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robertogreco : startup   28

Bruce Sterling on Fantasy prototypes and real disruption | NEXT Berlin
[video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7KErICTSHU ]

"In the closing keynote of NEXT Berlin 2013, acclaimed science-fiction author and journalist Bruce Sterling tackled a variety of topics like design fiction, start-up culture, and the mass adoption of disruptive technology. He sees science fiction as a form of design – design fiction that is part of the start-up world."
brucesterling  anabjain  superflux  nearfuturelaboratory  designfiction  disruption  design  networkedsociety  2013  nextberlin  nextberlin2013  protoyping  future  sciencefiction  scifi  capitalism  startups  money  culture  startup 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Alex Payne — On Business Madness
"We mistake dumb luck for a machine that produces success. We rely on induction when we should rely on deduction, and then, having realized our mistake, we lean on “data-driven decisions” in lieu of common sense. We chase patterns that aren’t there and miss eager markets right in front of us. All this while projecting the confidence, real or manufactured, that’s necessary to play the game.

This madness takes many forms…"

"How can we be like the successful ones and not like we are: tired, confused, scared, not-rich? Just tell us the secret. There is a secret, right? There must be. They make it look so easy.

I am not a business person. I don’t know what makes a good business. It seems like it helps to have a good idea, great people, the willingness to work hard, and an absolute shit-ton of luck. Being certain about much beyond that seems, well, a bit crazy to me."
nobodyknowswhatthey'redoing  patterns  patternrecognition  deducation  induction  2012  successworship  entrepreneurship  processcults  taylorism  processcult  process  failure  madness  startup  advice  luck  startups  success  business  alexpayne 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Generation Make | TechCrunch
"We have a distrust of large organizations…don’t look down on people creating small businesses. But we’re not emotionless…We have anger…flares up to become Arab Spring & OccupyWallStreet…We have ego…every entrepreneur who thinks their tech startup is the best…We have passion, & an intense drive to follow…through, immediately. Our generation is autonomous…impatient. We refuse to pay our dues…want to be running the department. We hop from job to job…average tenure…is just 3 years. We think we can do anything we can imagine…hate the idea that we should ever be beholden to someone else. We do this because we have been abandoned by the institutions that should have embraced us…We are a generation of makers…of creators. Maybe we don’t have the global idealism of the hippies. Our idealism is more individual: that every person should be able to live their own life, working on what they choose, creating what they choose…"
socialmedia  makers  making  generations  millennials  2011  justinkan  williamderesiewicz  entrepreneurship  ows  arabspring  occupywallstreet  idealism  attitude  trends  passion  unschooling  deschooling  hierarchy  revolution  via:preoccupations  davidfincer  markzuckerberg  individualism  self-actualization  independence  work  labor  behavior  startups  startup  workplace  motivation  geny  generationy 
november 2011 by robertogreco
What motivates an early employee to work in a startup? - Quora
"The most powerful and sustainable motivator for an early employee at a startup, or for employees at any company for that matter, is the sense of meaning derived from work.  Meaning comes from working on a product whose long-term vision you believe will have an impact. It comes from working with a team whose members you respect, who constantly challenges you to learn and get better, and who you can't bear to let down. It comes from the dopamine rush you get from building and releasing something that your user base will love."
startups  startup  meaning  motivation  work  cv  vision  tcsnmy  respect  iteration  learning  leadership  management  administration  small  edmondlau  quora  lcproject 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Evan Williams | evhead: Ten Rules for Web Startups
"#1 Be Narrow: Focus on the smallest possible problem you could solve that would potentially be useful. Most companies start out trying to do too many things, which makes life difficult and turns you into a me-too…#2 Be Different #3 Be Casual #4 Be Picky: Another perennial business rule, and it applies to everything you do: features, employees, investors, partners, press opportunities. Startups are often too eager to accept people or ideas into their world. You can almost always afford to wait if something doesn't feel just right, and false negatives are usually better than false positives. One of Google's biggest strengths—and sources of frustration for outsiders—was their willingness to say no to opportunities, easy money, potential employees, and deals. #5 Be User-Centric #6 Be Self-Centred: Make it better based on your own desires. #7 Be Greedy #8 Be Tiny #9 Be Agile #10 Be Balanced #11 Be Wary"

