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robertogreco : soundscapes   51

Reassemblage Trinh T Minh ha 1983 - YouTube
[https://www.artandeducation.net/classroom/video/66044/trinh-t-minh-ha-reassemblage

"Who made these borders and whom do they serve? This question is taken up by Trinh T. Minh-ha in her 1983 film Reassemblage, which remains one of the most incisive and poetic critiques of the philosophical paradigm that colonialism has passed down. True to the idea that no radical statement can be uttered in inherited grammars, Trinh’s film rigorously interrogates cinematic form while flooding us with content that undoes the very logic most critique relies upon. Soundscapes extend for minutes while the screen remains dark, inviting us to know through hearing rather than through the immediate privileging of sight. And when images do come, sound is silenced so that the diegetic and non-diegetic elements of cinema are seldom operating in tandem, refusing to produce a familiar real. It is here that Trinh T. Minh-ha delivers a most profound statement: “I do not intend to speak about / Just speak near by”––a total undoing of the privileging of mastery, the form of knowing that requires distance, the one that has possession as its quiet but pervasive aim. The film is forty minutes long and this excerpt is only the first ten but my hope is that this will compel you to find it, and receive."]
trinhminh-ha  1983  film  reassemblage  colonialism  soundscapes  mastery  knowing  proximity  distance  form 
april 2019 by robertogreco
NOTHING | but the textures of my body de Nicole L'Huillier
"*These songs are composed for headphones.

[https://soundcloud.com/nicole-lhuillier/sets/things

1 NOTHING | but the textures of my body
2 SOMETHING | mindscapes
3 EVERYTHING | the space we share ]

THINGS is my first solo album. It consists of three tracks, and each one contains a different scale of sonic spatial scenario. This way, THINGS is constructed by 1. NOTHING (but the textures of my body), this track alludes to the nonexistent and constructed idea of the perception of silence by presenting a composition of the ever-present bodily textures. 2. SOMETHING (mindscapes) exposes the capacity of roaming from one mental space to another. To do so, the 5 different parts of this track are composed of frequencies that can stimuli different brain waves. The last track 3. EVERYTHING (the space we share) builds a sonic portrait of the place I grew up and the common sonic scenarios we all share in our culture. This piece gathers field recordings done during my last visit to Chile, my country of origin.

THINGS was released as a sound installation at the me Convention, SXSW, Frankfurt, September 2017. The installation was done using the radio as a spatial medium and was diffused in 3 different radio channels that could be tuned in with radios and headphones provided for the assistants. This way, THINGS presents different scales or layers of spaces by using in its physical form the radio as a mobile space and a transversal sonic architecture."
sound  audio  nicolel'huillier  chile  binaural  soundscapes  2017  silence  binauralrecording 
october 2017 by robertogreco
An Evening with Lawrence Abu Hamdan | MoMA
"MoMA presents the US premiere of an “audio essay” by Beirut-based Jordanian-British artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan, whose work attempts to trace and highlight the relationship between the act of listening and politics, human rights, international law and borders, testimony, and truth. Using audio documentaries and essays, as well as audiovisual installations, Abu Hamdan expresses his fascination with different types of listening at work in today’s legal and political forums. MoMA has recently acquired three important works dealing with similar themes: The Whole Truth, Conflicted Phonemes, and The Aural Contract Audio Archive.

In this new audio essay (a term the artist prefers to “lecture-performance”), he focuses on Saydnaya prison, near Damascus. Working with Forensic Architecture, Amnesty International, and the survivors of Saydnaya, Abu Hamdan captures “ear-witness accounts,” as detainees reconstruct events and the architecture of the prison they experienced through sound. The work raises pivotal questions about the politics of the field known as “forensic listening.”

The artist will be joined for a conversation by Ana Janevski, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art.

Lawrence Abu Hamdan is a 2015–17 Vera List Center Fellow."

[Casey says:

"he’s… just about the smartest person ever… Super dense speaking/listening/visuals on secret prisons, gunshots, birds.

Precedent for the kind of surveillance we’re dealing with, he argued, isn’t ~the Panopticon~, but Cage’s 4’33 (Silence).

(Listening to foley reconstructions of military prison torture sounds for 2 hrs…"]

[See also:
"What Now? 2015: The Politics of Listening - Keynote presentation by Lawrence Abu Hamdan"
https://vimeo.com/129018344

What Now? 2015: The Politics of Listening
April 24 - 25, 2015
The New School, Anna-Maria & Stephen Kellen Auditorium
66 Fifth Avenue, New York City

What Now? 2015 is a two-day annual symposium, organized by Art in General in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, which investigates critical and timely issues in contemporary art. Dedicated to the topic of “The Politics of Listening,” the 2015 symposium comprises four panel discussions spanning Friday and Saturday, a keynote delivered by Lawrence Abu Hamdan, and a program of sound installations, audio works, film screenings, and performances.

For more information on What Now? 2015: The Politics of Listening, visit:
artingeneral.org/exhibitions/592

Lawrence Abu Hamdan is a multi-media artist with a background in DIY music. In 2015, he was the Armory Show commissioned artist and participated in the New Museum Triennial. The artist’s forensic audio investigations are made as part of the Forensic Architecture research project at Goldsmiths College, University of London, where he is also a PhD candidate and associate lecturer. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at institutions such as The Showroom, London; Casco, Utrecht; Beirut, Cairo; and forthcoming at Kunsthalle St Gallen and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.]

[See also:
"LAWRENCE ABU HAMDAN: Introduction"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8UAwxoeIi8

"VOICE ~ CREATURE OF TRANSITION

“[…] the voice is elusive, always changing, becoming, elapsing, with unclear contours […]“ – Mladen Dolar in: A Voice And Nothing More (2006)

Conference- festival that took place from 20-23 March, 2014 at De Brakke Grond, a theater space located in the heart of Amsterdam’s old city center.

Gabriëlle Schleijpen, head of Studium Generale Rietveld Academie invited  Lawrence Abu Hamdan, If I Can’t Dance I Don’t Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution, Ruth Noack and Mark Beasley to each inaugurate a discursive and performative program of one day.

Thursday March 20

The Right To Silence, curated and presented by Lawrence Abu Hamdan

A daylong exploration of how voices are both heard and silenced; listening itself will be interpreted in its many forms and affects, allowing us to understand both the frontiers of the voice and the tireless battle to govern and contain it.

With contributions by Noah Angell, Ali Kaviani (Silent University), Anna Kipervaser, Maha Mamoun and Haytham El-Wardany, Kobe Matthys (Agence), Niall Moore, James Parker and Tom Rice."]

