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robertogreco : sounds   59

Jacob Sam-La Rose en Instagram: “Decluttering. These are the keepers. I harbour a fantasy of my future kids being fascinated with these in the same way I raided my mother’s…”
"Decluttering. These are the keepers. I harbour a fantasy of my future kids being fascinated with these in the same way I raided my mother’s record collection. Not just for the music itself, but the cover design, the appeal of the tangible object... In a digital world, it’s good to have analog anchors..."

[Commented: "Oh, those spacial, ambient, tactile, smell, taste, and sound memories that come from the places where we are raised. Swoon. I just tracked down a book about whales that was in our house as a child. I’d been referencing it for years without remembering the name (The Whale), but recalling so many details of its contents and the situations I was in while pouring over the book. The confines of small-ish collections encourage repeated reencounters that just don’t come as easily in the near infinite expanse of YouTube, Spotify, etc. Maybe this is why I have been so keen to create my on digital collections, something that I can move around in over and over again?"]

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/p/BmL5xv5HcOo/]
jacobsam-larose  2018  decluttering  memory  space  sound  music  collections  senses  mariekondo  taste  smell  sounds  place  finite  curation  tangible  tactile  analog  digital  books  childhood  memories 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Ode to the Foghorn: The Sound of the Sea | KQED News
"San Francisco residents Andy MacKinnon and Jen Liu live in the Sunset District near Ocean Beach.

From their apartment, MacKinnon says, "We can see the fog rolling in off the ocean and creeping up the street until our house is completely engulfed by fog. And shortly after that happens, we start hearing foghorns."

MacKinnon and Liu have a boatload of questions about the sounds that help vessels navigate safely through the water. They want to know:

Where are these foghorns?
How many of them are there?
Why do we still use them despite technologies like radar and GPS?
Who or what turns them on?

For those answers, hit that listen button at the top of this post, or read Foghorns: Who Presses The Play Button? [https://www.kqed.org/news/11272504/foghorns-who-presses-the-play-button ]"
sanfrancisco  sound  foghorns  2018  sounds  audio 
august 2018 by robertogreco
RWM - RWM
"RWM is a nonprofit online radio project for popular education.

We have done everything in our power to identify the copyright owners of the works we present. Any and all accidental errors and omissions that RWM is notified of in writing will be corrected as soon as possible. For a list of authors, see the details of each program.

Available under a Creative Commons license the following contents.

Part of our programme is possible through Re-Imagine Europe, a four-year project presented by ten cultural organisations from across Europe, funded by Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe is initiated by Sonic Acts (NL) and coordinated by Paradiso (NL) in collaboration with Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) and Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Online interview on the project.
[http://www.perfomap.de/map3/kapitel4/ramos ]

Follow us on Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contact us: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonia: Magnitude that expresses the level of sonorous sensation produced by an intense sound.

The RWM emits SON[I]A, its first program, since May 2 2006.

SON[I]A aims to be an alternative way to receive the information produced during Museum activities; audio information brought to us by characters who take part in activities in and around the MACBA.

This series is produced by: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, Lúa Coderch, André Chêdas, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos and Matías Rossi."



"RWM es un proyecto de radio online con vocación divulgativa y sin ánimo de lucro.

Se han hecho todas las gestiones para identificar a los propietarios de los derechos de autor. Cualquier error u omisión accidental tendrá que ser notificado por escrito a RWM y será corregido en la medida de lo posible. Para consultar el listado de autores, ver detalle de cada programa.

Disponible bajo licencia Creative Commons Creative Commons los contenidos enlazados aquí.

Parte de nuestra programación es posible a través de Re-Imagine Europe, un proyecto de cuatro años que agrupa diez organizaciones culturales europeas, financiado por Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe ha sido iniciado por Sonic Acts (NL) y coordinado a través de Paradiso (NL) en colaboración con Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) y Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Entrevista online sobre las líneas discursivas del proyecto.

Síguenos en Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contacto: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonía: Magnitud que expresa el nivel de sensación sonora producida por un sonido de intensidad.

SON[I]A fue el primer programa de la plataforma RWM y se emite desde el 2 de mayo de 2006.

El SON[I]A se presenta como una alternativa de consumo de la información que produce la actividad del Museo, aprovechando sinergias que se generan a partir de la presencia de personajes, actividades y sonidos que transcurren por el MACBA.