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2011/01/18/ten_rules_for_web_startups ]
business  startup  entrepreneurship  tips  tcsnmy  lcproject  small  agility  evanwilliams  focus  startups  2005 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Urbanscale | Design for networked cities and citizens
"This is the challenge we've taken up. Urbanscale is a practice committed to applying the toolkit and mindset of interaction design to the specific problems of cities. Through the design of products, services, interfaces and spatial interventions, our work aims to make cities easier to understand, more pleasant to use and more responsive to the desires of their inhabitants and other users. We hope you join us in the coming weeks and years, as we explore the abundant possibilities presented by a world of networked cities and citizens."
design  urban  socialsoftware  opencities  startup  adamgreenfield  urbancomputing  urbanism  networkedurbanism  ubicomp  networkedcities  cities 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Want to be an entrepreneur? Drop out of college.
"College works on factory model, & is in many ways not suited to training entrepreneurs. You put in a student & out comes a scholar.

Entrepreneurship works on apprenticeship model. The best way to learn how to be an entrepreneur is to start a company, & seek advice of a successful entrepreneur in the area in which you are interested. Or work at a startup for a few years to learn the ropes. A small number of people—maybe in the high hundreds or low thousands—have knowledge of how to start & run a tech company, & things change so fast, only people in the thick of things have a sense of what is going on. Take a few years off & you're behind the times. Some publishers have asked Chris to collate his blog posts on entrepreneurship into a book, but he said, What's the point, it'd be out of date by the time it hit bookstores.

As Fred pointed out, basic skills necessary to start tech company—design or coding—are skills that can be learned outside of academy, & are often self-taught."
education  entrepreneurship  business  startup  college  universities  colleges  autodidacts  unschooling  deschooling  caterinafake  fredwilson  evanwilliams  robkalin  bizstone  jackdorsey  markzuckerberg  dropouts  lcproject  billgates  stevejobs  industrial  learning 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Chile’s Grand Innovation Experiment
"All government-sponsored tech-cluster efforts either have failed or are on life support. That’s because they all used the wrong ingredients. It isn’t real estate, universities, or VCs that make innovation happen; it is entrepreneurs. To create a tech center like SV, you need to first attract smart entrepreneurs…Then you have to create entrepreneurial networks; instill a spirit of risk-taking & openness; & build mentoring systems. You also need to provide seed financing to startups. The money is easy; everything else requires a change in culture that usually takes decades.<br />
<br />
But Chile is trying a radical new experiment that I helped conceive, to short-circuit this process. It is importing entrepreneurs from all over the world, by offering them $40,000 to bootstrap in Chile. They get a visa; free office space; assistance w/ networking, mentoring, fundraising, & connecting to potential customers and partners. All the entrepreneurs have to do, in return, is commit to working hard…"
chile  startup  innovation  technology  internet  start-upchile  techcrunch  incubator  entrepreneurship  funding  networking 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Among your lessons learned as a young entrepreneur, which are the greatest? - Quora
"It's usually better to have a cofounder than go it alone.<br />
<br />
Being an entrepreneur is not about being in love with an idea, it's about being in love w/ running a company.<br />
<br />
Having a highly homogeneous (background, education, values, preferences, etc) very early team is better than not — cuts down on time-wasting arguments.<br />
<br />
You can have successful teams where people hate but deeply respect each other; the opposite (love but not respect among team members) is a recipe for disaster.<br />
<br />
If there is any doubt about hiring a candidate for your first 5-6 positions, there is no doubt — do not.<br />
<br />
You cannot hire a cofounder.<br />
<br />
All compensation information eventually becomes public, & usually eventually—very quickly.<br />
<br />
In many cases "working from home" is not really working.<br />
<br />
Leadership by example is the most effective type. If you expect the troops to crank through nights & weekends, better be there yourself…"
lcproject  via:robinsloan  management  leadership  business  startup  advice  administration  maxlevchin 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Bloom
"Pop-cultural instruments for data expression and exploration.
We're building new ways to see and communicate."
bencerveny  startup  visualization  tomcarden  towatch  communication  expression  roberthodgin  jespersparreandersen 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Scaling startups
"People who don’t take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year. People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year."

