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robertogreco : speechrecognition   7

Google Released An Amazing Speech to Text Feature in Google Docs ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning
"Voice Typing is another interesting new feature Google released a few day ago. Google Docs’ users can now type with their voice. You can write an entire essay without having to touch the keyboard. You can even use punctuation with voice typing. There are several phrases you can choose from to punctuate your text (e.g ‘period’,’comma’, ‘exclamation mark’, ‘question mark’, ‘new line’, ‘new paragraph’.

Voice tying for Google Docs is only available on computers using a Chrome browser. To start using Voice typing, you need to have a working microphone then open a document in your Chrome browser and click on Tools and select Voice typing as shown in the screenshot below."
assistivetechnology  classideas  speechrecognition  voice  googledocs  dictation  2015  via:ablerism  chrome 
september 2015 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: The Wilful Ignorance of Richard Allington
"Now, since "Doctor" Allington has called me a "cheater" and "illiterate" - let me list my credentials - and I will argue that these are contemporary - post-Gutenberg - credentials. Sure "Doctor," I struggle mightily with decoding alphabetical text, and sure, unless I am drawing my letters, copying them in fact, my writing is just about useless, and - well, to go further, I've never learned to "keyboard" with more than one finger. So yes, "Doctor," by your standards I can neither read nor write. And to get around that I do indeed "cheat." I use digital text-to-speech tools, from WYNN to WordTalk to Balabolka to Click-Speak and I use audiobooks all the time, whether from Project Gutenberg or LibriVox or Audible. Yes, I "cheat" by writing with Windows Speech Recognition and Android Speech Recognition and the SpeakIt Chrome extension.

And "Doctor," I not only use them, I encourage students all over the United States, all around the world in fact, to cheat with these tools as well. I've even helped develop a free suite of tools for American students to support that "cheating."

But beyond that, I'll match my scholarship with "Doctor" Allington's anytime, including my "deeply read" knowledge of the history of American education, and my "actual" - Grounded Theory Research - with real children in real schools in real - non-laboratory, non-abusive-control-group - situations.

And beyond that, I tend to think I'm as "well read" as any non-literature major around. So if the "Doctor" wants to debate James Joyce or Seamus Heaney or current Booker Prize shortlist fiction, or argue over why American schools often teach literature and the real part of reading, the understanding - so badly, I think I'll be able to hold my own."
irasocol  2013  richardallington  literacy  multiliteracies  credentialism  assistivetechnology  learning  education  accommodations  testing  speechrecognition  gutenbergparenthesis  audiobooks  cheating  specialeducation  commoncore  universaldesign 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Why Siri Is (Probably) So Good • Quisby
"If anybody’s wondering why Siri is so good when the 4S comes out in a few weeks, this is almost certainly why. (I highly doubt the iPhone’s CPU isn’t capable of processing speech recognition on its own. And I just heard Gruber on 5by5 live speculating that the phone takes a first pass at interpreting the Siri command before sending it to the cloud, suggesting the cloud isn’t there for interpretation, having actually used it.) Pretty interesting—and, ultimately, unsurprising—that Google and Apple are responsible for what are probably the biggest advances in speech recognition in decades. Fuck your stupid iPhone 5 rumours, this is some insane future shit."
siri  apple  2011  iphone  ios  google  speechrecognition  ai  richardgaywood  technology 
october 2011 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: Classroom Changers
"School (in North America and Europe) is starting soon. So I just wanted to offer five quick "classroom changing" solutions... 1. The Backchannel… 2. Text-To-Speech… 3. Spellchecking for the rest of us… 4. Speech Recognition… 5. Do Not Disturb" [Bookmarked mostly for the tools that it points to. I've used many of these approaches before (often with other tools), all great advice.]
irasocol  edtech  classideas  texttospeech  backchannel  spellcheck  speechrecognition  teaching  tcsnmy  resources  specialed 
august 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
vlingo
"Vlingo is a voice-powered user interface that unlocks access to mobile phone wireless data services. vlingo for iPhone™ and vlingo for BlackBerry smartphones allows users to speak into their device and have many popular applications carry out their respective functions. This includes dialing your phone, sending an email or SMS, creating and saving a memo or task, opening a web browser and performing a web search, composing a social-networking status message and more.
iphone  applications  speechrecognition  speech  voice  blackberry  phones  messaging  sms  text  mobile  speech2text  ios 
december 2008 by robertogreco
How to Speak a Book - Books - Review - New York Times
"I write these words from bed, under the covers with my knees up, my head propped and my three-pound tablet PC — just a shade heavier than a hardcover — resting in my lap, almost forgettable. I speak untethered, without a headset, into the slate’s m
literature  writing  speech  speechrecognition  tools  software  spoken  composition  howto  dictation  history 
january 2007 by robertogreco

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