[And more:

"Artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan Demands the Right to Stay Silent"
http://www.vice.com/read/artist-lawrence-abu-hamdan-demands-the-right-to-stay-silent-981

"THE RIGHT TO SILENCE: An event series in three parts"
http://www.electra-productions.com/projects/2012/silence/overview.shtml

"Lawrence Abu Hamdan on Contra Diction: Speech Against Itself"
http://www.newmuseum.org/calendar/view/452/lawrence-abu-hamdan-s-contra-diction-speech-against-itself

"LAWRENCE ABU HAMDAN: THE POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF SOUND AND SILENCE"
http://www.digicult.it/articles/lawrence-abu-hamdan-the-political-implications-of-sound-and-silence/

"The Right To Silence I"
http://www.theshowroom.org/events/the-right-to-silence-i

"The Right To Silence II"
http://www.theshowroom.org/events/the-right-to-silence-ii

"Lawrence Abu Hamdan: Aural Contract: The Freedom of Speech Itself"
http://www.theshowroom.org/exhibitions/lawrence-abu-hamdan-aural-contract-the-freedom-of-speech-itself
http://sound-art-text.com/post/34633829824/lawrence-abu-hamdan-aural-contract-the-freedom ]
via:caseygollan  lawrenceabuhamdan  listening  politcs  humanrights  tolisten  borders  law  internationallaw  testimony  truth  audio  politics  saysnayaprison  damascus  syria  amnestyinternational  forensiclistening  gunshots  birds  soundscapes  classideas  earwitnesses  hearing  anajanecski 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Hack Circus: Synesthesia
"LJ Rich is a classically-trained composer, music technologist and journalist who has recently started speaking publicly about her synaesthesia and perfect pitch. Everything in LJ's world is musical, and she shares some of her extraordinary experiences in this exclusive interview – which includes an original composition based on part of this conversation, and a 'glitching session' with Leila that transforms the streets of London into a gloriously strange living soundscape."
2014  soundscapes  ljrich  sound  music  synesthesia  leilajohnston 
november 2016 by robertogreco
The sounds in your backyard are unique, go record them - The Verge
"Pristine soundscapes are so important that the National Park Service works to preserve wilderness sounds in many natural parks. There's even federal legislation in the US, like the 1987 National Park Overflights Act, that aims to keep noise from airplanes out of the lands below. Of course, it's impossible to escape noise where I live in New York City, but recently I've been inspired to look for quieter pastures.

After reading Bernie Krause’s The Great Animal Orchestra, I took the first chance I had to get out of the city for the weekend and head up to my hometown in Connecticut to listen and record soundscapes from a less industrialized environment. As an audio engineer I was well-prepared for these kind of projects, since I have to record outside frequently.

But you don't have to be an audio engineer to capture your own favorite natural soundscapes. Here are some basic gadgets, tools, and tips for recording soundscapes in your own backyard. I’m a big fan of recording in stereo and I think you get a fuller and more immersive sound this way so here’s some ways you can do that."
soundscapes  nature  2016  audio  sound  recording 
november 2016 by robertogreco
October 2016 – The California Sunday Magazine [issue dedicated to the topic of sound]
"LISTEN.

For the first time, we’ve dedicated an issue to one topic: Sound. We reached out to a bunch of writers and photographers and asked, “What do California and the West sound like right now?” As you’ll discover, they came back with an incredible variety of stories.

They met L.A. musicians just starting to hit big and traveled deep into the woods to learn about soundscape ecology. They visited Bay Area tech and design companies figuring out what cars and homes and toys will sound like in the future and spent time with inmates producing the first podcast from prison. They spoke with scientists lowering microphones into the Pacific Ocean and artists who make sound effects for television and film. And more — so much more that our creative director Leo Jung set aside our usual issue design and created something new. Our sound issue is presented in three acts, each with its own table of contents, beginning with our quietest stories and ending with our loudest ones.

Sound is fascinating, and it’s a way into so many different kinds of stories. But we worried that a print issue dedicated to sound might be a bit … quiet? So, throughout the issue, you’ll see audio footnotes so you can play the sounds you’re reading about.

One more thing. To accompany the release of this issue, our editors teamed up with the producers of our live series, Pop-Up Magazine, and the music-festival producers Noise Pop to create a sound-themed “live magazine” show at the magical, monumental Greek Theatre in Berkeley. The show, on September 30 (tickets available here) features a collection of new multimedia stories about the sounds of California and the West performed by writers, radio producers, photographers, filmmakers, and illustrators, alongside musical performances.

We hope you enjoy all of this as much as we enjoyed putting it together for you."
california  sound  listening  soundscapes  bayarea  thewest  west  classideas  2016 
october 2016 by robertogreco
Mapping Boston’s soundscape – News – Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
"Erica Walker, SD ’17, biked around Boston to take the measure of a city’s noise and its effects on residents.

Hot coffee dripping. Steamed milk hissing. Muzak droning. Keyboards clacking. Patrons murmuring: Erica Walker’s soft voice was almost drowned out by the ambient noise in a Starbucks. It was an ironic touch, considering that Walker has spent the past five years intently tuned in to Boston’s cacophonous urban soundscape.

The 36-year-old researcher, who will receive her doctorate in environmental health next year from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, has pedaled nearly every inch of the city on a purple commuter bike—hauling a bulky sound monitor, a boom microphone, and a camera in her backpack—all in the service of plotting sound levels in 400 separate locations and collecting residents’ subjective responses to the aural onslaught.

Most people have approached her with curiosity and, on learning her mission, gratitude. A few, alarmed by the paraphernalia of her sonic surveillance, have reported her to the police.

It’s all in a day’s research for Walker, a former artist who was compelled to undertake the study after suffering her own noise nightmare. The children living in the apartment above hers “ran across the floor literally 24 hours a day, and it drove me crazy,” says the Mississippi native. Plagued with headaches and sleeplessness, she sent out an impromptu Craigslist survey asking about annoying footstep sounds and was flooded with responses. She began to suspect her auditory torment was not isolated.

SIGNATURE SOUNDS

Walker has discovered that each Boston neighborhood carries a unique acoustic signature. The dominant note of Dorchester, for example, is transportation. “You have planes, you have trains, you have automobiles,” Walker says. But Dorchester’s rich cultural diversity also lends evocative countermelodies

to the main theme. “Something I hadn’t planned on is people standing outside and yelling across the street to each other, or sitting on their porches talking really loud—that human element,” Walker laughs. She wonders: “If people are part of that cultural landscape, is it ‘noise’ or just ‘sound’?”

By contrast, East Boston, which abuts Logan International Airport, is perpetually assaulted by the din of low-flying jets. In a community survey that Walker created, one resident called the commotion “a regular horror.” Another lamented, “Everybody is walking around looking wrung out, some are getting nasty, kids are crying more, kids with behavioral issues are out of control. People don’t know what to do.”

THE MISMEASURE OF NOISE

Most formal surveys of sound gauge what are known as “A- weighted decibel levels,” or dB(A)—sounds that are perceptible by the human ear. Boston’s noise ordinance defines “unreasonable or excessive noise” as that in excess of 50 dB(A) between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., or in excess of 70 dB(A) at other hours. To put this in context, normal human speech at about 3 feet apart takes place at between 55 and 65 dB(A).

Walker found that the city’s ordinance thresholds are rou- tinely flouted. Boston’s two loudest enclaves—East Boston, with the roar of jet engines, and Savin Hill, awash in jangling nightclub noise from across Marina Bay—average 80 dB(A). Passing ambulances clock in at 105 decibels. Construction site jackhammers reach 112. Even those neighborly conversations between porches can hit 85 decibels.

And these numbers don’t tell the whole story. Walker
is also measuring a type of low-frequency noise called “infrasound.” Although vibrations at this level are not picked up by the ear, our bodies still register them. “Infrasound is totally inaudible; we don’t hear it, we just feel it, such as when a bus passes by or a plane takes off,” Walker says.

In nature, low-frequency vibrations take the form of thunder, earthquakes, volcanoes, or nearby herds of wild animals. Such vibrations signal approaching danger—a clue to the toll they may take on mental and physical health in modern urban environments. “Maybe our body is processing these vibrations and we don’t know it,” Walker suggests. Making matters worse, infrasound is not only highly prevalent in cities but also persistent, hard to mitigate, and it travels long distances.

What Walker wants to know is: Are these low-frequency noises, which are rife in urban environments but not included in standard A-weighted decibel measurements, exacting a hidden public health toll?