"Process is an embedded reaction to prior stupidity."

"If you follow process religiously, you’ll never get anything done!"

"Hire well: This goes without saying, and I didn’t mention it in the panel. It’s a big topic probably best left for another post. Hiring great people makes everything else below easier.

Communication: Everyone in the company uses IRC, not just engineers. Everyone, all the time, from the CEO on down. Sure, sometimes you can miss things if you’re not in IRC at the time, but the benefits far outweigh the costs, and you have a lot fewer meetings about day-to-day mundane issues. …

Encourage experimentation … External transparency … Embracing failure …"
business  culture  startups  startup  entrepreneurship  scalability  risk  failure  strategy  chaddickerson  transparency  experimentation  tcsnmy  communication  process  purpose  riskassessment  riskaversion  risks  risktaking  hiring  via:stamen  scale 
august 2010 by robertogreco
What Happened to Yahoo
"Why would great programmers want to work for a company that didn't have a hacker-centric culture, as long as there were others that did? I can imagine two reasons: if they were paid a huge amount, or if the domain was interesting and none of the companies in it were hacker-centric. Otherwise you can't attract good programmers to work in a suit-centric culture. And without good programmers you won't get good software, no matter how many people you put on a task, or how many procedures you establish to ensure "quality."

Hacker culture often seems kind of irresponsible. That's why people proposing to destroy it use phrases like "adult supervision." That was the phrase they used at Yahoo. But there are worse things than seeming irresponsible. Losing, for example."
paulgraham  hackers  entrepreneurship  yahoo  technology  startups  startup  management  media  programming  culture  business  google  history  software  hackerculture  facebook  markzuckerberg  tcsnmy  hiring  leadership  values  business-iness  lcproject  hierarchy 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Want to be an entrepreneur? Drop out of college.
"College works on the factory model, & is in many ways not suited to training entrepreneurs. You put in a student & out comes a scholar.

Entrepreneurship works on apprenticeship model...best way to learn how to be entrepreneur is to start a company & seek advice of successful entrepreneur in area you are interested...Take a few years off & you're behind the times. Some publishers have asked Chris to collate his blog posts on entrepreneurship...What's the point, it'd be out of date by the time it hit bookstores...

basic skills necessary to start tech company—design or coding—re skills that can be learned outside of academy, & are often self-taught...