Esta serie está producida por: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, André Chêdas, Lúa Coderch, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos y Matías Rossi."



[via: https://twitter.com/Radio_Web_MACBA/status/1014437790359138304

"🔊 Most listened podcast this June 🔊
1/ @Jenn1fer_A https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/jennifer-lucy-allan/capsula
2/ PROBES by Chris Cutler https://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
3/ Griselda Pollock https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/griselda-pollock-main/capsula
4/ Domènec https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/domenec-main/capsula
5/ val flores https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/val-flores-main/capsula "]
audio  podcasts  tolisten  sound  sounds  rwm  macba  barcelona  radio 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Kauai 'O'o - YouTube
[See also: Kauaʻi ʻōʻō on Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaua%CA%BBi_%CA%BB%C5%8D%CA%BB%C5%8D

[via: https://twitter.com/Rainmaker1973/status/1011873160273317889

"The Kauaʻi ʻōʻō was a bird common in the subtropical forests of Hawaii until the early twentieth century, when its decline began. This is its last song that was last heard in 1987: it is now probably extinct"

via: https://twitter.com/somebadideas/status/1012093976021749760

"Memories in the anthropocene: loss at something impossibly beautiful you never knew of."]
birds  foreden  animals  nature  anthropocene  wildlfide  multispecies  extinction  audio  hawaii  sounds  sounf  birdsong  kauai 
june 2018 by robertogreco
xeno-canto :: Sharing bird sounds from around the world
"What is xeno-canto?
xeno-canto is a website dedicated to sharing bird sounds from all over the world. Whether you are a research scientist, a birder, or simply curious about a sound that you heard out your kitchen window, we invite you to listen, download, and explore the bird sound recordings in the collection.

But xeno-canto is more than just a collection of recordings. It is also a collaborative project. We invite you to share your own bird recordings, help identify mystery recordings, or share your expertise in the forums. Welcome!"

[via: https://twitter.com/RobGMacfarlane/status/1010604840416894978

"In case you don't already know it, Xeno-Canto is an astonishing resource: more than 400,000 recordings of wild bird song & sounds from almost 10,000 different species worldwide, freely available & explorable by region, taxonomy etc Remarkable. Listen here: https://www.xeno-canto.org/ "]
birds  sounds  birdsongs  birding  nature  foreden  audio  recordings  sound 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Hear the Otherworldly Sounds of Skating on Thin Ice | National Geographic - YouTube
"This small lake outside Stockholm, Sweden, emits otherworldly sounds as Mårten Ajne skates over its precariously thin, black ice. “Wild ice skating,” or “Nordic skating,” is both an art and a science. A skater seeks out the thinnest, most pristine black ice possible—both for its smoothness, and for its high-pitched, laser-like sounds."
sound  sounds  audio  ice  sweden  iceskating  2018 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Andre Louis - FreakyFwoof Shorts - AudioPlayer
"FreakyFwoof Shorts is your one-stop-shop for producers, podcasters, media students, radio stations and hardcore enthusiasts looking for high-quality intros, outros, sweeps and stings for your projects."
sounds  free  audio  music 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Sounds of Extinct Birds – Earbirding
"Ever wondered what a Dodo sounded like? Or a Great Auk? Or a Kaua’i ‘O’o?

On a whim, I went looking for sounds of extinct birds on the internet, and I found a lot more than I bargained for — in more ways than one. I managed to turn up some of the rarest, most remarkable, saddest and most haunting recordings I’ve ever heard…and also some of the looniest. I’ll save the loony for last; let’s start with the poignant."
birds  sounds  recordings  anthropocene  artifacts  nature  animals  extinction 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Everyday smells, sights and sounds of children in the city | Child in the City
"Building genuinely child friendly cities must begin with an appreciation of the child’s own daily perspective on their built environment, argues Jackie Bourke. Here, she describes how her research with inner city children in the Republic of Ireland capital, Dublin opened a window on the sensory and imaginative richness of children’s ‘everyday walks through a complex urban landscape of belonging’.

Increased attention to meeting children’s needs is an encouraging shift in urban planning, with models like the UNICEF Child Friendly Cities and Communities Initiative supporting cities to move in this direction. Dublin City is among those taking the first steps towards achieving child friendly status, with an initial focus on creating a playful city.