NOISE AND HEALTH

To find out, Walker, along with her adviser, Francine Laden, MS ’93, SD ’98, professor of environmental epidemiology, will map audible and infrasound noise levels across Boston’s neighborhoods, using color gradients to denote areas of higher or lower average sound intensity. Walker will also catalog residents’ perceptions of noise levels, using the Greater Boston Neighborhood Noise Survey, an instrument she developed that is being translated into Spanish, Simple Chinese, Vietnamese, and Haitian Creole. The survey, Walkers says, “will put a human face on community noise.” Eventually, Walker will correlate soundscape metrics with data from established health studies conducted in Boston to learn if any type of noise is linked to cardiovascular and mental health outcomes.

Walker’s research takes place in the midst of a heated discussion about airplane noise—much of it low-frequency—in Greater Boston. In December 2015, U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch, who lives in South Boston, hosted a forum with Federal Aviation Administration officials, during which residents from across the region furiously recounted tales of babies constantly woken, rising asthma rates in families living beneath flight paths, and spouses sleeping in basements to escape the racket of Logan’s traffic. According to Lynch’s office, aircraft noise complaints in Greater Boston have worsened since the installation of a new GPS-based navigation system that directs planes on the most efficient route.

Francesca Dominici, professor of biostatistics at Harvard Chan, co-authored a 2013 study published in the British Medical Journal, which found that elderly individuals living on the noisiest flight paths near airports have a 3.5 percent increase in cardiovascular hospitalization for every 10-decibel increase in airport-related noise. She also found a strong association between noise exposure and cardiovascular hospitalizations in ZIP codes with noise exposures greater than 55 decibels.

For her part, Walker will be posting Boston sound maps and updates on her project’s progress at www.noiseandthecity.org. She has been biking Boston’s clamorous streets long enough to know that the most anguished complaints are about airplanes, construction, booming bass tones from car stereos, and barking dogs.

She can sympathize. “People don’t have a place to voice their noise issues,” Walker says. “They’re just kind of stuck here, suffering. And the city has no idea what’s bothering them.”"
noice  sound  boston  audio  soundscapes  2016  ericawalker  health  airports  maps  mapping  recordings  acoustics 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Drifter - Mitchell Whitelaw
[via: https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717891312683356160
https://twitter.com/mtchl/status/717907711459872770
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717917873969102849
https://twitter.com/mtchl/status/717919016463896576
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717920437041168384 ]

"Drifter is a multilayered portrait of the Murrumbidgee river system, made out of data. Historic images, newspaper articles, scientific observations and digital maps; tens of thousands of data points come together in three ever-changing views.

Map uses digital newspaper articles to trace fragments of the river's (white) history, from everyday life to large-scale interventions. Alongside these human stories, thousands of scientific observations reveal some of the nonhuman life of the river.

Sifter transforms text into texture, drifting through text snippets from newspaper articles discussing the Murrumbidgee and its tributaries, piecing together the names of some of the living things that go unmentioned in these accounts.

Compositor combines historic images from library and archive collections with contemporary images from fieldwork monitoring the health of the river's wetland ecology.

About

Drifter is a work by Mitchell Whitelaw, created for exhibition at the Wagga Wagga Art Gallery in conjunction with the Land Dialogues conference. A big-screen, non-interactive version is on show there until June 2016.

This web version works best with a modern browser and a big-ish screen.

Drifter is part of a research project on combining digital scientific and cultural heritage materials to create rich representations of landscape. It builds on the speculative, generative approaches to digital heritage developed in Succession.

Sources

Geospatial data sources

• US Geological Service HydroSHEDS River network
• Digital Chart of the World water areas
• Open Street Map towns and rivers
• Australian Department of the Environment, Interim Classification of Aquatic Ecosystems in the Murray Darling Basin based on the Australian National Aquatic Ecosystems (ANAE) Classification Framework - Wetlands

Newspaper articles: Trove, National Library of Australia

Frog observations: Atlas of Living Australia

Frog audio

• Amphibiaweb
• Australian National Botanic Gardens
• Frogwatch ACT - recordings by Ederic Slater
• Museum Victoria Biodiversity Snapshots
• North Central Catchment Management Authority Frogwatch resources - recordings by Murray Littlejohn

Images from the National Library of Australia and Flickr Commons where credited.

Wetland fieldwork images courtesy of Dr Skye Wassens and her team, Institute for Land Water and Society, Charles Sturt University.

Built With

• The Trove API
• The Atlas of Living Australia API
• Leaflet.js
• jQuery
• howler.js"
maps  mapping  osm  openstreetmap  drifter  murrumbidgeeriver  australia  audio  nature  mitchellwhitelaw  waggawaggaartgallery  landdialogues  lansdscape  sound  soundscapes  webdev  gis  frogs  webdesign 
april 2016 by robertogreco
lost in doi saket - a soundmap by kate carr
"Lost in Doi Saket - a sound map

I've never been a driver and have a hopeless sense of direction, so deciding to rent a scooter for my month in Doi Saket was always going to be risky. Nor did things start well at the rental place. Before I had even managed to ride a metre with my feet off the ground the owner had declared me ready to go and pushed me out the door. Almost immediately I was lost and so began my 600 kilometre recording tour of the region. At its heart my soundmap is about the process of weaving an emotional landscape from a physical spaces. It explores the way fragile and fleeting moments like a teen listening to love songs on the shores of a lake, or a joyful burst of backyard dancing slowly sink into an area, shaping it in the same slow way that walking along a similar route every day will eventually create a path. Lost in Doi Saket is about the different ways people leave a mark on the places they inhabit and visit. The way a community wears the land around them, and the way this process changes them too. The piece isn't intended as an collection of observations, it isn't simply about things I heard or saw, it is also about the things I did here -- the different ways I tried to explore, understand, participate and listen to Doi Saket. It's about the little things like struggling to buy cigarettes, and big things like realising I was very ignorant about Thailand. It's about the beautiful, haphazard and confusing process of getting to know and like new people, and new places and catching yourself totally lost in a moment. It is a record of the tiny ways I shaped Doi Saket during my time here, and the far bigger mark my visit left on me.

Kate Carr, Doi Saket, Thailand.

Thanks to: Helen Michaelsen, Pisithpong Siraphisut, Rees Archibald, Tim Plaisted and Tanya Serisier.

This artwork was made possible by the Compeung Residency Grant Program."
katecarr  soundscapes  fieldrecordings  doisaket  thailand  sound  audio  ambient 
may 2015 by robertogreco
foundsoundscape : created & curated by Janek Schaefer
"live radio collage of foundsound places to underscore your personal spaces

1 DAY of SONIC SERENDIPITY / 100 ARTISTS / 1000 LOCATIONS / NEVER THE SAME AGAIN*

Created and curated by Janek Schaefer / adjust your volume to background sound "
sound  soundscapes  janekschaefer  audio  foundsound 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Lagos Wide and Close Online
"An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City"

"Every day, hundreds of people start new lives in Lagos, Nigeria. This megacity is home to an estimated 13 million people who very survival depends on improvisation, networking, and risk-taking.

In 2001, architect Rem Koolhaas and filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak went to Lagos to document one of fastest growing cities in Africa. Based on research by the Harvard Project on the City, this website represents a unique engagement with an exploding city, capturing multiple perspectives of a volatile moment in its evolution.

In this interactive documentary film, the information has been organised according to distance. Loosely based on the trajectory of bus driver Olawole Busayo, it presents intimate encounters with the city and its people on the one hand, and a more removed perspective of Lagos on the other. In the one hour film, viewers join Busayo for his daily journey in the yellow minivan. Switch between a wide and a close view of Lagos and choose between three audio tracks: comments by Rem Koolhaas, conversations with Lagos citizens, or city sounds."



