information.

Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — Does your involvement in the world of music, and the musicality of your novels, betray some sort of frustration with the limits of the written word?

A: SJÓN — No. I am in the position where I can move between those different ways of writing. For me, it is a celebration of the many possibilities given to an author. I play no instruments, my only involvement with music is in collaborations with people who know how to do it. It is a privilege to be working with these musicians and to be allowed to bring my words to their work. To hear the words sung is a wonderful present from these people."



"This view actually went against everything that I had been taught in school. The Reformation is presented in Icelandic history books as something very benevolent and it was convenient to ignore that in the first decade after the Reformation life was very difficult for the common man and for scholars. The Methodist church became very dogmatic, and everything that had to do with the old Nordic religion, with old wisdom or old medicine, was banished as sorcery. He is the only historical voice that we have speaking against this. It was an opportunity to put a seed inside somebody’s skull, and take a walk through those times with his eyes."



"The reason that I felt it right to enter this world, this state of complaint against a world going to pieces, is because he lived through the period when the Catholic Church, the only socially responsible institution, was all of a sudden taken away. In Iceland, it is a fact that the Catholic Church was the only welfare structure in the country – we had no king, no dukes, we had no one to take over the social responsibilities when the Catholic Church vanished overnight. All the monasteries were closed down, all the orphanages, the old people’s shelters – everything, overnight. And the duty that the rich had – to keep the livestock alive on behalf of the religious priests who fed the poor – that vanished too.

Jón Guðmundsson is unique in that he is the only one who wrote about this. He bore witness to a world in which man had been relieved of his duty to show charity to his fellow men. This is very much what the last decade has felt like, at least in Iceland, if not many parts of the West. With the deregulation of the economic system, social responsibility was thrown out of the window and all of a sudden the rich became richer and they had no duties any more. This is something that happened with the fall of the Eastern Bloc – the message that we were told then was that capitalism had won and communism was the dark art. The Left lost its voice, at least in Iceland. The centre Left – the social democrats – they decided to start playing along with the capitalists, which is what you would call New Labour here. The real Left was all of a sudden presented as the losers of history, even though these people had been in opposition to the totalitarian regimes in the East for decades. All of a sudden everything that began with the word ‘social’ was a dirty word. The social contract that was established in most of the West after the Second World War, was dealt the final blow."



"In times where grand narratives are needed we look to the grand narratives of our culture. In our case it is the great myths, and sometimes it is to give name to something like the panic after September 11. Myth always puts man down to size, and man realises he is just this tiny figure moving from one meal to another on his way to the grave.

Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — Oral tradition is very much a part of myth. Is this something that can still exist today?

A: SJÓN — You have a whole continent, Africa, which has so many languages that have still not found a written form. There are places that have an unbroken tradition, stretching thousands of years back, of telling the same stories over and over again. Mostly here in the West we have lost the ability to protect our culture orally, and maybe we are in danger. What will happen when all the books have flared up and all the Kindles lost their battery power?

Q: THE WHITE REVIEW — Literary translation and the rise of world … [more]
sjón  2012  interviews  iceland  poems  poetry  novels  literature  writing  music  björk  reality  collaboration  surrealism  existence  humans  storytelling  davidbowie  mogenrukov  dogme95  life  living  perspective  curiosity  translation  africa  diversity  myths  myth  mythology  charity  catholicism  history  capitalism  economics  society  collectivism  interdependence  individualism  insignificance  folklore  nature  reformation  religion  magic  mysticism  enlightenment  catholicchurch  9/11  oraltradition  ebooks  books  words  coldwar  socialism  communism  jónguðmundsson  sorcery  songs  posthumanism 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Plagiarism: Maybe It's Not So Bad - On The Media
"Artists often draw inspiration from other sources. Musicians sample songs. Painters recreate existing masterpieces. Kenneth Goldsmith believes writers should catch-up with other mediums and embrace plagiarism in their work. Brooke talks with Goldsmith, MoMA’s new Poet Laureate, about how he plagiarizes in his own poetry and asks if appropriation is something best left in the art world."