The urban public realm is of course not only a potential site of play for children and young people. Much like adults, they use public space to go to the shop, access amenities, visit friends and family and make the trip to and from school. A key question underpinning efforts to ensure cities are child friendly is how they experience these everyday journeys.

Research undertaken by the author, with 9-11 year olds based in Dublin, suggests it is a very rich and varied experience. Twenty children participated in the study, all of whom live in the North West Inner City. This part of Dublin has a diverse built environment; ponies kept down small cobbled laneways contrast with heavily trafficked arterial routes, bringing commuters in and out of the city.

The children who participated in the study all walk to school on a regular basis. As part of the research the children photographed their routes and captured their experience. Through their images they described journeys through an urban landscape at once social, sensory, imaginative and pragmatic.

Their social interactions with local shop keepers, business owners and neighbours are much treasured. Through small daily exchanges the children foster social capital and help knit the community together. Their experience is an embodied one and the children capture a range of sensory moments on their walks: they see and appreciate the aesthetic detail of buildings they pass, and describe the sounds of the city that gives texture to their walk: from the daunting clang of the tram, to the roar of traffic drowning out their conversations.

Sensory experience

Certain smells are evocative, particularly for the children who walk by the old fruit and vegetable market each day. Their sensory experience is also quite tactile and they described both the hard feel of the footpath beneath their feet and the more gentle touch of the sunshine on a warm sunny day.

At the same time the children mapped out an imaginative experience. They identified haunted houses, a visitors’ centre where, apparently, a broken lift has left a number of tourists stranded for several years, and even a forest of trees “full of life” hidden behind a high wall. Inevitably there was a pragmatic dimension to these walks and the children were quick to point to the challenges presented by the high volume of traffic. Equally, poorly designed spaces, neglect, decay, dereliction and rubbish must be navigated on their routes.

The childhood landscape of the urban public realm revealed through this study is rich and complex, both inviting and hostile, and it sheds valuable light on the city world children that inhabit and shape. This kind of insight into children’s everyday lives is an important starting point on the journey towards creating a genuinely child friendly city."
children  cities  urban  urbanism  sfsh  landscape  maps  mapping  experience  deblin  jackiebourke  classideas  geography  place  senses  smells  sounds  sounf  multisensory 
april 2017 by robertogreco
The Walking Playground – Linda Knight
"Edges are an interesting concept to consider. Do edges exist? Does everything have an edge, even the atmosphere or air? If edges do exist, are they sharp, sudden? Do edges sit alongside each other without space between them? What might be between the edge of an object and the edge of air? Ideas about matter are being reconceptualised and ‘things’ are being thought about less as discrete bodies, but as clusters of forces, what Karen Barad calls ‘transmaterialities’, energy fields of particles moving in times and patterns with lively edges that move back and forth. Barad’s research into theoretical physics exposes how even seemingly inert matter is not dormant or static but consists of particles busily moving and experimenting with possibilities and futures.

These theoretical reconceptualisations around matter enable thinking about taken-for-granted notions of how space, structures and forms can be allocated particular purposes. Playgrounds are static, demarcated architectural sites, however I’m curious about where the edge of a playground sits. Clearly, invisible force fields do not surround a playground so at what point does the playground end?

My work explores the pedagogies that occur in pedagogic sites and how ideas about pedagogy as a human exchange, might be rethought. I also explore the pedagogic in/of the other-than human, including surfaces, light, time, animals, birds, sounds, gestures, shade, rain, and noises. In rethinking where and what is pedagogic, the static playground loses its edges and becomes a series of moving, traveling, multispecies events, shifting locations in unpredictable ways. This project investigates the walking playground through a series of inefficient mappings."
lindaknight  edges  karenbarad  maps  mapping  multispecies  playgrounds  walking  birds  animals  light  time  morethanhuman  human  surfaces  gestures  shade  rain  noise  sounds  sfsh 
march 2017 by robertogreco
BBC Radio 4 - Word of Mouth, Intonation: The Music of Speaking
"Michael Rosen and Laura Wright explore the tunes we sing when we are speaking - without even realising it. Sound artist John Wynne extracts the melodies to play in the studio and Sam Hellmuth explains what we use intonation for."
intonation  sound  music  language  2017  accents  english  johnwynne  samhellmuth  sounds 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Someone Put Giant Megaphones in the Woods So You Can Listen to the Forest «TwistedSifter
"51% of Estonia is covered with forests and according to author Valdur Mikita, ‘Estonian culture is intertwined and imbued with forests’. In September, students from the Interior Architecture Department at the Estonian Academy of Arts installed three gigantic wooden megaphones that let you listen to naturally amplified sounds of the surrounding forest.