"This interactive documentary is an online adaptation of the DVD Lagos Wide & Close - An Interactive Journey into an Exploding City (2004). As one of the first interactive documentaries ever made, and a rare documentation of Lagos at a volatile moment in its evolution, we decided to make it available on the Internet in 2014.

The interactive film presents a selection of video and audio of Lagos recorded in 2001. It separates the distant – wide — and the intimate – close — views of the city enabling the viewer to switch between these perspectives interactively. Rather than following a dramatic storyline, it aims to bring the viewer close to the reality of what it means to live and work in Lagos, to move alongside bus driver Olawole Busayo and other Lagosians, and to delve into the city’s layered fabric, slowly making sense of the rules, the possibilities, and lifestyles of Lagos.

Increased bandwidth makes it now possible to play the two video channels and three audio channels in parallel online. The Lagos research project by Rem Koolhaas and The Harvard Project on the City, on which this interactive film is based, has not been published yet. With this online adaptation, we hope to provide a permanent and accessible resource for those interested in understanding Lagos and rapid urban growth.

The Explosive Growth of Lagos

Reliable statistics are not available, but based on UN reports and the Lagos city census, it is estimated that every day, hundreds of people start new lives in the African city of Lagos. As the largest port and commercial centre of Nigeria, it is now home to approximately 15 million people. This dangerous, polluted, and in many ways, dysfunctional city, has drainage problems, relentless traffic jams, and shortages of water and electricity, but is somehow working for those who move there to start new lives.

How and why does a city with so many problems continue to grow against all odds? In 2000, architect Rem Koolhaas decided to study Lagos in an attempt to understand the hidden logic that makes a “dysfunctional” city function. His research revealed a population’s unique ability to cope inventively with an urban landscape of disorder and to bring order into it. Lagosians have equipped their expanding metropolis with a finely meshed web of efficient self-organizing networks, challenging the dominant idea that “Lagos doesn’t work.”

Loosely based on the trajectories of bus driver Olawole Busayo, this interactive film provides a wide and a close perspective on an expanding city. In three separate audio tracks, it provides a glimpse of the lives of eight Lagos inhabitants, revealing the creative relationships they develop with their urban environment. In parallel to Busayo’s journey and interviews with Lagosians, Rem Koolhaas voices his reactions, interpretations, and changing attitudes towards Lagos during his five years of research.

Recording in 2001

In 2001, Rem Koolhaas invited filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak to help document his research in Lagos with the Harvard project on the City and photographer Edgar Cleijne. To present Lagos through the eyes of Koolhaas, Van der Haak created the documentary Lagos/Koolhaas that premiered in the International Documentary Festival Amsterdam and the Volksbühne in Berlin in the fall of 2002. As the title suggests, Lagos/Koolhaas is as much a portrait of the architect and his research methods as it is an image of the city of Lagos.

But another, more personal interpretation of the city was embedded in the 55 hours of material she shot with cinematographer Alexander Oey during their three trips to Nigeria — a collection of up-close encounters with the people of Lagos and a tracing of the paths and rhythms of their daily lives. If Koolhaas looked at the patterns of Lagos from afar and then zoomed in on the details, Van der Haak started from within letting personal encounters gradually reveal clues for deciphering the larger picture.

No Event No History

Because filming had long been prohibited in Nigeria, very few images of Lagos existed before 2001. This project involves an extended, chaotic and intimate engagement with a then hardly documented city, capturing multiple perspectives of a unique moment in its evolution, presenting experiences and observations, rather than a linear argument.

As one of the few contemporary records of a city that has been largely ignored by western media – with the exception of ‘news events’ like religious riots and military coups - this project is an invitation to look and listen to Lagos – at a moment in which the energy of change may reveal valuable insights into the uncontrollable forces of urbanization.

Credits

This project has been developed by documentary filmmaker Bregtje van der Haak and designer Silke Wawro in close collaboration with architect Rem Koolhaas, photographer Edgar Cleijne, and the Harvard Project on the City. The concept and scenario for Lagos Wide & Close was developed by Van der Haak and Wawro during a masterclass of the Sandberg Institute and Dutch Cultural Media Fund in 2003 and produced by Submarine. Most of the footage was originally shot in 2001/2002 by Alexander Oey for the linear documentary Lagos/Koolhaas (2002, 55 minutes), directed by Bregtje van der Haak and produced by Pieter van Huystee Film & TV in co-production with VPRO Television. Alexander Oey also edited Lagos Wide & Close. The soundscape was designed by Rik Meier."
lagos  nigeria  via:litheland  cities  interactive  urban  urbanism  storytelling  documentaries  improvisation  risktaking  networking  megacities  remkoolhaas  bregtjevanderhaak  africa  2001  olawolebusayo  soundscapes  2004  2014  edgarcleijne  silkewawro  rikmeier 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Designing around sound? — Medium
"Hi Boris—a great experiment. I’m looking at non-text inputs for students and the noise factor comes to mind every time.

So in the future will we pick our coffee shop/office based on acoustics as much as the espresso? Will shopkeeps design around sound—I don’t think anyone pays much attention to that right now. I noticed Propaganda Coffee is a very bright room and the noise volume quickly becomes distracting.

And just in case you can’t get out to a coffee shop: https://coffitivity.com/ "
sound  learning  soundscapes  education  schools  schooldesign  acoustics  coffeshops  bradovenell-carter  2015 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Surrounded by sound: how 3D audio hacks your brain | The Verge
[video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yd5i7TlpzCk ]

[Bonus video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Gpl99s02Aw ]

"The technique at the heart of binaural audio can be traced back to Clement Ader, a 19th-century French engineer. In 1881, Ader devised the Theatrophone, a telephonic system of transmission to broadcast a Paris Opera show. Pairs of microphones were systematically spaced in front of the stage, covering the breadth from left to right. Signals from the show were then transmitted via telephone receivers to listeners on the other end. With a pair of receivers, one mounted on each ear, listeners could hear the show from their designated suites at the gallery of Palais de l’Industrie.

In 1933, AT&T Bell Laboratories brought binaural audio to the Chicago World’s Fair. The acoustics research department of the company created a mechanical dummy, which it named Oscar, with microphones placed on its cheeks in front its ears. Oscar sat in a glass room capturing sounds while visitors gathered outside used headphones to hear exactly what the dummy heard. The technique revised the experience introduced by Ader, but both inventions offered poor sound quality.

Through World War II and the decades that followed, progress in binaural faced significant obstacles: primitive techniques failed to achieve accurate, high-fidelity recordings. But in 1973, Neumann, a renowned German microphone company, introduced the breakthrough KU-80, a prototype binaural recording device. Neumann’s iteration consisted of a detached dummy head with microphones placed in the eardrums – the position captured cues with more precision than any of its predecessors. Three generations of dummy heads later, the KU-100, introduced in 1992, featured omnidirectional microphones, expertly preserving the spatial cues and the overall quality of sound. It continues to be the go-to dummy head for binaural recordings.

Now, almost a century after the demise of the Theatrophones, investors are starting to revisit 3D audio technology: the prototype of Sony’s VR headset Project Morpheus includes a custom 3D audio binaural solution in its development kit. "3D audio adds to the feeling of presence that we strive so hard to achieve with the visuals in VR," says Richard Marks, senior director of research and development at Sony Computer Entertainment America. "When sound is perceived to come from the same direction as a visual stimulus, the credibility of the virtual experience is greatly increased. While purely visual VR experiences can be made, adding 3D audio greatly magnifies the impact and depth of a VR experience."

3D audio offers a more expansive experience than its visual counterpart. "Unlike with the visuals, 3D audio is not limited to the field of view of the display and can be rendered to give a 'complete 360-degree' experience," says Marks. "One of the biggest challenges for VR design is that the user can look in any direction, and may not even be looking when something momentous occurs. But using a 3D audio cue, it is possible to steer the user’s attention to look in the direction of the sound, similar to techniques that are used in live theater.""