I was on verge of attending grad school to get a PhD in Renaissance poetry - my lost careers...writer, artist or academic. Do I regret spending all that time poring over Shakespeare when I could have been getting a jump start on competition? Not at all. There's no money in poetry, but then again, there's no poetry in money either."
startup  twitter  entrepreneurship  college  advice  autodidacts  self-education  learning  apprenticeships  tcsnmy  alternative  change  caterinafake  evanwilliams  fredwilson  robkalin  etsy  markzuckerberg  billgates  stevejobs  dropouts  life  glvo  edg  srg 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Israel’s Time To Know Aims To Revolutionize The Classroom
"Time To Know designs and produces what it calls ‘full digital curriculum coverage,’ which is a complete year’s worth of lesson plans, learning activities, and homework assignments. To grasp just what an immense undertaking this is, multiply these by the four subjects matters Time To Know targets—math, science, language arts and social studies—and now multiply that by 13 year’s worth of education (kindergarten plus 12 formal years of schooling). To put this into perspective, in a single year Time To Know produces animation with a combined length of one and a half feature films." [Sites constructivism, but doesn't sound like it.]
constructivism  learning  technology  innovation  curriculum  computers  elearning  entrepreneurship  e-learning  techcrunch  1:1  israel  lms  startup  education  laptops  classroom  differentiatedlearning  timetoknow  classrooms  1to1 
february 2010 by robertogreco
How I Hire Programmers (Aaron Swartz's Raw Thought)
"To find out whether someone’s smart, I just have a casual conversation with them. I do everything I can to take off any pressure off: I meet at a cafe, I make it clear it’s not an interview, I do my best to be casual and friendly. Under no circumstances do I ask them any standard “interview questions” — I just chat with them like I would with someone I met at a party...what it is that makes someone seem smart...First, do they know stuff? Ask them what they’ve been thinking about and probe them about it. Do they seem to understand it in detail? Can they explain it clearly? (Clear explanations are a sign of genuine understanding.) Do they know stuff about the subject that you don’t? Second, are they curious? Do they reciprocate by asking questions about you? Are they genuinely interested or just being polite? Do they ask follow-up questions about what you’re saying? Do their questions that make you think? Third, do they learn?..."
startup  hiring  programming  interestingness  people  administration  management  leadership  entrepreneurship  business  work  interviews  howto  process  jobs  life 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Start your own online School
"Redefining Schools Online: Get started within a couple of clicks and create your next generation online school - educating others has never been easier! Teach students, customers & your audience: Supercool School is an all in one education tool that allows you to create live online classes, record them and distribute them virally. Students can join the live sessions, watch recordings and even request classes themselves."

[via: http://www.downes.ca/cgi-bin/page.cgi?post=50836 ]

[blog: http://supercoolschool.typepad.com/blog/]
education  learning  internet  teaching  online  web  community  onlinelearning  facebook  howto  e-learning  elearning  socialnetworking  free  interactive  sharing  ideas  knowledge  startup  web2.0  lcproject  onlinetoolkit  tcsnmy 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Why Craigslist Is Such a Mess
"The long-running tech-industry war between engineers and marketers has been ended at craigslist by the simple expedient of having no marketers. Only programmers, customer service reps, and accounting staff work at craigslist. There is no business development, no human resources, no sales. As a result, there are no meetings. The staff communicates by email and IM. This is a nice environment for employees of a certain temperament. "Not that we're a Shangri-La or anything," Buckmaster says, "but no technical people have ever left the company of their own accord."" AND "There may be a peace sign on every page, but the implicit political philosophy of craigslist has a deeply conservative, even a tragic cast. Every day the choristers of the social web chirp their advice about openness and trust; craigslist follows none of it, and every day it grows."
via:kottke  meetings  entrepreneurship  community  business  socialmedia  management  craignewmark  craigslist  startup  strategy  advertising  technology  internet  culture  web  social  journalism 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Tiny Speck, Inc.
"Tiny Speck is small company building something enormous. We show up in the afterburst of highly charged particle collisions; we are the only-imagined baryon consisting of two charmed quarks and one strange. We will blow your minds.

Tiny Speck was founded in early 2009 by four of the original members of the Flickr team. We are now eight, plus assorted artists from all over the world. We are backed by ourselves, and some of the most clever and insightful investors around.

Our principal offices are in Vancouver and San Francisco, but we are global, from the Russian Steppes to The Big Apple. We are using every ounce of our craft to build bits to bytes and summon Glitch to life."