The student project was executed in collaboration with the Estonian Forest Management Centre and the multi-purpose megaphones also double as a sitting and resting area as well as a stage for small events.

Most of the installation was built in Tallinn at the end of August and then shipped to Võrumaa, Pähni Nature Centre—not far from Latvian border—where it has been installed and opened to the public as of September 18th.

The project was led by Birgit Õigus, with the rest of her coursemates Mariann Drell, Ardo Hiiuväin, Lennart Lind, Henri Kaarel Luht, Mariette Nõmm, Johanna Sepp, Kertti Soots and Sabine Suuster helping out with the building process.

You can find dropbox folders of the building process and transport/installation and visit the project page for more information."

[See also:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/jpqt1lpc4mcueqn/AABmt1Pf1uYjpfb1ZL3N-TVAa?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/59doqwq0u6qngyx/AAAr7a1V2il_zW8REbVCPPwla?dl=0

and

"Unplugged Kingsize Megaphones Help Nature Explorers Hear the Forests"
http://www.artun.ee/en/unplugged-kingsize-megaphones-help-nature-explorers-to-listen-to-the-forests-2/
estonia  listening  forests  sounds  megaphones  audio  sound  trees 
november 2015 by robertogreco
The sound of a plant dying of thirst › News in Science (ABC Science)
"That is the sound of a plant dying of thirst. Heartbreaking isn't it?

As a plant's water source dries out, small bubbles form in the xylem — the hollow strands that carry water from the soil to the leaves of vascular plants.

The recording was made 30 years ago by Dr Kim Ritman, using a very low-fi phone receiver with a pin soldered onto it to amplify the sound.

Ritman, who is now chief scientist at the Department of Agriculture, spent a good part of his PhD poking the pin into leaf stems of plants and recording the clicks as bubbles formed. The idea was to see if the diameter of the xylem determined the frequency of the sound, and he found that the larger the xylem, the lower the clicking sound.

"In general, our hypothesis that larger conduits produced lower frequency signals and smaller units at the ultrasonic frequencies was supported", he writes in his study Acoustic Emissions from Plants: Ultrasonic and Audible Compared."
via:anne  plants  audio  sounds  botany  physics  nature  biology  kimritman 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Yamanote Eki-Melo
"The Yamanote Line is the most famous and well-travelled train line in Tokyo. Each station on the Yamanote plays a song (eki-melo, "train melody", 発車メロディ or "hassha melody") when trains are about to depart, differing by platform, direction and station.

Click any post to listen to that station's eki-melo!"

[via: https://twitter.com/debcha/status/553661667439935488 ]
japan  sounds  sound  trains  chimes  yamanote  eki-melo  tokyo 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Sound and Memory — The Message — Medium
"We need an Instagram for field recordings"



"Soundcloud is designed for community feedback rather than quick sharing and simple faving/liking activity. The ideal app would be lightweight and keep files neatly organized. Twitter was recently reported to be in talks with the company, but the deal fell through. Licensing would be a challenge, but not if the community is encouraged to share the sounds of a place rather than someone else’s music.