"Back in Manhattan, Choueiri is considering another problem: since the inception of the technology, binaural audio has been reserved for headphone listening. But Choueiri wants to make the technology accessible over external speaker systems for a wider audience. The challenge is that with speakers, a right ear not only hears its respective cues, but also picks up information meant for the left ear. "It messes up the cues, so instead of hearing 3D sound, the brain just locates the speakers," Choueiri said. "It’s like watching 3D movies without the glasses on."

For decades, this confusing crosstalk between speakers has perplexed the audio community. But Choueiri’s BACCH SP, a filter that enables a pair of speakers to retain the aural cues, creates the illusion of 3D audio for the listeners. Jawbone has employed Princeton University’s algorithm over the last two years to create the LiveAudio filter for its wireless bluetooth speaker, Jambox. Loading the mini-speaker with the digital filter optimizes audio to create a three-dimensional experience. While effective, the experience is limited to a sweet spot — the device needs to be centered in relation to the listener. The illusion instantly collapses when the listener moves from the spot. Choueiri says a version of that software, the BACCH-dSP app, coupled with a head-tracking feature, can sustain the illusion irrespective of the listener’s head movements. That app is scheduled to show up in the store for Mac OS soon, bringing 3D audio experiences to laptops.

Slowly but surely, binaural is becoming a linchpin in virtual reality development. Oculus’ most recent prototype, Crescent Bay, unveiled at CES last month, integrates binaural technology with Rift’s head tracking for complete audio-visual immersion. And while Sony’s Project Morpheus hasn’t announced final specifications of the product yet, their emphasis on 3D audio is evident. As Adam Somers of Jaunt put it, "Binaural audio is critical to an immersive experience within the context of VR. We consider audio to be 50 percent of the immersive experience.""

[via: http://tinyletter.com/chrbutler/letters/2-6-neighborhoods-the-anti-algorithm ]
ryanmanning  binaural  audio  2015  history  clementader  soundscapes  sound  virtualreality  oculusrift  edg  srg  glvo  video  pointofview  beck  radiohead  binauralrecording  monalalwani  vr 
february 2015 by robertogreco
New map shows America's quietest places | Science/AAAS | News
"Craving some silence? Head (quietly) toward the blue regions on the map above. Based on 1.5 million hours of acoustical monitoring from places as remote as Dinosaur National Monument in Utah and as urban as New York City, scientists have created a map of noise levels across the country on an average summer day. After feeding acoustic data into a computer algorithm, the researchers modeled sound levels across the country including variables such as air and street traffic. Deep blue regions, such as Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming and the Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado, have background noise levels lower than 20 decibels—a silence likely as deep as before European colonization, researchers say. That's orders of magnitude quieter than most cities, where noise levels average 50 to 60 decibels, scientists reported here today at the annual meeting of AAAS (which publishes Science). The National Park Service is using the map to identify places where humanmade noise is affecting wildlife—animals such bats and owls, whose ears are up to 20 decibels more sensitive than human ears, for example, are affected by humanmade noise because it drowns out the faint rustles of insects and rodents they need to hunt, they say."
maps  mapping  sound  us  silence  2015  soundscapes 
february 2015 by robertogreco
re:sound
"Re:sound is an experimental music series focusing on exploring the relationship between forgotten spaces and the natural environment. The series takes place on the Mare Island Shoreline Heritage Preserve, a 215-acre park that formerly served as one of the first Naval Ammunition Depots.

The event is held in a concrete munitions storage magazine measuring 55'x100' with ceilings over 15'. The architecture of the building traps sound resulting in a prolonged reverberation.


The series will launch its first show in February 2015 as part of the San Francisco Bay Flyway Festival, celebrating the annual bird migration to the Bay.

Special thanks to Myrna Hayes, volunteer preserve manager, without whom none of this would be possible. Thank you for giving us a place to listen and create."
sound  soundscapes 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Sounds We Hear - Binaural Headphones on Vimeo
"Experimenting the use of head-worn binaural headphone CS-10EM with static directional sound in a visual mix.

Binaural hearing has been emulated in sound laboratories by using mannequin heads with built-in microphones. Except this time, I'm the living breathing head. :) From these signals, human beings can determine characteristics such as inter-aural time and level differences and—based on the listening experience—information about the spatial origin of the sounds being heard. Are they coming from in front or behind, from the left or right, or above or below? This ability to perceive where a sound originates from is referred to as binaural hearing.

Read more about binaural audio
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binaural_recording

Also noted, that GoPro WiFi app does not work well in snow somehow. It was -5ºC that morning and the range was somehow drastically reduced. My iPhone sees an connect to the GoPro ad hoc WiFi connection but buttons initiation does not relay well even at this rope length. It could be either the iPhone or GoPro. But phone is warm in my pocket while GoPro is close to the freezing floor.

Tech specs:

Binaural Mic
Roland CS-10EM
roland.com/products/en/CS-10EM

Field Recorder
Roland R-26 powering the binaural mics internally
roland.com/products/en/R-26

GoPro Hero2 + Wifi BacPac + Dive Housing
gopro.com/hd-hero2-cameras

Manfrotto Super Clamp
manfrotto.com/super-clamp-without-stud

Velbon Alu Mini Ball Head QHD-51Q
velbon.co.uk/products/heads/ball_and_socket.html "
recording  soundscapes  binaural  audio  video  gopro  hasanismail  binauralrecording 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Rev Dan Catt: RDCXAD #007, the binaural episode.
"The latest experimental audio diary is out and this one is a bit of fun (for me). For this week it's all about the binaural recordings.

I was introduced to binaural recordings for the first time back in 2008 by Scott while working at Flickr. In short you record with microphones positioned at ear distance apart, with a head like object between them to block the sound from one side of the head directly reaching the other. A good way to simulate this head like object is to use your actual head, easy huh!

Then when someone wearing headphones listens back to the recording they end up with the slightly freaky experience of essentially ending up in your head. The effect isn't so great on stereo speakers, but I figure most people listen to podcasts with headphones.

Anyway, wearing a pair of handy in-ear microphones we all set off on a family walk around our local deer park, with the intent of getting some nice nature/field records. Turns out as a family we don't really shut up for more than 20 seconds at a time, I blame the kids."

[Direct link to the podcast: https://soundcloud.com/revdancatt/rev-dan-catt-experimental-audio-diary-episode-7 ]

[Hardware:

Zoom H1 Handy Portable Digital Recorder
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003QKBVYK/

Roland CS-10EM Binaural Microphone Earphones
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003QGPCTE/ ]
revdancatt  fieldnotes  fieldrecording  audio  sound  soundscapes  2014  classideas  projectideas  microphones  binaural  binauralrecording  zoomh1 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Mexico celebrates its unique street sounds this week - USATODAY.com
"MEXICO CITY — From the earsplitting whistles of yam vendors to the squeeze horns of bakers delivering bread, Mexico can be a cacophony of strange sounds.
A series of four notes on a pan flute means the scissor-sharpening man is in the neighborhood. A ringing hand bell means the garbage truck is here. In parks on weekends, balloon vendors announce themselves with a buzzing plastic whistle.

The sounds are not just noise, say some. They are part of Mexico's culture, and the government is celebrating them, including "sound walks" through cities, performances of recorded street noise and a contest to choose "The Most Beautiful Sound in Mexico."

"People who come from other countries may be bothered by all this noise, but for Mexicans, these sounds are part of our identity," said Álvaro Hegewisch, director of Mexico's Fonoteca Nacional, or National Audio Archive.