[Full show here: http://www.onthemedia.org/2013/mar/08/ ]

"A special hour on our changing understanding of ownership and how it is affected by the law. An author and professor who encourages creative writing through plagiarism, 3D printing, fan fiction & fair use, and the strange tale of who owns "The Happy Birthday Song""
plagiarism  poetry  poems  2013  kennethgoldsmith  moma  appropriation  creativity  originality  writing  creativewriting  3dprinting  fanfiction  happybirthday  songs  music  drm  copyright  fairuse  ownership  possessions  property  law  legal  ip  intellectualproperty  campervan  beethoven  robertbrauneis  jamesboyle  history  rebeccatushnet  chrisanderson  michaelweinberg  public  publicknowledge  campervanbeethoven  davidlowey  johncage  representation  copying  sampling  photography  painting  art  economics  content  aesthetics  jamesjoyce  patchwriting  ulysses 
march 2013 by robertogreco
At Last, 'Hot Cheetos and Takis' Is the Jam We've Been Searching For All Summer - Hollywood Prospectus Blog - Grantland
"What you just listened to, and then listened to 22 more times, is the end-of-summer jam "Hot Cheetos and Takis" by the Y.N.RichKids. A few answers to some questions, right off the bat:

* Who are they signed to? No one.
* Who are their famous rapper parents? No one.
* Is this some sort of spoof? Not at all.
* Does this completely straddle the line between adorable and impressive? Absolutely.

Even more confused? Here's some of what you need to know (Spoiler alert: It's about to get much more adorable and impressive)."
education  ynrichkids  rembertbrowne  songs  summer2012  2012  minneapolis  youth  children  music  takis  hotcheetos 
september 2012 by robertogreco
What American English sounds like to non-English speakers - YouTube
"Prisecolinensinenciousol, a parody by Adriano Celentano for the Italian TV programme Mileluci is sung entirely in gibberish designed to sound like American English."