Recently, I lost the metadata for my files saved in Voice Memos. The recordings defaulted to “12/31/11” as the file names and dates. Writing this post, I listened to a few tracks at random. Among these files was my recording of a gamelan performance on a hot night in Bali. Another track was captured the time I stumbled upon a band playing weepy rock music in a small club in Taipei. Some rain on my windows, a lot of it is just me talking to myself. Another track I recorded from the backseat of a car in Moscow. It is the music playing on the radio (that’s artist Constant Dullaart you hear, saying it’s Christmas time). Often a gust of wind blocks out whatever it was I hoped to capture or my sleeve rubs against the device and interrupts things, but for the most part the sound quality is pretty good."
sound  audio  joannemcneil  maps  mapping  instagram  soundcloud  2014  soundscapes  sounds  fieldrecording 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Sound maps - UK Soundmap | British Library - Sounds
"The UK Soundmap, the first nationwide sound map, invited people to record the sounds of their environment, be it at home, work or play. Over 2,000 recordings were uploaded by some 350 contributors during the period July 2010 to July 2011."
maps  mapping  sound  audio  sounds  soundscapes  fieldrecording 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Derek Abbott's Animal Noise Page
"In different languages what do we say to mimic animal sounds? Below is the world's biggest multilingual list. A guiding principle behind this list is to visualise a comic book, in your language, and imagine what would be written in the text balloon coming from the mouth of an animal. For languages that use a different alphabet, I have tried to transliterate the word into the English alphabet for ease of comparison. A forward slash is used to separate alternative words. Please email me at dabbott(at)eleceng.adelaide.edu.au if you have any comments, corrections or additions.

See also: http://fluffypals4kids.com/dabbott-animal-et "
animals  culture  language  onomatopoeia  sounds  derekabbott 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Hauntology of Daily Life — Medium
"Next time I need to go to the café, I will know exactly where it is, just as I know that another café that I frequent is across the street — one block closer to the Pacific ocean — from a dim sum place I eat lunch at frequently, and just as I know that a favorite Vietnamese restaurant is on the same block as the movie theater that is closest to my home. I could not tell you the cross streets of any of these businesses, but I know where they all are in relation to each other. That is how memories are cemented. At least that is how my brain makes memories, through context, correlation, proximity.

And through incidence. There are different types of proximity, and though the word suggests physical nearness, there is also simply chance incident. On the way to the dim sum restaurant, there is a spot where I think about feathers, because a dead bird was left there for several weeks, and for weeks after its carcass had disappeared, individual feathers fluttered in the bushes and grass.

Key for my memory is sound, certain parallels between physical places and the sounds that I associate with them.

I do not think of alarms when I walk past the neighborhood fire station, but I do think about the crying in a nursery ward. This is because of a sign on the firehouse door that announces the place as a safe haven for unwanted newborns. The sign shows a child sleeping in a pair of hands, yet I cannot walk by that firehouse without the helpless calls of infants ringing in my mind’s ears.

There is a stretch of road between Pasadena and Glendale where I will always hear the rhythmic threadbare minimal techno of Monolake’s album Cinemascope, even if Led Zeppelin is blasting on the radio,even if I am deep in conversation on the phone or with a fellow passenger, even if the windows are open and letting in the sirens of passing police cars, all of which has happened. More than a decade ago, on a visit to the Los Angeles area, I blasted a CD of that album in a rental car after a long day of meetings, on my way to visit a friend across town, and though I have never again sat in that particular car, and I have long since parted ways with that employer, and my physical copy of the Monolake album is buried in a box in my closet, the music still hovers on the highway, waiting for me to trigger it simply by driving through it.

And I cannot step into a particular corner of my home’s small backyard without having the novelist China Miéville tell me a story — more specifically, tell me a particular part of a story. For at some point, many years ago, I struggled in that spot with a heavy ration of weeds, and while I pulled at the weeds, tried to separate them from the ground without leaving their crepuscular roots intact, a recording of Miéville reading from one of his stories played through the headphones attached to my MP3 player. I was fixed in that spot long enough for the story to take root. It is as if the story lingers there, set on a loop on an invisible jukebox, and I can access it if I get just inside a specific zone of the yard."
memory  mapping  place  senses  sound  sounds  2013  marcweidenbaum  audio  music  losangeles  context  proximity  chinamieville  brain  mameories  associations 
august 2013 by robertogreco
The Unspeakableness
"The Unspeakableness" investigates the essence of human emotions. Through experiments of different languages, sounds, body languages, and the subtle elements of emotions, as well as comparing the untranslatable emotion expressions in different languages with English-based researches on human emotions as a stepping stone to discover mysterious qualities of the unspeakableness between human emotions and communications.