GALLERY: The sounds of Mexico
To capitalize on the street sounds, the government has declared this week to be National Sound Week, which runs through Sunday.

During the week, government-run radio stations will play two-minute segments featuring Mexico's "endangered sounds," such as the tip-tap of cobblers hammering nails into leather or the notoriously out-of-tune organs played by Mexico City's organ grinders.

One spot features the sound of typing on manual typewriters used by public scribes or typists who serve illiterate Mexicans. The scribes fill out legal documents, government forms or take dictation for letters for customers and are found seated behind desks on sidewalks next to government offices and courts. The scribes are becoming fewer in number as literacy rises in Mexico.

'Most Beautiful Sound'

In Mexico City's Chapultepec Park — one of the few quiet corners in this metropolis of 20 million — listeners will gather to hear "soundscapes," or compilations of street noise, from India, Vancouver, Canada, and Mexico City itself. Other soundscapes feature the forests of Mexico's Michoacan state, the jungles of Chiapas and Indian dances from Papantla.

At an event in the east coast city of Veracruz, audiences will listen to sound effects re-creating events from the 1910-20 Mexican Revolution.

The National Audio Archive is inviting citizens to describe their favorite Mexican sounds through a page on its website. The sound mentioned the most will be named "The Most Beautiful Sound in Mexico" next Monday.

Mexico's unique sounds have long inspired outsiders.

Author D.H. Lawrence described the hum of a Mexican market as sounding "as if all the ghosts in the world were talking to one another."

The sounds of a Mexico City dance hall inspired composer Aaron Copland to write the tone poem El Salon Mexico.

In Calling Mexico, a short story by Ray Bradbury, a dying man in Illinois dials Mexico City just to hear the street noise: "a thousand people in another sunlight, and the faint, tinkling music of an organ grinder playing 'La Marimba.' "

Many of Mexico's sounds are kept alive by the country's street vendors. In Mexico City, thousands of roaming tamale carts play the same recording, a froggy voice that shouts "Riiiiiiiiiicos tamaaaaaaales oaaaaaaxaqueños!" ("Delicious Oaxacan tamales!")

Ice cream vendors ring a set of six small bells mounted on their carts. Sellers of roasted yams use a steam whistle attached to their rolling ovens.

"It's like a code that everyone knows. I make a certain sound, and everyone knows it's me," said Eleuterio Hernández, a bread seller.

He honked a squeeze horn while navigating a cart full of muffins and rolls through Mexico City's Coyoacan neighborhood.

In many cities, a loudspeaker can often be heard intoning "Refrigerators ... air-conditioners ... mattresses ... metal drums" with no explanation. It's a junk collector, looking for metal to buy.

Starting preservation efforts

Many parts of Mexico still have a town crier who shouts the day's headlines, or a community watchman who speeds through neighborhoods at 1 a.m., tooting a slide whistle to let everyone know all is well.

There are websites decoding the sounds. Cancunassist.com, a website for foreigners in Cancun, lists them under a section titled "What's all the noise in the street?"

In recent years, the government has started trying to preserve the country's sounds.

In 2008, it opened the National Audio Archive to computerize recordings and protect the originals in climate-controlled vaults. The agency now has some 274,000 tapes and records, from radio soap operas to recordings of dying Indian languages made by anthropologists.

"People from abroad have no idea what all these sounds mean to us," said Georgina Sanabria, academic director for the audio archive. "But for us, they're important, and we want to preserve them.""

[Gallery: http://mediagallery.usatoday.com/The-sounds-of-Mexico/G1725]
publicscribes  mexico  sound  cities  urban  urbanism  street  2010  raybradbury  dhlawrence  vendors  knifesharpeners  recordings  audio  soundscapes 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Sound and Memory — The Message — Medium
"We need an Instagram for field recordings"



"Soundcloud is designed for community feedback rather than quick sharing and simple faving/liking activity. The ideal app would be lightweight and keep files neatly organized. Twitter was recently reported to be in talks with the company, but the deal fell through. Licensing would be a challenge, but not if the community is encouraged to share the sounds of a place rather than someone else’s music.

Recently, I lost the metadata for my files saved in Voice Memos. The recordings defaulted to “12/31/11” as the file names and dates. Writing this post, I listened to a few tracks at random. Among these files was my recording of a gamelan performance on a hot night in Bali. Another track was captured the time I stumbled upon a band playing weepy rock music in a small club in Taipei. Some rain on my windows, a lot of it is just me talking to myself. Another track I recorded from the backseat of a car in Moscow. It is the music playing on the radio (that’s artist Constant Dullaart you hear, saying it’s Christmas time). Often a gust of wind blocks out whatever it was I hoped to capture or my sleeve rubs against the device and interrupts things, but for the most part the sound quality is pretty good."
sound  audio  joannemcneil  maps  mapping  instagram  soundcloud  2014  soundscapes  sounds  fieldrecording 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Sound maps - UK Soundmap | British Library - Sounds
"The UK Soundmap, the first nationwide sound map, invited people to record the sounds of their environment, be it at home, work or play. Over 2,000 recordings were uploaded by some 350 contributors during the period July 2010 to July 2011."
maps  mapping  sound  audio  sounds  soundscapes  fieldrecording 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The sound of one ant walking – inside the world of a wildlife audio expert | Radio Times
"Chris Watson, who has worked on Attenborough's Frozen Planet and Life in the Undergrowth, shares a remarkable insight into sound recording, some exclusive clips - and his feelings about music in wildlife shows"



"The only way that Watson was able to capture sound in such detail was thanks to the help of Peng Lee, a man with perhaps the greatest job title in the world – Principal Investigator of Insect Acoustics at the University of Mississippi.

Lee was researching how to record within ants' nests and had made a highly specialised piece of equipment to do so. When Watson told him he was making a programme about ants at the same time, Lee sent over two of his strange, home-made devices.

“They're literally like black box devices with a knitting needle on a wire. But they were actually classified at the time and we had to battle to get clearance to have them exported from US customs.”

Deploying new technology to interesting effect is something Watson has been doing all his recording life. The first step he took on his journey into sound happened back in the 60s, during his early teens, after his parents had bought him a reel-to-reel tape recorder. It involved a kind of aural epiphany, and is something he describes in detail in the Radio 4 documentary The Listeners (available on BBC iPlayer here).

One day he was standing in the family kitchen watching starlings feeding at the bird table in the garden, when he realised he was merely watching; he could hear nothing of the birds' activity.

“I was watching through a large picture window that gave it a large CinemaScope frame. But it was like watching a silent film.”

Realising he could use his new present to rectify this, he attached the tape recorder and microphone to the bird table, pressed record and waited. The results were a revelation.

“I was just amazed at what I heard. This was the sound of another world. A world where we cannot be because our presence would affect it. All this beautiful, exquisite, fascinating detail came out.”"



"Though there may be certain places on Earth you just can't hear, such as volcanos, Watson is one person who has gone further than any in uncovering hidden worlds of sound.

One of his favourite pieces is from another David Attenborough documentary, Frozen Planet. It's the sound of Weddell seals singing under the sea ice.

“It is another world, but it does sound as if it's from outer space, this wailing voice. But because it's recorded under the sea ice, there's no wave action, so it doesn't sound underwater but there are these haunting voices that are absolutely amazing.”'
ants  audio  sound  nature  recording  via:shannon_mattern  2013  chriswatson  davidcrawford  wildlife  insects  soundtracks  soundscapes  penglee  acoustics 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Sonic Terrain | listening, field recording, environmental sound
"Sonic Terrain is dedicated to field recording: Audio and sound recording not inside the studio environment, but in the outside world around us. We encourage not just hearing the world around you, but to listening to it, and recording it, for reflection, relaxation, art, science, or entertainment.