[via: http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/07/10/flickr-follow-up-project-has-a-name-tiny-speck-and-theyre-hiring/ AND later: http://kottke.org/10/02/glitch-is-the-new-game-neverending ]
stewartbutterfield  flickr  gne  calhenderson  startup  vancouver  tinyspeck  gaming 
july 2009 by robertogreco
edublogs: Guy Kawasaki: The Art Of The Start in Scotland
"1. Find meaning for your mission, but don't make a mission statement. Delete anything that would qualify for a bullshit bingo competition: partnership, collaboration, cooperation. These are givens. A mantra should be repeatable by everyone in the company, and everyone in the company should be able to make decisions based on that: Do It First, Inspire Change, Make Trouble. ... 2. ... Polarise people - have the courage to create the product or service that you would want to use. Some people will hate it and some people will love it. If you try to make something that makes everyone happy then you'll make something mediocre. ... 9 Embrace your evangelists. Those customers or users who love what you do need to be thanked, embraced, give them information, give them the ability to help new people into the fold."
tcsnmy  startup  business  organizations  leadership  management  administration  guykawasaki  change  gamechanging  innovation 
may 2009 by robertogreco
The High-Res Society
"trend to bet on seems to be networks of small, autonomous groups whose performance is measured individually...Part of the reason—possibly the main reason—that startups have not spread as broadly as the Industrial Revolution did is their social disruptiveness. Though it brought many social changes, the Industrial Revolution was not fighting the principle that bigger is better...The new industrial companies adapted the customs of existing large organizations ...military & civil service...resulting hybrid worked well. "Captains of industry" issued orders to "armies of workers"...Startups seem to go more against the grain, socially. It's hard for them to flourish in societies that value hierarchy and stability, just as it was hard for industrialization to flourish in societies ruled by people who stole at will from the merchant class. But there were already a handful of countries past that stage when the Industrial Revolution happened. There do not seem to be that many ready this time."
paulgraham  industrialization  industrialrevolution  startup  disruption  business  future  society  small  leadership  management  administration  change  gamechanging  accountability  lcproject  organizations  hierarchy  autonomy  flexibility  wealth  technology  money  culture  entrepreneurship  startups 
december 2008 by robertogreco
ideas are just a multiplier of execution - O'Reilly ONLamp Blog
"To me, ideas are worth nothing unless executed. They are just a multiplier. Execution is worth millions."
business  entrepreneurship  ideas  gtd  innovation  creativity  process  execution  startup  design 
august 2008 by robertogreco
SMIT: a sustainable design start-up company that is developing a new approach to solar and wind power
"Our mission is to create Sustainably Minded Interactive Technology. We will provide a sustainable relationship between our clients, our products, and the environment. SMIT's work will connect and provide for people in pursuit of a zero footprint lifestyl
design  electricity  energy  entrepreneurship  power  solar  startup  sustainability 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Bubblegeneration Strategy Lab - A Wake Up Call For The Venturescape - "Help fix things, and get rich, or just get blown up along with everyone else."
"DNA of industrial era firm is sucking life out of economy. Once [they] were engines of value creation. Today, they're prisons, where trauma is institutionalized into everyone who comes into contact w/ them...power of 2.0...is new DNA it brings to table"
via:migurski  business  economics  entrepreneurship  futurism  organizations  gamechanging  change  administration  management  productivity  value  leadership  collaboration  web2.0  strategy  investment  vc  trends  startup 
march 2008 by robertogreco
You Weren't Meant to Have a Boss
"You can adjust the amount of freedom you get by scaling size of company you work for...start company, most freedom...one of first 10 employees, almost as much freedom as founders. Even company w/ 100 people will feel different from 1 w/ 1000."
business  development  culture  paulgraham  groups  hierarchy  work  management  administration  society  nature  startup  jobs  motivation  entrepreneurship  organization  programming  freedom  workplace  projectmanagement  employment  education  economics  careers  success  organizations 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Six Principles for Making New Things
"I like to find (a) simple solutions (b) to overlooked problems (c) that actually need to be solved, and (d) deliver them as informally as possible, (e) starting with a very crude version 1, then (f) iterating rapidly."
paulgraham  advice  business  creative  creativity  design  entrepreneurship  problemsolving  software  process  howwework  wisdom  work  programming  marketing  howto  innovation  startup  invention  ideas 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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