The project can be divided into several

• Investigation in Emotion Classification
• Alternative Ways of Translation"
emotions  sounds  bodylanguage  unspeakableness  communication  expression  via:jenlowe 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Bat Recordings - with the Anabat SD2 - Ultrasonic Echolocation Detector by RichardDevine on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free
"Bat field recordings from a recent trip to the North GA mountains. This sound clip was captured using the Anabat SD2 - Bat Detector - high microphone. This device allows you to monitor the ultrasonic echolocation calls of bats for species identification and activity measurement. The particular species of bat in this recording are the Indiana Bat. The typical hearing range of this bat is between 20hz - 150Khz. They locate their prey by means of echolocation. They will produce a very, loud short sound and assess the echo when it bounces back. The type of insect and how big it is can be determined by the quality of the echo and time it takes for the echo to rebound. They also use two frequency types; constant frequency (CF) and frequency modulated (FM) calls that descend in pitch. Each type reveals different information for the bat. …"

[via: http://wfmu.org/playlists/shows/47828 ]
richarddevine  ultrasonic  fieldrecording  audio  sounds  nature  echolocation  recordings  sound  animals  bats 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Music & Audio
"The "sonic barberpole" illusion invented by psychologist Roger Shepard at Bell Labs. The illusion consists of a seemingly endlessly rising or falling set of tones. The trick is done by simultaneously sweeping eight (or so) pure tones (i.e., sine waves) tuned exactly one octave apart. The human ear/brain has a really hard time figuring out which pure tone is the fundamental, so it "slips" periodically, just like an eye watching a barberpole (or looking at an Escher staircase). To conceal the tones' appearing and disappearing they fade in at one end of the cycle and fade out at the other."

[via: http://russelldavies.typepad.com/planning/2008/10/shepard-deep-br.html ]
illusions  sounds  audio  music 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Is Dubstep Avant Garde Musical Genius? | Idea Channel | PBS - YouTube
"Dubstep. Is. Awesome. While some people may hear noise, we hear amazing musical genius. The aural creativity of Dubstep, and its embrace of inharmonic sounds, makes it the most recent member of the long-established Avant Garde community. There is a long history of avant garde musicians and thinkers promoting the concept of noise and non-instrumental sounds as MUSIC, much to the horror of their audience. But over the past century, changes in technology and music genres have primed listeners, allowing mainstream audiences to enjoy the beautiful noise of Skrillex, Bassnectar & the whole Dubstep movement."
popmusic  sounds  sound  art  history  music  2012  futurists  dubstep 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Museum of Endangered Sounds
"The Museum Of Endangered Sounds is owned and operated by me, Brendan Chilcutt (handle: kidpeleus99@aol.com).

I launched the site in January of 2012 as a way to preserve the sounds made famous by my favorite old technologies and electronics equipment. For instance, the textured rattle and hum of a VHS tape being sucked into the womb of a 1983 JVC HR-7100 VCR. As you probably know, it's a wonderfully complex sound, subtle yet unfiltered. But, as streaming playback becomes more common in the US, and as people in developing nations like Canada and the UK get brought up to DVD players, it's likely that the world will have seen and heard the last of older machines like the HR-7100. And as new products comes to market, we stand to lose much more than VCRs.

Imagine a world where we never again hear the symphonic startup of a Windows 95 machine. Imagine generations of children unacquainted with the chattering of angels lodged deep within the recesses of an old cathode ray tube TV…"
brendanchilcutt  endangeredsounds  endangered  audio  museum  retro  music  obsoletetechnologies  obsolescence  memory  technology  sounds  sound 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Synesthesia's blended senses - latimes.com
"The study of synesthesia has helped shift the way scientists think about the brain. In the past, they have focused on matching different areas with specific functions; now, the entire organ is viewed as a tapestry of interwoven connections.

"The whole system is a giant network," Eagleman says. "It's no longer sufficient to think about single areas in isolation."

Like synesthesia, many neurological disorders — such as schizophrenia, autism,Alzheimer's disease, depression and epilepsy — have been linked to abnormal communication between brain regions. The hope is that as neuroscientists learn about how the connections in the synesthetic brain differ from those in normal brains, they will also gain insight into how these differences develop — and how they sometimes manifest as harmful disorders."
davideagleman  sensoryprocessingdysfunction  depression  epilepsy  alzheimers  schizophrenia  autism  music  sudio  sounds  smells  colors  numbers  ucsd  networks  senses  brain  neuroscience  2012  synesthesia 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Synesthesia: Can You Taste the Difference Between Sounds? | PRI's The World
"Audio extra: Test yourself, can you taste the sounds?