We don’t draw hard boxes around disciplines or styles, because field recording is used by an incredibly wide array of people and professions: laypeople, sound designers, sound mixers, multi-media artists, musicians, scientists, researchers, acoustic ecology conservationists, and more. Sonic Terrain offers a place for these disciplines to be cross-pollinated, in order to expose everyone to aspects of sound and recording they may not have considered."
fieldrecording  sound  space  methodology  soundscapes  recording  audio  via:shannon_mattern 
april 2014 by robertogreco
The Roaring Twenties
"an interactive exploration of the historical soundscape of New York City"
sound  soundscapes  nyc  history  1920s  neogeography  maps  mapping  emilythompson  scottmahoy  via:pomeranian 
november 2013 by robertogreco
UrbanGems
"What
Urbangems uses crowdsourcing to convert people's perceptions of neighbourhoods into quantities that capture fuzzy qualities such as calm, beauty, and happiness.

How
A user glances at two street views side-by-side, then votes on which one is more beautiful (or quiet or happy). The user has also to guess the fraction of individuals who would share the same view. The more the user guesses correctly, the higher his/her score. As each image is compared, a ranking of beautiful (or calm or happy) pictures emerges.

Where
Initially, we are focusing on London: users are shown places that are considered beautiful/quiet. Users also receive personalised recommendation of places they might like based on the ratings of like-minded individuals.

Why
Out of these rankings, we could answer questions like: Are certain areas seen as more beautiful? And, if so, why? What are the most common visual cues among pictures considered beautiful?
There has been extensive research on the relationship between urban perception and social deprivation. For example, in 1960, Kevin Lynch published "The Image of the City" and established how people perceive the cities they inhabit and what impression neighbourhoods left on them. In 1982, Wilson and Kelling put forward their theory of "broken windows" - cues of disorder in public are highly visible and constitute a salient marker of urban spaces, and "broken windows" (appearance) might lead to future crime (reality). More recently, Sampson has shown that perceptions of the same neighbourhoods differ among residents and are shaped by one's position in society (especially one's race).

So What (Criticism)
One problem with this study is that "what is perceived" is not necessarily "what is there". Users' votes might be influenced by: picture quality; position in society and race; and shared priors (e.g., reputation of a neighbourhood built over the years). A second problem is that the study cannot establish any casual mechanism - stimulate beautiful neighbourhoods might be less beneficial than reducing actual crime."

[via: http://studiox-nyc.tumblr.com/post/44630860758/sound-city ]
calm  beauty  happiness  neighborhoods  streetview  london  quiet  soundscapes  sound 
march 2013 by robertogreco
stillspotting nyc
"While the vitality and stimulation of the urban environment can be pleasant, those living in or visiting densely populated areas, such as New York, can have wildly different experiences. The ever-present cacophony of traffic, construction, and commerce; the struggle for mental and physical space; and the anxious need for constant communication in person or via technology are relentless assaults on the senses. One wonders how locals and visitors can escape, find respite, and make peace with their space in this “city that never sleeps.”

The Guggenheim Museum responded with stillspotting nyc, a two-year multidisciplinary project that took the museum’s Architecture and Urban Studies programming out into the streets of the city’s five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island. Every three to five months between June 2011 and October 2012, “stillspots” were identified, created, or transformed by architects, artists, designers, composers, and philosophers into public tours, events, or installations.

In conjunction with the projects organized around the city, the Spatial Information Design Lab (SIDL) at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University was commissioned to develop a mapping study on silence and noise in New York City. The interactive map developed by SIDL presents actual noise complaints generated by New York residents when calling 311, the city’s phone number for government information and non-emergency services. Reading the complaints offers insights into the city’s noise, and the contrasts between private and social space and between residential and commercial necessities."

[via: http://studiox-nyc.tumblr.com/post/44630860758/sound-city ]
maps  mapping  silence  nyc  stillspotting  curating  exhibition  soundscapes  sound  space 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Stereopublic
"stereopublic: crowdsourcing the quiet is a participatory art project that asks you to navigate your city for" quiet spaces, share them with your social networks, take audio and visual snapshots, experience audio tours and request original compositions made using your recordings."

[via: http://studiox-nyc.tumblr.com/post/44630860758/sound-city ]
mapping  quiet  silence  soundscapes  maps  stereopublic  sound  ios  applications 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Global Sustainable Soundscapes Network | Exploring and promoting the sustainability of soundscapes around the world.
The overarching objective of our network is to bring together ecologists (landscape ecologists and conservation biologists), acoustic ecologists (from the creative arts) and acousticians and psychoacousticians (scientists that study sound and how people perceive sound) to coordinate studies in diverse soundscapes around the world. The network will help to foster:

• Open communication between different disciplines about the composition of soundscapes and the underlying mechanisms that control dynamics and the ways that humans experience sounds in the environment through the support of workshops (listening, conservation), sharing of tools, social networking and coordinated Theme Teams

• Coordination of 4-5 soundscape monitoring sites where acoustic data are being collected long-term

• Development of a common vocabulary, long-term monitoring standards, and metadata standards for acoustic data for use by ecologists

• Increase awareness of this new field among ecologists and social scientists through a variety of activities

• Increase public awareness of the importance of their acoustic connection to nature."

[via: http://studiox-nyc.tumblr.com/post/44630860758/sound-city ]
soundscapes  acoustics  ecology  sound  biology  sustainability 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The Never-Ending Story | design mind
Harris: "I think that’s something stories can do—prepare their way of finding meaning in this madness and bringing some order to the chaos.

…creating a space that’s more about slowing down and contemplating and being introspective is a prerequisite for getting people to tell stories that have impact.

…Cow Bird is basically a storytelling platform that people can use to tell stories online using photos, sound maps, timelines, videos, and casts of characters. It’s geared towards long-form narrative…when many different people tell stories, the system automatically finds connections between them and weaves them together into a kind of meta-story…The platform automatically analyzes all the text in your memory, figures out your cast of characters, and connects it to previous stories.

…one of the pieces of this system I’ve been building is that to tell the story you have to dedicate it to somebody, which creates a gift economy of stories."

[via http://twitter.com/frogdesign/status/105785778331852800 via @bobulate]
design  art  writing  storytelling  jonathanharris  cowbird  slow  slowness  multimedia  thisishuge  gamechanging  2011  interviews  classideas  curating  curation  twitter  facebook  longform  meaning  meaningmaking  meaningfulness  self-expression  internet  web  stories  social  socialsoftware  metastory  relationships  connectivism  narrative  memory  memories  soundscapes  soundmaps  timelines  video  gifteconomy 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The National Mall: A Location-Aware App-Album | Underwire | Wired.com
"Two musicians from Washington, D.C., who go by the name Bluebrain have put together a location-aware album called The National Mall.

It comes in the form of an iPhone app, which you download to your handset and then open up while you’re standing in the National Mall — the green space between the Lincoln Memorial and Capitol building. As you move around the area, the music changes."