[See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prisencolinensinainciusol ]
pronunciation  accents  adrianocelentano  foreignears  perception  sound  parody  gibberish  italy  italian  us  english  americanenglish  language  prisencolinensinainciusol  2018  music  songs  nonsense  mimicry 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Es Un Monstruo Grande Y Pisa Fuerte: 12 Latin American Protest Songs : NPR
"Esta semana en Alt.Latino les presentamos a varios artistas que denuncian la injusticia social. Es un show dedicado al arte de la canción contestataria. Tenemos íconos como Mercedes Sosa de Argentina, Chico Buarque de Brasil, Violeta Parra de Chile, y Ruben Blades de Panamá. Y también enfocamos en los trabajos de artistas mucho más jóvenes, que continúan la tradición: la cantautora mexicana Ceci Bastida, el dúo boricua Calle 13, y el rapero peruano Immortal Technique. Cantan sobre temas tan variados como el horror de la guerra, la necesidad de un sistema de educación más justo, la violencia en México, y el estatus político de Puerto Rico."
mercedessosa  argentina  perú  panamá  calle13  puertorico  chicobuarque  brasil  spain  españa  mexico  chile  violetaparra  deportee  manuchao  songs  protest  latinamerica  music  alt.latino  brazil 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Kevin Slavin on Lift 11: Geneva - live streaming video powered by Livestream
Quotes transcribed by David Smith: "things we write but can no longer read"; "three problems … opacity, inscrutability … The third one is darker and a little bit harder to describe — I don't even know what to call it yet"; flash crash; dark pools; 60% of all movies rented on Netflix are rented because Netflix recommended them; 70% of current Wall St trades are algorithms trying to be invisible or other algorithms trying to find the invisible algorithms"
kevinslavin  technology  algorithms  evolution  wallstreet  cities  darkpools  netflix  trading  finance  invisibilealgorithms  financialservices  realestate  nyc  manhattan  songs  film  television  tv  opacity  inscrutability  elevators  lift11  roomba  robots 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Mathematics (song) - Wikipedia
""Mathematics" is a b-side single from Mos Def's solo debut album, Black on Both Sides. It contains lyrics about various social issues and asks the listener to add them up and come to conclusions about them. Many references to numbers are found in this song and at times, Mos Def rhymes statistics in numerical order. The song is produced by DJ Premier whose famous scratch samples make up the song's bridge. Premier has called it one of his favorite beats."
mosdef  math  mathematics  hiphop  music  rap  1999  songs 
november 2010 by robertogreco
List of songs about school - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Songs about school have probably been composed and sung by students for as long as there have been schools. Examples of such literature can be found dating back to Medieval England.[1] The number of popular songs dealing with school as a subject has continued to increase with the development of Youth subculture starting in the 1950s and 1960s."
wikipedia  lists  schools  schooling  songs  music  tcsnmy  history 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Singing: The Key To A Long Life : NPR
"Singing aloud leaves you with a sense of levity and contentedness. And then there are what I would call "civilizational benefits." When you sing with a group of people, you learn how to subsume yourself into a group consciousness because a capella singing is all about the immersion of the self into the community. That's one of the great feelings -- to stop being me for a little while and to become us. That way lies empathy, the great social virtue."
brianeno  singing  music  empathy  cooperation  education  community  life  health  commons  thisibelieve  songs  happiness  longevity 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Source: Benchmark Invests In TuneWiki To Bring Song Lyrics To iPhone
"Why is TuneWiki so popular? The video at the end of the post shows how it synchronizes lyrics (karaoke style) to music playing on the iPhone."
iphone  music  lyrics  applications  mobile  radio  songs  ios 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Songs Translated To Buildings
"3D models of houses created by an architecture firm in Chennai/India, based solely on songs, lyrics of: "House Where Nobody Lives" by Tom Waits (1999), "Our House" by Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young (1970), "House With No Door" by Van Der Graaf Generator (1
architecture  visualization  songs  music  lyrics  strange 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Freeplay Music, Broadcast Production Music Library, Free and Mp3 Music Downloads, See Usage Terms.
"Freeplay's vision and continued mission is to expand the scope and depth of the Freeplay Music Library, and introduce additional offerings that set new standards as well as meet the production music needs of creative professionals and users around the gl
sound  audio  copyright  creativecommons  editing  opensource  songs  music  free  filmmaking 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Spool.fm ! / The new online music player !
"Spool.fm is a completely free community oriented website whose goal is to make sharing music simple. You can start listening to music right away by searching for an artist or a song and clicking on one of the result."
mp3  lastfm  music  audio  songs  streaming  radio  last.fm 
october 2007 by robertogreco
All Linkin Park songs look the same - Hometracked
"it’s hard not to view the six images above as a statement on the music industry...major labels decry actions of listeners who download music from free sources. But...the alternative they offer: The same song, repackaged six different ways."
music  analysis  audio  visualization  marketing  business  sound  commentary  songs  culture 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Anywhere.FM
"Anywhere.FM is a powerful music player that makes it easy to: # Upload your entire music collection # Play it anywhere on the best web music player # Discover new music through Friend Radio"
aggregator  music  online  playlists  radio  sharing  socialnetworking  social  songs  itunes  free  onlinetoolkit  streaming  lastfm  mashup  mp3  last.fm 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Boing Boing: Songs for Ice Cream Trucks
"Like old circus and carousel music, I found the melodies on Songs For Ice Cream Trucks to be hauntingly beautiful, sometimes sickeningly sweet, and often eerily familiar. I hope my neighborhood ice cream man gets turned on to this new sound of summer. "
icecream  music  songs  instuments 
august 2007 by robertogreco
RADIO.BLOG.CLUB
"Radio.blog is the first stand-alone player that lets you stream sound on your website."
audio  blogging  aggregator  mp3  streaming  songs  entertainment  radio  playlists 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Online Music: 90+ Essential Music and Audio Websites
"Here are more than 90 sites for musicians, fans, and everyone who enjoys music."
music  onlinetoolkit  online  web  internet  audio  reference  radio  mp3  multimedia  songs  streaming 
july 2007 by robertogreco
midomi
"Search for music by singing or humming part of a song. All you need is a microphone"
audio  music  search  voice  hum  songs  sounds  tools  recognition 
january 2007 by robertogreco
Splice - Meet. Mix. Mashup.
"Record sounds, compose songs, listen to music, make friends and remixes... all through this browser window. Come on, you know you want to :)"
audio  freeware  collaboration  creativity  culture  software  socialsoftware  social  remix  record  radio  podcasts  tools  utilities  online  interactive  interface  internet  mp3  music  multimedia  songs  sound  entertainment  design 
october 2006 by robertogreco
Song Search by Tapping - Search for music by tapping the rhythm of the song's melody.
"This site lets you search for a song, by tapping the rhythm of its words (lyrics)."
music  mp3  online  search  software  tools  songs  web  audio 
february 2006 by robertogreco
SONGS TO WEAR PANTS TO
"I make songs in any genre, for free or for money, based on instructions people send me."
blogs  creative  fun  humor  Music  mp3  songs 
february 2006 by robertogreco

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