Oxford University psychologist Charles Spence studies human senses and how they interact. In recent studies, he had people smell wines and sample chocolate, and then match the different aromas and flavors to different musical sounds.

He found that people tend to associate sweet tastes with high-pitched notes and the sounds of a piano. People match bitter flavors with low notes and brass instruments.

Spence wondered if he could put this finding to use. Could he use music to influence what people smell or taste?"
music  flavor  theworld  audio  sounds  smells  smell  taste  jamespetrie  2012  daphnemaurer  charlesspence  senses  synesthesia 
february 2012 by robertogreco
I hope Buddha doesn't hate me.
"This is Chanter. It began its humble life as one of those free prayer boxes you can get free from the Buddhist Temple in LA. My friend the wonderfully bizarre Negativland co-conspirator Tim Maloney (Naked Rabbit) gave it to me to see what I could do to it. Here's his comment on the modification: "No matter the motivations, you are still offending a world religion."

Well. I was able to do much to it, as you can see.

I added a 500K pot for fairly wide pitch down control, 2 optical resistors (under the glass blobs), an LED snakelite that is hooked up to the audio output so it can optically play itself, and an amazing noise bank of 9 switches (8 toggles and one momentary pushbutton). Each group of "additions" can be switched on independently, together, or left off for "normal" mode. "
stories  sounds  via:russelldavies  buddhism  buddha  prayerboxes 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Katie Paterson, Vatnajokull (the sound of)
"An underwater microphone lead into Jökulsárlón lagoon - an outlet glacial lagoon of Vatnajökull, filled with icebergs - connected to an amplifier, and a mobile-phone, which created a live phone line to the glacier. The number +44(0)7757001122 could be called from any telephone in the world, the listener put through to Vatnajökull. A white neon sign of the phone number hung in the gallery space."
iceland  vatnajökull  glaciers  ice  sound  sounds  soundscapes  art  katiepaterson  communication  phones  nature 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Katie Paterson, Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull
"Sound recordings from three glaciers in Iceland, pressed into three records, cast, and frozen with the meltwater from each of these glaciers, and played on three turntables until they completely melt. The records were played once and now exist as three digital films. The turntables begin playing together, and for the first ten minutes as the needles trace their way around, the sounds from each glacier merge in and out with the sounds the ice itself creates. The needle catches on the last loop, and the records play for nearly two hours, until completely melted."
langjökull  snæfellsjökull  solheimajökull  iceland  glaciers  ice  sound  soundscapes  sounds  art  katiepaterson  ecology  vinyl  music  records 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Radiolab: Episode #202: Musical Language - Radiolab
"In this hour of Radiolab, we examine the line between language and music.

What is music? Why does it move us? How does the brain process sound, and why are some people better at it than others?

We re-imagine the disastrous debut of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring in 1913 through the lens of modern neurology, and we meet a composer who uses computers to capture the musical DNA of dead composers in order to create new work."

[Rediscovered through: http://kottke.org/10/08/language-between-thought-and-music ]
radiolab  language  music  sounds  speech 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Quisby - Semantic Satiation
""Semantic satiation (also semantic saturation) is a cognitive neuroscience phenomenon in which repetition causes a word or phrase to temporarily lose meaning for the listener, who can only process the speech as repeated meaningless sounds."

[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_satiation ]
repetition  meaning  speech  words  listening  semanticsatiation  semanticsaturation  neuroscience  sounds  definitions 
july 2010 by robertogreco
55 Great Websites To Download Free Sound Effects | Tools
"Sound effects are used to emphasize artistic or other content of films, television shows, live performance, animation, video games, music, or other media. These trick of sound are mostly achieved by combining technology, ingenuity and creativity. Sound effects are important for digital media because an appropriate sound effect can easily resemble a real occurrence for a situation.