[See also: http://www.bluebra.in/ ]
music  dc  washingtondc  applications  ipos  soundscapes  musicforairports  brianeno  nationalmall  location  location-aware  sound  soundtracks  bluebrain  ryanholladay  2011  via:robinsloan  bluebrains 
may 2011 by robertogreco
The Here & Now | Future Archaeology
"The Here & Now presents documentation of projects by the collective Future Archaeology as well as original artworks by each of its members. The show explores themes of ephemerality and the specificity of time and place. Using a variety of media — sculpture, film, sound, photography — the show connects our present situation to an imagined future."
brooklyn  nyc  art  media  hereandnow  futurearchaeology  imaginedfuture  sculpture  photography  sound  soundscapes  film  time  place  ephemeral  ephemerality  heatherdewey-hagborg  thomasdexter  ellieirons  josephmoore  danphiffer  matthewradune 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Katie Paterson, Vatnajokull (the sound of)
"An underwater microphone lead into Jökulsárlón lagoon - an outlet glacial lagoon of Vatnajökull, filled with icebergs - connected to an amplifier, and a mobile-phone, which created a live phone line to the glacier. The number +44(0)7757001122 could be called from any telephone in the world, the listener put through to Vatnajökull. A white neon sign of the phone number hung in the gallery space."
iceland  vatnajökull  glaciers  ice  sound  sounds  soundscapes  art  katiepaterson  communication  phones  nature 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Katie Paterson, Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull
"Sound recordings from three glaciers in Iceland, pressed into three records, cast, and frozen with the meltwater from each of these glaciers, and played on three turntables until they completely melt. The records were played once and now exist as three digital films. The turntables begin playing together, and for the first ten minutes as the needles trace their way around, the sounds from each glacier merge in and out with the sounds the ice itself creates. The needle catches on the last loop, and the records play for nearly two hours, until completely melted."
langjökull  snæfellsjökull  solheimajökull  iceland  glaciers  ice  sound  soundscapes  sounds  art  katiepaterson  ecology  vinyl  music  records 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Scientific Commons: Sigur Rós's Heima: An Icelandic Psychogeography (2009), 2009 [Tony Mitchell]
[now here: https://opus.lib.uts.edu.au/handle/10453/10567 ]

[PDF: https://opus.lib.uts.edu.au/bitstream/10453/10567/1/2008008719OK.pdf ]

"examines sonic geography of…Sigur Rós w/ particular reference to Heima, which documents tour…of remote places in home country. Known for causing people to faint or burst into tears during concerts, music could be said to express sonically both isolation of Icelandic location & induce feeling of hermetic isolation in listener through climactic & melodic intensity of sound…Singing both in Icelandic & invented language Hopelandic (vonlenska), Jónsi, gay & blind in one eye, channels a striking form of glossolalia in vocals…group acknowledges strong degree of Icelandic animism in music…have referred to ‘presence of mortality’ in Icelandic landscape & links to stories, sagas, magic & ritual in remote country where ‘majority…believes in elves & power spots…invisible world is always w/ us’…create geomorphic soundscapes which transport active listener into imaginary world…bass player Georg Holm, who is demophobic, has stated, ‘we provide colors & frame & you paint the picture'"

[via: http://twitter.com/ballardian/status/24613154409 ]
glossolalia  vonlenska  sigurros  heima  iceland  music  psychogeography  inventedlanguages  language  emotion  fear  demophobia  sound  animism  landscape  sagas  magic  ritual  mortality  soundscapes  geomorphicsoundscapes  jouissance  identity  myth  isolation  sigurrós  rituals 
september 2010 by robertogreco
::NoiseTube:: Turn your mobile phone into an environmental sensor and participate to the monitoring of noise pollution
"Noise pollution is a serious problem in many cities. NoiseTube is a research project about a new participative approach for monitoring noise pollution involving the general public. Our goal is to extend the current usage of mobile phones by turning them into noise sensors enabling each citizen to measure his own exposure in his everyday environment. Furthermore each user could also participate to the creation of a collective map of noise pollution by sharing automatically his geolocalized measures with the community.

By installing our free application on your GPS equipped phone, you will be able to measure the level of noise in dB(A) (with a precision a bit lower than a sound level meter), and contribute to the collective noise mapping by annotating it (tagging, subjective level of annoyance) and sending this geolocalized information automatically to the NoiseTube server by internet (GPRS)."

[via: http://www.iftf.org/node/3314 ]
noise  gis  gps  sensors  pollution  crowdsourcing  activism  mapping  environment  maps  experience  sound  monitoring  mobile  research  community  collaborative  audio  soundscape  sensornetworks  noisetube  soundscapes  sounds 
february 2010 by robertogreco
A TIME AND PLACE - Christian Moeller
"The installation consists of a circular wooden platform 12 metres in diameter, on which 56 vertical steel posts extend 5.5 metres up toward the ceiling. Each of the steel posts is connected to a touch-sensitive sensor system. This forest of vertical steel posts is an interface through which light and sound can be physically experienced and controlled. Visitors touching the posts can evoke a soundscape which always results in a harmonic whole whatever the conceivable combination of interactions. To accomplish this, the acoustical structures were perfected within a physical modeling system."
art  architecture  installation  christianmoeller  sound  light  soundscapes 
april 2009 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: The Year of Listening
"After all, he concludes, "2009 will be a year of listening."
bldgblog  listening  sound  audio  recording  ambient  soundscapes  observation 
january 2009 by robertogreco
ISEA 2008 - The Juried exhibition - we make money not art
"Finally, We Hear One Another is a work by Kelly Jaclynn Andres that enables people to experience each other's soundscapes. Collaborating with the Mixed Reality Lab, Kelly made bonnet's fitted with a speaker and an extra 'ear' - a cone at the back of the
wmmna  soundscapes  sound  mixedreality  wearable  installation  glvo  games  wearables 
july 2008 by robertogreco
greg.org: the making of: Dude. Olafur Eliasson Has A Blog
"Well, he and his studio do. Spatial Vibration documents a series of collaboration/experiments concerning the relationship of sound and space. Several of the experiments are on view in a show of the same name, "Spatial Vibration, String-Based Instrument, Study II," at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery through mid-June.

The Endless Study translates the sonic vibrations of a single-string instrument into a drawing by means of two pen-equipped pendulum arms, which record [sic] the sounds onto a rotating sheet of paper. It's an update of a 19th century invention known as a harmonograph."
blogs  art  soundscapes  sound  music  space  olafureliasson 
april 2008 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Transmitting live from below the Antarctic Ice
"we can now listen directly to "an acoustic live stream of the Antarctic underwater soundscape." This "live stream" is recorded via hydrophones attached to "an autonomous, wind and solar powered observatory located on the Ekström ice shelf."
bldgblog  arctic  life  sound  audio  water  oceans  soundscapes 
april 2008 by robertogreco
musicwords/GREEN&ILPO: Sound Project From London
"Spring Makes Noise: The music is a souvenir from the 30min walk on the very first spring day in East London when everybody was so happy going a little crazy making noise." See also: Green & Ilpo on MySpace
music  london  sound  soundscapes  audio  japan  finland  mapping  maps  megumimatsubara 
november 2007 by robertogreco
http://web.media.mit.edu/~nvawter/thesis/index.html
"Ambient Addition is a Walkman with binaural microphones. A tiny Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chip analyzes the microphone's sound and superimposes a layer of harmony and rhythm on top of the listener's world. In the new context, some surprising behavi
ambient  audio  cities  electronics  music  sound  space  interaction  place  play  architecture  psychogeography  soundscapes  sounds  mit  art  walking  wearable  installation  headphones  medialab  ipod  future  interface  noise  processing  portable  multimedia  monitoring  mobile  environment  dynamic  newmedia  wearables  mitmedialab 
december 2006 by robertogreco
invisible5: home
"Invisible-5 is a self-guided critical audio tour along Interstate 5 between San Francisco and Los Angeles. It uses the format of a museum audio tour to guide the listener along the highway landscape."
activism  architecture  art  california  audio  cars  culture  documentary  ecology  environment  geography  history  losangeles  landscape  local  locative  mp3  politics  social  sound  space  sustainability  theory  travel  voice  radio  soundscapes 
november 2006 by robertogreco

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