We understand it’s kind of fussy to record and process sound effects on one’s own. Thus, we’ve crawled into Internet and search for free sound effects which are available for download. Here’s 55 websites for free sound effects download."
free  sound  soundeffects  samples  filmmaking  editing  effects  recording  video  downloads  audio  music  sounds 
march 2010 by robertogreco
::NoiseTube:: Turn your mobile phone into an environmental sensor and participate to the monitoring of noise pollution
"Noise pollution is a serious problem in many cities. NoiseTube is a research project about a new participative approach for monitoring noise pollution involving the general public. Our goal is to extend the current usage of mobile phones by turning them into noise sensors enabling each citizen to measure his own exposure in his everyday environment. Furthermore each user could also participate to the creation of a collective map of noise pollution by sharing automatically his geolocalized measures with the community.

By installing our free application on your GPS equipped phone, you will be able to measure the level of noise in dB(A) (with a precision a bit lower than a sound level meter), and contribute to the collective noise mapping by annotating it (tagging, subjective level of annoyance) and sending this geolocalized information automatically to the NoiseTube server by internet (GPRS)."

[via: http://www.iftf.org/node/3314 ]
noise  gis  gps  sensors  pollution  crowdsourcing  activism  mapping  environment  maps  experience  sound  monitoring  mobile  research  community  collaborative  audio  soundscape  sensornetworks  noisetube  soundscapes  sounds 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Archival Sound Recordings
"Explore 44,500 selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environments: accents and dialects; arts, literature and performance; classical music; environment and nature; jazz and popular music; oral history; sound recording history; world and traditional music"
art  history  music  uk  britishlibrary  library  sounds  recordings  samples  ethnography  multimedia  database  free  audio  sound  online  world  jazz  classical  environment  nature  arts  literature  poetry  accents  spokenword  media  archives  repository  tcsnmy  libraries 
september 2009 by robertogreco
CitySounds.fm - The music of cities
"Hello and welcome to CitySounds.fm! Here you can listen to the latest music from your favorite cities around the world.

At The Board you see the most musically active cities right now. The Board is constantly changing as new music is being created. On the individual city pages you can see what genres that are popular and listen to more of the latest tracks. Tweet the link to a city and you will be registered as a listener on that cities page, in that way your favorite city becomes more popular."
via:preoccupations  music  cities  international  urban  ambient  streaming  sound  sounds  audio  world  aggregation  citysounds 
august 2009 by robertogreco
The Voice of the Underground is silenced | MetaFilter
"Emma Clarke the voice of the London Underground has just been fired for recording and posting some spoofs on her own website. "Mind the gap" no more."
humor  london  sounds  audio  work  dooced 
november 2007 by robertogreco
framework
"phonography/field recording; contextual and decontextualized sound activity"
ambient  audio  field  sound  recording  sounds  streaming  radio  podcast  music 
november 2007 by robertogreco
LMA WLAC - Past Champions
"World Livestock Auctioneer Championship"
audio  speech  sounds  records  language  sound  voice  words 
september 2007 by robertogreco
FindSounds - Search the Web for Sounds
"a free site where you can search the Web for sound effects and musical instrument samples"
sound  online  audio  multimedia  media  mp3  free  sounds 
february 2007 by robertogreco
midomi
"Search for music by singing or humming part of a song. All you need is a microphone"
audio  music  search  voice  hum  songs  sounds  tools  recognition 
january 2007 by robertogreco
http://web.media.mit.edu/~nvawter/thesis/index.html
"Ambient Addition is a Walkman with binaural microphones. A tiny Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chip analyzes the microphone's sound and superimposes a layer of harmony and rhythm on top of the listener's world. In the new context, some surprising behavi
ambient  audio  cities  electronics  music  sound  space  interaction  place  play  architecture  psychogeography  soundscapes  sounds  mit  art  walking  wearable  installation  headphones  medialab  ipod  future  interface  noise  processing  portable  multimedia  monitoring  mobile  environment  dynamic  newmedia  wearables  mitmedialab 
december 2006 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | UK | Urban-based birds 'learn to rap'
"Birds living in cities are performing a type of "avian rap" while their rural counterparts are sticking to more traditional sounds, a study shows."
animals  birds  nature  sounds  cities  behavior  biology  psychology  environment 
december 2006 by robertogreco
freesound :: home page
"The Freesound Project aims to create a huge collaborative database of audio snippets, samples, recordings, bleeps, ... released under the Creative Commons Sampling Plus License."
audio  online  internet  free  resources  media  sound  sounds 
november 2005 by robertogreco

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